17 Burst results for "Megan Squire"

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:39 min | 2 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the mezzanine. We are in the main dome right now. We are rocking it and throwing grenades. They're freaking shooting people with paintballs. But we're in here. Speech safe. God! Blessing God speed and keep going. Get it, Jess. Do your this is what we've slipped up for everything we've been trained for. Following our report on these communications. In January, the Department of Justice began quoting these yellow chats in indictments, along with quite a bit of information about Watkins, alleged plans and motivations. This is a woman who had served honorably in Afghanistan and was from place in Ohio, where there really wasn't much going on. Marcy Wheeler and independent journalist who publishes on her site, Empty wheel dot net has been poring over all of the reporting and court records related to the sixth. She was, I think, given an identity in the oath keepers that Probably replaced what she had in the military. It was it was structure. It was considered honorable. They could go out and feel like they were protectors of America. As the inauguration grew nearer, Jessica Watkins indicated that she was awaiting direction from President Trump. Specifically, They say she sent a text on November 9th saying. If Trump asked me to come, I will. According to her boyfriend, Watkins had started her own militia, the Ohio State regulars as a storm relief group a year earlier. But after Trump lost the election, she ramped up her involvement with the oath keepers by recruiting militia men to come to D. C to act as private security for Roger Stone. Video uncovered by ABC News shows that at least three oath keepers did end up spending time with him in D. C. So I haven't seen anything to prove that he and Jessica Watkins interacted under stone doesn't need these people to defend them. I think that that was the lure to get her to get people that function of saying, Okay, you're going to be security for these. The IPs who are one degree from the president of the United States that's like glamour. Ultimately, Watkins was able to rope in enough people from Ohio. She was rewarded with an invite to the oath Keepers Leadership chat room on signal an encrypted messaging app in December. Which put her in touch with oath keepers who had travelled from Florida and Alabama, along with the founder of the oath keepers. Stewart Rhodes, who was in D. C on January 6th but hasn't been indicted yet. So these are these signal chats, which will form the backbone of the actual conspiracy case. In fact, the government has those chat logs because they were still on her phone when she was arrested on January 18th. They got the weapons before she deleted anything, and she, you know, didn't want to perjure herself. She knew enough not to do that. But other people did delete stuff. People in that chat room make up a large chunk of the 16 person conspiracy case. But remember, Watkins said, We have a good group We got about 30 40 of us. We're sticking together and sticking to the plan. What do we know about the 30 to 40? Right? I'm waiting for those other 15 people. There's a group from North Carolina. We haven't seen arrested yet. Some of them stayed in Virginia, staying at the Comfort Inn in Boston, guarding the weapons that everyone had stashed there. The government claims the oath keepers stored a cachet of weapons for a Q, R F or quick reaction force that would respond to the capital armed if President Trump were to quote, declare an insurrection and to call us up as the militia. This brings us to the plan. Or as Marcy Wheeler says, one of the possible plans. They were basically talking about preventing the democratic transfer of power, either by doing something so outrageous in Congress that the expected Biden supporters would rise up as well. Or they're just presumptive notion that enough quote unquote antifa would show up in the streets. And they could perform being victims again. And so enough violence to give trump the excuse to call in the National Guard and then by calling in the National Guard, then you say you can't transfer power. We're in the middle of an insurrection. You can't transfer power. We're at war You can transfer Power, DC, has been locked down under the National Guard to protect them from those evil anti FAS. Week after January, 6th Hampton and I sent an email to Zell. Oh, detailing this evidence that its APP had been used by insurrectionists, along with an updated list of over 800 far right channels. Then we reported those findings in the guardian. And then a couple hours later, I'm Selo released a statement on their site, saying that they were appalled by the organizing that was happening on their app and that they were banning 2000 channels. Maybe a third or so came from the list of 800 plus channels. We sent them. Yeah. For sure of the 800. Plus the majority of them are now offline, either deleted by the users or removed by Selo itself. Many of the groups that we were tracking on Zillow relied on that APP and its network and now that network In most cases is gone. Is it fair to say that a lot of these groups are sort of in shambles after January? 6th. I think a lot of them are struggling to find their footing for sure. Some of the channels I heard people say. Pretty explicitly. That's Ella would never banned them that it was. The one thing that they could always depend them on. Militias are just like one piece of the broader puzzle. And I think militias themselves are maybe a little bit quiet right now, because If they're smart, they're probably on the lookout for what the FBI is up to. The groups don't really disappear. And the idea is that they espouse. Certainly don't disappear. They just might change focus. They might change platform. They might change the volume so there may be quieter at the moment. Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University, as the people start feeling more emboldened as they feel stronger. El re coalesce into groups again. I'd like to think of a jar of marbles, you drop it on the floor. It shatters everywhere in the marbles are rolling all around, right? Well, eventually they find the little dips in the circles on the floor, and they kind of collect back up. I am personally convinced that part of what motivated militias to break into the capital. The belief that they need to protect a mythical vision of America at all costs is here to stay. But it's also possible that the role of national far right groups will diminish even as violence continues. January, 6th and its aftermath has crystallized an idea that had been percolating among researchers that the far right in America has entered what's called post organizational or post group paradigm. Both terms really capture what we're seeing in the modern, far right. Cynthia Miller address is the director of the polarization and extremism Research Innovation Lab at American University groups do still matter. I don't mean to say that they don't There are a lot of groups that exist, but the vast majority of people who radicalize into these kinds of movements are encountering the propaganda and the information online. But may never actually formally joined a group. While the oath keepers and proud boys contributed significantly to the violence and planning on January 6th about 85% of those arrested after the insurrection, had no prior involvement in a formal, far right organization. One of my biggest concerns is that As a country that we look at January six as the end of something as the culmination of something we even hear that language a lot. January six was really the culmination of a months long coordinated effort by Donald what happened on January, 6th was, in many ways the culmination of all of these forces. It was the last day of the Trump era, and it ended in chaos. And frankly, disgrace. I think we should be more open to the possibility that it was a continuation or even a beginning of something in terms of mobilization. When you look at the long arcs of history around the world and how democracies have stumbled. These aren't usually things that happened. Super rapidly. They are an accumulation over time of Many small injuries and large injuries that chip away at people's trust in the system at their their trust in the legitimacy of information and increase their sense of betrayal and anger and their willingness to believe that violence is a legitimate solution. Miller. Idriss warns that this is not the end of the citizen militia. More like a lull before the next storm hits But in the wake of January 6th Zell Oh has gone quiet..

Cynthia Miller Megan Squire Donald Florida Jessica Watkins Virginia Ohio Stewart Rhodes North Carolina Alabama January January 6th FBI November 9th December Trump Roger Stone Congress January 18th Afghanistan
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:57 min | 2 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now we are rocking it. They're throwing grenades. They're freaking shooting people with paintballs. But we're in here. Be safe. God Blessing God speed and keep going. Get it, Jess. Do your this is what we've lived up for. Everything we've been trained for. Following our report on these communications In January, the Department of Justice began quoting these Elo chats in indictments, along with quite a bit of information about Watkins, alleged plans and motivations. This is a woman who had served honorably in Afghanistan and was from place in Ohio, where there really wasn't much going on. Marcy Wheeler, an independent journalist who publishes on her site, Empty wheel dot net, has been poring over all of the reporting and court records related to the sixth. She was, I think, given an identity in the oath keepers that Probably replaced what she had in the military. It was it was structure. It was considered honorable. They could go out and feel like they were protectors of America. As the inauguration grew nearer, Jessica Watkins indicated that she was awaiting direction from President Trump. Specifically, They say she sent a text on November 9th saying. If Trump asked me to come, I will. According to her boyfriend, Watkins had started her own militia, the Ohio State regulars as a storm relief group a year earlier. But after Trump lost the election, she ramped up her involvement with the oath keepers by recruiting militia men to come to D. C to act as private security for Roger Stone. A video uncovered by ABC News shows that at least three oath keepers did end up spending time with him in D. C. So I haven't seen anything to prove that he and Jessica Watkins interacted. Wonderstone doesn't need these people to defend them. I think that that was the lure to get her to get people that function of saying, Okay, you're going to be security for these VIPs who are one degree from the president of the United States that's like glamour. Ultimately, Watkins was able to rope in enough people from Ohio that she was rewarded with an invite to the oath Keepers Leadership chat room on signal and encrypted messaging app in December. Which put her in touch with oath keepers who had travelled from Florida and Alabama, along with the founder of the oath keepers. Stewart Rhodes, who was in D. C on January 6th but hasn't been indicted yet. So these are these signal chats, which will form the backbone of the actual conspiracy case. In fact, the government has those chat logs because they were still on her phone when she was arrested on January 18th. I got to weapons before she deleted anything, and she, you know, didn't want to perjure herself. She knew enough not to do that bunch of other people did delete stuff. People in that chat room make up a large chunk of the 16 person conspiracy case. But remember, Watkins said, We have a good group We got about 30 40 of us. We're sticking together and sticking to the plan. What do we know about the 30 to 40? Right? I'm waiting for those other 15 people. There's a group from North Carolina. We haven't seen arrested yet. Some of them stayed in Virginia, staying at the Comfort Inn in Boston, guarding the weapons that everyone had stashed there. The government claims the oath keepers stored a cachet of weapons for a Q, R F or quick reaction force that would respond to the capital armed if President Trump were to quote, declare an insurrection and to call us up as the militia. This brings us to the plan. Or as Marcy Wheeler says, one of the possible plans. They were basically talking about preventing the democratic transfer of power, either by doing something so outrageous in Congress that the expected Biden supporters would rise up as well. Or they're just presumptive notion that enough quote unquote antifa would show up in the streets. And they could perform being victims again. And so enough violence to give trump the excuse to call in the National Guard. And then by calling in the National Guard, Ben you say, you can't transfer power. We're in the middle of an insurrection. You can't transfer power. We're at war You can transfer Power, DC, has been locked down under the National Guard to protect them from those evil anti FAS. Week after January, 6th Hampton and I sent an email to Zell. Oh, detailing this evidence that its APP had been used by insurrectionists, along with an updated list of over 800 far right channels. Then we reported those findings in the Guardian. And then a couple hours later, I'm Selo released a statement on their site saying that they were appalled by the organizing that was happening on their app and that they were banning 2000 channels. Maybe a third or so came from the list of 800 plus channels. We sent them. Oh, yeah, For sure. Of the 800. Plus the majority of them are now offline, either deleted by the users or removed by Selo itself. Many of the groups that we were tracking on Zillow relied on that APP and its network, and now that network in most cases is gone. Is it fair to say that a lot of these groups are sort of in shambles after January? 6th. I think a lot of them are struggling to find their footing for sure. Some of the channels I heard people say. Pretty explicitly. That's Ella would never banned them that it was. The one thing that they could always depend them on. Militias are just like one piece of the broader puzzle. And I think militias themselves are maybe a little bit quiet right now, because if they're smart, they're probably on the lookout for what the FBI is up to. The groups don't really disappear and the ideas that they espouse certainly don't disappear. They just might change focus. They might change platform. They might change the volume so there may be quieter at the moment. Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University. As the people start feeling more emboldened as they feel stronger, they'll re coalesce into groups again. I like to think of a jar of marbles. You drop it on the floor. It shatters everywhere in the marbles are rolling all around, right? Well, eventually they find the little dips in the circles in the floor, and they kind of collect back up. I'm personally convinced that part of what motivated militias to break into the capital. The belief that they need to protect a mythical vision of America at all costs is here to stay. But it's also possible that the role of national far right groups will diminish even as violence continues. January, 6th and its aftermath has crystallized an idea that had been percolating among researchers that the far right in America has entered what's called post organizational or post group paradigm. Both terms really capture what we're seeing in the modern far right? Cynthia Miller Idris is the director of the polarization and extremism Research Innovation Lab at American University. Perps do still matter. I don't mean to say that they don't There are a lot of groups that exist, but the vast majority of people who radicalize into these kinds of movements are encountering the propaganda and the information online. But may never actually formally joined a group. While the oath keepers and proud boys contributed significantly to the violence and planning on January 6th about 85% of those arrested after the insurrection, had no prior involvement in a formal Fireeye organization. One of my biggest concerns is that As a country that we look at January six as the end of something as the culmination of something we even hear that language a lot. January six was really the culmination of a months long coordinated effort by Donald What happened on January 6th. Was, in many ways the culmination of all of these forces. It was the last day of the trump era, and it ended in chaos and, frankly, disgrace. I think we should be more open to the possibility that it was a continuation or even the beginning of something in terms of mobilization..

Megan Squire Jessica Watkins Florida Donald Marcy Wheeler Virginia North Carolina Ohio Trump Alabama Stewart Rhodes Cynthia Miller Idris January 6th December Roger Stone January 18th November 9th January FBI Afghanistan
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:55 min | 2 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Throwing grenades. They're freaking shooting people with paintballs, But we're in here. Be safe. God Blessing God speed and keep going. Get it, Jess. Do your this is what we've lived up for. Everything we've been trained for. Following our report on these communications In January, the Department of Justice began quoting these Elo chats in indictments, along with quite a bit of information about Watkins, alleged plans and motivations. This is a woman who had served honorably in Afghanistan and was from place in Ohio, where there really wasn't much going on. Marcy Wheeler, an independent journalist who publishes on her site, Empty wheel dot net, has been poring over all of the reporting and court records related to the sixth. She was, I think, given an identity in the oath keepers that Probably replaced what she had in the military. It was it was structure. It was considered honorable. They could go out and feel like they were protectors of America. As the inauguration grew nearer, Jessica Watkins indicated that she was awaiting direction from President Trump. Specifically, They say she sent a text on November 9th saying. If Trump asked me to come, I will. According to her boyfriend, Watkins had started her own militia, the Ohio State regulars as a storm relief group a year earlier. But after Trump lost the election, she ramped up her involvement with the oath keepers by recruiting militia men to come to D. C to act as private security for Roger Stone. A video uncovered by ABC News shows that at least three oath keepers did end up spending time with him in D. C. So I haven't seen anything to prove that he and Jessica Watkins interacted under stone doesn't need these people to defend them. I think that that was the lure to get her to get people that function of saying, Okay, you're going to be security for these VIPs who are one degree from the president of the United States that's like glamour. Ultimately, Watkins was able to rope in enough people from Ohio that she was rewarded with an invite to the oath Keepers Leadership chat room on signal and encrypted messaging app in December. Which put her in touch with oath keepers who had travelled from Florida and Alabama, along with the founder of the oath keepers. Stewart Rhodes, who was in D. C on January 6th but hasn't been indicted yet. So these are these signal chats, which will form the backbone of the actual conspiracy case. In fact, the government has those chat logs because they were still on her phone when she was arrested on January 18th. I got to weapons before she deleted anything, and she, you know, didn't want to perjure herself. She knew enough not to do that. But other people did delete stuff. People in that chat room make up a large chunk of the 16 person conspiracy case. But remember, Watkins said, We have a good group We got about 30 40 of us. We're sticking together and sticking to the plan. What do we know about the 30 to 40? Right? I'm waiting for those other 15 people. There's a group from North Carolina. We haven't seen arrested yet. Some of them stayed in Virginia, staying at the Comfort Inn in Boston, guarding the weapons that everyone had stashed there. The government claims the oath keepers stored a cachet of weapons for a Q, R F or quick reaction force that would respond to the capital armed if President Trump were to quote, declare an insurrection and to call us up as the militia. This brings us to the plan. Or as Marcy Wheeler says, one of the possible plans. They were basically talking about preventing the democratic transfer of power, either by doing something so outrageous in Congress that the expected Biden supporters would rise up as well. Or they're just presumptive notion that enough quote unquote antifa would show up in the streets. And they could perform being victims again. And so enough violence to give trump the excuse to call in the National Guard and then by calling in the National Guard, then you say you can't transfer power. We're in the middle of an insurrection. You can't transfer power. We're at war You can't transfer Power, DC, has been locked down under the National Guard to protect them from those evil anti FAS. Week after January, 6th Hampton and I sent an email to Zell. Oh, detailing this evidence that its APP had been used by insurrectionists, along with an updated list of over 800 far right channels. Then we reported those findings in the Guardian. And then a couple hours later, I'm Selo released a statement on their site saying that they were appalled by the organizing that was happening on their app and that they were banning 2000 channels. Maybe a third or so came from the list of 800 plus channels. We sent them. Oh, yeah, For sure. Of the 800. Plus the majority of them are now offline, either deleted by the users or removed by seller itself. Many of the groups that we were tracking on Zillow relied on that APP and its network, and now that network in most cases is gone. Is it fair to say that a lot of these groups are sort of in shambles after January? 6th. I think a lot of them are struggling to find their footing for sure. Some of the channels I heard people say. Pretty explicitly. That's Ella would never banned them that it was. The one thing that they could always depend them on. Militias are just like one piece of the broader puzzle. And I think militias themselves are maybe a little bit quiet right now, because if they're smart, they're probably on the lookout for what the FBI is up to. The groups don't really disappear and the ideas that they espouse certainly don't disappear. They just might change focus. They might change platform, They might change the volume that there may be quieter at the moment. Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University. As the people start feeling more emboldened as they feel stronger, they'll re coalesce into groups again. I'd like to think of a jar of marbles. You drop it on the floor. It shatters everywhere in the marbles are rolling all around, right? Well, eventually they find the little dips in the circles in the floor, and they kind of collect back up. I'm personally convinced that part of what motivated militias to break into the capital. The belief that they need to protect a mythical vision of America at all costs is here to stay. But it's also possible that the role of national far right groups will diminish even as violence continues. January, 6th and its aftermath has crystallized an idea that had been percolating among researchers that the far right in America has entered what's called post organizational or post group paradigm. Both terms really capture what we're seeing in the modern, far right. Cynthia Miller address is the director of the polarization and extremism Research Innovation Lab at American University. Perps do still matter. I don't mean to say that they don't There are a lot of groups that exist, but the vast majority of people who radicalize into these kinds of movements are encountering the propaganda and the information online. But may never actually formally joined a group. While the oath keepers and proud boys contributed significantly to the violence and planning on January 6th about 85% of those arrested after the insurrection, had no prior involvement in a formal thyroid organization. One of my biggest concerns is that As a country that we look at January six as the end of something as the culmination of something we even hear that language a lot. January six was really the culmination of a months long coordinated effort by Donald What happened on January 6th. Was, in many ways the culmination of all of these forces. It was the last day of the trump era, and it ended in chaos and, frankly, disgrace. I think we should be more open to the possibility that it was a continuation or even the beginning of something in terms of mobilization..

Cynthia Miller Donald Megan Squire Jessica Watkins Virginia Florida Marcy Wheeler North Carolina Ohio Trump Stewart Rhodes Roger Stone January November 9th Alabama December Afghanistan Congress January 6th FBI
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wing forums and Facebook group. Where militia guys shared passwords for their selo channels with step by step instructions about how to join And so you joined the group. And then the officers will invite you for an interview. Ask you some questions about what area you're in Whatever sort of ideological requirements there are for joining. Said Militia. What interested you in the 3% movement where you heard about the 3%. I was actually approached and conversation during a anti protests of Antifa and BLM and Brandon, Mississippi. Do all of you have the backing of your family? Do they know that you're on an interview tonight? I'm the man of the house. So You know if I need to go somewhere or do something that's going to happen to be clear. Neither Hampton nor I ever pretended to be a militia member or a new recruit. We merely lurked in the background. So what do you got kind of experience? You got military law enforcement medical 31 Bravo military police. I know a lot about weapons, munitions and a fair amount of gear. It's like a second job. It's us a tyranny. It's us or failure. It's us or Post American world Don't give to their flag about anybody. That's less than 100%. All the Yeah. And are you all the and over? I ain't got nothing holding me back trip. It kills me. It kills me and the ways in which those groups come together and do recruitment through platforms really has to do with them. Unapologetically, believing that they can actually become a proxy for law enforcement. Joan Donovan directs research at the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University. The continuous engagements with one another through social media. Has really normalized. The notion of the vigilante vigilantes, of course, are not law enforcement. They're not accountable to the public or trained to de escalate violence, and that's why some observers shuddered at the thought of armed militias say Standing guard at polling stations last November. Monitoring Zella. We did hear references to violence surrounding the election, but it wasn't about how to start it. It was about how to react to it. We have to stay vigilant, Stay well trained. And maintain our composure so that we don't ever fired that first shot that would kill us. Yeah, Roger that Serve, we fire the first shot. We're done. I mean, the public view is turning around about us, and that's the way we need to keep it. We don't need to do anything to tarnish that. They're fantasizing. I got an O. There's going to be all this, You know, riots in the streets. We've got to be ready guys with everyone, but they're not talking about themselves going out there and doing it. Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at you. On university had been tracking discussions of the election from far right groups online. The whole vigilante ism is couched in this language of protection. And that started in earnest with the reopen protests. I'm going to protect your business from the police who are trying to shut you down, and then I went to George Floyd. Oh, I'm going to protect you from the looters. I'm going to protect Trump from election meddling. The idea that this vigilante ism is justified from a protection standpoint. Ouch. That's terrifying because now they have a reason right? And it's the reason that makes them look like a hero. And then there's a growing body of evidence that some local police departments are enabling it. Look what happened last summer during the protests that erupted after police shot Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse, who had traveled to Kenosha from his home in Illinois, shot three protesters, killing two in an alleged act of self defense hours before that, though, He and the Kenosha guard, a local militia were thanked by law enforcement. They even offered the vigilantes bottles of water. We appreciate you guys, I really do. Thank you. Written.

Joan Donovan Megan Squire Kyle Rittenhouse Jacob Blake Kenosha Trump Illinois Roger George Floyd Facebook two last November tonight Kenosha, Wisconsin Harvard University less than 100% 17 year old three protesters first shot last summer
"megan squire" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

07:31 min | 8 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

"Back to those bands put in place by social media sites in the following. The president's widespread d platforming on january eighth a company called signal labs found that misinformation across a few big social sites including facebook and twitter. Dropped seventy three percent. I think we just need to add some context to that university of washington. Professor kate star bird she researches misinformation on the what signals ups did was they took a measure of misinformation that was essentially just looking at keywords related to claims of election fraud and they looked at one week compared to the week before and A couple of things happened. That were different from one week to the next and that the suspension donald trump's account probably made a difference but it's hard to attribute all of that difference to just that one suspension because seventy thousand other accounts were taken out of the system. Now that doesn't mean she thinks d platforming isn't effective in slowing the flow of misinformation. At least in the short-term we spoke about whether it can work in the long term as well. I have a sense that that will have short term impact for sure what happens in the long term. I think is something we don't yet know. The answer to my expectation will be that if those suspensions stay in place if that vacuum isn't filled by other spreading misinformation and if the platforms can do a better job of not letting those networks build themselves back in that there will be a long-term benefit to the platforms. That did the d platforming. I'm asking because we're also seeing those who promoted The the violent uprising And new promoted q. On conspiracies flocked to other sites gab telegram me we is the solution to deeply form these people kind of everywhere they go or is it whack-a-mole there's a too big to get under control. I'm using this technique. I think we're going to find that there are other platforms that don't mind those kinds of conversations and in fact are designed for those conversations and if you consider sort of our values of freedom of speech and how those things work as long as they're within the law and those platforms want support that kind of speech that'll be a choice they make and perhaps we will see people that are that are d- platforms elsewhere find these other platforms as a place where they can move to but what that also does that means that the conversations that are happening on these larger more popular platforms where in the last few years. We've seen recruiting into these conversations. That recruiting won't be able to happen because those conversations won't be happening there. If this is a turning point what are you going to be listening for. That will give you the sense that it's a meaningful turning point. This is actually a really hard question because the research that we've been doing historically has been focused on publicly available data and what's what would happen if this is a turning point is our research methods aren't gonna be useful anymore because the content is going to go into other places and so f- for me it's actually to see you know in our research community the folks that are studying these sort of long tail platforms that are you know edgier the altech platforms. Are they the ones that are busiest right now. And and when that happens we can see that a turning point happened and what that means for society. I don't think we know yet. We're still gonna have struggle with some of these technology based toxicity is but they're gonna shift where they're at home. That's kate star bird at the university of washington as we mentioned new alternatives to facebook and twitter companies like gab telegram and me we are gaining new users by the millions but those companies have less experience moderating content than their larger more established competitors. Npr tech correspondent shannon. Bond has been looking into how one of those platforms is responding to the new attention and the new challenges. It's a social network called me. We bats me and we get it and in the past few weeks. Millions of people have signed up in twenty twenty. We went from six million to twelve million. And now we're already. It's the middle of january and we're already over fifteen half will mark weinstein launched me. We back in two thousand sixteen as an alternative to facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness users data to sell ads or decide what content to show them but privacy is not the only reason people are flocking to meet me right now along with other smaller social networks like gab and messaging apps like telegram it's become popular with trump supporters who are disillusioned with facebook and twitter. Cindy otis tracks online disinformation at the aletha group people are splintering off into us more fringe platforms that essentially have no content moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing. Stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We gab and parlor another alternative. Social app parlor recently went down after amazon refuse to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me. We is not parlor or gap for one thing. He says he's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer moderation idol like sites or anything goes i've been quoted saying i think they're disgusting good people right and left and middle. Can't handle anything goes. We don't want to be around hate speech. We don't want to be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules. But they're more lax than facebook and twitter the big platforms have banned the cunanan conspiracy for example. A step me. We has not taken in. Fact weinstein accuses facebook and twitter of political censorship which the companies deny. And i should note. Facebook is among npr's financial supporters me. We says it removes content accounts that violate its policies but journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me. We yes. you're right now. The influx of people like social media is messy. Some bad actors getting all over the place look at facebook and twitter. I think we're much more. Nimble than they are weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently under one hundred people but experts say all social networks. Have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan squire of elon. University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup but they need to be treated more like starting in an airplane. Company urged company that makes cars. I mean you gotta think about seatbelt. She says the risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection. At the capitol. It's npr's shannon bond and additional reporting in. This episode came from npr. Business reporter bobby allen. You're listening to consider this from npr. I'm audie cornish. Consider this is a partnership between npr and wmu to help you understand the news that is happening around the world and here in the washington region. Police keep listening and downloading. We'll be here every wednesday afternoon with news about the washington region as well as your national news..

six million donald trump amazon Facebook Cindy otis Weinstein bobby allen weinstein twitter twelve million january eighth facebook millions shannon mark weinstein twenty twenty signal labs trump seventy three percent Mimi
"megan squire" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:30 min | 8 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Oh, immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientists to the researchers have done that. We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health. We can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it will take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we're seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it any sooner unless we get more vaccines. Authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and crack down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over. 15.5 Mole Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to, maybe right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off introduce more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says. He's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like sites in or anything goes. I've been quoted saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't want to be around hate speech. We don't wanna be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in accounts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, Right now. The influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently on 100 people, But experts say all social networks have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan Squire of Ilan University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup, But maybe they need to be treated more like starting an airplane company, a company that makes cars. I mean, you've got to think about a seatbelt, she says. The risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection at the Capitol. Shannon BONDS. NPR news You're listening to all things.

Facebook Mark Weinstein Twitter South Dakota Donald Trump Department of Health NPR Shannon Bond Lee Gabin Parlor Megan Squire Monument Health Rapid City Hos Junker Cora Shannon BONDS Cindy Otis vice president Alethea group Amazon
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 8 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Personally, You've been engaging with your community. Throughout this pandemic. How does it feel to finally see vaccines being administered? Oh, immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientist of the researchers have done that. We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health, we can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it'll take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we've seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it and he's sooner unless we get more vaccines authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and cracks down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over 15.5 million Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to, maybe right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off insidious, more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says he's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like sites it or anything goes have been quoted as saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't wanna be around hate speech. We don't want to be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in accounts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, Right now. The influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently on 100 people, But experts say all social networks have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan Squire of Ilan University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup, But maybe they need to be treated more like starting an airplane company, a company that makes cars. I mean, you've got to think about a seatbelt, she says. The risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection at the Capitol. Shannon Bond, NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A group of outsider candidates are joining with some of New Jersey's leading progressive activists to throw their weight behind a lawsuit that argues the state's ballot.

Facebook Mark Weinstein Twitter Shannon Bond Donald Trump NPR Department of Health Lee South Dakota Gabin Parlor scientist Megan Squire Monument Health Rapid City Hos New Jersey Junker Cora Cindy Otis Alethea group
"megan squire" Discussed on Up First

Up First

04:18 min | 9 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on Up First

"Federal prosecutors. Say they will aggressively pursue the people involved in this week's direction. A reporter asked the united states attorney in washington. Dc whether that included the president and the answer came back quote. We are looking at all actors capital police chief. Stephen son has submitted his resignation. After the attack still many people ask whether law enforcement is taking this seriously enough as a matter of timing yesterday video circulated of people who said they had been part of the mob outside the capitol they hung around gave interviews took selfies and talk proudly of what they had done. So why were they not rest. Npr's hannah lamb has been following this story. Good morning hannah. Good morning so among others in in this group cunanan conspiracy theorists white power groups militias the proud boys gang known for violence two days later. How are they reacting. What are they saying. Overall there's been a lot of celebration and bragging portray themselves as patriots but reactions did split somewhat after the president's condemnation video with some feeling that the president had betrayed them. I wanna play you a little bit of what megan squire to say on this. She's a professor at elon university in north carolina who monitor sparring networks. She says the reactions to the storming of the capital tend to fall into three categories. So i there are the sympathizers. A probably weren't there. They're all over social media and on regular media. These are the ones who were you know blooming antifa. They're making up stuff about that. This was a false flag and then there are the ones who were thrilled to be there. She says who felt like they're making a stand air taking bounty shots. Trophy picks making memes. Just talking it up. Yeah complete lack of remorse and finally. There's the group squire usually studies. These are the hard core white supremacist. She says they're thinking long term about how to capitalize on the incident for recruiting an expansion and again many of these factions have been talking about violent uprisings for years. I watched some of the video. That steve mentioned where people were outside like. Yeah i stormed in. I was teargassed. Many people question why those folks were out there making videos and not being arrested or the authorities taking this seriously if we think back from to two thousand seventeen the deadly unite the rally in charlottesville. That was this watershed moment for public awareness of the violent far right and you know. Us authorities consider this the deadliest to most active domestic terrorism threat. The fast forward nearly four years in some of the same white supremacist figures from charlottesville. We're at the capital wednesday part of another violent mob and this time the hard extremists are alongside suburban families. Conservative voters who've been radicalized. Disinformation and conspiracy a so far. Police have made more than ninety arrests. Federal authorities have charged at least fifty people with more expected as they crowdsource suspects from photos and videos so over the years. We have seen some changes in how federal authorities prioritize investigate these crimes but many extremism analysts. I talk to say they're still a long way to go. The trump administration has routinely played down the right wing threat and said the real danger was activists movements like antiphon black lives matter and speaking of which this summer racial justice protesters were teargassed arrested and tackled. That just is not what we saw with these folks this week. That's right. that's been a key criticism. Ashley howard teaches history and african american studies at the university of iowa. Talked to her yesterday. And she says this is not an aberration it fits into a pattern of responses to white mob violence the terror that we see here and the lack of response in equivalent response once again really highlights that crisis just brings out things. We already know about this country at amplifies. The trends and themes in the narratives of american history so while we are seeing arrests and condemnation critical questions remain really about whether the longtime minimizing of the threat from the extreme-right paved the way for their shocking security lapses. We saw this week. Npr's hannah.

hannah lamb cunanan megan squire elon university charlottesville Npr hannah Stephen patriots washington united states north carolina steve Ashley howard university of iowa
"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Thank you, Kelsi. Thank you so much for having me. How concerned should we be about the possibility of political violence After Election Day? Some experts are watching online chatter and see some people arguing for people to show up. Armed at the polls. NPR's Tim Mak has more Far right Militia style groups are busy this year. Their numbers are growing, their online cheddar is increasing and their threats are becoming more specific. Megan Squire is a computer science professor at Elon University who studies right wing extremism and online spaces. I would say the heat in the conversations that I observed, the heat is higher. The vitriol is greater. A mosaic of groups on the far right with different goals. Agree on one thing. That President Trump can only lose if the election is rigged. Hampton Stall is the founder of Militia Watch. Ah, blogged attracts the right wing militia movement. So there's circulation of rumors of left way intervention at the polls air in the election, which has led to individuals and militia groups, discussing primarily showing up armed at the poles to see if there's anything suspicious that they deem suspicious. A patchwork of federal and state laws against voter intimidation exists to protect the process and voting rights activists say that even if there is an increased risk of militia activity, it is important to keep it in perspective. The risk, says Jerry Hubert of the Campaign Legal Center is that people may be afraid to go to the polls. If there's too much hype around militia rhetoric is designed to maybe keep people from showing up because they fear that there might be some activity when in fact, it's just a chilling commentary, But the commentary in planning is getting harder to track online. Cassie Miller, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that while Facebook and Twitter have cracked down on these groups, they've moved the conversation to other places. You know, it becomes a lot harder for people like me and my colleagues to track them because Will you watch them kind of splinter and other places other places like fringe social media networks that are more permissive of their content and to discussion boards where militia members can meet and organize. It's hard to predict how much online threats could spill into real world violence, but there are efforts to assess the risk of militia activity. Backlit, a crisis mapping project teamed up with militia watch to map out potential hot spots for malicious style activities around the elections. The report, exclusively obtained by NPR looks at states where militias have had recruitment drives in training where they have cultivated relationships with law enforcement and where there have been substantial engagement in anti Corona virus lock down protests. Hey says that five states Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Oregon have the highest risk of seeing increased militia activities around the elections, everything from demonstrations to potential violence. Stall who worked on this report said. One of the reasons he is so alarmed now is because of how the members of militias are talking. There's a lot more sort of worst case scenario, thinking that is leading to Fantasising about like violence like very riel militarized action That hasn't really been a cz widespread and the militia movement as it is now, the threats by malicious style groups have been growing in number, vitriol and specificity. Culminating in events like the alledged.

Militia Watch Kelsey Snell NPR Cassie Miller Hampton Stall Kelsi President Trump Megan Squire Tim Mak Elon University Campaign Legal Center Southern Poverty Law Center Jerry Hubert Fantasising Facebook professor founder
"megan squire" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:10 min | 11 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Noelle King. Good morning. The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote today on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett. But Democrats won't be their Senate minority leader Tuck, Schumer says they'll boycott Because this has been the most rushed, most partisan and least legitimate process in the history of Supreme Court nominations, Judiciary members will boycott the markup and not provide the quorum that is required. Committee chairman Lindsey Graham says they'll just go ahead without the Democrats. She deserves a vote, he said of Judge Barrett. NPR's Kelsey Snell has been covering this. Good morning, Kelsey. Good morning, so if the boycott isn't going to do anything, or change the outcome, what do the Democrats China cheap? While they're trying to send a message that they don't support the process, and they say that the winner of the presidential election should choose the next Supreme Court justice. It's what they've been saying all along, and they also said that they're kind of refusing to participate in approving bear. They don't want to be part of the process of getting her over the line and on to the Supreme Court, you know, they say that they'll deny the committee unnecessary quorum to vote, but they're also doing some corrective work. After progressive activists were angry that Democrats didn't do more to stop Parrots nomination or are you no calls a protest during the process where they were, you know, asking her questions and through the whole hearing that happened the previous week. They also, you know the There was also a time when progresses, we're taking issue with the committee's top Democrat, Dianne Feinstein. She hugged Chairman Lindsey Graham at the end of Barrett's questioning and was complimenting him on how he ran the hearings. And that really upset a lot of people on the far left of the party. And you know people who are advocating for a more progressive Supreme court, and there's been pressure for Feinstein to step down. Until Republicans response is basically okay, guys, do you? Yeah, Basically, they've just dismissed. All of this is a stunt, Graham says they'll move ahead with the vote anyway. Even without the Democrats, you know that may require him to move to go around the rule that that seems to require to members of the minority party to be present for committee business. But Graham was really undeterred yesterday when he was asked about it. He said the vote will go on. He issued a statement saying it's the democratschoice not to attend. But he believes it does a disservice to Baird, who deserves an up or down vote. And you know his his committee put out some additional information, letting us know that they see at least seven occasions where the committee has done business or held over nominees with just a majority without that. A minimum of members from the minority party. Now that's interesting. So so at the end of the day, what does this all ultimately mean for Barrett's nomination? You know, it really doesn't seem like it'll mean all that much. Even some Democratic aides. I spoke to privately acknowledged that this boycott will ultimately have no impact on the process or her confirmation. If Graham decides to go around the rules and say that it's okay anyway. The Republicans had the vote for any qualified nominee before Barrett's name was even announced us all Republicans coming out and saying that they would support anybody and they spent the hearings establishing her qualification will be hard for them to see how they'll lose any Republicans. Really aside from the few people who already said they wouldn't vote on the nomination this close to the election, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the final vote will happen on Monday, and the Senate will be in session this weekend. A complete procedural work to make sure that that can happen, But this does all remain a political gamble control. The Senate is in the balance this election and moving ahead with this nomination really does risk angering voters who have already been turned off by the GOP under Trump. But it could also energize loyal Republicans and inspire them to vote by reminding them what's at stake with the control of the Senate. NPR's Kelsey's now. Thanks, Kelsey. Thank you. How concerned should we be about the possibility of political violence After Election Day? Some experts are watching online chatter and see some people arguing for people to show up. Armed at the polls. NPR's Tim Mak has more Far right Militia style groups are busy this year. Their numbers are growing, their online cheddar is increasing and their threats are becoming more specific. Megan Squire is a computer science professor at Elon University who studies right wing extremism and online spaces. I would say the heat In the conversations that I observed, the heat is higher. The vitriol is greater. A mosaic of groups on the far right with different goals agree on one thing that President Trump can only lose if the election is rigged. Hempton stall is the founder of Militia Watch. Ah blogged attracts the right wing militia movement. So there's circulation of rumors of left wing intervention at the polls there in the election, which has led to individuals and militia groups, discussing primarily showing up armed at the poles to see if there's anything suspicious that they deem suspicious. A patchwork of federal and state laws against voter intimidation exists to protect the process and voting rights activists say that even if there is an increased risk of militia activity, it is important to keep it in perspective. The risk, says Jerry. He, Bert of the campaign Legal center is that people may be afraid to go to the polls. If there's too much hype around militia rhetoric is designed to maybe keep people from showing up because they fear that there might be some activity when in fact, it's just chilling commentary, But the commentary in planning is getting harder to track online. Cassie Miller, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that while Facebook and Twitter have cracked down on these groups, they've moved the conversation to other places. You know, it becomes a lot harder for people like me and my colleagues to track them because we watched them kind of splinter and other places, other places like fringe social media networks that are more permissive of their content. And to discussion boards where militia members can meet and organize. It's hard to predict how much online threats could spill into real world violence, but there are efforts to assess the risk of militia activity. Jack led a crisis mapping project teamed up with militia watch to map out potential hot spots for malicious style activities around the elections..

Amy Cockney Barrett Lindsey Graham Supreme Court Senate Kelsey Snell Militia Watch NPR Senate Judiciary Committee minority party chairman Democrats Dianne Feinstein Steve Inskeep China campaign Legal center Noelle King Judiciary
"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:26 min | 11 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Noelle King. Good morning. The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote today on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett. But Democrats won't be their Senate minority leader Tuck, Schumer says they'll boycott Because this has been the most rushed, most partisan and least legitimate process in the history of Supreme Court nominations, Judiciary members will boycott the markup and not provide the quorum that is required. Committee chairman Lindsey Graham says they'll just go ahead without the Democrats. She deserves a vote, he said of Judge Barrett. NPR's Kelsey Snell has been covering this. Good morning, Kelsey. Good morning. So if the boycott isn't going to do anything, or change the outcome, what do the Democrats China Jeep while they're trying to send a message that they don't support the process, and they say that the winner of the presidential election should choose the next Supreme Court? Justice is what they've been saying all along, and they also said that they're kind of refusing to participate in approving bear. They don't want to be part of the process. Of getting her over the line and on to the Supreme Court. You know, they say that they'll deny the committee unnecessary quorum to vote. But they're also doing some corrective work after progressive activists were angry that Democrats didn't do more to stop parrots nomination ors are, you know Cause of protest during the process where they were, you know, asking her questions and through the whole hearing that happened the previous week. They also you know that there was also a time when progresses were taking issue with the committee's top Democrat, Dianne Feinstein. She hugged Chairman Lindsey Graham at the end of Barrett's questioning and was complimenting him on how he ran the hearings. And that really upset a lot of people on the far left of the party. And, you know people who are advocating for a more progressive Supreme Court. There's been pressure for Feinstein to step down. Until Republicans response is basically okay, guys, do you basically they've does dismissed. All of this is a stunt, Graham says They'll move ahead with the vote anyway. Even without the Democrats, you know that may require him to move to go around the rule that that seems to require to members of the minority party to be present for committee business. But Graham was really undeterred yesterday when he was asked about it. He said the vote will go on. He issued a statement saying it's the democratschoice not to attend. But he believes it does a disservice to Barrett, who deserves an up or down vote. And you know his his committee put out some additional information that we know that they see at least seven occasions where the committee has done business or held over nominees with just a majority without that. A minimum of members from the minority party. That's interesting. So so at the end of the day, what does this all ultimately mean for Barrett's nomination? You know, it really doesn't seem like it'll mean all that much. Even some Democratic aides. I spoke to privately acknowledged that this boycott will ultimately had no impact on the process or her confirmation. If Graham decides to go around the rules and say that it's okay anyway. The Republicans had the vote for any qualified nominee before Barrett's name was even announced us all Republicans coming out and saying that they would support anybody and they spent the hearings establishing her qualification will be hard for them to see how they lose any Republicans. Really aside from the few people who already said they wouldn't vote on the nomination this close to the election, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the final vote will happen on Monday, and the Senate will be in session this weekend. A complete procedural work to make sure that that can happen, But this does all remain a political gamble control. The Senate is in the balance this election and moving ahead with this nomination really does risk angering voters who have already been turned off by the GOP under Trump. But it could also energize loyal Republicans and inspire them to vote by reminding them What's at stake with the control of the Senate. NPR's Kelsey's now Thanks, Kelsey. Thank you. How concerned should we be about the possibility of political violence After Election Day? Some experts are watching online chatter and see some people arguing for people to show up. Armed at the polls. NPR's Tim Mak has more Far right Militia style groups are busy this year. Their numbers are growing, their online cheddar is increasing and their threats are becoming more specific. Megan Squire is a computer science professor at Elon University who studies right wing extremism and online spaces. I would say The heat. In the conversations that I observed, the heat is higher. The vitriol is greater. A mosaic of groups on the far right with different goals. Agree on one thing. That President Trump can only lose if the election is rigged. Hampton Stall is the founder of Militia Watch. Ah, blogged attracts the right wing militia movement. So there's circulation of rumors of left wing intervention at the polls air in the election, which has led to individuals and militia groups, discussing primarily showing up armed at the poles to see if there's anything suspicious that they deem suspicious. A patchwork of federal and state laws against voter intimidation exists to protect the process and voting rights activists say that even if there is an increased risk of militia activity, it is important to keep it in perspective. The risk, says Jerry Hubert of the Campaign Legal Center is that people may be afraid to go to the polls. If there's too much hype around militia rhetoric is designed to maybe keep people from showing up because they fear that there might be some activity when in fact, it's just a chilling commentary, But the commentary and planning is getting harder to track online. Cassie Miller, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that while Facebook and Twitter have cracked down on these groups, they've moved the conversation to other places. You know, it becomes a lot harder for people like me and my colleagues to track them because Will you watch them kind of splinter and other places other places like fringe social media networks that are more permissive of their content and to discussion boards where militia members can meet and organized. It's hard to predict how much online threats could spill into real world violence, but there are efforts to assess the risk of militia activity. AC led a crisis mapping project teamed up with militia watch to map out potential hot spots for malicious style activities around the elections. The report, exclusively obtained by NPR looks at states where militias have had recruitment drives in training where they have cultivated relationships with law enforcement and where there have been substantial engagement in anti Corona virus lock down protests..

Amy Cockney Barrett Lindsey Graham NPR Kelsey Snell Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Senate Militia Watch NPR News minority party Dianne Feinstein chairman Steve Inskeep Campaign Legal Center Noelle King
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or pledge online at WN y si dot org's We thank you so much for listening and for your support. And it is also key, Teo to note that w N Y. C is not pulling back on news coverage with everything that's going on. We're all busy trying to sort out how to deal with this pandemic. Jacqueline Urine in your home Right now we're working remotely. I'm in my home office and we're able to do this on DH Stay socially assistant. Thanks to your support, and we're not pulling back on anything that we are doing at this moment, and that is thanks to you. We can't do that any of what we're doing without you, and we need your support as urgently as ever right now, even as we shorten our pledge drive to bring you more of the reporting that you need, and that's why we're asking you to give at w n y c dot org's Or, of course you can call us the number is 8883769692 and remember, as an extra bonus. We have that coffee special that ends at 10 o'clock this morning. A great way to take advantage of an extra little thank you gift from us and know that the main reason that you're calling and supporting W C is because you know that's the way it works. Individual listener contributions are so essential to making everything work here. A w N Y c. We thank you for listening. We thank you very much for your support. Here's that number again, 888376969 to or you can give at w n y c dot org's and thanks It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning. The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote today on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett. But Democrats won't be their Senate minority leader Tuck, Schumer says they'll boycott Because this has been the most rushed, most partisan and least legitimate process in the history of Supreme Court nominations, Judiciary members will boycott the markup and not provide the quorum that is required. Committee chairman Lindsey Graham says they'll just go ahead without the Democrats. She deserves a vote, he said of Judge Barrett. NPR's Kelsey Snell has been covering this. Good morning, Kelsey. Good morning. So if the boycott isn't going to do anything, or change the outcome, what do the Democrats China cheap while they're trying to send a message that they don't support the process, and they say that the winner of the presidential election should choose the next Supreme Court justice? It's what they've been saying all along, and they also said that they're kind of refusing to participate in approving bear. They don't want to be part of the process. Of getting her over the line and on to the Supreme Court. You know, they say that they'll deny the committee unnecessary quorum to vote. But they're also doing some corrective work after progressive activists were angry that Democrats didn't do more to stop Parrots nomination or are you no calls a protest? During the process where they were, you know, asking her questions and through the whole hearing that happened the previous week. They also, you know the there was also a time when progresses were taking issue with the committee's top Democrat, Dianne Feinstein. She hugged Chairman Lindsey Graham at the end of Barrett's questioning and was complimenting him on how he ran the hearings. And that really upset a lot of people on the far left of the party. And you know people who are advocating for a more progressive Supreme court, and there's been pressure for Feinstein to step down. Until Republicans response is basically okay, guys, do you? Yeah, Basically, they've just dismissed. All of this is a stunt, Graham says they'll move ahead with the vote anyway. Even without the Democrats, you know that may require him to move to go around the rule that that seems to require to members of the minority party to be present for committee business. But Graham was really undeterred yesterday when he was asked about it. He said the vote will go on. He issued a statement saying it's the democratschoice not to attend. But he believes it does a disservice to Baird, who deserves an up or down vote. And you know his his committee put out some additional information that we know that they see at least seven occasions where the committee has done business or held over nominees with just a majority without that. A minimum of members from the minority party. Now that's interesting. So so at the end of the day, what does this all ultimately mean for Barrett's nomination, you know, it really doesn't seem like it'll mean all that much. Even some Democratic aides. I spoke to privately acknowledged that this boycott will ultimately have no impact on the process or her confirmation. If Graham decides to go around the rules and say that it's okay anyway. No Republicans had the vote for any qualified nominee before Barrett's name was even announced. You have Republicans coming out and saying that they would support anybody and they spent the hearings establishing her qualification will be hard for them to see how they'll lose any Republicans. Really aside from the few people who already said they wouldn't vote on the nomination this close to the election, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the final vote will happen on Monday. And this then it will be in session this weekend to complete procedural work to make sure that that can happen. But this does all remain a political gamble control. The Senate is in the balance this election and moving ahead with this nomination really does risk angering voters who have already been turned off by the GOP under Trump. It could also energize loyal Republicans and inspire them to vote by reminding them What's at stake with the control of the Senate. NPR's Kelsey's now Thanks, Kelsey. Thank you. How concerned should we be about the possibility of political violence After Election Day? Some experts are watching online chatter and see some people arguing for people to show up. Armed at the polls. NPR's Tim Mak has more Far right Militia style groups are busy this year. Their numbers are growing, their online cheddar is increasing and their threats are becoming more specific. Megan Squire is a computer science professor at Elon University who studies right wing extremism and online spaces. I would say the heat In the conversations that I observed, the heat is higher. The vitriol is greater. A mosaic of groups on the far right with different goals. Agree on one thing. That President Trump can only lose if the election is rigged. Hempton stall is the founder of Militia Watch. Ah blogged that tracks the right wing militia movement. So there's circulation of rumors of left wing. Intervention at the polls air in the election, which has led to individuals and militia groups, discussing primarily showing up armed at the poles to see if there's anything suspicious or what they deem suspicious. A patchwork of federal and state laws against voter intimidation exists to protect the process. And voting rights activists say that even if there is an increased risk of militia activity, it is important to keep it in perspective. The risk, says Jerry Hubert of the Campaign Legal Center is that people may be afraid to go to the polls. If there's too much hype around militia rhetoric is designed to maybe keep people from showing up because they fear that there might be some activity when in fact, it's just a chilling commentary, But the commentary in planning is getting harder to track online. Cassie Miller, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that while Facebook and Twitter have cracked down on these groups, they've moved the conversation to other places. You know, it becomes a lot harder for people like me and my colleagues to track them because we watched them kind of splinter and other places, other places like fringe social media networks that are more permissive of their content. And to discussion boards where militia members can meet and organize. It's hard to predict how much online threats could spill into real world violence, but there are efforts to assess the risk of militia activity. AC led a crisis mapping project teamed up with militia watch to map out potential hot spots for malicious style activities around the elections. The report, exclusively obtained by NPR looks at states where militias have had recruitment drives and training. Where they have cultivated relationships with law enforcement.

Amy Cockney Barrett Lindsey Graham Supreme Court NPR Kelsey Snell Militia Watch Senate minority party Senate Judiciary Committee Dianne Feinstein chairman NPR News Democrats Jacqueline Urine Teo Steve Inskeep Campaign Legal Center
"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Above me, men with rifles yelling at us. Some of my colleagues who own board proof vests. Are wearing them. The black lives matter. Protests sparked by the murder of George Floyd. Peaceful protests met by armed men and Confederate flags and conspiracy theories of antifa, infiltrating white suburbs, Stay safe and locked and loaded. That's the warning in this Facebook post made Tuesday afternoon. Police call it a false rumor that claimed Antifa had three busloads of members ready to hit neighborhoods in. It's an interesting situation that we find ourselves in where America is heavily armed, right. Joan Donovan directs research at the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University. And there are a lot of folks right now who have been socially isolated for a very long period of time. And have been reaching out through social media because they don't know how to assess the risks posed by the pandemic political environment that we're in the heightened polarization. The increased visibility of these armed groups combined with the anxiety and anger about the news. Drove prospective recruits to right wing forums and Facebook groups where militia guys shared passwords with step by step instructions about how to join their zealot channels. And so you joined the group. And then the officers will invite you for an interview. That's you some questions about what area you're in Whatever sort of ideological requirements there are for joining. Said Militia. What interested you in the 3% movement where you heard about the I was actually approached conversation during a anti protests of Antifa and be alone and Brandon, Mississippi. All of you have the backing of your family doesn't know that you're on interview tonight. Man of the house. So You know if I need to go somewhere or do something that's gonna happen to be clear. Neither Hampton nor I ever pretended to be a militia guy or a potential recruit. We merely lurked in the background. So what do you got going experience? You got military law enforcement, medical everyone. Robert Military police. I know a lot about Weapons, munitions and a fair amount of gear. It's like a second job this us or tyranny. It's us or failure. It's us or post American world. Don't give to surf. Laugh about anybody. That's less than 100% off in. Are you all over on? Got nothing. Hold me back. If it kills me, it kills me. The ways in which those groups come together and do recruitment through platforms really has to do with them unapologetically believing. That they can actually become a proxy for law enforcement, Joan Donovan until I think the continuous engagements with one another through social media has really normalized. The notion of the vigilante vigilantes, of course, are not law enforcement. They're not accountable to the public or train to de escalate violence. That's why some observers shudder at the thought of armed militias, say Standing guard at polling stations in November. Monitoring Selo. We did hear some references to violence surrounding the election. But it was about how to react to it. We have to stay vigilant. Stay well trained and maintain our composure. So we don't ever fire that first shot that would kill us. Yeah, Roger that, sir. We fire the first shot. We're done. I mean, the public view is turning around about us, and that's the way we need to keep it. We don't need to do anything to tarnish that. They're fantasising again. Oh, there's going to be all this, You know, riots in the streets. We've got to be ready guys fingers, but they're not talking about themselves, going out there and doing it. Megan Squire, professor of computer science at Elon University. Has been tracking discussions of the election from far right groups online. The whole vigilante ism is couched in the language of protection. And that started in earnest with the reopen protest. So I'm gonna protect your business from the police who are trying to shut you down. And then I went to George flight. I'm gonna protect you from the looters and it's persisting now, like I'm gonna protect Trump from election meddling the idea that this vigilante ism is justified from a protection standpoint. Gout. That's terrifying because now they have a reason right? And it's the reason that makes him look like a hero. And then there's this growing body of evidence that some local police departments are enabling it. Hours before a Kyle Riton house shot three protesters, killing two In an alleged act of self defense. He and the Kenosha Garden local militia were think by law enforcement. They even offered the vigilantes bottles of water. Really.

Militia Antifa Facebook Joan Donovan George Floyd murder Trump America Mississippi Harvard University Kyle Riton Robert Military Hampton Shorenstein Center Elon University George flight Megan Squire Brandon
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Directly above me, men with rifles yelling at us. Some of my colleagues who own bulletproof vests are wearing them. The black lives matter. Protests sparked by the murder of George Floyd. Peaceful protests met By armed men and Confederate flags and conspiracy theories of antifa, infiltrating white suburbs, Stay safe and walk and loaded. That's the warning in this Facebook post made Tuesday afternoon. Police call it a false rumor that claimed Antifa had three busloads of members ready to hit neighborhoods in Mama. It's an interesting situation that we find ourselves in where America is heavily armed, right. Joan Donovan directs research at the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University. And there are a lot of folks right now who have been socially isolated for a very long period of time. And have been reaching out through social media because they don't know how to assess the risks posed by the pandemic political environment that we're in the heightened polarization. The increased visibility of these armed groups combined with the anxiety and anger about the news. Drove prospective recruits to right wing forums and Facebook groups where militia guys shared passwords with step by step instructions about how to join their zealot channels. And so you joined the group. And then the officers will invite you for an interview. Thus you some questions about what area you're in Whatever sort of ideological requirements there are for joining, said Militia. What interested you in the 3% movement where you heard about the 3%? I was actually approached in conversation during a anti protests of Antifa and be alone and Brandon, Mississippi. You all of you have the backing of your family. Do they know that? You're on an interview tonight? I'm the man of the house. So You know if I need to go somewhere or do something that's gonna happen to be clear. Neither Hamden nor I ever pretended to be a militia guy or a potential recruit. We merely lurked in the background. So what do you got going experience? You've got military law enforcement medical Everyone. Robin Military police. I know a lot about weapons, munitions and a fair amount of gear. It's like a second job is us or tyranny. It's us or failure. It's us or A post American world. Don't give two flying about anybody. That's less than 100%. Although in are you all in over? I ain't got nothing holding me back. Terrific kills me. It kills me and the ways in which those groups come together and do recruitment through platforms really has to do with them. Unapologetically, believing that they can actually become a proxy for law enforcement Joan Donovan, and so I think the continuous engagements with one another through social media. Has really normalized. The notion of the vigilante vigilantes, of course, are not law enforcement. They're not accountable to the public or trained to de escalate violence. That's why some observers shudder at the thought of armed militias, say Standing guard at polling stations in November. Monitoring Selo. We did hear some references to violence surrounding the election. But it was about how to react to it. We have to stay vigilant. Stay well trained and maintain our composure so that we don't ever fire that first shot that would kill us. Yeah, Roger that, sir. We fire the first shot. We're done. I mean, the public view is turning around about us, and that's the way we need to keep it. We don't need to do anything to tarnish that. They're fantasising again. Oh, there's going to be all this, You know riots in the streets. We've got to be ready guys with numbers, but they're not talking about themselves, going out there and doing it. Megan Squire, professor of computer science at Elon University. Has been tracking discussions of the election from far right groups online. The whole vigilante ism is couched in the language of protection. And that started in earnest with the reopen protest. So I'm gonna protect your business from the police who are trying to shut you down. And then I went to George flight. Oh, I'm gonna protect you from the looters. And it's persisting now, like I'm gonna protect Trump from election meddling. The idea that this vigilante ism is justified, but from a protection standpoint. Gout. That's terrifying because now they have a reason right? And it's the reason that makes him look like a hero. And then there's this growing body of evidence that some local police departments are enabling it. Hours before a Kyle Riton house shot three protesters, killing two In an alleged act of self defense. He and the Kenosha Garden local militia were think by law enforcement. They even offered the vigilantes bottles of water..

Militia Facebook Robin Military police Antifa Joan Donovan George Floyd murder America Mississippi Harvard University Kyle Riton Hamden Trump Shorenstein Center Kenosha Garden Elon University George flight Megan Squire
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"These Jews there in these positions of power. You know, When you Google that kind of stuff, you see it and you consume it eventually, after a few months, kind of get desensitized to it, and everybody's agreeing with everyone. For the most part you get along. There's that online community. Storefront was kind of my 1st 1 He didn't know their names, but they were his team now. It's been the next 10 years as what he calls a keyboard warrior for the white supremacist movement. He'd be there for every step in its evolution from joining the K and the neo Nazi National socialist movement. More diffuse groups and websites that called themselves all right and identity. Arian. Some of these groups would go to some lengths to appear respectable and say We're not racist. We're not Nazis were not the cake on then Some of those groups were Nazis. They were the cake, okay, and you were In all of them. Does that tell you that the differences between these groups are more about that image and the tactics than absolutely the core ideas or who they attract? Absolutely. We've been using the terms white nationalism. 1.0, and white nationalism to for a few years now and 1.0 is your Earlier groups. You know, Cookbooks clan They're They're very explicit. National Socialist movement want swastikas on their uniforms under flags. Your 2.0, guys, They're your identity. Europa's where they're dressing in khakis. Collar shirts and doc shoes and they've got these nice cropped haircuts. They call it good optics. But anybody who was in the early one point movements like myself I could see right through it. You know, they just put lipstick on a pig. But people who followed the white supremacist movement for decades like type investigations, reporter David My words. They say that this alright makeover of the old racist, right? It was transformative. That radical right was very backward looking very stiff and formal. They didn't have any. Humor was not part of their repertoire. In fact, their primary recruitment demographic really was men between the ages of 40 and 60 With the added into the All right what we saw was this very Tech savvy, very agile, a movement that instead of running away from sort of the culturally savvy component aspects of the Internet, rather embraced them wholly. Instead of writing racist newsletters that people had to sign up for. They were making names and jokes in places like Reddit and four champ and the's forums that celebrated being politically incorrect. They were the perfect place for those ideas to take root hybridize with other fringe ideas and grow into something that could be shared on more mainstream platforms like Twitter and Facebook. And it was, you know, very brilliant because it meant that suddenly, their recruitment demographic was much larger and had, you know a lot more political activist energy. They're younger people. And Josh Bates says that energy got a huge boost in 2016 with the rise of a new presidential candidate. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists and some I assume are good people because from wass spouting off a lot of the same talking points is general white nationalists. He breathed new life into them. And the thought leaders of the movement just took full advantage. Thinking that I could take it even further, and they did. He started to take their ideas into the real world. After Trump's election in 2017 computer scientist Megan Squire set up software to track extremists on Facebook. She started out studying the misogynist gamergate movement. That letter to all of these different anti Muslim and neo Confederate and white supremacist groups. At the time. Facebook was a central player, if not the central fire, and it was the place where these guys all wanted to be, and I was looking for a crossover. Ideological crossover group member should cross over just tryingto, I guess map the ecosystem of hate on Facebook. She watched this ecosystem plan what one neo Nazi website would call the summer of hate. Anti Muslim marches, misogynist, proud boy rallies and what was shaping up to be this really world media of all these different, mostly online hate groups, they unite the right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. This is where she came across Josh Bates. It.

Facebook Josh Bates Megan Squire Google Arian Reddit Virginia Europa Twitter reporter David My Charlottesville Trump scientist
"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"megan squire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For Investigative Reporting in P R X. This is reveal I'm outlets over the past month. Protests have helped give unprecedented attention to the issue of police brutality. But right wing extremists are also trying to seize the moment. At a black lives Matter. Rally in Richmond, Virginia, A man claiming to be a leader drove his truck into a group of protesters in Oakland, California man who follows the online boogaloo movement allegedly shot and killed a federal security officer. They want to kick off chaos. They want to start the race warrants that always waiting for some Chaotic event to happen that'll help them kick this off. Megan Squire is a computer scientist who studies online extremism at Elon University in North Carolina. She's seen firsthand how the recent wave of protests and counter protests can get out of control. Someone protesting the removal of Confederate monuments recently punched her in the face. Megan says Right wing extremists are using what's in the news to spread their message. They track pretty closely to whatever the news headlines are, and then what they do is provide the racist anti Semitic fill in the blank spin on that news. All of these police systems are like big funnels. They have a variety of ways of recruiting people into them. That's David my word. A reporter with the nonprofit newsroom type investigations a few years ago. Reveal, teamed up with Type two track every single domestic terror event from 2008 to 2016. It showed that law enforcement was focused on extremist acting in the name of Islam. But homegrown right wing terror was a bigger threat by a nearly 2 to 1 margin. We were trying to make the point that really right wing extremism is a much bigger problem than Islamist extremism and that the government needs to be paying attention to. Now we've updated the database to include attacks from 2017 to 2019. We found that white extremist terror has grown and become more lethal, responsible for almost the same number of deaths during the 1st 3 years of the Trump presidency, as during all of the Obama years. And the right wing extremists appeared to target different groups. Many are driven by the same ideology. There's a very specific stripe of quite nationalism. That we're seeing run through, especially these more recent mass killings. Today, we're going to connect the dots and show how one act of terror inspires another thanks to online platforms and will ask why law enforcement is still struggling to catch up. Reveal reporters stand out. Corn and Prisca nearly have been digging into this for months. Prisco starts us off with a story of a man who witnessed the deadliest domestic terror attack from last year. Guillermo Glenn is well known in El Paso's Mexican American community. He's 79 now, and he's been a community organizer and labor rights activist. For most of his life. We conducted a lot of protest. We broke the bridge. They went to jail on August 3rd, 2019. He was just going about his weekend routine. It was a Saturday morning, right and around 10 o'clock, so I'm going to Wal Mart to buy and pet food, and I was way in the back, and I heard his great big noise. A warning. Guillermo was going to share graphic details about what happened that day. Ah, a large number of families, women and men. We're running towards me from the front of the building. And I noticed at least where the women that was dripping blood where there's something really wrong. I ran into the woman who is she had Both her legs had received some type of this shrapnel or bullet wounds, and she was bleeding, so I stopped. There to help her and I grabbed First aid kit and tried to at least tend to her wounds on her legs. One of the firemen, your paramedic came and tell you, you have to get around. We're getting everybody out of the store. So we put her in and whether there was a grocery baskets. When he wheeled the woman to the front. He saw what had happened right at the front door. There was a lot of blood. I knew then that there's been a shooter. It was very dramatic scene. You know, I saw the body of the man with half his head shot off. There was a lady land on the pavement across from where we're noting the people. I don't know exactly. Who had taken out I didn't have that information he was actually shooting Mexicans. The.

reporter Guillermo Glenn Megan Squire Richmond Wal Mart Oakland Virginia Obama California Elon University officer North Carolina El Paso David Prisco scientist Mexican American community
"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"megan squire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mississippi was the last day to include the symbol of the pro slavery Confederacy. It was adopted by white supremacist lawmakers a generation after the South lost the war. Republican Governor Tate Reeves says he'll sign the bill. A commission will come up with a new flag that can't include the Confederate battle emblem. But must include the words in God we trust will be submitted to the voters November 3rd. Vice President Mike Pence, told a crowd at a Dallas megachurch yesterday that faith will help the nation through a time of protest that has seen the destruction of some public statues. Veranda Suarez from member Station K. R Reports First Baptist. Alice is led by Pastor Robert Jeffress, a vocal supporter of President Donald Trump, and Pence found a warm welcome there as he talked about the pandemic and national protests for racial justice. He condemned the killing of George Floyd, but said the destruction of statues and public property will not be tolerated. You see statues of Some of our nation's greatest heroes being torn down and one can't help but wonder. About ancient question that if the foundation's crumble how can the righteous stand Confederate monuments have come down across the South during protests in recent weeks for NPR news? I'm Miranda Suarez. The world has two milestones in the Corona virus pandemic yesterday. There are now more than 10 million confirmed cases and more than 500,000 people have died. The U. S has both the most cases and the most debts more than 2.5 1,000,000 cases and more than 125,000 deaths. The governor of California is ordering the closure of bars in seven counties, citing the rise in confirm Corona virus cases. Queen Achim from member station KQED reports Governor Gavin Newsom and state officials have said all along that the data would guide re openings and closures. Well, there has been a modest uptick in confirmed cases and hospitalizations in the state as a whole. Some counties are looking at a spike Newsome is ordering those counties to close their bars because of concerns of community spread. Several counties in the central part of the state were on the list, including fresh know where hospitalizations have gone up, and the number of cases per 100,000 have increased by 114% in the last two weeks. Similar data lead the state to require Los Angeles and Imperial County's both in Southern California to shut their bars, too. For NPR news. I'm Queen A. Kim in San Francisco, Texas, is also heard bars too close again. Governor Greg Abbott says that Cove in 19 has taken a very swift and dangerous turn. This is NPR. Pakistani police say four gunmen attacked the Pakistani stock exchange building in Karachi today with grenades and automatic rifles. They say two people were killed. Security forces killed all four Attackers. The building is located in a high security zone but also houses the headquarters of many private banks, A separatist group claimed responsibility. Canada's two major airlines say they'll end physical distancing on flights by the end of the week. Dan Carpet Chuck reports They're Canada and West Jet now join American Airlines in booking flights to full capacity. West jet says it will remove seat distancing protocols on domestic flights beginning on July the first West. Yet, officials say their flights have heaped air filters installed to help clean recirculated air. They add that the airflow and cabins goes from ceiling to floor, so an extra barrier isn't necessary. Officials also say the seatbacks provide protection for passengers. WestJet says it has beefed up cleaning and sanitizing as well as introduced mandatory temperature checks. Of all passengers with a requirement that all passengers and crew wear masks. Air Canada says it will also end seat restrictions at the same time is West Jet for NPR News of Dan Carpet Shock in Toronto, a 74 year old former police officer is due in court in Sacramento, California today. Joseph D'Angelo is believed to be the Golden State killer responsible for dozens of rapes and 13 murders in California in the seventies and eighties. He was arrested only two years ago based on new DNA technology. Investigators linked evidence to a distant relative. D'Angelo's through popular DNA data days. I'm Nora RAHM NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rents, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w. J f dot org's From the center for Investigative Reporting in P R X. This is reveal I'm outlets over the past month. Protests have helped give unprecedented attention to the issue of police brutality. But right wing extremists are also trying to seize the moment. At a black lives Matter. Rally in Richmond, Virginia, A man claiming to be a leader drove his truck into a group of protesters in Oakland, California man who follows the online boogaloo movement allegedly shot and killed a federal security officer. They want to kick off chaos and they want to start. The Reese warns that always waiting for some Chaotic event to happen that'll help them kick this off. Megan Squire is a computer scientist who studies online extremism at Elon University in North Carolina. She's seen firsthand.

NPR News California NPR West Jet Veranda Suarez Joseph D'Angelo Canada Tate Reeves Mike Pence Governor Gavin Newsom officer Vice President George Floyd Mississippi Governor Greg Abbott Robert Wood Johnson Foundation WestJet spike Newsome Queen Achim