19 Episode results for "Meese"

The Dangers Of Methane

A Moment of Science

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Dangers Of Methane

"Here's a riddle for your dial. What do one hundred thirty six thousand cows and glacier flowing from an active ice-covered volcano have in common. They both move really slowly I was thinking about the fact that they both release about the same amount of methane per day. At least miss warm out. Scientists calculated that the salt may have cooled glacier in Iceland, which flows from the volcano Cutler releases up to forty one tonnes of methane from Meltwater a day during the summer months. That's a little too specific to make a good riddle on. But that is a surprising amount of methane for microbes to produce beneath the ice. Researchers think the volcano might be helping I the heat from the volcano might be increasing waterflow under the glacier moving the methane out faster. And Secondly, the volcano might be helping the methane stay methane usually when methane comes into contact with oxygen. It's converted to receive to buy methane consuming microbes so in Milwaukee, which has a lot of dissolved oxygen molecules comes into contact with a glacier bed. The methane the microbes produce there is converted to carbon dioxide, but when Meltwater Meese assault who glacier bed it also encounters gases from the volcano those guesses reduce the amount of oxygen in the water. So the methane remains methane as it dissolved in the water and flows out of the glacier fr. From where it can enter the atmosphere and function as a potent greenhouse gas is land in an article or full of his glacier, covered volcanoes. So it's something to keep an eye on. In the meantime, the microbes are complaining this moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don glass and Cassandra.

Meltwater Meese Meltwater Don glass Iceland Indiana University Milwaukee assault forty one tonnes
Ep 36: The Spanferkel

Eleanor Amplified

16:09 min | 7 months ago

Ep 36: The Spanferkel

"Hello Listener before. We begin a short message from team. Eleanor firstly we hope that you and your family are staying healthy and safe and indoors. Thank you so much for listening secondly and you've probably guessed it by now we have to take a break after this episode before we can bring you the rest of season for. We are really really sorry and it won't be long. I mean time is relative but seriously we'll be back as soon as we possibly can in the meantime if you want to contact us maybe with questions for the actors or the characters or if you have complaints like why can't there be more episodes. Now send them to us. And then email eleanor amplified at whyy. Dot Org. You could even get a parent to record you on the phone an e mail that to us if we get enough maybe we'll even turn that into a bonus episode. Think about it but for now. Us episode thirty six the span for coal from whyy in Philadelphia in business spasm life only one thing really matters respect and a comfy restroom. It's another adventure oven when last we left our heroes. They were deep in enemy territory posing as Angela branch professor ignominy and Lars Torso. Eleanor and her friends had infiltrated Mecca. Blurb headquarters only to get embroiled. In the executive intrigued that's called boardroom. Cage match fix executives. Enter one leader lifts. No it appears. They've gotten more than they bargained for. As a new ruthless corporate executive seems to have caught on to the gangs secret. I don't know who these imposters. Put that not Angela. Brandt who knew it? Ganga's hit a spy on US why it's probably elmer amplified. Herself would know. What are we using? Dramatic Hyperbole. Oh Oh so you thought about literally no. I was using hyperbole. Also you thought Angela. Brandt literally switched bodies with eleanor amplified. Never I knew. It was dramatic hyperbole. You're a Fu Brim. Laura another point for the kid now. How WHOA yes how? Spot on various seriously go Brent take your three dimensional. Chess moves somewhere else. They're all work on smashed hard stone. I guess you're just too smart for me Smash Hardstone. Hook up for myself and don't be forget it sweb. I hope everyone enjoyed cage. We got the idea watching the natural channel. So zoom you know. Who's the winner yet me? Wait a minute. Brandt settle down hard head. I'll get to you you leave smash alot. How Monroe you sycophantic lackey? You lose because you'll say anything to be close to power the chew. Have no real ideas loyalty or backbone. She's right I know mother I heard her. Stop telling me what to do. Good gravy. That was vicious rid law. Us CRUELTY FEAR AND EXTORTION. To get what you want. That's not leadership. It's just an astonishing abuse of law degree. You for that no you won't. I know you're way out of line branch and you smash Harto's heart stone. Guess what pal you yell. Bluster and Brag just to hide your old crippling insecurity and protect your fragile ego ever heard of projection paging. Dr Throw the only insecure Persian Yay GS. And G we sit win the boardroom. Psychologically that's the Great Year Enemies Jack Over Cal and what about examine Lars Vic cooled? Okay well maybe. We misjudged you Angela. Because that was brutal. Abbad is still haven't told us what yell would dare to fix mega blurred. I wouldn't do anything to fix Mega Bloomberg. She should have a plan. I destroy entrace. Iran can can you? Angela mean another Evil Tech Company. Being everybody knows mega blog is evil. No one cares. That's what we had. But what if we pull a one? Eighty dissolve the company take all the money and sinking into public education health care and fighting climate change. We'd take the entire world by surprise. Okay I get surprised part but that evil. It's not and we just give away the money. I thought you don't care about money. Can't out causing mayhem. Chaos and confusion and this would definitely confuse people sure but think about it a nice peaceful society a trusting world. Leaving you to free to come in you know graffiti stuff a whatever that a little more than caffeine and mine. Angela Grudge but I do have to say is almost making science. I was thinking the Sam's back especially considering the goals of project and what was project Chris Talia again for the last time. Angie project is Talia. Is the songs other avoid ask? And yes. It can be agreed education. Him One buddy getting this so dry house and then will rule the world. Easy PATHAK'S J. We're so proud you've done it again. You either winner aboard room cage match up to the roof. There's a helicopter wedding to bring you to the span. Yeah the span. I can't wait to go there. I'm going to bring my lung kids to whatever Harry out. I'm sure you've got the big line or up to Vincent. He's waiting for it. Just go ahead and destroy Mangla. Sounds Fun Angie okay? You heard the bosses often spread that most incredible way to bring down. Capitalism brand is Matt Smith. What have you? It's just business now. Smashed I want you to manage the transformation. Starting now. Megabucks stops all evil activity. I don't like US total cash. I will this. Can I fire anyone? It's Mayfield no brim law. Instead you're GONNA do some good with that low degree. Why don't you drop the paperwork to make Mega Bloomberg One hundred percent nonprofit? We're going to give away all money but beck only benefits. The vast majority of the population Yup and make sure everybody knows that this was my idea. Me Angela business failure in history you now I see it differently berry laws and ignore me. Come with me. We've got a date with a span. Fergal let's get to that shop speaking you. Sf to communicate and boys strapped. Thank you and well. All of our Nation Funchal Where is the what do you weigh like do time? I'm half robot Cuba wanting me about that. Before entering the aircraft shows there was no big deal. Sidewise all right. I can't help but notice. We're just fly straight up into the Stanford an actual place on state of my door being asked the same question repeatedly out the window of grabbed. You won't see her destination only see a large cloud does ause. I see it that no cloud my goodness ICU. To a ship. I thought it looked like a tortoise came from Rusel but is an eighteenth century. Galleon spos- name is incredibly specific. Are you just messing with me or own? Now I see it's surrounded by Miss to vapor but looks like a clown but was it just floating you think that's the weird part of my business. Why any business brought to you by landing on the deck of the Span Fargo. Please be advised but I cannot take off again. The WIND DIES DOWN. So why will be waiting to hear passionately if anyone needs me? Please keep your child. If you ever have a nice day threads ms Ms Lat this way over here over there? A doorway hello me spread. Professor League Nomi Blurs. Robot is so good to see you again. Yeah No yes. Yes we've met up. Obviously I always. Oh you two always joking with toady. We spent so much time together that house in Los Angeles Swell Right. Yes cornea professor. Remember that time you demanded a large half calf double cupped no sleeve. Salted CARAMEL MOCHA lattes. Sure but I forgot the carer male. Oh Yeah let me you screen. Yes Sorry Toady. Clearly a bad person. Please never listen to me again. Why professor that's the nicest thing you ever said to me. That makes sense please. You must be tired from your journey. Follow me Master Vincent. He's waiting for you in Wayne. So Toady this is a floating eighteenth century Spanish warship. The WREC yes. Okay just checking. And what are you in Vincent doing up here anyway? Why what else we sprints? We're helping the wax with their spiritual plans right. Yes so we're going to see Vincent. Of course Vincent. Who Professor. Are you working on your stand up routine because you are full of jokes today? How what stopping you know? We expected you earlier meese brands. Yes I had a little business to destroy the tend to Yes we all have duties that guide the course of our lives sometimes in directions. We could never predict what people get busy here. We are Master Vincent. Oh you he's braving. Study Master Master. Meese Brandt and her companions are here to see you come right in and Jila brands. Thank you Vincit next to see you meet you for the first time. I'm quite sure we've never met before. Step closer here next room queen. What's wrong Oh Tony Now? Up The net ace master. What what is this that could contain? How old of Wild Barracuda struggling his Usenet Angela? For should I say all amplified? Don't know what you're talking about. What's meaning of this Real Angela? Hi there eleanor. This time you're stuck for good content. An actual won't web of danger. What could be worse of Rope of peril a gauge of jeopardy offense of precariousness? And what will happen now that our heroes have come face to face with a legendary villain here. Too Poor thought to be ancient history and will the gang ever get to switch back to their own buddies. Find Out in the next mind-bending body flipping metaphor stretching adventure of amplify support for Eleanor. Amplified is provided by the Sutherland. Family Charitable Fund.

Angela Grudge Meese Brandt Master Vincent Eleanor professor Mega Bloomberg Us executive whyy Fu Brim Tony Now Lars Torso Span Fargo Iran Mecca Philadelphia Chess Lars Vic beck
Iran-Contra Pt. 1

Conspiracy Theories

44:00 min | Last week

Iran-Contra Pt. 1

"In. November third nineteen eighty-six. The. Lebanese magazine al-Shara printed and expose reporting the U US President Ronald Reagan had established a covert arrangement to secretly sell weapons to Iran in exchange Iran allegedly released several American hostages being held in. Lebanon. A week and a half after the article dropped Reagan appeared on national television and strongly denied it saying we did not repeat did not trade weapons or anything else for hostages nor will we? But something didn't quite add up. At a press conference later that month attorney, General Edwin meese revealed that the US actually did have an arms deal with Iran. Not only that but high ranking administration officials had illegally diverted the prophets to support the CONTRAS. and. Militia. In Nicaragua, all told Attorney General meese explained the arrangement had funneled millions of dollars without any congressional approval or oversight. Following Mrs, disclosure a series of investigations ensued and continued into the following year. Eventually President Reagan accepted full responsibility for the deal with Iran. But. He alleged that he was completely uninvolved in the diversion of funds to the CONTRAS. However the facts never quite matched up with his explanations. And as it turned out the so called Iran Contra affair was just the tip of a corrupt iceberg. Welcome to conspiracy theories a par cast original. Every Monday and Wednesday. We dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most controversial events and search for the truth on Carter Roy. I'm Molly Brandenburg and neither of us are conspiracy theorists bud we are open minded skeptical and curious don't get US wrong. Sometimes, the official version is the truth but sometimes it's not. You can find episodes of conspiracy theories and all other park originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. To stream conspiracy theories for free on spotify, just open the APP and type conspiracy theories in the search bar. This is our first episode on the Iran Contra affair, a political scandal that US President Ronald Reagan supposedly carried out in the nineteen eighty S. The story goes that Reagan and his administration secretly facilitated in arms exchange with Iran. Then, they redirected the prophets to help the right wing contras in Nicaragua. Today were covering the official story of the Iran Contra. Affair Will Chronicle how the weapons trade began and will discuss how the Reagan administration spun the fax to disguise their criminal activities. Next time we'll examine three conspiracies related to the affair. We'll explore whether Reagan's party collaborated to shield him from the fallout will scrutinize Vice President Bush's role in the affair investigating whether he was a key player and will unravel how the profits made from the Contra funds may have fueled the crack epidemic in the nineteen eighty S. We have all that and more coming up stay with us. At the beginning of Ronald, Reagan's presidency in Nineteen eighty-one. The Cold War. had been simmering for nearly four decades. The capitalist United States and Communists Soviet Union didn't antagonize each other directly because they knew and all out battle between the nuclear superpowers would be disastrous. Instead they fought so-called proxy wars they'd interfere in developing nations economies each hoping to tip the global balance between communism and capitalism in their favor. In particular Reagan focused on Nicaragua where tensions simmered between the right wing Contra rebels in the socialist Cuban back Sandinista government in keeping with his pro capitalist ideology Reagan champion the contras. According to him, the contras were quote the moral equivalent of our founding fathers. In reality, the rebels weren't particularly ethical. Although their tactics rarely made the press in the United States. They were later accused of human rights violations. They attack civilians and displaced thousands of indigenous people and they regularly tortured or killed prisoners of war. But so far as the Reagan administration was concerned, that was a fair price to pay. Laid work with terrorist if that's what it took to keep communism in check. To that end around nineteen eighty, the US government hosted numerous contras in training camps in Florida their Cuban exiles in American military officials train the rebels for the coming revolution. The camps were an important first step, but Reagan wanted to do more. On December first nineteen eighty-one he authorized nineteen million dollars worth of secret military assistance to the CONTRAS. The Neutrality Act already made it illegal for the United States to interfere in a foreign war but Reagan emphasized that this aid wouldn't tip the scales it would merely prevent left leaning agitators from. Acquiring, weapons. But he couldn't get support from the legislative branch. Well Reagan was a Republican Democrats control the Senate and House during the first term. And they were reluctant to sidestep the neutrality act or get too involved in the Nicaraguan conflict. Rather than reach across the aisle. Reagan, and his advisors preferred to make decisions behind closed doors. Unfortunately for Reagan, this secrecy didn't go over well with Congress which feared that Reagan was misusing his power. In nineteen eighty to a democratic representative named Edward Boland drafted the Boland amendment. It prohibited the Department of Defense the CIA, and other government agencies from using federal funds to overthrow the government of Nicaragua. The amendment passed unanimously four hundred eleven to zero. Reagan had no choice but to sign it into law. But it didn't stop him and his team from finding and exploiting loopholes. The Director of Central Intelligence William J Casey assured the White House that they could still support the contras without breaching the amendment. Since. The legislation didn't cover the National Security Council Casey explained that they could oversee the contra funding without getting reprimanded. As the name implies the National Security Council is supposed to advise the president on matters related to national security. Although foreign relations fall under their purview, the agency isn't supposed to intervene in other countries politics. But they were willing to bend the rules to get a leg up in the Cold War. Under the supervision of national security. Advisor Robert Carl Bud McFarlane Reagan authorized the CIA to conduct mining. Karaguanov. Then from January until March nineteen eighty-four, the CIA exploded minds. Nicaraguan harbors. They hope to damage and scare off Soviet ships. The Wall Street Journal uncovered the mining operations in April. The discovery stoked outrage on both sides of the political spectrum. Several. Democrats called for a prosecutor to determine if Reagan had broken the law. Nicaragua filed a suit against the United States. It went to trial before the world court, a United Nations operated court system. It was the first time a third country ever product case against a developed nation in Nicaragua won. The World Court ruled that the US had to immediately cease mining operations in. Nicaragua. Reagan State Department responded that they'd adhere to the world court ruling in two years. After all, what was the U. N. going to do to stop them? It was clear that the president and his allies wouldn't back down easily. To keep them in check congress. Crafted a more comprehensive and restricted version of the Boland amendment in the spring of Nineteen eighty-four. This new proposal made it nearly impossible for Reagan, the Department of Defense or the CIA to support the contras. But Reagan wouldn't accept no for an answer. He told National Security Advisor McFarland to assist in funding the CONTRAS anyways regardless of the consequences. The problem without Congressional approval. The National Security Council needed some way to raise funds. Luckily McFarland found in opportunity in Iran. And this is where things get tricky. In nineteen, eighty, five and iranian-backed terrorist group called Hezbollah captured several Americans and held them hostage in. Lebanon. Reagan was deeply concerned about the fate of the American captives he stressed to his advisors quote I, want you to whatever you have to do to help these people keep body and soul. That summer the Director General of the Israeli Foreign Ministry David Kim he met with McFarland to discuss the hostage crisis came he mentioned that Iran was desperate for artillery in their war against a Soviet assisted Iraq. So they might be willing to exchange prisoners for weapons. Based on this tip McFarland proposed a measure known as the National Security Decision Directive. The order said that the US could provide Iran with enough military as to slow the spread of communism. In, exchange, the Iranian government would pay the United States in released hostages and cash. The directive polarized Reagan's cabinet. Two of its harshest critics were Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and secretary of State George. Shultz. Even the Weinberger and Schultz were both Republicans and Reagan appointees, they preferred a less interventionist policy. But Reagan didn't need them on board since unlike ordinary legislation, the directive didn't need approval. So despite Weinberger's and Schultz's objections Reagan gave the National Security Council the go-ahead to initiate contact with Iran? In the following months the US transfer hundreds of missiles to Israel that were then shipped to Iran in return Hezbollah released one hostage that September. As. The rescue mission ramped up and more missiles were delivered. Mcfarland began having second thoughts about the whole operation. He may have had a crisis of conscience, but some report suggests his unease stemmed from interpersonal conflicts. Publicly McFarland claim that he got along with everyone in Reagan's administration. But several White House officials said there was major friction between McFarland and other cabinet members. Whatever the reason a new official took over for McFarland during the next weapons transfer. Lieutenant. Colonel. was a Vietnam vet and the deputy director of the National Security Council. North was well qualified to run the illegal arms trade, but he encountered an obstacle almost immediately. In November nineteen eighty-five North chartered a CIA aircraft to carry a bundle of missiles to Iran. But. When the weapons arrived Iran deemed them sub-standard. Hezbollah refused to release any more hostages but north was undeterred. He sees the leftover funds from the missile transaction and transferred them to the contras. The diversion had begun. It's hard to say how much authority north actually had to make the transfer. Remember Reagan told, McFarland, to fund the contras however he could. It's unclear how the message made its way to. Colonel Morris. Officially Reagan never told them to divert the profits nor did he know that North was moving the money? By, that's a little hard to believe especially given the fact that the president of the United States also sits as the chair, her of the national. Security Council. I'm not sure I buy that this entire conspiracy played out unnoticed right under Reagan's knows. Maybe he was distracted while North oversaw weapons, deals and fun diversions. Reagan had to fill vacant seat. In any case on December? Second Nineteen eighty-five McFarland resigned. Vice. Admiral. John Poindexter succeeded him has Reagan's national security adviser. With. North's help poindexter also began diverting millions of the profits from the arms exchange to the contras. But the conspirators couldn't keep this up forever critics like Weinberger and scholes still condemned Reagan's intervention or at least the parts of it they knew about. The Iranian weapons exchange and the funds diversion were totally secret. And once the public learned what was going on. The so-called Iran-contra Fair would become a full blown scandal. Next One News story brings the Iran Contra affair to light. Par casters we're entering the spookiest season of the year, and while I can't wait for candy corn hit the grocery store shelves. I'm also looking forward to more frightful parts of fall starting with podcast networks, newest original series called haunted places, ghost stories starting October first, we're bringing you the scariest most hair raising ghost stories ever imagined. Thursday on haunted places ghost stories Alastair murden someone's a new spine tingling tale of wraiths phantoms and chilling apparitions. These stories come from all over the world including Japan, India, the UK and even ancient Rome. Don't miss stone cold classics like the Kit bag I- Algernon Blackwood. Sinister account of a condemned murderers final wish and the lengths he'd go to fulfill it. And the media Ray Ray Spanish, tale of a wandering musician who here's a terrifyingly beautiful song in a burned out monastery. And is doomed capture. It's notes until he dies. You can find and follow haunted places go stories free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and don't forget October is our favorite month and one of our busiest. So make sure to search par cast network in the spotify search bar to see all of our new shows. Now, back to the story. In the nineteen eighties, US President Reagan secretly arranged to sell weapons to Iran in exchange they paid cash and released several American hostages who had been held captive in Lebanon. The deputy director of the National Security Council Oliver. North. Diverted profits from the exchange to support the capitalist CONTRAS. To this end north collaborated with the Central Intelligence Agency. However he and the C., I. A. Weren't the only ones helping the Nicaraguan rebel group. According. To a report from the Associated Press drug traffickers in Nicaragua funneled money to the contras in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and nineteen eighty-five. Exchange the rebels helped transport cocaine across borders in nineteen eighty-five they made enough from coke sales to buy two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars in weapons and a helicopter. The equivalent of roughly six hundred thousand dollars today. Later the Reagan administration confirmed that they knew about the drug money. All though the cocaine dealers and the US officials weren't officially allies their connection through the contras made them uneasy accomplices. This is especially ironic given Reagan's role in the so-called war on drugs in the united, states. and. It's hard to believe that the US operations were completely independent from the contras cocaine trade. After all the CIA has a long history of dealing drugs in order to de stabilize foreign governments. During World War Two the as predecessors conspired with the Italian mafia to stabilize Benito. Mussolini's government in nineteen forty. Three. They also supposedly facilitated trade with China in an effort to flood Italy with heroin. Not only did the alliance helped the United States infiltrate Italian politics. It also proved to be massively profitable by nineteen forty seven when the CIA was formerly established they were dealing heroin in France afterward, they helped the Yakuza come to power in Japan, thanks to the meth trade in addition the CIA were major players in the global opium industry. To be clear these events have all been confirmed. They're not conspiracy theories. Which means the United States had a history of dubious political intervention facilitated by drug dealing even before they got involved with the contras. Most of this had gone on in secret with ordinary American citizens none the wiser. But the events of Nineteen eighty-six change everything. The trouble started in. May. Oliver North traveled to Tehran to negotiate the release of more American hostages. Even, though he'd resigned the previous year former national security adviser, Robert Carl Bud McFarlane accompanied north in unofficial capacity. But after four days of meetings with the leaders, no hostages were afraid. The Iranians complained that they'd been overcharged in the past. Now they were worried that the Americans would dupe them again. Their suspicions were of course justified even though they failed to free any more hostages north and his colleagues had a cash down payment from the Iranians. On their way back to Washington north reportedly told McFarland that they wouldn't refund money it funland to the contras. Somehow north dishonesty didn't completely sour the relationship. Later that year, the United States convinced the Iranians to pay four million dollars for the missile parts from May. That's over nine point, five, million dollars today for the same weaponry they'd previously deemed substandard. Hezbollah released two more American captives that year and as promised. The US government reciprocated with even more weapons. Soon however, the Reagan administration found themselves on thin ice. In October nineteen eighty-six the Communist Sandinista. Government shutdown a seeing one twenty-three supply plane over northern Nicaragua. They captured the lone survivor, an American pilot name. Eugene Hossan Fuss. At a press conference in Managua a week later hospice confessed that the CIA had hired him to load and deliver weapons to the CONTRAS. Later he refuted his statement claiming that he was unsure if the other men on the plane were affiliated with any government agency. But. It was too late to backtrack. The secret was out and everyone started investigating hospices claims. The Nicaraguan government identified the two men who died in the crash as American CIA agents. Reagan and his administration immediately denied the as involvement, but the evidence was stacking up against them. One short month after. Hossam. Fuss. The pilot gave his statement all Cheryl published an expose. That revealed the Reagan administration's entire year's long deception or at least the Iranian it. L. Sharara had no idea that profits from the Iranian trade were being funneled to Contra rebels in Nicaragua. President Reagan failed to illuminate them on the Nicaraguan connection. In fact, initially denied that an arms exchange had even taken place in a televised speech Reagan claim that the US did not negotiate with terrorists or hostage takers. But his denial didn't convince everyone in light of the growing scandal Attorney General Edwin meese launched an investigation into the US Iran arms hostage deal. MEESE was an odd choice to lead such a probe. He was President Reagan's right hand man hardly an impartial third party. And his bias soon reared its ugly head during his research. MEESE found a memo north at panned, detailing the funds diversion to the contras. meese worked from Friday night to Monday morning with a team of Department of Justice Lawyers. Not to investigate the memo or build a case against the White House but to present a narrative that vindicated Reagan in his team. He called the president and suggested he coordinate his story with his advisors so that no, one would be quote blindsided by us not knowing something that might be going on. Once. The president had enough time to prepare mismatched met with Reagan. Bush and the Chief of Staff Donald. Regan no relation. They agreed that meese should break the news about the funds diversion. So he could put the proper spin on the story. So on November Twenty Fifth Nineteen eighty-six the president called a press conference. There means delivered the news to an incredulous gobsmacked group of reporters telling them that ten to thirty million dollars from the Iran arms exchange had aided the contras. That's about twenty three to seventy million dollars today. Most. Significantly. MEESE name. The three key players he thought were responsible for the scheme. North Poindexter and McFarland. To. Hear me tell it president Reagan was totally innocent. MEESE reassured the journalists that Reagan had been completely unaware of the diversion until meese had alerted him about it. He also maintained that the CIA was completely uninvolved with the transfer of funds. Instead, he insisted that North Poindexter and McFarland had acted alone. Soon, after his announcement, the National Security Council fired north. POINDEXTER immediately resigned as for McFarland. He hadn't been officially involved with the agency since one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. So there was nothing to be done. But otherwise, things were happening fast the day after the press conference Reagan created a Task Force to investigate the National Security Council he appointed Texas Senator John Tower to head the force which became known as the Tower Commission. Like Mrs Probe The Tower Commission was also rife with conflicts of interest. Reagan handpicked tower to look into the scandal here he was allegedly responsible for. Luckily, the Tower Commission wasn't the only group investigating the Iran Contra Affair The court appointed Deputy Attorney General Lawrence Walsh as an independent prosecutor to help with the inquest. Walsh was the opposite of tower in almost every way. He had a reputation as an honest and persistent attorney. He'd overseen several criminal proceedings against the New York City mob. And he had political experience negotiating on President Nixon's behalf in Vietnam. The judiciary placed a lot of stock in Walsh's stellar, reputation. They likely hoped it would stop people from thinking that his conservative ties post conflict of interest. Also, prove them correct. He hired a staff of researchers instructed them to spare no expense in gathering evidence against Reagan and his team. But even his vigilance wasn't enough. Congress formed yet another separate committee a month later in January nineteen, eighty seven. According to one participant, the committee decided early on not to pursue the president directly. Reagan's term was about to end and it didn't seem like a good use of resources to indict an official with one foot out the door. More importantly, Congress wanted to avoid another Watergate crisis. So Reagan managed to escape the majority of the scrutiny but the other conspirators weren't so lucky. Former national security adviser Bud McFarland found himself in a deep pool of despair. Three hours before he was supposed to testify in front of the Tower Commission. McFarland, took an overdose of volume. Someone at his house found him and called an ambulance. Paramedics rushed McFarland to the hospital. Luckily doctors were able to stabilize him. And once again, the spin began McFarland's attorney argued that this was not a suicide attempt. He suggested that his client had simply taken too much of the tranquilizer in order to alleviate three days of back, spasms and headaches. Whatever the cause for his overdose, the Tower Commission examined Macfarlane while he was still hospitalized. To the panel surprise, he came completely clean. McFarland admitted that Reagan had authorized a shipment of weapons to Iran in August one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. He continued explaining that north, then took a portion of those profits to support the contras. You think the confession would break the case wide open. But. It was hard for the Tower Commission to take McFarland's testimony at face value because they couldn't verify his account. Chief of Staff Donald Regan contradicted his testimony. He asserted the president had not only opposed the August nineteen eighty-five shipment but that neither he nor Ronald Reagan knew anything about the diversion of funds. The president wasn't the only official. The investigators couldn't pin down. Vice President George H W Bush was also cryptic about his role in the scandal. He denied that he knew anything about the fund aversion to the CONTRAS. Later he told the Senate Intelligence Committee that quote mistakes were made. Public opinion polls suggested that people didn't believe Bush was innocent. A year later, CBS News Anchor Dan Rather reported that one third of Republicans believed the vice president was hiding something about the Iran Contra affair. In response Bush adamantly denied his involvement. But no matter. What excuse is the administration came up with the pressure escalated to a breaking point on February twenty sixth nineteen eighty seven, the tower commission released their findings. It was a comprehensive document that spanned over three hundred pages. The report criticized President Reagan's lack of oversight and aloof managerial style but it didn't say he was directly involved. The rest of his staff bore the brunt of the blame. Weirdly, the report also condemned Cabinet Members Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger Secretary of State George Shultz. It said they failed to halt the diversion of profits from the Iran arms exchange. Remember they'd opposed the international intervention from the beginning. But. The report suggested they weren't and enough about their objections. Seemingly, the Tower Commission report was more about spin than it was about uncovering the truth. Even. After extensive investigation and questioning, it looked like Reagan was about to get away with everything. But to other probes were still running in soon, the White House officials would have to defend themselves in the court of law. Coming up the Iran Contra trials begin now back to the story. On February Twenty Sixth Nineteen Eighty seven the tower commission released their official report and US President Ronald Reagan seemed untouchable. He'd apparently gotten away with an illegal arms trade and funds diversion. But even though the investigators didn't blame him for the Iran Contra affair, Reagan had been found guilty in the court of public opinion. His presidency was slowly drawing to a close and the bad publicity would likely follow him forever. He looked Graham and stumbled several times when delivering brief public statement on the day of the report's release. Still Reagan reaffirmed his complete innocence. In a letter to the Tower Commission, the president reiterated that he had no personal notes on the Iran Contra Matters. In, fact, he said he couldn't recall anything whatsoever about whether he'd approved an arm sale around August one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. It seems unlikely Reagan would forget something as important as in illegal weapons trade. And the American public weren't buying his excuses. A New York Times CBS poll showed that Reagan's approval rating had plummeted to forty two percent the lowest in more than four years. With his popularity flagging Reagan needed to own up to his mistakes. He gave his first televised direct address regarding the Tower Commission on March Fourth Nineteen eighty-seven. Reagan said. The reason I haven't to you before now is this. You deserve the truth and as frustrating as the waiting has been I, felt it was improper to come to you sketchy reports or possibly even a Romania statements which would then have to be corrected creating even more doubt in confusion. The president went on to confess his part in the scandal. Sort of. President Reagan acknowledged that he'd appointed officials like Donald Regan Oliver North and Bud McFarland, and because they were his representatives, he had to take responsibility for their actions. But he still maintained that he never knew anything about the arms trade. So yes, he was responsible but not culpable. From. There his speech got even weirder. Reagan acknowledge that the Tower Commission had implicated him in the Iranian deal and he didn't exactly deny it. But he said I did not trade arms-for-hostages, my heart and my best intentions still tell me that's true. Whatever, that means. The entire speech felt like Reagan was trying to have it both ways it was like he wanted the benefits of confessing without going so far as to actually confess. His statement elicited a mixed reaction, but it was enough to salvage the president's reputation. According to a CBS poll the day after Reagan's address, his approval rating bumped up nine points. His slow ascent continued when Reagan installed two new members to his cabinet these new appointments replaced Director of Central Intelligence, William Casey and Chief of staff on Regan, symbolizing Reagan's commitment to move past the Iran Contra affair. But Congress wasn't so willing to put the past behind them. Remember two investigations were still ongoing. From may until August nineteen eighty seven Congress hosted a series hearings interrogating the key players in the affair. These proceedings were televised everywhere. It was as big a spectacle as it was a glimpse into the purported corruption within Reagan's administration. The trials most incendiary moment came in July. Lieutenant Colonel. testified. Trust in his green marine uniform north, took the stand and address the crowd poised and stoic. He said, he believed the United States had a moral obligation to provide aid to the contras. He confessed not only his knowledge about the contra funds, but also his collusion with his former colleagues Casey and McFarland. North claim that Casey knew from the beginning about the funds diversion he added the McFarland had asked him to alter official records to help cover up their crimes. North was just one of several witnesses who helped build the case against the Reagan administration. On November Eighteenth nineteen eighty seven Congress released a report based on the summer hearings. They declared that Reagan bore ultimate responsibility for the scandal. Finally Justice had caught up to the president. But by then Reagan was preparing to leave office and Vice President George H W Bush was gearing up to succeed him. In spite of the Kale of the Iran Contra affair, Bush managed to run a successful campaign. He won the presidency in nineteen eighty eight in a landslide victory against Democratic candidate. Michael Dukakis. and. From the Oval Office, it seemed like Bush continued to participate in the cover up. or at the very least he did everything in his power to mitigate the damage from the congressional findings. Eleven members of Reagan's administration had been convicted. Many including poindexter was aided on appeals in nineteen ninety-one during Bush's tenure in the White House. North face the most severe punishment out of everyone involved in the affair he was sentenced to a three year prison term two years probation one hundred and fifty thousand dollars in fines in twelve, hundred hours of community service but like his former colleagues. North's conviction was vacated in his case was dismissed in nineteen one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, one. In June nineteen ninety-two Secretary of Defense Weinberger was indicted on two counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice. Bush pardoned him before he even got to trial. To justify the clemency, Bush called Congress's investigation a quote criminalization of policy differences. In other words he refused to acknowledge that alleged corruption illegal international interference and black market arms straits merited criminal charges. According to Bush the Iran Contra affair and the subsequent probes were just garden. Variety party politics. But Bush's leniency didn't win him and he popular support he lost his bid for reelection. A. Toward the end of his term, he decided to make one final push to take control of the investigation. On Christmas Eve nineteen ninety two Bush pardoned five key players of the Iran Contra affair including Bud McFarlane. Prosecutor Lawrence Walsh was still overseeing the Iran Contra investigation at the time. He could have pushed back against the Bush pardons. In fact, he said that the exonerations undermine the idea that no man is above the law. Ultimately however decided not to pursue anymore convictions. The Iran Contra affair was over. Of course something as enigmatic into Modulus as this scandal is never really over. Next time we'll explore some of the conspiracy theories surrounding the Iran Contra affair like conspiracy theory number one, Reagan was never charged or convicted due to the tribalism of the Republican Party. Conspiracy theory number two, Vice President Bush knew the whole time about the funds diversion, he granted pardons to protect his conspiritors into ensure. would. Ever implicate him. And conspiracy theory number three the CIA's operation in Nicaragua facilitated a drug trade and led to the crack epidemic in the United States. With an official story. So obscured by lies and cover ups the truth about the Iran Contra affair is hard to unravel. Join US next time as we search for answers Thanks for tuning in to conspiracy theories. We'll be back Wednesday with a new episode on conspiracy theories about the Iran Contra. Affair. You can find all episodes of conspiracy theories and all other podcasts originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already have all of your favorite music but not spotify making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like conspiracy theories for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker. To stream conspiracy theories on spotify, just open the APP and type conspiracy theories in the search bar until then remember the truth isn't always the best story and the official story isn't always the truth. Conspiracy theories was created by Max Cutler and is a park has studios original executive producers include Max Ron Cutler, sound design by Brian Gulab with production assistance by Ron, Shapiro Carleen Madden and Travis Clark this episode of Conspiracy Theories was written by Sam Rosenberg with writing assistance by Allie wicker in stars Molly Brandenburg, and Carter Roy. Don't forget to follow haunted places ghost stories for the spookiest thrillers ever imagined collected from all around the world and all throughout time Alistair Murdoch brings a news story to life every Thursday follow haunted places, ghost stories free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Robert Carl Bud McFarlane Reag Iran CONTRAS. president Reagan administration US Bud McFarland Nicaragua Vice President George H W Bush Central Intelligence Agency official Congress National Security Council Caspar Weinberger spotify Attorney General meese attorney Tower Commission North Hezbollah
Episode 42 The Keys to Success

Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

22:23 min | 3 months ago

Episode 42 The Keys to Success

"Growing their beauty business doesn't have to be neat overwhelming. It's all about mastering a few key strategies and systems to save you time. Welcome to beauty marketing simplified a podcast dedicated to helping me on your entrepreneurial journey I'm your host April niece? I'm a permanent cosmetic artists that built my six year business while only working three days a week and raising twin toddlers. I'm here to tell you. The is possible for you to with a background in style marketing, it's my mission to help women worldwide debt more prophets while pursuing their passion and purpose. Let's transform your beauty business for more income and less stress starting right now. Low lows so gone to be with you. Hello, beautiful today! We're talking about the three keys to success, and I just have a quick thing. This is actually from the book is called limitless by Jim. Quick heard him. He does a lot of speed reading techniques, and just really helping people learn faster, and he has his book called limitless, and I wanted to share some takeaways from that book, and just his teaching, so yes, we are talking about the three keys to success and this is again. His teaching, not my own, but also give you. Some of my own personal takeaways from Jim quicks book, called limitless and one of the things that he starts book book, outwith is a quote from a French philosopher, and it says that life is the see between the MD and the beasts fans for birth, and the D. stands for death, and the C. stands for choice, so life is the choices we make between our birth our. Our death right, and so we have the choice to focus on things that matter to us. We've the choice on what we focus on rate. We have the choice of even what we make those things me and then another coach that he had on which I loved, it said in these difficult times they can either define us. Diminish US or develop us. Adam, saving they either define us. Diminish US or develop us so so good. Good. So what are you doing with this time like in quarantine or this kind of change in your business like? Are you leading it to find your develop you and then I'm GonNa? Get into the teachings of the book, but he was talking about the three Cs and the first one is mindset so with mindset. He was saying that with difficult times. You can either downgrade your drainings with the current situation like Oh, I had. Had these goals that I said at the beginning of twenty twenty bytes I. Don't think I'm GonNa hit them, so I'm GonNa. Just bring it down. He can either grade your dreams with the current situation, or you can upgrade your mindset of greed, your mindset right, and that is the way to use this time to think of like what are the things that are like challenge. You one of the things that we can do. Do to upgrade our mindset is to get rid of these false beliefs. Write these stories that we tell ourselves right like I. Don't know if I can do it or I. Don't think it's possible to hit my goal because of my business being closed for so many months right and so instead of saying that I don't think I can do it instead of saying that say, how can you do it? How can I hit those? Those goals, so he calls these false beliefs. These stories that we have he calls them. He says it's the why L. I. E., but Li- stands for limited idea entertained. Okay, so the Lai is a limited idea that you entertain right. A belief is simply a thought that we keep thinking right so me think it so many hinds that we actually believe it's true, and there are many times that what we can do is. is we can poke holes in our beliefs right meaning, we can turn it around so for example if you believe that it takes hard work to be successful, right We always heard that growing up. It takes hard work to be successful, and then you think well. I don't know if I can work much harder. I don't want to take away from my time for my family. You might start to sabotage yourself and and not. Not Reach that that all right. So where can you say well? I know of times where it doesn't take hard work I know people that have invented things and they were successful, and then I also know people, or for example a sake, if it takes hard work to make a lot of money, I know people that don't do a lot of hard work and still make a lot of money and I know people that. Actually. Do hard work. Like for example, you line care, they're out there in the heat. It's labor intensive, and they don't make a lot of money. Right so you're seeing where the opposite is true in I know people that don't do a lot of work and make a lot of money. Do. You follow me on that where you're looking at that limited idea entertained right, so think about the quote allies that you might be telling yourself. I don't think I can hit my goal because you know. Corona had my business shutdown. Right whatever it might be. Where are ways that we can look at our mindset and start to think differently about it ten so? So that is one of the key things that he's talking about a mindset in here's I love how he defines it. I'm GonNa give you a few of the ways that he defines it. So mindset is the stories we tell ourselves, but he also says with mindset. It's the assumptions attitude, so it's what you believe is possible like we just talked about with your. It's what you believe you are capable of an. And what do you believe you deserve? Okay, let's break that down for a moment. So what you believe is possible, so you might be like well. I've seen people do. Six figures envied business year all the time and that might be your goal. Maybe your goal is to even do seven figures. Maybe your goal is to impact a thousand people this year meaning that you're going to have a thousand new clients that you transform their life this year. Right I believe that's possible, because I've seen other businesses to it so now you believe it's possible, but then you think, but I don't believe that's possible for me. Right so not only what you believe is possible, but what you believe you are capable of remember. That was the second question so really start to think about I know for me. I've done some deep work with this according t I'm and I've been thinking about what are my own limited, because we all have them right, we grow up with them and worthiness issues in what we think that we are capable of doing right, and so really take some time to think about what you believe is possible what you believe you are capable of, and then the last part of that is y. You believe you deserve especially for women I. think There's a lot of worthiness issues I know is still battling from time to time. Right so ways. That Leeson had sabotage success. So, what do you believe you deserve? So? These are some mindset things we need to work on. Because you're actually you know. You need to take action on something like make the post your video or reach out to a referral partner. Do these things to grow your business, but you won't take the action because really in. In your mind, you don't believe that you're capable, or you don't believe you deserve it, so that's where we get into some challenge things so one of the things. He says it's our rain. These stories are bring. Our brain is a filter. It actually is at deletion device. He says, and meaning that there are all these thoughts are constantly coming into our minds are. Are Mine has to focus on certain things, and if you think about your brain as a supercomputer, the self talk things that we say to ourselves is the program that's running the super computer, so if you are consistently having negative talk, right if you are consistently talking to yourself in a negative way that that's the way the program is going to run right so. So. You'RE GONNA. See that reflected in your business right now. If you just have like one bad thought every now and then just like having a donut every now and then it's not going to be humble way off track so when we have this that your mind has that same algorithm as like instagram? So think about this, so your mind has the same. Is Instrumental when you start liking dog photos guess what happens on Instagram. Your instagram starts showing you more. Dog Photos you like how it's everywhere. Yes, terming so good, the thing is when you see more dog photos. You're like. Wow, it's everywhere writes the same reason that when you buying car. Your brain starts showing you that car everywhere. If you had a friend that gets pregnant. If you're pregnant, all of a sudden, you see pregnant women everywhere. Right yet, fighting to see the end goal is capable yes. Oh, good by to see. I love that I'm GonNa have to quote you on that, so that's how your brain does just like the instagram and facebook algorithm. It will show you more of those same things, so if you're having that negative self talk think I can do this right than your brain will start to show you. Hey, you're right. Your brain will start to show you that and if you. You search look for what you're grateful for, or if you start to look for possibilities, or if you start to say well, how can I do this right? So this was my goal for the year I wanted to get maybe always at thousand new client, right? That was your goal. Whatever your goal wasn't is a monetary goal. Whatever it is and you're like well. I've been closed now. My business because of Covid, nineteen or quarantine. We've been closed for three four. Four months or every year at however long you're closed in California week closed back down again. We are open for a short time, and then we close. We do again, but now like well now. How can I make it possible? Would I need to double those numbers up in the fall? Some people that have opened up to some of their biggest record months in terms of the open up their business. They were prepared for it so I don't want you to. To think you're just GONNA. Obey build it. They will come. They were prepared for it, but think about how you can start to make it happen, and then your brain will start to search for answers instead of thinking. No, it's not gonNA happen. Think of how it happened look for those possibilities, so we talked about mindset and we talked about your assumptions. Your stories in your attitudes remember those three questions that you ask yourself. Why do I believe as possible? What do I believe? I am capable of right because he might believe. It's possible for somebody else that you might not believe the you are capable of. And what do you believe you deserve right right? What do you feel like? You are worthy of in that type of thing deep questions to ask yourself. That's your mindset now the next thing this is all coming from Jim quicks called limitless right and he talks about mindset is the first and the second key is motivation right? Motivation is actually getting up to do it right. We all he says young knowledge is power. We've heard that, but actually knowledge is potential tower. Right A lot. Lot of people know what to do, but they just don't do enough right, so it's actually you know. If you want to lose weight, you have to limit your calorie restriction and you need to exercise to burn it right? Know what to do, but during it is a different situation right? So why can you do to get motivated? Right to actually follow through on your action right? One of the things that I love that he says in the book is not that people have too much to do. Because we always hear things like well. I have too much on my plate or I can tell you as a mom of twin girls. I totally feel that that's one of my self. Sabotaging stories is saying I don't have enough time rate, so he says it's not that we have, but it's that we do not have enough of the things that light. A, so we are loading up our calendar with things you know all the little to do's, and it's not really being the needle in. It's not the things that light us out so I love on that. He says that so. How can you get motivated right, so we all know there's things that we need to do. How can you get motivated? Here's some of the things that he says in the book, so he talks about motivation is first of all. It's the action Friday that you have to have achieved of the mindset to believe it, and then you have to do it the action and he says the proof is with. The action, and when you put purpose to it so when you write down the reasons why right the reasons why? He went to get those clients right? The reasons why you want to make that amount of money because you can get your family about your life. If you can give back to community, you can transform these people. Your clients lives right, really top into your purpose. Right remember passion is. Is what you do for yourself. Purpose is what you do for others, so tap into that purpose that bigger. Why of what you're going to do? The reason that you WanNa do it. The second part of the equation is emotions right so you can have a big Y in you believe in your why, but you have to tap into the emotions, and this is the rewards and the consequences. So, the benefits of doing that thing to do and the consequences of if you don't do it, so let's just say you know. You need to be more visible on social media and maybe even heard that doing video. I'm GonNa say this is. It is really key reaches more people right? We know that eighty percent of online content that is consumed is video, and there's even been some recent studies show that when consumers when our perspective clients see a video a brand. Brand they are eight percent more likely to make a purchase. A video actually informs them and motivates them to make a purchase. So you've probably heard all the stats about how video is so powerful, but then you're like Ooh, I. Don't know it's scary. What if people judge me if I mess out a he has to tap into the rewards of doing that video well. If I do that video, I might get more clients if I don't do that video in my. My business night's stay stuck right and I don't want. Pass me by so tapping in to the emotions reap the rewards the consequences. Have you thought about doing video? And what you feel is holding you back from doing video. Do you feel scared? What people will say that? There is a fear of camera and I would like to have a little switch in that process until you that you're not afraid of the camera. Many people take selfies, pictures, and so forth, but. But you're afraid of usually the judgment. Are you doing it consistently consistently is the key. It's just like exercise or anything. You have to be consistent in showing up and when you do and this is what a lot of my students see is when you're doing it. It is actually making your You see the rewards from it, so it's actually making your brain say hey, this is a good thing so when you do something anyhow that success you actually than. WanNa. Do it more. Yeah, if your brother is a cameraman Emmy. Come on. He can make you look good. He can edit out the bad stuff all of that you know, sometimes you can also I always tell my students. You can always put the camera on your client and start that way, so do a little brief introduction to yourself. Because people want to know the person behind the brand, right, they wanNA know you I always say you. You, hear me say people buy from people. They don't just buy from brands, so they wanna see you want WanNa. Know you get to know your personality and that way. The great thing is you can build a quick connection video, so you can attract the best and repelled arrest fully, and then like I, said, put it on your your client, and you'll up more courage little by little and like. I said your brain will reward you. So we talked about mindset and now let's talk about the motivation again. The first one was your purpose. You have to tap into that greater y. the next thing is you have to put emotion behind it well if I don't do it, this will happen. If I do do it. This will happen right, so it really makes it. It makes you WANNA do it. The third thing is he says it's an s wicker, three about it and s to the third power any calls it simple small steps, simple small steps, and I love this quote in. He says inch by inch. It's a cinch. But by the yard. It's hard. Right so if you can take small steps. So sharmake Peon, you might just say okay well. I'm just going to do a little introduction of myself and Ben I'm going to turn the camera on my climate right. I'M GONNA start with this little baby step or let's just say if we're using the example of exercise. You're like I know I need to exercise I'm so I can't bring myself to do it will maybe in the morning you get up and put your running shoes on right, so if you take those small staff or they've even said will sat. Certain dentist will say if you can just. If you just lost one tooth right, but but what happens is you don't usually just lost one tooth. You actually start If you floss floss a few more, but if you can start by those simple step, those simple steps will lead to more right. It will lead to doing more so start with simple and that way. It doesn't feel overwhelming. Pick one thing that you know you need to do in your business, so write down what you know you need to do could be. The new could be something else like I said you make. Make there's you need to reach out to that referral partner? Something that way right think about? What's that one thing that you need to do in your business it down something that you've been procrastinating on maybe SEO. Maybe it's I. Don't know what it is for you working on your marketing message. Write it down and write down your purpose for doing it your emotions behind it in a small simple steps that you can do to make it happen. Okay so now let's do this. Let's just take a moment to review, so check out mindset. Right how your brain is going to reward you and make it happen, and you'll continue to see more of what you weren't you look for possibilities when you look for what you're grateful for. Your Business will continue to. Look for ways that you can do. It didn't think about your mindset. What you believe is possible what you believe you are capable of and what you believe you deserve. The next thing is you're going to look at motivation, right? You're gonNA, have you have to take action rainy? That's the proof right and you're GONNA. Look at your purpose your emotions and then the small, says the tiny tiniest thing that can get you closer to your goal. Okay and then the last thing is method and methods are derived strategies and systems to get into your goal. Right is you can have a great mindset new like I'm ready to do this and motivated attack into your Y and all of the other things, but if you don't have a way of getting there right if you don't have a strategy for Marketing Your Business. If you don't have systems to save you time, you're going to chase all of these shiny objects right? You're going to do a lot of things with a little resolved. You might do marketing, but then you burn out because it's just so much right. You need a system to save you time right assistant as I always say, that is reliable and repeatable, so it is a proven system and a strategy for getting clients, forgetting your audience's attention, and for really taking your business to the next level that's systems and strategies right? Did you hear the good news with opened the doors to my signature? Elevate program, and this is a program where we help you become the go to be professional so that you can. Can have more income and impact. If you've been wanting to grow your business with a proven reliable and repeatable system, you can do that with my amplified method that helps you attract and Sistan clients with ease and listen. It's getting harder more than ever to get our client attention right perspective clients have become more distracted and desensitized by most of the mainstream marketing, so it's important that we get their attention, and that we conveyed the value of our services so that you can get Kai inst- to buyer services and become lasting a loyal customers. If you would like to grow your business and step up your business. Make sure you check it out right now. Before the doors close Goto April. MEESE DOT COM forward slash elevate to learn more about the program I can't wait to see their. Thank you for listening to another episode of the beauty marketing simplified podcast, and if you enjoy today's episode, we would love to hear from you. Make sure you subscribe download and also leave us a review. Let us know any topics that you would like to hear about and also differently refer it to a friend. Thank you again for joining us on signing off. This is April with Britain graced hugs and high fives. Next week.

Jim quicks instagram WanNa US partner Adam MD Emmy Sistan Corona California Leeson Ben I Kai MEESE DOT Britain L. I. E. sharmake Peon facebook
Episode 80: Beavers and Bats and Cats, Oh My!

The Ladies of Strange

33:31 min | 5 months ago

Episode 80: Beavers and Bats and Cats, Oh My!

"We need to fix that calender. Yes I was hoping you wouldn't say that because I was waiting to see how long it would take Rebecca to look at it and get twitchy. I'd I've been twitchy I'd since I walked in here. Okay cool fix it after we record Oregon Pause and fix it now if you prefer this long as it's fixed extend we gather next Tuesday on a regular basis? Now I've missed you guys so much. Welcome our ladies of strange. I'm Ashley I'm Tiffany and I'm Rebecca. Thank you for joining US each week. Is we discuss the history mystery and theory of all things questionable. Odd An airy. Hi Friend Hi you guys I could reach out and touch them right now. Rage out Rebecca's space don't that please revival install plexiglass this is not the Kroger shopping checkout and then even like going through the drive thru on remember when I think maybe Duncan they just have like this teeny tiny like enough to put your food in. Announ cut out there not opening the window all the way anymore. We're types weird times indeed but but we're back to get there where we are and we've been good about respecting Rebecca's need to not be touched has been very difficult but actually and I had a nice cuddle puddle to make up for him so I watched awkwardly from the Corner Drinking Murdoch at all. We reached new levels speaking a witch. Tiffany what are we learning about today? Oh you guys. I'm excited so you know how we have random ramblings with Rebecca indeed today. We're have terrific tales with tiffany. Oh well I mean for me you do. Maybe I'll come up with one for you. Amazing annihilation by Ash. Perfect all right so. Skydiving is like in the top. Five greatest experiences I've ever had there was in no particular order. The birth of my child marrying my husband watching Celine Dion perform skydiving. And I have a placeholder for when I meet the backstreet boys which hasn't happened yet but will fare. Neither of you have skydived correct. Correct okay cool. Well it's amazing and I think everyone should experience it. I mean if wolves can skydive why can't you wipe the wolves like our can skydive? Why not you? Why would wolves skydive feeling? She's GonNa tell us. I am so glad you asked her back so back. In March of Twenty nineteen as on article on my facebook feed. Got Me really excited and I wanted to cover it but I couldn't make a full episode out of it fast forward over a year and give me lots of time and self isolation staring at balls and I finally circled back to it. So I'll royal. National Park is located north of mainland Michigan. It's almost touching Minnesota and Canada. But it's Michigan. I promise it's here that biologists have started studying the dynamic between the wolf population and the Moose population so this island is not inhabited by humans. Just a national park. I have questions about these wolves quote unquote skydiving. I think it's GONNA be like you're properly treated goat on top of the pedestal. These are getting dropped out of a plane. I'm not talking about goats wolves. These wolves are getting dropped out of a plane. Can they're observing the moose observe the falling wolves saying what the fuck and running away so? They began observing this Wolf Moose relationship back in nineteen fifty eight and it still continues to this day. It's like the longest running observation of this kind. In nineteen eighty. The Wolf population reached a high of fifty by twenty sixteen. Only two remained. Important Wolf's moves moves. We'll cover them later. We won't move so what happens when a Predator is not around the get more different to get more and overpopulation of the prey. Takes over exactly in this case the predatory e who got more so in this case the Moose and I checked the plural of Moose is Moose not me because I wanted to say me so bad Moose who roughly the same amount a day as I do. More than their fair share. Are we getting fat? Meese branding overly fat meese that are destroying the land. Well the overly large meese so they started to eat more than their fair share and left the plant buffet. Low on stock for the remaining herbivores. So they had to do something about it to protect the other animals who are slowly starting to help with this. In September of twenty eighteen scientists captured two wolves one five year old mill and one four year old female from separate packs and the grand portage reservation. Which is Where they believe the original canines migrated from and airdropped them into. I'll royal worst date. Ever get let's not skydiving dropping animals from parachuting those poor wolves. And then what did they do with the parachute when they landed? They left it attached to the wolf's a quick release the could've died like I have a lot of questions or treatment of these wolves. They were in like Kennel. Great things that were parachuted down. How do they get out of the Kennel crate things? I didn't check on this one but I don't remember. I didn't check on this one but I don't remember. I didn't check on this. I can tell you about something later. Okay for this one. I don't know they did. They successfully got out. But I don't know how so although these wolves had never seen Moose before the thought was that their instincts would kick in and they would know what to do so like. Tiffany DONUT. Exactly and you know what they were right. The new wolves joined the remaining to form to pack and hunted Moose to keep the population go by control. The end goal for them is to have twenty to thirty wolves on the island to restore the Predator prey balance to accomplish this. They'll continue to airdrop over the next few years in March. When I saw that article they just dropped to additional wolves successfully. Okay good successfully. Hanks for clarifying that. So all of this was really cool to me because it meant that. A minimum of four animals had gone skydiving. Sort of got me thinking. They did not go skydiving. They were dropped out of a plane with a parachute tomato. Tomato once consensual. The other isn't consent is key folks so it's got me thinking had other animals have they? Tiffany been pushed out of a plane. Oh Okay my next note is well as I'm sure has already been pointed out to me. By my lovely co host. Parachuting animals is nothing new but it was not pointed out. So hey parachuting. Animals is nothing new. Most commonly dogs are used in military situations and can become quite accomplished divers paradox. Parachuting dogs obviously real slew. We're most famously used by the thirteenth L- Interest Parachute Battalion on D Day. The dogs were trained to locate mines. Keep Watch and warn of enemies a good to know good dot goes right the US also trained dogs to jump from planes during World War Two but the main goal of that was aid down to our men and isolated locations so talk about some good boys whose Nuku's news do goodrich boy do so speaking of military uses. Do you guys want to hear about how the US plan to use that bombs against Japan in World War Two? Did you say that bombs I did? And it's not just like a giant thing from lush. They stuck in the ocean. Now the bath a bat bomb like a flying creature. That's really cute and hangs upside down. I was really worried. You'RE GONNA try legal all right. This harebrained idea was the work of a dentist slash inventor who was pissed about Pearl Harbor. That's a lot of details. Dentist who's pissed about Pearl Harbor Inventor can't say I blame him and had a bad problem so Dr Little Atoms. It's spelled L. Y. T. L. E. So it's like adult thinking more little atoms like bombs public. So funny just through bobby come up with a nuclear joke and there's no reaction so let's go. Oh God this is raising my causing vision. Okay he had an idea. That basically boiled down to gluing bombs. The whole size bombs to the underside of hibernating bats loading them into a five foot long metal tube and dropping them on unsuspecting villages in Japan kamikaze. It's it's not even kamikaze. It'd just be like firecrackers explode. The Bat there would be no negative impact. Unless you're the bat because I meant to the people that they're dropping monitor would just explode the bat. Yeah these bomb-carrier's would hold one thousand forty bats in twenty-six round so that's forty bats per trae. How do they even get that? Many bats are hibernating So he dr Adams was on a trip in Mexico or something and noticed all these bats in a cave and was fascinated by the way they flew in the way. They hibernated in all this to make suicide backs well. So once the bombs dropped to an altitude of four thousand feet or one thousand two hundred nineteen meters parachute with open up and the sides of the bomb carrier would kind of open up. The bats would theoretically fly out post up in an attic or any dark place they could find and then boom what triggers the bomb guess. It's a time bomb but this would destroy everything in their path. It's not a very big bomb. It's simple sized bomb. But it's a powerful bomb firecracker. The good news is the. Us would never approve of testing this out as a viable option. Right don't doesn't sound very promising wrong. President Roosevelt. Pass this along to the powers that be and work began to make this a reality. I read somewhere. That Dr Adams was friends with Roosevelt's wife. And that's how he got the idea for it must have been a good friend to have blah blah stuff happened blah blah. Things long didn't read. I just learned but L. DR means I'm using it everywhere. Basically wants the navy took over. The project was assigned Codename Project X ray and by May of Nineteen Ninety Project Echo. Come on right. I think they probably already had a project ECHO. But yeah that's still by. May of nineteen forty four. After two years in two million dollars in research one million bombs were scheduled to be made they may not have known that about bats at that point in nineteen forty four then. They use echo location. A pretty sure they did echo location over the nineteen forty so they knew this in forty four. Well it may not have been a mutual. Unfortunately Dr Adams another bomb was being worked on that might be of greater use in the war. You don't say the atom bomb any hope of Dr Adams creation seen frontline action was dashed but technically bat stood parachute during testing. So there you go another case of Parachuting Animals. With a case that they were in parachuted. Why would a bat need to parachute wings? They they're pretty good at the whole flight thing just F- way now. Skydiving is fun and all but sometimes it's done to save a life rather than as an Adrenalin fuelled pastime. Or you know to kill lots of unsuspecting civilians but ever for example escape capsules in aircrafts. Very important right. Yes well when they were creating escape capsules. They needed to test them out. Oh no worry. They used humans to test them until the fatality started pile up. This is getting worse. No willing human's non willing animals. Well okay so here we go. Did you know the black bears internal organs are arranged similarly to humans? I do now. Apparently someone in the Air Force in nineteen sixty two that as well so when they started testing White Shrewd Fares Beats Best Star Galactica. Also what is their internal organs being organized the same. We have to do with anything because outside of them is very different. The theory was if you could successfully do it. You could Figure out the impact to the organs. Even more start on a path to figuring out how it would affect the organs k. So when they started testing escape capsules at supersonic speeds and. They didn't want any more human casualties. They switched to black bears on March twenty. First nineteen sixty two yogi became the first living creature to be successfully. Ejected from a supersonic convair B. Fifty eight escape capsule at thirty five thousand or ten thousand six hundred and sixty eight meters flying. At Mach one point three which is roughly a hundred and seventy miles per hour or one thousand four hundred kilometers per hour. Ma'am one point. Three is nine hundred ninety seven miles per hour. Okay well I have my source cited below. So they were wrong but it's fine. I say I'm like people can reset in their car or not. Big Hundred and seventy miles per hour. I thought you said one hundred. Yeah no eight hundred seventy right so hundred and okay. That makes a little more. Because you said approximately Mach One. Yes sorry percents. Roughly eight hundred seventy miles per hour or one thousand four hundred kilometers started like you said a hundred up. Sorry yet. No eight hundred. 's Okay okay. Well the rocket booster shot him. Two hundred twenty five feet or sixty nine meters above the jet and seven minutes and forty nine seconds later. Yogi landed unharmed on the ground unharmed. Separate like insane. Ptsd in the poor bear probably had a heart attack while he didn't have it for long because unfortunately he was put down to have his organs examined afterwards Next note this was sad and I'm sorry. Thank stiff on a lighter. No let's talk about beavers broads I am I. I heard this on the reach broads. So in nineteen forty. Eight in McCall Idaho beavers in humans. Were not on the best of terms as people started moving further west into the beavers land. They started realizing that the beavers didn't care who was in their space. They just continue to do what they do. Best unfortunately that make quite a bit of destruction to the homes being built in that Area Idaho. Fishing Games had a plan. Though actually elmo header had a plan. He knew that the beavers could be happy and prosperous and the Chamberlain Basin. In the McCall residents. Go about their happy. Lives critter free but how to get them there. A beaver parade. No Oh the imagery no. The initial proposal was horses since the area they were being relocated to didn't have roads. They thought they could use horses. And this is a quote from transplanting beavers. A report by L. O. W. Header in the Journal of Wildlife Management so quote horses and Mules Become Spooky and quarrelsome when the struggling odorous pair of live beavers. These problem aim. These problems involve further handling in too frequently result in a loss of beavers. Were out in one thousand nine hundred forty eight. What major event had recently ended around this time so they took four years to try? And figure out this problem. All of this is in nineteen forty eight nineteen forty four was another thing we were talking about. Okay I was like why could they have not just trained the horses to be around the no in nineteen forty eight? What was something like super major that within the past like World War Two so header wanted to use the surplus of parachutes leftover from the war to drop the beavers into the Wilderness. Was he a madman over genius? He's batch it. He's Guano considering this worked. I'll say he's a genius. Stop pair shooting innocent animals. He started testing out crates to use for the beavers that could open without the help of man. One idea involved. Crates held together with rope that the beavers could chew through but there was the possibility that they would choose through them while in the air. That would've not ended. Well at least he's thinking about their livelihood. Oh yes I actually kinda liked this guy. And he was able to create a container that would open upon impact and he tested it with weights numerous times to ensure it worked before testing it out with an animal Once they were confident it would work. They recruited Geronimo to help them out. Geronimo is a male beaver in recruit him. They took him from his home and put them in. Vox hopefully with a bow tie. I did not see a bow tie in the video. And yes there will be a link to the video on the blog. Geronimo made many jumps on a landing field to ensure this would work. Poor Peter Actually so. This is another quote from transplanting beavers. Quote poor fellow. He finally became resigned as soon as we approached him would crawl back into his box. Ready to go aloft again. So he and three lady. Beavers were the first to be relocated. Are you okay? Ashley? Can't make a Ho House. You can train them. So so he three lady. Beavers were the first to be relocated in all seventy six. Beavers were relocated and only one lost. Its life during this. He's nuts yeah. He seemed like a nice guy that elmo header now for the one proves I shouldn't run the world because I probably would have done something similar. Oh Jesus in the early nineteen fifties Borneo in. Indonesia was being overwhelmed by an outbreak of malaria. Luckily the World Health Organization had a plan they sprayed. Ddt An insecticide that is now banned in many countries all over the infected area to kill the mosquitoes and it worked. The mosquitoes died. In cases of malaria began to decline. Unfortunately the quality of people's houses started to decline as well as roofs began to collapse turns out the DDT used to kill. Mosquitoes also killed parasitic wasp that controlled the population of that eating caterpillars insects killed by DDT. Where EATEN BIKE ECHOES? Geckos were eaten by cats. Cats began to die off and rats began to rule the area. Rats also bring plague and typhus so got rid of the. I've ever heard someone say those words so to play fish couple kids story time well to correct this little the. Uk's World Air Force dropped anywhere from twenty three to fourteen thousand cats depending on the source. Twenty three to fourteen thousand cats who were dying because of the geckos. They wanted to use the cats to control the RATS. Yes so like a bad kid story. Time thing right. The cats the rats the three to fourteen thousand donning source so as you can probably tell from. The wide range mentioned a council. This story varied. I did see a link to an ad requesting thirty cats to control a rat problem but I do agree to terms before viewing it and I didn't so let's take this one grain of salt. Are you the reason we had to reset our passwords recently? No popped up and it was like a you can view this article if you agree to our terms and conditions that I was close out of everything shut down restart what am I done. I've gone too far. Okay so the earliest story I discussed today was in World War Two parachutes and some form or another date back to the renaissance period and parachutes. We know them today. Were invented roughly seventeen eighty three so I guarantee animals have been falling from the sky long before World War. Two speaking of animals falling from the sky. Are we talking about frogs now? Who who you know about this. Oh No it's fine. It's fine I've got you. Don't worry speaking of animals falling from the sky. Did you guys know? It's not unheard of for it to to Really Rain. Animals just like any. I know where this is going and I'm not happy. I tried to keep the frog. Mentions very minimum. Don't worry okay may have lied about that. Reports of animal rain stretch back centuries and it kind of makes sense when you think about it so this next section. I'm going to tell you about all have a start quote unquote said that you know 'cause it's a long section but I pulled it straight from a national geographic article mentioned in the blog because I couldn't summit up any better SIP waterspouts form as violent storm. Clouds swirl above large bodies of water these clouds form a tornado like whirlwind called the vortex that dips into the ocean. Laker pawn waterspouts can spin up to a hundred miles per hour or one hundred and sixty kilometers per hour and may pull up small objects in their funnel. Water Pebble Small Aquatic Animals. Strong winds called up dress may also pull animals into their swirling VORTICES UPDRAFTS can sweep up much larger animals than waterspouts like travelling birds and bats as well as frogs snakes and insects as waterspouts. Updrafts MOVE OVER LAND. They lose their swirling energy. The storm clouds that form. The waterspouts are forced to dump their heavy loads. The heaviest objects are dumped. First and the largest objects usually simple raindrops are dump last. This explains why reports of animal rain usually describe only one type of animal raining down. The cloud will dump all objects of a similar weight at the same time like fish. I followed by insects followed by rain and quote. Make sense right yes. Yes don't look centuries ago I'm going to pronounce this name really wrong and I apologized. Hair cleese limps a Greek philosopher who lived in the second century. Bc wrote quote in. Peyot NIA and Dardania it. Has they say before now. Rain frogs and so great has been the number of these frogs that the houses and the roads have been full of them So something that I thought was interesting. A lot of places where I was reading about this people mentioned the ten plagues mentioned in the Bible. Ha and one of them is Ashley Nightmare. Just one thing in the Bible's might give the the Bible verse again. Not An expert in this area at all but I I think it's exodus chapter eight verse one. Well the books correct. Then the Lord said to Moses go to Pharaoh and say to him this is what the Lord says. Let my people go said that they may worship me. If you refuse to let them go I will play your whole country frogs. The Nile will team with frogs. So there were quite a few places discussing whether or not raining. Frogs and if animal rain was assigned a plague an I thought that was really cool. But I didn't have time to go into those deep dives sale. Just putting that out there for you. To ponder on said that's ancient mentions of animal rain. There is a city in Honduras that has annual fish rain usually between May and June and that is like currently going on and I need to mention that so when I saw it was like Oh this is cool and it mentioned like some name and I was like oh I miss read it and assume that was the name of a festival held in celebration of this anyway. Wave Ish rain and I got so excited to be able to cover another festival but no that's just how they fish rain in Honduras but there is an annual. There is animal rain still currently going on. So that's cool is it. Are you sure about that? It's something it's interesting it is it really is so all the water spout and updraft. Theory is most common. It's important to note that many meteorologists don't subscribe to this belief Dave too far into why they don't believe this because I started researching last night and had too many rabbit holes to go down so sorry but I did read somewhere. That one reason for this is how far inland animals fall or that. The animals that fall aren't native to that sometimes they think it's something else going on. What else could explain it? Goose with the full of fish. Oh my gosh. That would be phenomenal. Actually they said the fish that fall there in Honduras aren't native to that area and I think it was National Geographic. Who was there one year while this was happening and they were trying to figure out what's going on said that the fish were all blind so they thought something about like the annual rainfall or how wet the ground was was like bringing the fish up from the ground or like up from deeper parts of the water that they normally don't go that's why they were blind because they don't need the there's no light down there for them to see and I don't know I actually raining. They were coming up from the ground. Like crawfish yeah so they say it's like raining fish but they all just like wake up and the streets are lined with fish and gross. My thoughts exactly. So lastly. I wanted to explore where the expression raining cats and dogs came from because I was like animals are falling from the sky on a pretty regular occurrence. Maybe some cats and dogs did too and that's for the expression came from. I was wrong. That's good turns out. There are a few theories but nothing concrete so the next part pulled straight from the history extra article linked in the blog. Because I finished my notes on my lunch break today so the rest of what I'm about to say comes straight from the article listed on the block so the phrase first appeared in the Welsh collection of poems from Welsh poet Henry Von in Sixteen Fifty. One where he referred to roof sturdy enough to survive quote dogs and cats raining and shower in quote the next year. English playwright. Richard Brom wrote the city wit that included quote. It shall rain dogs and polecat. S- in quote polecat. Cats was a common name for them that time. There are also two theories suggesting that the renowned Irish satiric. Tear your right satire. What does he called? Satirical tire satirist centrist ensure the renowned Irish Guy Jonathan Swift the phrase popular Irish author of satire. Yes and seventeen thirty eight. In his complete collection of Genteel and ingenious conversation. A character is afraid it might quote rain cats and dogs in quote fairly likely that swift's satire regardless of whether he invented the term was responsible for its following popularity in seventeen ten swift. Wrote the poem city shower which included an image of dead animals left in the city streets after heavy floods. Not that this really answers. Why cats and dogs of all animals but there are four possible. Origins of y domestic pets became synonymous with torrential downpour. And they are theory. One cats and dogs used to cuddle into thatched roofs during storms. Only to be washed out during heavy rain. Considering how a well-maintained that truth is actually fairly waterproof. The animals would have to be cowering on the outside so this wouldn't have been a great hiding place in a storm. This theory makes for a nice story. But it's probably Apocryphal. I googled that earlier. Can't remember what it means. A story or statement of doubtful. Authenticity although widely circulated is being true theory number two the first two theories. I'm not a big fan of but whatever so theory number two in norse mythology odin the father God responsible for storms was often depicted with dogs and wolves representing wind according to folklore with road their brooms during storms accompanied by their black cats. So that image took on the connotation of heavy rains for Sailors Odin in witches could be responsible for the expression theory three which is the one I like. I like three and four. Okay theory three. We may have the words entirely wrong instead. We should be saying CATA DOXA. This Greek expression means contrary to experience or belief which in actual storm featuring falling cats and dogs certainly would be seems like a little bit of a stretch there but okay fine and then the final theory. Finally we could be using a derived form of the now obsolete word Kadupe in old English did means a cataract or waterfall version of this words exist in many ancient languages like h Inc Greek and refer to a cataract of the River Nile. So when they say it's raining cats and dogs. We might be suggesting that it's raining waterfalls. That seems more on the nose gear. So that is where that ends. And those are my notes. Boom flying aminals bombs and breakable greats. Yeah so how'd you always wondered? How many animals skydive no well 'cause that's not animal. Skydiving that's animals being thrusted out of planes. I mean yes but that's sad so I prefer my view. It is sad. It just didn't entire episode on IT Ma'am will. I'm sorry for that earlier when we got a subject recommendation. And I got so excited because I had payback for you Is it going to be beautiful? Just keep that in mind. Sweet CAN'T WAIT. Covered a lot of animal cruelty which is weird because my too hard noser animal cruelty and child cruelty obviously not talking about dogs jumping off bridges. Taqwa goats being thrust on pedal stools and can't leave and they're tortured. That bomb spat bombs and then the kids in the fire on Christmas Eve. Who Cares about that? We don't know that that's actually what happened. It's not but it Kinda might be now. They didn't parish in that fire. That's why I was told them remember. No Dad did that anyway so that was interesting. Thank you say enjoyed hearing about the poor defenseless little critters being thrown out of airplanes. But no one of our listeners will looking at you reckon no. She didn't get to name them before he trusted in them out of aircrafts Sarah. Good job man thank you. I'm proud of you for having together. Rebecca's awfully quiet. No thoughts thoughts okay. We'll damn alrighty then well on that note remember friends. Everyone has something that they find odd. Let us tell you why it's not or is this time it says this time. It is odd odd. The word use cruel if you have any questionable topics you like us to discuss. You can share them with us on any of our. Social media's links can be found on our website ladies estranged dot com or you can email them to us at the lady strange at G MAIL DOT COM. I stand by the fact that the beaver one wasn't cruel but it was the best out of the ones who cover it. Okay perfect what do I say? All thank. Were doing great now. That's not stop. Stay in your lane. Ma'am you for kids. Ma'am to subscribe rate and review. And if you think we're doing a great job and want to support the show you can find us at Patriotair dot com slash. The ladies of strained give it strange. The love lease may go hug of fluffy creature and don't throw them out of moving transportation. Always good solid vice by guys.

Bat Rebecca Dr Adams US Beavers Parachuting tiffany Moose Celine Dion Oregon Ashley Nightmare facebook National Park Minnesota Michigan Meese Kroger Canada Geronimo
John Meese on NOT using Social Media For Business or Personal Use

Beyond the To Do List

49:04 min | 1 year ago

John Meese on NOT using Social Media For Business or Personal Use

"Yeah hello welcome back to another episode of beyond the two dealers the job and building my own platform this show so enjoy this conversation with John meese this week is where he is literally not using social media to build his own personal platform we'll talk about the story behind the why of that and the intent you are the platform building Michael's book platform obviously then spawned into platform university that's been around for only gosh finality that he and his wife have taken towards their home and work life balance and success that they've seen from that decision making process in this conversation we're going to talk about the usage of social media or lack thereof for building brand and that right there is the hook for most of you revisiting Nashville to see friends which I now count you as part of but you and you what is your proper title Dean of Platform University is that right three of conversation until a couple of things kind of popped up so let's let's set the stage I and kind of give context I so I've known you for Distinction of Michael Hyatt and company you are all about winning at work and six win at work in succeed at life yes platform university an online community started by Michael Hyatt back in two thousand thirteen he's been doing that position now for about two years little over little under somewhere in that realm and my privilege to welcome to the show John meese my friend I don't know why I never thought to have you on but welcome well thank you Eric I'm so glad to be here so that just sounds like why would I ever about that which I shouldn't have anyway but but a little platform university is obviously a part of but different different the productivity benefits that it repays him I had a great time talking with John About all these topics because they are always top of mind for me working from home using social media for my day at least three more than that but you know no new more frequently and senior more frequently for at least the last three years plus yes constant community and the membership site platform university which originally I was a student off and then I kind of I build my own blog and my own podcast and my own courses and I kind of who was just a good plot form get noticed noisy world became a number one New York Times bestseller and it was really during the rise of new things like the facebook dot com and you know you remember that Yes yeah I'm the dean of University on Michael Seem and we've actually I was gonna say I think twitter friends counts Eric we've been twitter as for like probably closer to it the name and it was during the rise of all these social media things and that book spawned this whole movement of people saying how do I go to plot from online and then let's greeting the back we aren't that anymore and we'll deal it we'll talk about that later that's true and especially the fact that I didn't notice we weren't so that was I felt bad you personally do not have any social media which struck me as no he did because I remember from the back of the room suddenly thought Oh I have jealousy of that idea for a conversation in in Yeah I saw you sitting on stage with Jeff Goings about a month ago and you're representing platform universe and he said yeah so we want you to come from a risky we watch what you've been doing apparently Michael was one of my podcast subscribers did not know that and they asked me to come onto the team and actually run city and he was talking to you about social media and at that point in time I don't know that we got into or he got into with you the fact that you don't company was going without abandoning this whole audience it was all saying how do I build an online business how rebelled platform but that was kind of Bercy has its own thing and actually free Michael Up to be able to focus more on things like free to focus investor ever and focus leader and business accelerator and this whole new direction student which is what I've been most of my life I suppose a good student and along the way Michael asked me out for lunch one day and I was like sure this is great let's do this we really like freeing and you must be the super focused and all this other pro possibly false ideas in my head but I wanNA talk about the what was the decision making process for you and your wife for that matter kind of in a way to decide you weren't going to be on social media anymore yeah well when it comes to your the Dean of Platform University building the platform on blogs podcasts whatever but also using social media to help with that as the decade now or so right well you're here that no eight years more like it yeah so so is the urge doesn't twelve when Michael came out with it because that's how you grow but really social media is actually one of the least effective marketing strategies today it's just the most visible in other words when you're the at that idea first off one I wanNA get into why you've decided to go that route for you yourself personally and of course some of the questions that spring up going on the whenever you saw on the surface with social media presence and that really led me to discover what I shared on stage a tribe conference was that the reason why that's basically what Jeff's question was but then going from there so first off let's get into this this story you and I talked about at the back of the room later the next day subscribers who are all students who are actually building platform at this point over the last six years you served more than twenty five thousand students that's a lot of case studies I mean some more successful than Hamis on the show and this doesn't make any sense no I totally just I it didn't occur to me to tie in the things that we're going to talk about into a somebody else linked to them somewhere else online you don't see anyone having a video call or a phone call about their business and you don't think people meeting in person you don't ironically it actually stems from role with plot from university I mean we have a massive audience and there's no other way to put it we we have several thousand actually like pain it was kind of an outlier to the rest of the business and so I've been running that as its own thing for a little over two years now a sort of business within the business yeah so you were representing this is this is what sparked this I sure but whenever I got to know kind of our most successful students and look at their success stories of like what actually worked then there was always a lot more grabber was fifteen times more likely to make a purchase than when social media follower in other words a hundred subscribers is way more valuable than a thousand Kinda wish I didn't have social at all which is strange to me but it sparked that kind of almost desire of man what's that like Oh man that must little kids and so when I when I go through that whole list and I'm like you don't really need social media for any of this and so I started by actually insert thing here and so I said I'm just gonNA reset the advice from cow in a in the digital I'm sorry digital minimalism where so many people spend so much time on social media from a marketing perspective not from like personal like family and friends use but from a marketing perspective you will say will you need it he the bulk of most people's business all you can see are the likes and shares on social media and so a lot of people make the mistake of assuming well okay they're really successful and and do this whole thing but I didn't and three months went by where I didn't Miss Social Media and then I deleted all of my accounts so now if you search me John Mese you'll find my website I don't while and then I felt guilty but really it's your fault how's that for an apology no I'm kidding but but there's more to this than that looking at your competitors or other people who are being successful in line which you don't see is how many people land in their website from a Google search which you don't see people who landed their website because three like there wasn't as deep a tug in a personal life kind of a re revelation for me until you told me that I was like Oh my God when I look at the list of things I want to spend more time on like I wanted to write more I want to spend more quality time with family and friends I wanna I wanNA sleep more like I want that to you because I had I think for you it's not just you know the show's all about productivity it's not just about productivity though and the decision for you wasn't just about productivity either tell me the story five years ago but several years ago so my oldest son is four now but before he was born when my wife pregnant it was first so we're a little nervous disorders weren't sure aged dot com but you're not gonNA find facebook profile twitter profile Arlington Profile or any of the other things because I just walked away from it and that'd be a followers and when I said that I was just like just blew my mind cause I was like well social media is a lot of work but like it's not actually driving results and so that kind of lead me on this breath and then when cal Newport came out with digital minimalism that really challenged my son's even further and I thought well even from a personal perspective why do I like why don't you social media like and we got to the point where like okay ready to tell everyone so we did what you do right. We had a massive like really exciting poppy like announcement campaign Z. that they're engaged on social media so must do social media that must be what I gotTa do to be successful but actually the research shows that an email this actually comes out of it's been wonderful so here's where I have to insert my apology that I did not notice that you had disappeared from twitter which was where we were connected and I you know suddenly it was like wait I haven't seen twenty five years on a regular basis and so that Sunday he goes up to a couple of his friends like one by one he said hey guess what I just found out I reset passwords on all my social media accounts to like random things that I didn't know so sure I could have gone back in then like reset my password send that to an email address getting right it's you you have to use social media to keep up with people to update them on your life and so that's the other side of the coin I guess it was actually closer the never thought about that aspect of social media we had no happened until that so the first thing I mean I really rational have shared so far really comes on facebook I don't remember exactly what we did but he was clever and it was cute and we announced the baby was coming up and then told my parents okay you can tell your friends now like not telling people for a while and my family super excited I'm also the oldest in my family and I was the first to get married and so like this is my family's like first grandkid so super excited the fact that on the Deana platform diversity so people who do digital marketing are like wait a second what are you doing that he's not marking rationale but does the other side of social media that even if you don't use social media for oldest son is about to have a baby and he was like yeah yeah I saw that that's pretty cool but like the wind was gone from my dad's excitement like the like it really speaks to the way that we've that social media has become a status quo just kind of suction that one you use it for life and I'm going to be a grandfather and he's like you know like he is so excited right he is so thrilled he's just like I'm going to be a grandma this huge sponsors yeah like that about how announcing that you were having Chhaya going and and your dad like because until you told me that story steady that can Birkin and Gumbo did together they have access to mass of data on digital product sales and emails and they did a study together and found out that one email on baby with the bathwater. I think you've got real good reasons again obviously I'm I'm somewhat jealous of your ability to do this but that said then I wonder though he told me later not from like a making me feel guilty perspective but just sharing his experience and I realized that that was on me that I stole that opportunity from him to really celebrate something that I'm just saying it's an experiment and this I got from my height where he said whenever you think you might face some push-back just start were saying well let's do an experiment where for the next thirty days use it for business and what you're saying to me is we should really question both those uses and in your case you've gone I don't think he probably get some questions from platform university students or people that are around it no this about you the question of the why and in and else good so my dad who at this point is sixty he's been going to the same church for twenty five years like those errors made like that's the friends that he talks to you for really special to him and we ran into the same thing with other friends once he kind of made me aware of it where all of a sudden it was like everybody in the world new pregnant so it wasn't like a special thing even we had a baby auto and he's like okay but like you know he's been on social media so he doesn't really get it so then he walks to another friend and he's like hey did you hear I'm going to be a grandfather that was I supposed to know that and I'm like no we didn't posted anywhere so I'm just telling you like I mean it's and it's actually throwing people off because I'm not saying you need to ignore social media completely one hundred percent I'm saying you should be very strategic about where you spend your limited time and resources on growing your business now if part of your strategy is social media great but then what's the strategy which social media platform you're gonNA focus your energy on what's the purpose of like that photo about this or can I Kennedy excited as if this is the first time I've heard it it's just it's just like a cultural thing that is happening before our eyes unintentionally I use like knowing everything all the time when you tell something really someone someone really something special we want to share the experience with them they're not sure they're like should I feel guilty like it so that's the first time we got rid of facebook we kept other things like twitter instagram that's when my wife and I got facebook because after that happened we were like I don't feel good about that taste of what you offer but to bring them back to your home base to your website into your email is to actually really take relationship further and we don't recommend that you have social media posts and I mean they were the most crazy businesses to be on social media I mean one of them was a payment or is it a a the media is an option and for some people were really well but I mean my wife for a while she was trying to make a little extra money and we had a friend who ran a digital marketing and what you would guide them to do towards social media use for their business moving forward of course this question comes up a lot I mean I know because of the Dean of Platform University that Kinda like whatever sure students to have one primary social embassy and Julie treat it like an embassy or an outpost where you're saying like this is a way to go meet new people and to kind of get people veiled payment services attorney in other words like if you send an invoice to someone and they didn't pay and you have to take that to court this guy was I love doing and here's why and here's what needs for you and I stand by this just echo this year what I said before that I'm not saying that you from a marketing ah that's just funny right now is my wife is pregnant currently right she's five weeks whitmer Judeh and I'll tell into a friend like when are you eric like run into friends due whether or not it's a good idea people are going to say oh that's probably what I should be doing and so it was kind of a little bit of pressure around that but it's a good thing because it actually forced me to get the social media just cuss and I'm just like basically saying forget the status quo forget the status quo you set your own status like what do you want to do and businesses should not be on social media like there that's not how they're getting customers they were just doing it just because they felt like they had to yeah oh gosh one of the other really clearing my rationale before I made this decision and then to actually go onto one of her office hours we live video hyun as students office hours and just explain check my facebook feed and NASA example of downhill work. It's really easy to do you feel a sense of accomplishment 'cause you're like social media's work I read that somewhere that helps my business and vex here though that that plays into this that we're not really talking about but fits perfectly in to bringing productivity into the mix of this question this this problem are you getting people on your mls Oregon will come to your coffee shop like what is the actual purpose of don't do social media just because of social media like actually have a reason so we especially when you're doing this on the side but you don't we don't want you to have like two three year five social media accounts you want you to have like one social media embassy mm-hmm this math problem that that we're trying to solve here is uphill work and downhill work as it enters into social media as owned and built out and sometimes there's new things get added in the book that are like we for whatever reason we haven't talked about internally it's when the book came out is like yeah but I need to be on social media right Jeeze it's a she was trying to come up with clever ways so talk about that like clients not paying their bill like it was like no I need to map out my three year strategy for my business or I need to create online course or I need to dig into some customer research to find out so it's really easy as you get into uphill tasks to kind of look well okay so I started going uphill but like why don't you just go check social media ferment work yes so this is a concept that actually came out of Michael Hyatt's book free to focus it's actually it's funny when we when we make we meaning like Michael Hyatt Team I mean two that's fate unaccounted facebook twitter instagram or elsewhere where you're really focusing on doing it really well and you're getting results but you need to know what are you after is I mean there are tasks were that are really important that take a lot of energy where you essentially it's like it's literally like you're riding a bike uphill where you're going in Oh you know you you feel like a sense of accomplishment but you're actually chasing the easy tasks and really avoiding really difficult work and so what I've tried to do content intentionally in designing environment is remove as many opportunities for downhill tasks as possible and that actually means that I'm stuck jurors who I guess I'm counting myself as part of tricky for you know right is like wait hold up part of that that important it's GonNa take longer it's GonNa take more effort it's you leaning into your strengths whereas anybody can easily go downhill work conferences or wherever you know be like go on I'm like Oh it's great actually we're about to have Arthur child and their response is telling responses Oh wow like did working downhill work and social media and the free to focus planner where you've got your big three for the day those are typically more often than not your big three R isn't you and another one was there was a urology expert and I've got some giggles coming up with some of those names that she posted for for that doctor but like those michaels books but like when they're come the books are coming together there's like that's really win the concepts that we talk about and teaching regular basis really become refined I've seen some my wife like offered to do a little work for her on the side and so it was great my wife was like Oh this is great I get to like design social media posts for these businesses that are paying an agency for going to be in minutes isn't necessarily so but more often than not than not they will be a part of or most likely related to uphill work working in air quotes of social media and that's not again I'm not downplaying that there are skilled crafted social media manager some of their you know maybe not their whole big three but some of their big three is that as well and so they own that and that's good for them the trends of WHO's buying what or I need to write my own book I mean what are like those are uphill tasks that are hugely difficult and hugely important me not matter I mean everything under matters to some extent but are they the task of greatest importance I mean that's where the big question in a moment John and I are GonNa talk more about but again for the average person out there it's not necessarily it's going to be under other tasks and it's going to be easy to dip down in there and get all those done even it list but I I start using the planner at the end of the day I would look over and realize I checked off like twelve other tasks but only one of my big three exquisitely I personally use blankets on the treadmill on the commute to the treadmill and back again it's a great way to review books you've already read and brush up doc having to do uphill were sort of designing it so like my only job is to do the work that matters I mean I mean I went so far as we got rid of Internet at home we're going to talk about that and read and learn more you don't feel like you can read or work on personal development but that's where blend guest comes in and solve that problem for me in a very unique way because so I can read them or listen to them in the buffer time in that margin time blink just makes it easy for busy people like you like me to get those main points of those basically I mean what you just described happened to me many times where when I first started using the full focus planner then I would like right in there okay here's big free possible first up is an APP I love it's bleakest talk about one of the things that it's just hard to find time to do these days unless you're intentional about taking time to sit down steps he's taken for work life balance in his life as he continues to be intentional about the use of his time and his focus before we get to that we're going to say thank you to our sponsors for making this episode trust me they did not tell you this but we will definitely be talking about that it's the same rationale yeah well then obviously in relation to uphill I I'm your host Eric Fisher and this is the show where I talked to the people behind the productivity this week I'm excited to share with you a conversation I had with my friend John Mese he is the dean of is it works on my phone on my tablet in my web browser blinking takes the best key takeaways from thousands of nonfiction books and then condenses them down into fifteen minutes on bleakest but have to stop there with links you get unlimited access to read or listen to their massive library right now for a limited time bleakest has a special offer for you I. N. K. I S. T. blinking dot com slash beyond to start your free seven-day trial you've gotta go over to blinking dot com slash beyond the one constant that stuck out that internally and the team were like on the Michael Hi team rolling wait a second we don't talk enough about this was this idea of upheld versus downhill work and as soon as I explain it you know exactly what on the learning there or to dip deeper or initially in to those books again that you've just never gotten around to in fact we're talking about the full focus planner and free to focus on this episodes also brought to you by organic I tell you what I know him Jinxing it but I have not gotten sick around this time of the year as of yet and usually suppose that come out of that book some of Michael Hyatt's books are on blinking platform for example which is what platform university was born out of free to focus and best year ever are all over to blinkprotect dot com slash beyond try it for free for seven days and then save twenty five percent off your new subscription that's bleakest spelled b. l. and I was like Dang it just it just made it real it made it real the fact that I had been I'd like the time was gone I mean the big three were not done the other tasks were but that those kind of because there was a lot of those were down there little things where I was like you know I'll just I'll just check my email you know I'm just gonNA email luria just say hey just like this list of things that they made but not get the top three and at the end of the day the like I didn't I didn't get what I get I didn't get like we'll end so nfl I couldn't speak that Eric asks it makes you every day say like what are the most important task three to do today so right those in and says okay what are your other tasks that's actually it's a smaller field or smaller boxes so are in default it almost sometimes feels like winter even and my nutrition is on my mind because that's what fuels my energy my energy fuels my productivity and that's why I'm glad that I've got have at least once by now I'm not going to chalk that up to luck I'm going to chalk that up to aura organic this is that time of year when there's less light outside summers winding down in fact edu slash beyond to do list and enter beyond for fifteen percent off one course that's C. E. DOT UCI dot edu slash be immersive online classroom as you collaborate with your peers winter registration begins October twenty fifth so visit c. e. Dot Uci dot organic and use the code checkout get fifteen percent off then you get to check it off your list this episodes also brought to you by the University of California Irvine's division of contain donned to do list and enter beyond to get fifteen percent off one course this offer is only valid until December thirty first twenty nineteen at eleven fifty nine pm a single course or enroll in an entire certificate program you have full control over your academic plan and their courses offer convenience and flexibility in a re all the activity that I've been doing their new plant based Collagen boosting powder and I make sure to take my easy being green daily that's made for more than twenty that in your home I am so curious as to why and then how you've made this work I wrote about this extensively on my blog ability for you to stay on top of your game and your current role while you're preparing to level up they have open enrollment which means there's no applications to complete you just log in and sign up you can pay for superfoods so that even on the busiest days I don't have to sacrifice my nutrition and fuelling myself properly aura is offering fifteen percent off your first order just head over to order doing education UCI's continuing education can help you gain an edge in your career and help you advance your career in as little as six months they do that by providing the flat dot organic there's no dot com in there it's just O. R. A. Dot Organic Use the code beyond at checkout made a mark this on your to do list right now to go visit the annual goals we'll also talk about like what's the life we wanna live and what's keeping us from achieving it and this was our quarterly retreat back in the probably marked tell me walk me through the steps of you now literally and you and your wife decided this together so Kudos to you that's great that you would not have internet you know you're you're not working from home well he's always you don't have to well you don't have to have Internet at home to get work done we intentionally like we get a sitter for the kids over the weekend and we do things like revisit our we do very Michael Haydn company things like revisit our life plan and like look at a quarterly goals in early this year in two thousand nineteen where we were talking about all the things we weren't doing whatever they wanted to deals can't really wish I was writing more and honestly I love reading books I was reading more I don't know is this idea of like what else could cut I mean where else my wasting time with downhill work because again like when you like my wife and I once a quarter we do like an offsite retreat where we I I want to definitely get into this this internet thing because again this kind of blew my mind and I'm like okay well yeah I guess I guess Oh like a day or so ago yes so shameless plug jammies dot com slash Internet if you WANNA learn more but but the so as we talked to that we realized that we wasted a lot of time just being unintentional with our media use and so we decided to try cutting Internet out and we get not enough you can still there's a lot of nuance here like I'm not even going to go into this just yet but again this is where story time comes in with John Mason they were like you know we can always turn it back on but let's just not use Internet for thirty days and during that time we found out this near us there's this place that gives out free we just became more intentional with our time and we realized that we discovered time for Reading For reconnection for for writing and so that's the reason why I like really relaunched my own go to abandon we'll go back to the library tomorrow instead of like you know that little loop that happens where it says next show starting in thirty seconds or five seconds yes one your work scenario than you're not you're not working in your home you're obviously not talking to me right now in your home because this call requires Internet entertainment called the library and we went there and found out they had an entire dvd collection we were like what is amazing and we asked him where like okay it was like because like new stuff like what kind of got like well one of the most popular things that you can borrow here is game of thrones and so we literally watched I mean like we still watch me you by not honestly but of course the little kids but that's kind of a cop out answer because like little like little kids but it's yeah but is that really where all my time was going all this talk on the phone thing I yes I do have a smartphone and I can quote tethering get away with it the extra barrier does make it more difficult to do so but got like we just like we went to the Turner like okay well let's get some DVD's but here's the thing about bingeing with DVD's you get to the end of a disk and you're like man now so good all right well of it's just that we'd like we realize where my time was actually going was two things that I didn't care about but they were leading up my time so I gotta ask him and we had time together and then when we as soon as we had our first son so flew over four years ago I realized that just all the bears were blurred it's like there's a whole systems and I realized that I didn't want to do that and so I I got an office outside of the house just actually just down the road great when she was a teacher because it was basically like we had our little morning routine and then she went off to work and then I went into my office in the home and I worked there all day and the finished my house where I could go work and then just working from home so I haven't worked from home even though technically I could for the last close to five years now I there's a period of time way from that but this is actually decision I made years ago because I was working from home fulltime running my own business when my wife and I got married logged with Gusto this year was because I recovered that time it's not because I suddenly found an extra hour day or that I didn't have to kids in fact no we're having a third that I could go down there and just chat with friends and kind of work around people or I can come up here to this small room that's honestly probably cheaper than think where I've got an Easterner upbraid this is kind of a downgrade and on yeah so anyway I just Kinda I liked having my space I've I've learned to make it work but I am very tempted to I have a smartphone so I'm going I'm going further going with this really just saying like what matters what can I remove that doesn't matter and a lot of that right now is like you know endless ed where I was there but it was not there where I realized like I was physically present but asking my wife to pretend like I wasn't there and like Noparat has been what are in that exact same boat I have done co working space before it moved and then moved to a place where it I was like yeah this is shaming for that and so that's and that is I thank you for that and I and I'm glad to hear that from you and you know there's a number of our listeners that he likes changes diaper and I'm like well no unlike blunting courses could make millions of course this aspiration like millions hands and I talked to some other friends that work from home and I realized that that's a real I mean some people had hacks like they have like a sign on their door that's like green if you can come bother dad yet what I assume that also then goes into what other people would be like well okay but you don't have home Internet but you have a smartphone so you could like together and stuff and get away with it right okay more haven't had an office and I just worked at coffee shops and co working spaces but like right now I'm in an office in down on the square above my favorite coffee shop you'll down or like in fact some of my friends and I have discussed like what we all just like we have a friend who rent houses he buys a mixed them up and rents them what if we chipped in rent on one place and then we so cord attached to fast Internet so that I can do things like job podcast every with my friend Eric so might house is literally as the fitbit flies having a commute that you are changing your your disposition you are now entering work or leaving work you are composite it's twelve hundred steps from here so wow like yeah that's good that's cool I like that because for a while there I do work from home I you know I it is easier for me mental is being in the best way to use that word possible most people are like oh it's all compartmentalized no compartments are good they keep things in there right place yes you're now you're pulling this out of me Eric like I'm not even ready to do this for sure but my life phones on the way I mean yes so my life phones on the way I'm about to wife was no longer working outside of the home and so you know she's dealing with a first time mom with a newborn baby and I'm trying to like grow a business and she's like opening door being like hey baby real quick of and you're doing this because even even again even if it's only twelve hundred steps or twelve hundred right even the twelve hundred steps is enough steps that you are we're one shocked at first but then to they're like oh that sounds interesting okay tell me how you do this I can't speak to the fact that everybody says interested in knowing completing some of the circle here that we're talking about is he did say she also said goodbye snapchat but I'm keeping instagram currently uninstalled on my phone but she's GonNa keep it I'm curious though like now that we've got the full picture here of the context of stopping using social media personally professionally as well as creating these these boundaries and focus points and compartments of home and work for a healthier life you probably have conversations with people about this all the time picked bedroom and made it our own like office says what Donald Miller does with his team I don't know if you knew that but Donald Miller bought the house next to his house and he turned it into his company had now and she literally just texted me and said just leave them facebook and twitter account don't use them I don't need them see her here I literally literally rolling on for me now it's little social media but I still have that impulse to scroll the Internet and the headlines and you know it's just just like everybody else so I want to get even further so yeah yeah that that's irony right there I mean I think she saw that I had interview with Eric and that's where my audience is as well and so I wanna ask like when they ask these how questions obviously as you've learned from Michael and done yourself it's the experiment that us not with I did see what fits what feels good what you can do without yes well the first thing I would say is I mean how how to do this or the why they're more interested in the Y. Yeah but some are going to get to the point of wanting to know the how like I am totally and so on away when I'm away that means that I'm I'm fully not present but I mean they also know like they can text or call my wife actually just texted me she doesn't know the purpose of the interview on back I start I suppose you could say I start with the end in mind but I really focused first on like what do you want to achieve and then what's stopping you from achieving that Oh come focused approach in other words focus I and like what's the outcome you want like what do you want out of life what do you want to accomplish and I start there so I'm very kind of like how to add another unless exactly almost in a way to dismantle okay why not why how do I make that happen like our leadership team goes through our own coaching program clients which is a really cool experience but there Michael Shared Hack that whenever you're facing a limiting belief I don't think that the things I do are necessarily like cart blunk solutions for everybody but I do think the approach I take would be good for everybody and that's to have an out unless takes you to the next thing where it's now I see what that is that would free that up but obviously like you said it's now a matter of okay well yeah I want my kids to know I want kids to know that when I'm with them I'm fully present I can get down to their level will look them in the eyes and not be worrying about getting back to that email now and that's removed as barriers and so for me when I wrote down like Oh actually here's another hack I learned this from Michael at one of our business accelerator a coaching intensive because action free environment where I could write and actually have the writing like ready to go for me in the mornings before my kids wake up that's what I came to him I'm GonNa make millions of pennies but still like you know I'm in the process of like well I'm going to write this blog was cheated diaper right now but it started creating this ten get really fast and with the whole idea of environment design so there's some crazy studies have been done on this and I don't I couldn't actually offhand

twitter John meese facebook University of California Irvin Michael Chhaya Oregon fifteen percent twenty five years thirty days five years two years one hundred percent twenty five percent fifteen minutes thirty seconds two three year five seconds three months
Chris Spangle

Part of the Problem

1:34:34 hr | 2 months ago

Chris Spangle

"Guys let's take a quick second I wanNA. Thank our sponsor for the show. It's a brand new sponsor and it's a different kind sponsor than we normally have. It is the Jordan Harbinger show, which is a podcast you really should be listening to. I know that every day somebody tells you you just have to listen to some podcasts and and you say show are, and then you never end up listening to it. Don't let that happen here Jordan. Show, which apple named one of the best of two thousand eighteen is aimed at making you better informed a more critical thinker. So you can get a sense of how the world actually works and come to your own conclusions about what's happening even inside your own brain. Each episode is a conversation with a different fascinating guest and when I say, there's something for everyone here. I really mean that in one episode Jordan talks to a hostage negotiator from. The FBI who offers techniques on how to get people to like entrust you which sounds useful and disturbing at the same time. It's kind of good to know these techniques. So you can read them when other people are trying to manipulate you with them. Another episode tells the story of a cinematographer who discovered a lost city in the jungle and made one of the most important archaeological finds of the century, and there's a whole bunch more stuff like. This just really really interesting topics really fascinating guests. I really enjoy the show and I think you will as well search for the Jordan Harbinger show that's H. A. R.. B. As in boy I N. as in Nancy G. E. R. ON APPLE PODCASTS spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts and I think you're really going to enjoy one more time. That's the Jordan Harbinger show. Make sure to check it out. All right. Let's get back into the show. Filled up. On that network. Hey guys today's show is brought to you by Henchi socks. My favorite socks on the planet they have a brand new line of athletic socks, the perfect white sock, new style, but the same amazing feel for those of you guys who are new to the podcast why do I love has she sucked so much? Well, if you're tired of your feet hurting maybe after a long day in dress shoes, shoes that don't fit exactly the right way try a pair Ohashi socks go to hetchy socks, dot com they will solve this problem for you most fashion and dress socks are expensive poorly constructed and provides zero protection not has she socks has she Sucks cushioned in the he'll foot. Anto. They have arch support in the center. So your feet don't slosh around in your shoes they're designed to stay up. So you don't have to pull up at your socks all day long they're made with breathable pima cotton and their anti microbial to kill the stink. So go to socks DOT COM H. E. S. H. I. S. O.. C. K. S. DOT COM. If you enter the Promo Code Problem Thirty, you're going to get thirty percent off your entire order fashion basic ankle, athletic socks. They've got it all HETCHY SOCKS DOT COM, Promo? Code. Problem thirty for thirty percent off. All right let's start the show. We need to roll back the state we spy on all of our own citizens. Our prisons are flooded with non violent drug offenders if you, WANNA, know who America's next enemy is. Look at were funding right now other than one of these problems are Volka government way to. I. Did you work. Hey. What's everybody? Welcome to a brand new episode of part of the problem during happy to have our guest, join us today who is Chris Bongo. He is the host of the. We are Libertarians podcast also a longtime member of the L. P. and you know a libertarian commentator much like myself Thank you so much for joining us. Yeah. Thanks for the invite. Appreciate it. Absolutely. So I had a I had posted in the Maecenas caucus a facebook group. Asking because I've been thinking a lot lately about kind of the divide within the Liberty Movement I've been talking about it on the show quite a bit and I was I was like who would be a good person for me to talk who's been critical of me or the MEESE caucus. Tom. Woods people like that and Mark Clare a mutual friend of ours who I respect very much was like you gotTa have Chris on. This'll be a really great conversation and he likes both of us very much. So credit for this episode to mark Claire from the lines of liberty, which is one of the best libertarian podcasts out there were three of the best libertarian podcasts out there and If you don't enjoy the episode all the blame falls squarely on mark. Shoulders it's not mere Chris's fault. Don't do that to. Put It on Brian McWilliams. Let's blame him. Okay. There's you know what? We're already starting with a with a point of agreement. We will blame Brian completely mark. You're off the hook. If you do like the episode markets the credit if you don't like the episode Brian Receives All of the blame. There we go. So it's interesting. I was a I was listening to a couple. I. Listened to a couple episodes of we are Libertarians. I listened to episode four, Forty Seven, which is titled How to Win The Culture War valuing unity over disintegration and episode four, fifty one which was titled Tweet Gate, the Mesa's caucus and Dave Smith. And I'm going to a link to both of those in the description. So if you guys want to, you can hear those episodes in their entirety and kind of judge judge for yourself what I don't WanNa. Misrepresent anything or take it out of context but I will say one of the things that. Strikes me and I noticed this when I had Spike Cohen show as well is that there will be a people like me and you who really have a tremendous amount of cash over lap in terms of what our views are, what our political beliefs are and what our goals are ultimately, which I think both me and you is you make pretty clear in the show. Our goals are to expand the Liberty Movement to see more liberty in real life. and. Get more people interested in these ideas that we believe in, and yet we we have many different kind of conclusions and cultural views on the current kind of dynamic of Culture in two thousand, twenty America. So it's interesting to me to explore D you. Don't we before we even get into that one you just for if anyone's not familiar with you or your work, why don't you just tell my audience a little bit like who you are, what the show is and what you share I appreciate that and I couldn't agree with you more because I've been. Listening to your show in preparation for this too just so I didn't misrepresent you and. Listen to the Hopkin malice episode and there's a lot that we agree on including the pork fest comments which we can get you later But yeah. I. Started I. started out in Talk Radio in two thousand four and I was a Republican and I was pretty hard core Bush at the time. But I was called Republicans and afford almost got impeached because I didn't really give a shit about urge and I was I was like this immigration plan I don't see why this is a problem is so I started to see little veins of things that I didn't agree with in the. Republican Party and then I've found Ron Paul's campaign the thing like I heard Neil Bortz talk about libertarian and I burst on a campaign with a guy named Andy Horning who is a libertarian and so I guess started to hear the free market ideas and all that started to appeal to me. But the thing that didn't make any sense was the non interventionist non interventionism peace and Ron Paul and those debates, and then studying him turned me into a libertarian. And so I, started talking to the local Libertarian Party and I was like, why are you guys not functional which has been a question of mine for about fifteen years. Out, and they said, we don't have an executive director and so I went and worked there for four years from two twelve in the Libertarian Party and then I went from their work for the advocates for self government is their marketing director in two thousand thirteen, which are the quiz. If you've taken the world's political quiz, they're the ones who started that, and then now I left there and I worked for a nationally syndicated radio show in the comedy world and. Twelve started libertarians and I've been podcasting libertarian space since Oh nine and we've had many different iterations of the show and the current one is really talking about current events and what I try to do is appeal to people who don't know what is going on. They know they're not Republicans they know they're not Democrats but they don't know what they. They're politically homeless and really talking issues because when you're new libertarian. I. How many different percentages of issues can I? Agree with on Libertarians before I am one, and so that's really what strikes people and so that that's mainly what we do and I appreciate this conversation and the ability to come and talk to you because. I actually am not a Libertarian party person and you actually I just rejoined the like the last few days because you matt Welsh others are like this Libertarian Party got I'm like, all right after four or five years of not being a member I'm like I can't escape it might as well embrace it. These are these are my This is my fucked up family. So you're I am well, I'm glad I'm counting you is one of my recruits. Yes, you're. Actually Spike Cohen. He gets the dammit? dammit. All right one one for spike cone no problem. So I actually I didn't realize you had left the Party and certainly didn't realize rejoined I will listen. I think that's great. That sounds like an awesome idea and You know like I'm right there with you in that with in terms of what like the mission of of your show I think that's that's excellent. So why don't we? You know I I will say I like as I mentioned I listen to these two episodes and I took umbrage with a few things that were said no shortage with or To whatever you you get what I'm saying with this what I wanted to do I just have to clips from the show I wanted to play and kind of respond to, and then you can let me know what I'm missing or what? You know where the disagreement is. So the first club I wanted to play again, I'm going to post these full episodes in the description. So everybody can go check them out and check out other episodes of the show as well. That are unrelated to me although you know I'm concerned more with the ones about me for the moment right now. But let's play the clip from episode four, Forty, seven how to win the culture war valuing unity over disintegration. Me On twitter when I defended Joe. Jorgenson or what? Frankly I'm I know that Dave Smith is a great podcast but what Dave Smith was doing to Joe Jorgenson was a form of cancer culture. It wasn't an honest open dialogue with Joe Jorgenson, about her beliefs he was calling her out. He was saying to his following attack that woman for having Marxist beliefs when the women are we supposed to sit here and believe that the woman who was from south? Carolina. This middle aged white woman is a secret Marcus Marxist plant. She was a secret Marxist in college and decided to run on the Libertarian Party ticket nineteen ninety-six and then has just been biding their time these last thirty years waiting for her moment to strike and make the Libertarian Party liberal. Don't insult my intelligence. Joe Jorgenson is not some Marxist plant, and if you said that you look foolish and then you got mad when people said, you look foolish and they were mad because you're contributing to call out culture which was stupid. Instead of saying I'm going to offer some grace to the libertarian. Party, presidential candidate and ask her to clarify what she believed. In a polite manner. Did she did? But it took a lot of reaching to get there. Yes the same canceled culture that they. PLANA belted. They spend all of their time fighting and arguing about identity politics and then Tom Woods re tweet some guy today who says. You know. Something about black people and capitalism black people should be capitalists like you re tweeting out the same identity politics that you say, you don't like areas. where he talks about. That we can end it there. So let me say as you said, if you said that then you look foolish. I guess my issue with that would be that I never said that or anything close to it I I I honestly Chris I don't like I want to say that you're Straw manning me but I don't even think this technically counts as a straw man it's just a flat-out inaccuracy I. Don't know if you heard from somebody that I had said Joe Jorgenson was a secret Marxists or that. I said that I was telling my fans to attack that woman for having Marxist beliefs I've said, I've done I've covered this pretty in depth what my issue with the tweet was and I said at least a dozen times on the show that Joe Jorgenson is not a Marxist and when people accused me of saying what I said. This is ridiculous anyone that is retarded. That's not my issue. And so I. Don't know where you got that I was telling my fans to attack Joe Jorgenson for being a Marxist from. Well I I agree with you. And let me just say I'm sorry I think. As I've gone and done a deeper dive in preparation for this and thought more deeply about this stuff that particular comment was not fair to you and I think that my criticism of. What I would say your faction which I consider you to be a large voice in and I can't imagine you disagree with that. Is it kind of breaks out into three different camps? There is the podcast class you and Tom and Eric and guys that do a lot of good and I have a lot of respect for especially Tom Woods like I. You know I almost never say anything bad about Tom Because. I've learned so much from him, and then there is the institutions there's the meese caucus and there's the macy's institute and what is typically done against that. Them is is the lifting of quotes. I can't say that I've listened to your podcast a lot until the last two or three weeks. And so what you see is sort of the the faker Terry and stuff being polled and the poll quotes You know you see this or that and and. You know how it is when you pull a clip or you pull a an image or tweet or whatever you take it out of context and you present bat as that just is who that person is. Right. So I mean in the lead up to this when you posted that I was coming on, that's what the macy's caucus didn't not entire thread. Libertarian here's this thing from a different writer who's not you know and so it it is easy to get an. An opinion formed of an organization or podcast or based on a couple of different things I other people's interpretation of that information and it's easy to misinterpret that when you don't pay attention to what they're doing. Second is the people who have an extra grind, the Mike Shipley of the world who come after because they don't agree with. Our. Fundamental beliefs, you know in terms of like property rights, they're they're out for. Their they have different game that they're playing So I think it's easy to misinterpret what people say because of that third wrong which is. The the just the. The you work in media I work in media, and when you say something that that I'll give you an example hop episode with you and malice. I had a completely different interpretation of what that was going to be. A before I, listened to it and then after. So what I see from the outside perspective who is not a part of the MEESE caucusing doesn't consider myself a part of that faction. is totally different than when I engaged in that content what I heard was you interpreting hop in a very succinct clear way and malice making a lot of points that I was like Oh. Yeah. I agree with that and he's talking about a lot of things in there that I agreed with for instance But what you don't get that impression when it's extrapolated out right and so when you say something If a broadcaster says something they say X. it gets amplified over and over and over and over and facebook groups on twitter on its that game of telephone that eventually starts to completely distort the message, and there are a lot of people who tend to twist things for their own personal gain, one way or the other. So I I apologize to you because that's what happened. I completely misinterpreted what you were saying about Joe while I did take exception with your reaction to her we can talk about that We'll look I appreciate that I really do and it's like water under the bridge. That's fine like you got it wrong and I appreciate the apology It's just it does it gets frustrating because as you mentioned with a this this small group of people who come at me all the time, it's quite often the case that they will take the most controversial sentence that you said and try to and then flat out lie about it, and like you said, it's like this game of telephone I saw someone sent me a clip the other day where like when it gets to appoint someone called into A. A freedom talk is the show in New Hampshire. Freetalklive. Yes. They call them to free talk and they like I don't know this Dave Smith guy is like he's a complete neo-con I mean he was saying that that Chelsea manning and snowden should be locked up and I'm like Dude I've never even said anything remotely critical of Chelsea Manning or Ed Snowden or fucking the other one was. I guess assange he's got search heroes to me like I never said anything and so it comes back and I'm like it when I see the reflection I'm like I don't know who this person is, but it's definitely not me. So. Anyway I appreciate that. Can I ask you something about that because I tend to think because I got when I basically like I support the idea of the meese caucus just don't think that they're living up to their promise and we will get to that but I tend to think that. When I watch what you do on social media, what Tom Does or Eric? It's easy to get. That Echo Chamber starts to become your panel. You know malice talked about sandwich looking at his six hundred thousand twitter followers and like you get to gather all this information. Is there a part of what you're doing where? You're so constantly bombarded by criticism that you start that starts to become the lens that you're looking through. No I mean I don't think so I mean truthfully speaking I'm not constantly bombarded by criticism I just I go back and forth with people on twitter. So I think people see that stuff. There's a group of about ten people who respond to just about everything I tweet like almost every day they tweet it may and a bow I'd say I mean even if you ask them if they're being honest which I count on them to be maybe about five percent of what they tweet at me, I'll respond back to. And I it is very much. I was talking about this when I was on co caches. Show the other day it's very much within my personality. So like I'm open to the fight like if you WanNa, if you WanNa come at me and mock me and call me names okay fine. Let's do this and I have I. I. Enjoy that in a weird way probably more than I should but I do not I don't throw bombs at any of these other groups. I remember. Is. That's a random example, but to pock as I, you know I think of myself as the Libertarian to. TUPUC. So I remember to Puck said when he he got shot like in the early nineties like five times in New York City and he said. In an interview once that he didn't believe any black person could hurt him because he was their representative at he was like I speak for you. So I'm on your. For your call so you would never shoot May. So he actually went to take the gun from the guy like it was like you're not gonNA shoot me and the guy shot him in the hands and then shot him four more times and he was like I can't believe these guys actually shot me and Julie speaking I feel that way to some degree with Libertarians. Like from the very beginning of this I was like well, limit. The Libertarians aren't GonNa, have a problem with me like I I speak for them. I'm nothing but their advocate and so that was kind of my attitude in the beginning when I first when we first started supporting Jacob Hornberger that's when I first started getting like this this crowd known as the Loser Brigade. Talking Wild Shit about me and at the time I used to go back and forth a little bit with them like they tag me in some of these groups on facebook I don't even know what any of these groups are but they tag. Criticizing mates and my attitude was always like I treat them with nothing. But like good intent I I'd say listen maybe you don't like me or you don't like Tom Woods but take a look at Jacob Hornberger I bet you'll like him I. Mean Jeez. Open borders he's. All like you're not gonNA find any of these issues with him. So go support that guy I thought. Like. I didn't think it would go in the direction at did but much like with nick SAR walk look I wouldn't know who knicks are walk was to this day. He hadn't started attacking Tom Woods and Jeff Dice and people who I love in a vicious manner. This is the truth. Okay. This is this is the extent of how involved in the party I am I don't know the name of the current chair if a gun to my head I, think there's a bishop in I can't tell you the rest of the name. If you put a gun to my head and said name the chair before Knicks are walk I'm going to die. There is no chance I could tell you who the chair was before and the same is true with this other group of people I wouldn't know who any of them are except that they launched these vicious attacks and so okay I'll I'll respond to them and more. So the fact they attacked people who I love who, I. Know are really good people who are heroes of mine that that me a little. Bit But so that's more or less might might take on the whole situation. That's the sense that I get and I since you're kind of searching for like, why am I being singled out in this way because it's gotta be awkward when an odd like and so I don't feel I feel your fair and honest otherwise wouldn't have coca sean you wouldn't have me on the but that's part of the breakdown is that the SAR works and those of us who are outside of the you I heard you talk in your. Talk about being called a cult and you're like Oh what are you talking about? Well, those of us who are outside of it that Third Rung that Group of people that amplify what you guys say. They mimic that? Breakneck. Style and they beat the shit out of the rest of us, and then because they're usually anonymous twitter account users, there's no accountability for those people. So people tend to blame you and Tom Eric because they're like, well, somebody's got to be responsible for this asshole who won't leave me alone because when you tend to criticize anything nieces a Ron Paul related, you get a swarm of several dozen if not hundreds of twitter accounts and I don't know if you're aware of that but that creates. A tremendous amount of resentment and I think what the macy's caucus experience it is experiencing is resentment from people like myself who've been around for a long time that don't understand that resentment and just are caught off guard by the criticism. Okay but you know in the same sense that in the clip that we just played which I again, I grant that you apologize for and that's fine. But in the clip you played what you explicitly say like, Hey, if you're getting criticism online if people are saying what you said is stupid maybe you should look at that and and like take that in and go okay there are these people criticising you. But then on the other hand when other people get criticized online, it's like my fault that that I understand you're not saying it's not saying that fair I'm saying you get. This is my thing. Okay. What you know the people who go. Oh. It's like a the meese caucus are like a cult or their dave dots or whatever it it's blatantly not true. Who Disagree with me in the Muses Caucus every time I talked to Michael on the phone at least two or three times in the conversation. He'll say well, I disagree with you there let me give you some pushback on this like like they don't just agree with me all the time but the fact that a lot of them do agree with me doesn't make them cult members. I. Mean it's like it's very convenient tactic. And it's a very convenient tactic say ana challenge Dave on this and if someone agrees with Dave, will they're just a colts member but if someone agrees with me, that's that's completely fair and that just proves that I'm right and that Dave really should take a look in the mirror whatever I mean that just seems like to me that seems childish and just an UN it's it's a heads I win tails you lose game. And look in terms of like people being shitty on twitter and Youtube comments. Believe me I've asked people not to be shitty in those environments twitter and Youtube comments are Cesspool. That's kind of the nature of the world today. There are by the way to the the loser brigade members who call me things like fucking a Nazi sympathizer are one of them said recently that I praised Holocaust deniers like I'm a fucking Jew whose. Family was slaughtered in the Holocaust if you're calling me that I, really don't care what you get back like you. You lose the ability to say Oh people are being mean to me on twitter you're engaging in that game and if they give it back to you I'm actually fine with that. But in general if people are coming with good faith criticism, people shouldn't be shitty to. Him But the other thing that happens and this is the nature of anybody who's got a any amount of following is that you got a few people out there who are the more were more than the others and they end up being what you've that you focus on. So for example, right this is just one example that is in my head for whatever reason. So I tweeted out. Something about when when the feds were rounding up people in a in Seattle was Portland. KNOWS WHO's in Seattle when when there were the Department of Homeland Security goons coming in and grabbing people I tweeted something out very critical of that and I said, I was like look this is a really terrifying president to set. This is the worst way for the government to handle it for it to be coming down from the feds. This is the even if you're critical of the riots as I am you gotTa have some concern over that and There was maybe a dozen people who responded to it like fuck that commies they get what they deserve but the tweet got like two or three, thousand likes or something in that range I don't remember exactly and so a bunch of the Luba gator types started jumping on that like look even when Dave's right look at his fan base there. Awful. They just hate commies and they're just anti laughed in their Thawra -Tarian and all of this but they're looking at the dozen people who said this and ignoring that like you could you could with a stronger argument look at that and go oh, look thousands of people agreed with what Dave said on this. So it's it's just a very convenient. Very. Dishonest. Like Line of attack, in my opinion to to kind of say. Okay. Yeah. Look there are going to be some people out there and that's not what I promote but. You know. That's the Internet I guys. Let's take a quick second. I WanNa thank our sponsor for today's show, which is yolk crate them. It's the world's best value in cranium him shipped right to your door. No questions asked they have a sixty dollar kilo which is unheard of in the crime world. If you don't know what is don't even worry about this ad but if you're over twenty one and enjoy creating goto create dot com, celebrate your freedom and get yourself a sixty dollar kilo it's unheard of as I mentioned before Ukraine Dot Com is one of the biggest sellers of Creighton nationwide and they made Ukraine. Dot Com. So you can buy directly at wholesale prices. This is quality creidim. We've heard feedback from the fans they'll confirm solid and like I said, it's the only place where you can get kilos for sixty dollars. So last time if you're currently a fan of crate him, go to Yo create him dot com and get yourself a sixty dollar kilo. All right. Let's get back into the show ten to twenty percent of any audience that I've ever worked with of any size is just fucking insane like literally just bat shit crazy and I. Think one of the one of my goals in coming here because. There's a very real danger for me coming here because if you see the mies caucus group, it's like I've been working to build a brand for ten years from scratch no funding from anybody other than my listeners. And There's there's a very real chance that. The Ten to twenty percent of insane people in your audience network affect me into just being the next SAR work or part of the loser brigade and that's not why I'm here. I genuinely care about the Libertarian Movement and I think you do too. Otherwise you wouldn't be having these conversations and. Part of what I want to get across to. To. You into some of the other macy's caucus guys is that Your message is being completely obliterated by the people in your camp that it's not a few dozen people like it's hundreds of people like it. So we just did a survey of our audience. We've got this new project that we're working. We did a survey. you know and like. Of One, hundred people, and it's literally like three pages of highlights of the reason I don't want to be a libertarian is because of the abuse because of. The all right Palios because the racism and the comments that go unchecked and I'm certainly not holding you accountable for anything that like an individual says on a comments section on Instagram, for instance. That's insane. But there is. There is some effect in an audience when you do the loser brigade stuff. Other people feel licensed to do that sort of thing, and they don't do it as well as you and they feel a sense of permission that I can abuse somebody who seems left right or like it then becomes a cudgel that they used to attack other people and so. I've just learned over time with my audience because I used to pick a lot of fights to like the name a libertarian I fought with them never do a podcast in the middle of a divorce i. a lot of MEA culpas to make I'm starting with you but I have a responsibility to try and build a movement that is more open to people that don't share my experience, and if I have any criticism of the caucus, is that they tend to look at people who don't share their experience and dismiss that and say we don't want them to be a part of this movement and that's where it becomes very difficult to do my job to go out and talk to people who. Like go look at any post on any Libertarian think tank yesterday about women's suffrage. And you see the just misogynistic shit that is said on those posts and you click on those accounts and you look and see Rothbart macy's Dave Smith Tom Tom Woods and so people eventually start to draw the conclusion that you guys support that kind of stuff and then they start to look at the comments the the faker -tarian comments and they start to draw conclusions and like that is That I think I, if I were to lay anything at your doorstep, it is. It is how you? Build an audience with some of that stuff because the punching the enemy, the turning the the left Libertarian into an enemy thing. You do with skill because you're a skilled communicator and a comedian, but it gives licensed to other people that take it so far. And I'm talking to thousands of people take it so far that they eventually are hurting your reputation they're hurting the effectiveness of the caucus and and it's becoming you know it it then then they don't get checked right then there's the well fuck those guys. They're all just loser Teheran's anyways ll Libertarians or whatever they're called like and it starts to diminish your credibility in your effectiveness and I think that's what's happening. Yeah. But I mean I don't know you know to say that it's like this is going to lead to a whole bunch of people being turned off diminishes my my credibility I've got to say. I think that look I mean personally like my influence and credibility I think done nothing but go up every single year and I've got lots of metrics just like Spike Cohen got lots of metrics that indicate that and if what you care about is the Liberty Movement as you said, it is. And I. Believe. I have a tough time believing that a lot of these other types of who criticise me the dozen of them are. So actually care about the Liberty Movement. These are people who want whatever they deem to be the right Paleo. Libertarians which I guess they would consider me one of. and. Look. I don't really consider myself a right wing libertarian I don't consider myself right I actually agree with Walter Block I. Think we're kind of the third leg on the stool and there's a lot that distinguishes us from both the left and the right. But if you WANNA call me at like fine whatever you know I've certainly called people left Libertarians who don't. Identify as left. So I'll take the right libertarian label. So they WANNA get rid of me. They want me out of the movement and the audience that I represent they want Tom. Woods out of the movement they want Ron Paul out of the movement they want Jeff dice out of the movement they want Michael. Heiss. At of the movement, they want Eric July maggiore. I'm sure I'm missing fear if you take all of those people out of the movement and the is that they represent there is no movement left like that there. You could argue there is no liberty movement really to speak of right now period that we're kind of talking to the remnant and trying to build it back up to where it was. You know in two thousand, twelve but you know if your goal is to kind of get rid of all of these people, I don't really see what we have left to speak up. So, and I'm not saying that that's your goal but it certainly is the goal of a lot of the other types that you're talking about I. I would I would agree with you on that I think are a lot of those critics who do want to push you guys out. Yes. I have basically in the fight that. So I started this show. In late two, thousand, twelve and I don't even know if those episodes are up in the archives I, think it's in two thousand thirteen when we went to stand up labs when when we started I don't even know if we saved those old episodes and there was like no audience I built this thing up year-over-year. So I came in right as the Liberty Movement was dwindling. Is Things were kind of Ron Paul left presidential politics, and there wasn't nearly as much energy and I have been bringing in thousands and thousands of people to Liberty Movement. Since that I have gotten maecenas and Rothbart and Tom Woods and Bob. Murphy and all these people, their books, the hands of a lot of people that's been my goal is always to spread the Liberty Movement and. Then for the last year or so I've really made a push for people to join the Libertarian Party and that's when all of this stuff happened because it's not so much I. think there's a lot of people who enjoy their comfortable positions in the Libertarian Party and didn't like that there's a lot of other people coming in and bringing New People in and look no question are. Some of them a little rough around the edges. Alright. Shore I'm very willing to have very uncomfortable, very politically incorrect conversations and to try to find truth within those areas and I'm not saying that I defend some random misogynistic comment. But if we're talking about women's suffrage I'm fine with questioning what the actual results of that were. I'm fine with questioning in general expanding voting rights and. Wet Weather. This is actually that good whether it's really a good thing libertarians to for libertarianism to have more democracy. Does that really help? Is it really worthwhile for us? Look when you have someone like Bernie Sanders. Proposing voting rights for felons and violent felons is that something libertarians should really be four violent criminals having a say in how their fellow neighbors ruled certainly doesn't seem to me. Like. Something Libertarian should be four and you much like Ron Paul and this is what I wish. I really try to smack DAB into a lot of the LP types heads the only time. There was a liberty movement in my lifetime was when Ron Paul was willing to say the bravest most courageous thing to room that he knew very well might boo him out of that room. And what I see from. Libertarians a lot. These days is trying to say the thing that couldn't possibly get you booed out of the room and they're listen just like with Ron Paul people respond to courage they respond to somebody who believes in something and is willing to take the name calling like okay. Yeah. Ron. Paul's a trade to his country because he doesn't support the troops because. He said, you know what they hate us because of what our troops have done not because we're free and I am just not willing to lie in order to say something that will make sure that I'm not called any of the names I enjoy going into controversial areas. You know I saw I saw spike cone zooming you tweet it actually at that Spike Cohen's response. To the what we should do about cutting welfare and what he said was he goes he goes will accuse the truth and I know this from going door to door nobody wants to be on welfare no one wants to be on welfare people want to work, and it's just that government makes it so hard for them to work, and that's why they end up being on welfare that. Really Nice it's a really nice sounding thing to say and I wish that was the world. But it's not. It's just not and I don't know how like I'm not from I. Remember on the show I listened to you said that you're from an area that's like ninety five percent white and that was to later in life that you got out I grew up in Brooklyn in the nineties. I UP I. I I know listen it's not that like Oh everyone fits into these groups I've known black nerds and white junkies I know of A. Black, who was my best friend like the fifth sixth and seventh grade went to Harvard my sister's best friend This girl is now identifies as a guy I've I've I've just grown up knowing a lot of different people. I also knew a lot of people from the hood. If you think there are no people who want to be on welfare and who are gaming the system and Brag about it. It's like it's a nice thought. It's just not true. It's just not reality and people if you save things like that you get. Attacked a little bit more in criticized but I don't care 'cause I'm willing to tell the truth. My mother was a she. She's a psychologist she was in the nineties she worked in the hospital want give it too much information but she worked in a hospital in one of the worst areas it New York City one of the highest crime areas and it was a night crime was through the roof. It was a fucking she would see children and their parents and determine whether or not they need to be taken away by the state. It was the and made like no money while she was doing it. She would she could tell you horror stories about how people have children for what they used to call the budget that you get. You get a budget when you have, can you get more of a budget for each kid you have. Now if we want to honestly start talking about what the solutions are to try to fix some of these incredibly damaged cultures because it's horrible what's happening to these children that if you actually care about those kids, you have to have like honest difficult conversations and twenty twenty if you do that, you get call ball of the names. But I think Libertarians need to stop being afraid of that. I. Don't think it has anything to do with you know the word pandering virtue signal gets thrown around a lot and I generally think that's a very condescending dismissive term because you just related your personal interpretation of the world through your your experiences, your information what you've taken in spike has a completely different set of information that he's judging from you know and and that is yet but we're talking about objective reality I mean it's not as simple as like my interpretation or spikes interpretation. Spike said, no one wants to be on welfare that is that lake objective claim. That is objectively false. So yes, you're right. We have different perspectives. Obviously I'm just talking about what is objectively real and what is not now that's not to say that it's fair for me to say everybody wants to be on welfare or every I think that's very much true and by the way I agree with spikes policy proposals like absolutely let's let's make it much easier for people to you know, get be entrepreneurs and get jobs, and let's not criminalise things that shouldn't be criminalized. Let's not make them jump through hoops, but I also think we should be honest. And I agree with you and I'm probably guilty of using other people pandering I know when people accuse me of pandering to the alt-right or whatever which I think is dog Lizard dog whistling. Lights Virtue Signal. Well, it's. Also, again, just like. You know cult worship stuff. It becomes a very convenient childish trick where you can say, okay well, I, don't actually have him saying anything that I object to but I'm going to tell you that he's really saying something that you can object to even though it's not there. Now you could pick out pretty easily I mean I've done thousands of of a for. Interviews and podcasts and all types of different things you know certainly Almost thousand episodes of part of the problem I forget exactly where we are. But. You could I'm sure find five or six different things that are right. Winger would like or a lot more than that. But you can find things that I've said that a right winger would like. You can also find a lot of things that I've said that a right winger would hate and you can say like all day cares about his bringing in you know. ault writers are or whatever. Okay. But I also go on Jimmy door show I just went on Ben Burgess. Show I've gone on Rogin, show four times I'm I'm trying to bring in anybody I can actually pretty good at messaging libertarianism to the left as well. So I I don't know I again. So I get your point on that. Whether it's pandering or not just to kind of come back full circle to to what we were talking about might issue with the Joe Jorgenson black lives matter tweet had never had anything to do with being a secret Marxist and in fact, the Marxism of the organization black lives matter is really the least of my concerns right now like really care that much. I mean I did one episode with Pete Granada's about the Marxist organization I. Think it's an interesting topic to know a little bit about libertarian should know about stuff but really That's not my issue Joe Jorgenson says, she's supporting the movement not the organization I'm like, okay. I can understand that the re my problem is with the movement it's not with the organization and my problem for anyone who listens to the show there's no way you could not know what it is. My problem is. The dozens of murders, the hundreds of a vicious assaults, the thousands of businesses that have been damaged looted graffitied on and the thousands of people who have been terrorized I mean go follow Andy No on twitter every day there's a new just stomach turning video of somebody being viciously assaulted and it's all being done in the name of black lives matter. Now, you can agree with the peaceful protesters and the you can agree that the police brutality is horrible. But if you say I support the movement Oh and by the way, it's not good enough. If you're not racist, you must be antiracist that sends quite a message out there which I think is really bad messaging and that's my critique it's. Messing whom because the majority of people? The majority of Americans. Which Joe Jorgenson is trying to reach are are in agreement with the general idea of black lives matter they're against racism the you know the the the campaign is trying to reach a broader audience than just the people that you are trying to reach and people who watch andy no videos all day long and bathe in the the Marcus element of black lives matter. That's not it's Marxist element. It's not about the mark Salomon about the violent element, it's I don't care if somebody's in a room reading dowse copy towel and talking about how we should. Share the means of production I don't want. The point still stands it is I understand your point about the tax. But when Jorgensen tweet, she's not signalling leftist, which is what the majority of the criticism not maybe not you. But the majority of criticism of that tweet was that she's pandering to leftists when in reality the majority of America agreed with the general spirit of that tweet. Yes I. Did yes. The majority of America agrees with the idea that racism is bad. That's why it's absurd when we're constantly lectured about how we live in a white supremacist society. Yes. The majority of Americans are against racism however, there's a lot of polling data to suggest that actually the black lives matter thing shockingly as the riots continue is getting less and less popular and the truth is that people are incredibly turned off by the woke lecturing about racism and I don't think like, yes, I understand the goal of the Jorgensen cone campaign is to attract more people. That's what I want them to do the reason on criticizing them as I think they're doing a very bad job. So I want to go back to the Libertarian party stuff. I want to jump back because this is the you said that you don't know much about the Libertarian Party and you know you said you basically said Ron Paul is the libertarian movement and that's just not true. Well, no but hold on what I said was that the only time we had a really substantial movement going in this country was when Ron Paul was running for president and I do believe that. Okay all right I appreciate that clarification. When one of the problems that the macy's caucus that when they came into the party in two thousand eighteen They have to I don't think that they understand the everything that came before and everything that the way that they talk the way they message how it turns off people that they need to build coalitions with within the party, which is part of the why you're getting criticism when they came in the takeover language that you just used an the takeover language that highs continual uses we're gonNA, take this party over. When in reality most people look at the Ron Paul campaign they look at the Ron Paul Messaging they look at the idea of the macy's caucus and they go yeah I mean I've been a liberty since two thousand seven. If you asked me are you for Austrian economics and four non interventionism the answer's Yes right and so most people look at that and they go oh, what are? You talking about when the Libertarian Party needs to be reformed in into the spirit of trudel over terrorism when Marie Rothbart really has captured the heart and soul of not just the movement but the entire Party and then you come in and start telling us we're GONNA take over you start offending people not you talking about the caucus you start picking fights and then eventually the caucus now. I think the General Promise of what you get people are attracted to right. I'm going to restore the Libertarian Party to the idea of Ron Paul's nonintervention, his campaign and a Austrian economics he will agree with that but then they joined the facebook group. Then they joined the different groups they start having conversations with people and their drug into a never ending Nick Sony list of enemies that we must fight, and that is what is starting to shed people off out of the group and also start to make people go. We just leave us alone like you're exhausting or tired of the fight for tired of all the like. The condescension us. I just think first of all the Maecenas Caucus, they they have their pack, they give money to all types of people they've given money to pragman. They've give money to the radicals they they give money to all types of different people. I don't think that it's ever been true that they come in here again, like the situation with me I didn't come into the Libertarian party looking for a fight other people brought the fight to me and I'm quite willing to have it and to win that fight and if you are for Murray Rothbart and Austrian Economics and The Ron. Paul a revolution. Then you should have no problem with US coming in and trying to move the party in the direction that we want to see them. But the truth is that I don't think what you're saying is accurate. Murat. Barred may have captured the imagination of a lot of people or captured the you know the the The the belief system of a lot of people in the party I. think that's probably very true. I think that people at the top of the party absolutely did not want the muses caucus to come in and start having the influence at has I don't think it's true. I don't think there's any evidence to back up your your assertion that this what the way the caucus is a working or the way that I'm working is driving people out of the party all of the evidence shows that we're bringing tremendous. Amounts of people into the party I I'm probably the number one or number two recruiter for the Libertarian Party. The Libertarian Party called me to see if I wanted to set up one of those you know pages. So I get credit and get paid off all of the people that I'm recruiting because. So many were telling them I'm the reason they joined and I turned it down because I'm not really interested in making money off of that I kind of see it as like a conflict of interest I'm like. If I'm telling you to do something. I'm saying I believe in this. So let's go do it. I did enter the same reason right doesn't seem exactly like the right thing to do but so no, I don't I don't think this what the truth is that the meese caucus came in they recruited a lot of people podcasters and a lot of different people in the Liberty Movement to join the liberty of the Libertarian Party and when that happened, they were attacked and condemned with all types of smears that are not accurate as it like Michael Heiss is a great dude he is. Not some right winger as he's working on decriminalize of mushrooms and shit like that. He's like a hard a hard core Ron Paul Leeann. But to the Group of people that that you're talking about who do criticize me and them Ron Paul is a racist to them to I. Think the whole thing is problematic even though the man Ron Paul does not have a hateful bone in his body you could never find anything that he's ever said or voted for or supported. That's even slightly racist. You'd literally what they could go back to some fucking newsletters from forty years I mean, yeah, we could. Some of that Shit that Ron Paul is is. Ron Paul has a bad habit of allowing people to do things in his name that are kind of ugly and it's happening right now at the institute to like, would you send a new person to go look the Ron Paul Institute News Yes. His website right now. Yes. I wouldn't. So we disagree why not? Because it's conspiratorial Daniel Adams never seems to find a Putin ally that he disagrees with and the non adventure. So. Let's let's drill down on that because I actually heard that I. I took some offense to you said that you think Daniel McAdams is a Russian asset on your show. Dana McAdams right now is running around calling students for liberty in Europe, CIA asset, a CIA plant because they're trying to in voting rights in Belarus okay. That sounds a little bit conspiratorial sodas calling him a Russian asset, right. So he also continually repeats the talking points that Abby Martin constantly pushes on Madero supported Madero and he is he anytime there is an a there is a foreign policy issue he tends to align with Russia and with Putin talking points and I. Think. It's curious. Okay I mean but that's like almost like okay. So you could like if we were in two thousand and three, you could accuse Ron Paul of being Saddam Hussein asset because he always seems to be taking the same side as Saddam Hussein I mean both of them don't want the US military to overthrow Saddam Hussein. So this is I mean this is not a very strong argument. Yes. Daniel Mc Adams is clearly against the. US Empire, and so when they are vilifying their next potential target, he's usually on the side of saying that there's a lot of propaganda here, and this isn't isn't right now he has a view that I don't really agree with that. We basically just shouldn't criticize the government's that the US is targeting for for whatever reason I don't necessarily agree with that but I certainly see the point that he's making but yeah, I agree. You can make the point but the the difference like and the Ron Paul Institutes recent criticism, Joe. Johnson's campaign and Adam Dick who when he writes stuff, you have to really fact check it like your criticism Jorgenson is totally genuine totally valid from your perspective and that isn't always the case with the people that are currently writing for the Ron Paul ends. That's my point. Okay. Well, let me I just WANNA finish. The last point just to make the point that I think, Daniel McAdams is making, which is, which is that if let's say in two thousand and two as there's the buildup to the war in Iraq and you're a libertarian with like a libertarian publication, maybe a writer for reason magazine and all the sudden you start writing all of these pieces about how illiberal Saddam Hussein is and how he's a brutal dictator and he Oppresses his people and how the enemy of Libertarians but which you know all is true. It does it seems a little bit weird and like the timing of that was I could understand where a libertarian would be like don't start doing this right now because clearly there's an agenda at work here and you don't really want to be on that side of the agenda. So I understand that part of the argument now in. Terms of what you're saying about their criticism of Joe Jordan's, and are you are you referring to all lives matter comment? Yeah and and I will say that McAdams blog in two thousand eleven by the way was called Putin's blog like he does have a track record with Putin like I'm just saying there's something off there and Ron Paul is a person that I respect and I look at this stuff and and go what? The Jorgensen stuff Adam Dick wrote a piece basically where Jordan Johnson gave an interview where she was trying to make the case to the free market will solve racism and that is. On the show yeah. Right and their interpretation with a headline which was then copied by Info wars was that she was saying private business owners must fire anybody who who are the headlines are though that's not what the headlines Look I'll read the headline the headline. The headline misinterpreted what Jorgensen was actually saying okay. Well, Chris, I mean look I, read the article I know the one you're talking about the video was in the article. So it's not as if they wrote something up about it drastically misleading I, think the video said she praises a company who fires woman for saying. Who actually clicks reads that's not the point. People don't actually click and read which is the point of doing misleading headline. Well, no. If the headline is Click Beatty, the point is to get people to try to click on it. The point is not to have click beatty headline that people don't Click on but the headline certainly what legs and I'm just saying if you're going to criticize people for misrepresenting something in the same breath, you shouldn't misrepresent it. So if you're saying that the headline was Joe, Johnson says companies must fire people for saying all lives matter I mean you can look it up right now but I'm Libertarian Party presidential candidate. Praises company firing woman who posted all lives matter on facebook right? That is very different than saying she said, they must fire people for saying all lives matter and by the way if you listen to the video, it's not really that inaccurate of a description that what we did on our show was we played the clip we let the audience decide and said man, it sure does sound like she's praising this company for doing this. Now I gotta say Chris I mean that is not nearly as misleading as you saying on your show that I was telling my fans to attack Joe Jorgenson for being a secret Marxist. I, mean that's that seems to me like. Maybe. I might grant you maybe a touch like if I was the editor there, I'd say, why don't you make the title Jorgensen Seemingly Praises Company. Point. Why would? Why would the why would Adam Dick? Why would the Ron Paul Institute a Libertarian think tank take the most destructive or unforgiving version of that and make that their headline what if we're all in the same movement together you clearly so why are you not why are you posting on your? Why are you saying on your podcast that I said things that I straight up never said people make mistakes, I? Don't know maybe you don't have to have the worst interpretation of it. It does if you listen to what Joe Jorgensen set, how many how many you needed consistently make though? Like. This is a constant. This is what I'm talking about with the Ron Paul Institute it's consistent thing. Daniel McAdams is constantly doing the most if you're, why would they intentionally miss interpret the Libertarian Party presidential candidates headline if they're a libertarian think, they're intentionally misinterpreting if you've listened to what she said, she's listing a whole bunch of acts by the market that she is praising and she throws in their this instances well, I think anybody any libertarian like any of us at the best case scenario if you saw that would be Joe, what are you saying this is Like going back to what you said you, when you talk out loud and do as much broadcasting as you and I do or as Joe Jorgenson is right now you're going to say things that don't always lineup. So. Why would we cherry pick that and highlight that and put a big break bread red line around it because. Of that because it seems insanely like at best insanely tone deaf and at worst it seems like she is actually praising this company for doing that and to be honest it wasn't really clear which one it is right now in the country. Okay. There are a lot of forces at work other than just the state and the state apparatus and the truth is that the entire right half of the country and about. Fifty percent of the left half are terrified of this kind of cancel culture thing where you can literally be just some lady and say all lives matter and be publicly humiliated and ruined, and that's a terrible thing to happen to somebody and so if you come out and you bring it up and you're Kinda like, yeah I'm on the side of that happening. That is a good reason for people to want to criticize. And she'd certainly made it sound like she was saying that was a good thing like I don't know that women who tweeted all lives matter or facebook posted lives matter maybe she was like a shitty person or maybe not at all maybe she was just some lady just saying a fairly you know normal thing that a lot of people say a lot of people on the right half the country say all odds matter a lot of people on the left half say black lives matter you don't have to have the. I don't know I mean I I didn't think Joe Jorgenson should've sent out that tweet because she's running for President Libertarian candidate. But if some lady said black lives matter and she was fired over that, I would think that was outrageous. In the body, you criticize her in the body of. Criticism. Praise you look at it from a you have a perspective right? There has not been any praise. There's it's just it seems like it's an attempt to drive down the Libertarian Party presidential vote, which is my point with it. It's it's an isolated piece of criticism that just struck me as very odd. In a different way than the way that you might criticize I take I'll take exception with you criticizing her just by virtue of that I don't know that it's terribly helpful but I see your criticism and I think that it's a valid criticism and you are trying to help. Guys let's take a quick second I. Want to thank our sponsor for today's show, which is cushy dreams cushy dreams specialized in extraordinary cbd rich hemp flour also known as Bud and CBD Pre roll joints. For the first time you can smoke your C I didn't even know this was a thing because cushy dreams has changed my life they have a full lineup of premium smokable CBD, its cannabis that ships directly to you and it's Legal. In all fifty states, it's point three percent or less thc. So it's just the CBD the medical benefits of marijuana without the drug aspect of it, join the men and women who are sick vapes and Gumy's WanNa smoke their CB day. If you get this stuff, it looks smells and tastes like the best pot you've ever seen in your life. But again, as I mentioned it cbd I love the stuff I use it every. Night, helps me get good sleep cushy dreams has cbd flour and pre rolled joints. They come specific indica sativa blends like Energy Hustle Relax and dream. I can't tell you how much I love this stuff I highly recommend you check it out. Go to cushy dreams, dot? com. That's K. U. S. H. Y. D. R. E. A. M. S. dot com and check out use the Promo Code P. O. T. P. that's GONNA. Get. Fifteen. percent off your first order cushy dreams smoke your CBD because you can. All right. Let's get back into the show. Let me take you. Let me ask you if Joe Jorgenson was praising that company which again, it's not really clear that she wasn't. But let's say she explicitly said this was such a great thing for this company to do to fire this woman Do you think that would be fair for us to criticize her for? Right, okay, right. Well, she it really sounded like that's what she was doing. So by the way I know people who are advisors to the campaign who are closed with the campaign who were sending her emails like this is a crazy messaging mistake. It's sounds like you're praise it like do you think this is good even people around the campaign were confused about what it is she was saying so I don't know it just doesn't seem. Like that big of a problems may certainly not a problem that would make me not want to send people to the wrong. Paul it's my my criticism of the Jorgensen selection was that she can be sloppy and interviews and doing because I didn't really follow any of the primary season, and then we helped lions and reason do a couple of debates and hosted them and did the tech for them and she has a tendency to. Kind of lose your train of thought and and kind of wonder off and that that can be a problem as they start to get into interviews and yeah well I listen I agree I mean I think the heart of the problem is that like look she's just not that great of a messenger and the that's that's a really big problem when really all we have is the message I mean the likelihood of Joe, Johnson getting sixty, three million votes and becoming the next president is. Let's say. Small really what you have out of these campaigns, you wanNA spread a message and introduce people to these ideas in a compelling way, and I just think that she's not the best person for that job. Now that being said when she first won the nomination, I publicly congratulated her I had her on the show I still this day up praised them when they do good. I, in fact, I think their campaign I. Think tweeted out like a like an ad that me and malice were like going over you know like what the best ad for them is we aren't praising for their. Bring the troops home at I thought was really well done. I just think that number one I don't think it helps the movement at all or helps any of our own credibility. If we just get into this kind of I'm not gonNA say anything bad about the Libertarians up for the whole campaign. The reason why people like Libertarians the reason why people listen to me and you and people like us is because they count on us to tell them the truth and so i. Think, that's the best thing for all of us is to continue to tell people the truth and number two when you're in the middle of a full-fledged culture war and you dive into that culture war, you can't be completely tone deaf and you have to be aware of the possibility that you're going to turn off an entire side of that culture war which I think is a good idea. So I guess up my pushback on that would be is that again that network effect one of the biggest. One of the big like over the last three weeks, specifically send your criticism of Jorgensen. Whenever, we are Libertarians, for instance, post something pro. Jorgensen, or any you know anything was spyker Joe all of the sudden. It is hundreds of comments of how they're horrible candidates. People shouldn't vote for them and. Don't you see that in and of itself is probably more damaging to the movement or to her vote. This is somebody that you support choosing to to criticize her in the middle of a campaign that network effect ultimately does more damage. So is it does it do more damage to her if I criticize her than if I shut up and don't say anything negative tour probably yeah. Like probably does. But if I'm criticizing her for like legitimate reasons and the people who are are listening to me who I influence are also criticizing them for legitimate reasons than I. Don't know like that's that's tough. This is this is grown up business. You're running to be president of the United States of America but you're talking go ahead. Sorry. No. Well, the people who are like. listen to say the podcast when I had Spike Cohen on I. Mean I didn't like I don't think I was unfair I pushed him a few times on a few questions other than that. I pretty much like we talked about a lot of areas we agree and I let him make his position that. Argues. Only agreed to come on because I. listened to the Spike episode and I thought you were very fair and you're very nice to him. You know. Listen I'm GonNa like this with. Listen. I. Don't believe I'm all for like having a debate or if. We disagree like hammering it out but I've never treated a single guest who have had on the show poorly with maybe the exception of Sarawak who I was pretty aggressive with him but it was a little bit personal on between us and even him I was friendly with him by the end of the show. We had a nice conversation off air. It's not like it wasn't like a a you know like I. Don't know I don't I believe in treating my guest kind of when they're on the show the also the difference with saw was it was billed as a debate like we're going to hammer the writings out here. But Yeah I mean look a lot of people didn't like the messaging that they heard from spike and I gotta say I understand why I understand what there is this Kind of whatever you WANNA call it like the kind of social justice, the progressive narrative that really dominates our society. It is the narrative that you hear coming out of both political parties. You hear it out of the entire corporate press hear it out of every major corporation. You hear it in academia you hear it in Hollywood and there's a lot of people who Are really over it and they think it's bullshit and I kind of tend to agree with them that it is. You know Spike Cohen had a to a facebook post the other day about how we're watching the beginning of a transgender genocide i. mean it literally it like my my reaction when I saw that post, I was like, oh, what a garbage post so misleading. Dishonest. So you know and he said days, there's like there's been like twenty five transgender people who were murdered this year and that was the number for last year. So we basically the amount of transgender people have been killed. This year has already equal last year were only in August. So He's has this long post about how since gender people have no idea what it's like to be murdered for who they are but transgender people are being murdered for who they are. Twenty twenty will be remembered for US watching the beginning of a transgender genocide. And it's like dude, he provides no evidence that these twenty five people were murdered because they were Trans just that twenty five trans people were murdered. The crime rate is way up across the country the number of transgender people who identify as transgender goes up every year. This could easily account for what we're seeing and save twenty five people being murdered is the beginning of a genocide is just all it it's like some people who are sick of this narrative that shit turns them off and I understand why it turns me off I don't like lying. In, order to kind of seem like the good guy that's a common but that's a common thing that the. Crowd does is they take a difference of opinion and call it lying heist does this to me personally we had. You know he calls me a liar and he calls me a leftist because we had a personal disagreement two years ago and I didn't even realize he was still mad about it like. You hold on, let me just make this point and then, and then you can talk but I wanna talk about the spike thing because my point on that that spike is probably not lying is why not pick up the phone and call spike you know why not call him and say these are my concerts. You could get a hold of spike cone. Please I mean you want you want grace for what you say but you're not willing to extend that despite Cohen who is The most radical Libertarian Party presidential vice presidential candidate. We've had in the time I've been in the party. Thousands Bednarik. Okay fine There's not too much competition for that but I'll I'll agree, no, I'm totally in agreement. I looked at his at his youtube channel on like the we're on the in agreement on the marketing stuff right like when I put together, we're putting together this project libertarianism and I went through all these youtube videos like tens of thousands of youtube videos trying to find the right stuff when I when I looked I found all this great Harry Brown talking about. Issues there's nothing from Harry Brown until Spike Conan Joe Jorgenson in terms of good policy prescriptions good messaging that stands the test of time because the party presidential candidate is the only time any of our friends and family care about libertarianism. That's the only time. Anybody asked me about that. So it does matter I totally agree with you on that but why elevate that? Spike up for score and when you could just call him on the phone and privately say like, Hey, dude, I want you to understand my perspective and the people that that I generally talked to here's how this comes across. Have you thought about that and plus you also got these other things inaccurate. Well I mean truthfully speaking I don't have a relationship with spike like that. I've had one conversation ever with him and that was when he was on my podcast and it seems pretty clear to me that he does not see the cultural views, the way I do, and so the reason I'm bringing it up is literally in direct response to you saying there are all these people who are turned off by. Spike Cohen and I'm explaining the reason why and giving a little glimpse of why it is that the way he's messaging turns people off. Now, what people in if they if people want to have a big liberty movement again, like we did under Ron, Paul what people are going to have to understand, and this is going to be a bitter pill for a lot of the more left libertarians to to swallow. Is that you're gonNA have to find a way to not turn off the entire right wing of the liberty. Movement, if you will Ron Paul by the way was perfect at this and because of that, they all call him names Ron Paul was perfect Ron. Paul was kind of like, Hey, you can have your identity as like a bleeding heart leftist or you can have your identity as a social conservative and. I've got a pure libertarian message that can appeal to both of you guys when spike makes posts like this she tells he he literally eliminates half of the audience. In fact I think a lot more than half because truthfully speaking, I think there is a reason why every libertarian outside of the LP. Who Runs for politics runs on the Republican Party I actually think it's really bad politics to turn off the entire. The entire group of people who are revolting against this dominant intersectional narrative in favor of the ones who are adopting it because I think there's a lot less of people who are going to be sympathetic to our message in that group, and this is kind of a point that that you know I know I'm sure you've criticized me and Tom for making, but we will point out the. Fact that of those loser brigade types who are criticizing US none of them have a following to speak up and they hate every libertarian pretty much who's got a big following and that is I think that in itself should show you that like, yeah, you know what? Maybe if we want to have a movement at all, we're going to have to have some voices who are more in that camp. Part of the reason though is that out of the Ron Paul Movement it was Tom Woods it was the macy's crowd that got into social media got into new media before anybody else did I mean that was and the Ron Paul campaign inspired a lot of. Of that media but Ron Paul's message was a foreign policy and Austrian economics. It was not cultural issues in the way that we're talking about it, and if you go look go look at the playlist on macy's on their Youtube Channel in this in twenty thirteen, it's Austrian economics it's foreign policy, and then over time especially through the trump era, it shifts towards cultural issues and I think our focus and our constant conversation and I definitely been guilty of this because we talk current events and we want to talk what everybody else is talking about trying to to help people understand their reality. Our our focus on cultural issues as trump has made cultural issue. So much more predominant is what's turning people off. The message of libertarianism appeals to everybody, it doesn't just appeal to right-leaning people. No I never said it just appeals to right-leaning people and that's why I go on shows like Jimmy door and Joe Rogan and Ben Burgess show that's why I go on these shows because of course, it can appeal to those people to. Here's the thing. If you say the MEESE Institute in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen, th, two, thousand, twelve, there purely talking foreign policy Australian economics all of these issues and then there's kind of change around the last few years well, truthfully speaking I mean they still majority focus on those issues right there yes. There might be a little bit more stuff involved but that it's like, yeah, take a look around the. Cultural issues have become much more dominant in the conversation today, and that's not a complete coincidence from the fact that you know the empire is crumbling and they'd like to get people focused on this other stuff. I think it's completely inaccurate for you to say that trump created this trump was a result of this and that's a very important distinction. What happened Obama's second term and I'M NOT SAYING OBAMA Did this under in those four years of his second term was that the social justice warriors of the country turned it up to eleven in a way that would have seemed crazy. Even the years before this, there's Jonathan has done a really great job of covering this and he chases it all back to right around two thousand thirteen. There was this. You did not afford that year you did not. See College Students medicalising why right-wing speakers could not speak on campus. I'm saying you saw them protesting it, but you didn't see them saying I'm the victim of assault or trauma because this person spoke you did not see people being fired from their jobs regular people not like people in the spotlight fired from their jobs for saying really benign things that just might be a little bit culturally to the right. People getting kicked off social media. You didn't see voices being this is a new phenomenon. The culture war has been brought to US Libertarians whether we like it or not. Now, there is trump is in many ways a response to this a response to look what happened was the first black president in the united. States of America, got reelected Barack Obama got elected and then re elected and then white people around the country started being lectured about how horrible racist they are, and there's been a Huge backlash to that and that backlash has taken the form of huge or orange middle finger in donald trump. Now, at this point look if you look like I, don't like to talk about race on this show I've done I've like I've said this for years and everyone who listens to me knows this the right wingers, the core right-wingers who listen to me are constantly pissed off at me because I won't talk about more of the cultural stuff in the race stuff that they want to but. Try being a political commentator today while there's this black lives matter mass protests mass riot across the country and don't talk about race. That's why I impossible I always laugh people accuse me of pandering to the left like I'm. Go do you really think that it's more popular for me to to stay because I largely agreed with Spike Cohen like when I listened to your episode of him he and I are very much in line on a lot of these issues build coalitions around classic Libertarian issues like ending mandatory minimums qualified immediately sorts of things. Do you think that it's more beneficial to my brand to go out and talk about racial justice in the middle of this environment like I'm I I'm going to take a stand just like you and you know a lot of people have taken the have given me shit for it and but I think it's it's necessary to have that conversation the the reality with the culture war stuff is that One of my concerns is that we have lost like if you go back and spend some time watching some of the Harry Brown stuff. We've lost a lot of what made that. Libertarianism special that that Ron Paul you watch his videos stuff that that made that specialty eight campaign how principle that was when he ran? We've kind of lost sight of some of those issues that started to speak across cultures because I think we're narrowing too much in on the culture awards because it is it is all around US I. Don't agree that trump is just a by product I. do think that trump has definitely made a choice in smashing that button driving people crazy. He does he does use sort of the alt-right idea of. I'm going to I'm going to do things that make the opposition crazy that only they understand. So when they react, I can just look at all these nut jobs over here. Look at how bad they are. You know I do think that he does bear some responsibility for the amount of cultural words but you're right. It was we were talking about the Frankfurt School and cultural. Marxism and canceled culture back in two thousand fourteen through all stuff. I have definitely evolved on overtime as I've had different life experiences and gone out and talk to different people a lot of my shows I. I, don't agree with myself. I am the least consistent motherfucker you know. So when when I go back and listen to some of the old stuff I'm just like. I I see it differently now because of these experiences that I'm having talking with other people, I'm on a podcast where the comedian pat where I'm constantly debating a socialist and miss pat and. and. It's it's made me think. All right. Where am I right where my wrong like having those conversations has made me break outside of my bubble a little bit and so You know I, think we're getting too deep into the culture wars and that is partially why we're having trouble connecting with voters. Well, see I, I, see it in a very different way I. Think that culture is what actually moves voters and as much as we would like it to be monetary policy or something like that. The truth is most people in red states vote read because that's the culture around them and most people in blue states vote blue because that's the culture around them and we've gotta find a way and for sure we've got to be delicate And try to try to be precise and still insert libertarian message and try to find some way where we can rise above the culture war and actually appeal to groups on both sides and say, Hey, look we have something to offer. You have something to offer you. This is the most principled compromise position that you can find, which is basically just that you're free to be as left as you WanNa to be your free to be as right wing as you want to bake, you can't force it on each other and that is kind of the libertarian puzzle that one to solve with all of this. But it you know. What I think is not helpful. Is when somebody like I don't know me is willing to go into some of these more controversial areas and then it immediately gets misrepresented or just you know in many ways the most dishonest of ways I mean like they're you know I. Look even your podcast Ho said. On one of the shows that I listen to that I said that race realism is real. which first of all I don't exactly know what that means I mean if race realism isn't real than it's not realism. So but what I said what I actually said when he said that I said, it was a scientific fact on the radio. He was talking about talking about mall new and you know. You don't understand. Yeah I know what? Quote your I said was that look I think that the fact that there are average differences in IQ's across race is a scientific fact. We really don't know what leads to that from the experts I've spoken to. They said anybody who's telling you it's this percents genetic and this percent environmental. We really have no clue what leads to exactly. What we you know is what causes IQ differences and that we do know that. Some environmental factors help it. So let's focus on that that's more or less. What I said. I've never done a podcast racing Iq I really stay away from the subject I'm not particularly interested in targeting. Why do you stay away from the subject? I? Mean you know that what you said is problematic like don't you what's problematic about what I said do you don't understand how that's going to be taken out that that particular idea hair what did I say? That's wrong. I don't know truly I don't know enough about it to argue with you about it, but I know that it's going to be taken. Like. Okay. I know it makes you uncomfortable. I get uncomfortable an uncomfortable thing to collect vising people and and applying IQ's two groups of people like that is not applying accused two groups of people at all I'm commenting on something that is a scientific fact. I'm not saying that it's not due to environmental conditions quite possibly it is the reason why I don't do entire podcasts about it is because I don't think it's particularly helpful if it's not listen all we can control is environmental situations anyway. So let's focus on that. Let's focus on what we know will help the situation and what we know will help the situation are libertarian policies. Let's if want to help. Black people we need to end the war on drugs and the welfare state we need like these are the things that are going to actually make the situation better. We as Libertarians know that the situation will be better than it is now without these policies. So that's what I focus on but my point is that if I go into like, I, said, one time on a on a podcast I said that and I guess maybe because I'm a I'm a Jew, I feel a little bit freer to speak on these things but I said and I was responding to Ben Shapiro calling out I think nick says or someone like that for being a Holocaust Denier And the video that he he cited was seemed to me to be Kinda tongue-in-cheek but. I don't really know every view Nick Quintas maybe he's a Holocaust denier but what I said and this is my libertarian take on it as I go. You know it's kind of funny to watch. One of these warhawks accused someone else of denying genocide in nineteen, forty five. And then that's supposed to be so morally outrageous while you advocate for genocides going on today that you know are happening right now and somehow how that's not supposed to be more morally outrageous than the previous one and I said I, don't really care if someone else doesn't believe the Holocaust happened I know that it happened. It's almost if someone were to say I don't believe that you're a podcast are like, okay nine. Like what what effect does this have on reality however, if someone is advocating the genocide in Yemen right now I'd be like, yeah no, that's actually a really this more or less what I said and then this gets taken as Dave praises Holocaust deniers I mean it's like so like so that type of Shit to me is not you know that ain't GonNa help anything and I just find it to be dishonest. But that happens on the other side like that. That's like. You and I both know that you watch just in the coming days they'll take something I say out of this podcast and it will be for years it will be. Some joke or it will be. I've seen it happen when other people come on your show right or when you debate Sarwari Work Right Likes Star Wars an idiot for saying the Cheney thing and rightly deserves to be teased for it but it becomes it doesn't become a an intellectual exercise of refuting him for why that's wrong which is what you do. You try to lead say like don't just sit there and mock the guy here's what you're wrong. Here's why disagree the IT becomes an exercise of It's it's. It's again it's like malice talks about with. The alright it's that material. Like joking mocking manner and when I mentioned that clip earlier about cancel culture that's what I'm talking about right like malices book the New Right was a great exercise in interviewing Taylor and refuting his ideas in the pages and he never through the outright dismisses or demeans anybody he refutes their ideas with other ideas and explains why this person Oh Taylor had never thought about this particular thing, right? That's what I'd love to see happen more and more in the liberty. Movement. That's one of the reasons I wanted to come here knowing that that ten percent of your audience that's nuts is going to elevate me for scorn and make a scapegoat and this is the this guy is the reason that the Libertarian Party's not successful and that bullshit because I think there's enough rational people in the eighty or ninety percent of your audience that will go more of these types of conversations need to happen right? Like more of the co- cash and Dave or spangled Dave or whoever you know here's where I'm coming at how are you coming at it? Because that happens all the time right that that Gotcha mentality that we have of of. You know I hate it right like I'm I'm with. You. What I'm trying to get on vk. I'm with you on the Shipley stuff because that's the behavior that would that loser brigade mentality right like Dave said this Dave did that here's why he's bad I hate that mentality but I'm trying to say to the other side that does it to like we're on the precipice of libertarianism. Generation like exit polling here in the end of the Libertarian candidate gets ten percent when the the vinyl vote totals one percent like in Jen's e and jet and millennials. The were widely libertarian like we're on the precipice of victory. But we're GONNA totally lose that if we continued to constantly fight each other and turn people off with all this shit man well. Ten percent in one demographic is not exactly the precipice of victory but I I appreciate your optimistic thinking I certainly hope that's the case look I. Don't I get what you're saying there are certainly people who are shitty on twitter and I will say don't do that I. Don't think I don't like that culture in general you know it kind of is a reality I don't know what we can do. I would certainly say Internet body listening don't be don't be Shitty to Chris on the Internet after this, it's a you know I respect you coming on and having this conversation I very much respect you. Apologizing when you got something wrong. So I think like there's no need for anybody to name caller shitty that being said when Nicholas what comes on the podcast and says that if Dick Cheney is the nominee we should vote from and then pretty much says even if it was Hitler well, here's why it may still be a good idea to vote for him and then he's going to go out and criticize other Libertarians obliglated if the response to that is to mock him as the guy who supported Hitler, I get why people want to do that in some cases it is more justified than it is in others. But that being yet we all we could all be nicer. I. Think that a lot of people. Are. You know there is tremendous anger. In the country right now on all sides and the the more right wing side that you see getting angry it you know online I think people are really furious with the fact that they. Are Constantly lectured put down and at risk genuinely at risk. If, they are like speak their mind publicly in any way I mean part of the reason why the right wingers have so many anonymous accounts is because it is legitimately dangerous to your livelihood to be a right-wing are on social media these days I mean if you say the wrong thing just like that woman who got fired for saying all lives matter your and so now I'm not saying that every manifestation of anger is justified but I certainly understand why they're angry. I understand why a Lotta left-wingers are angry about stuff as well. Yeah I mean if you if you sit down and talk to people who are On the left. They argue that cancel culture has always existed and especially if you're a minority, a person of color a woman like the. White men were now starting to experience that same thing. We fucking hate it. I don't know I like I really don't like those narratives and I I gotTa say white men are not just starting to experience oppression white or not just starting to experience a hard times. The idea that history has been nothing but easy for white men and now all. Cancer. Culture is now ramping up and starting like the right is starting to experience what's going on and that's one of. The dixie chicks got it in two thousand and three when the Republicans were using cancel culture us. As I recall yet, it is a phenomenon that happens constantly and it's a it's a function of us trying to manage things from the top instead of looking at local solutions and managing up like that should be our message. Yeah. Well, listen I don't agree I. Don't disagree with that I think, yes, a bottom up is always better than top down and absolutely I mean canceled culture of different varieties has existed as long as you go try being antiwar during the Woodrow Wilson Administration, you'll find out about some hardcore cancel culture right there. But So I certainly agree with that listen we are we are at the end of our time So I, I will say, I really appreciate the conversation. I'm down to do it again if if there's more stuff that you want to hammer out a please let my audience no one more time where they can follow you and your your websites and social media and all that stuff. Yeah. Feel free to follow me. It's Weird Libertarians, dot, com and liberty explained dot com. All right, absolutely. Well, Chris Thank you very much. I really appreciate the conversation nobody Dick on twitter I enjoyed this very much and. Thanks one more time for for coming on the show. Have a good one.

Libertarian Party Ron Paul Joe Jorgenson twitter Dave Smith meese caucus Spike Cohen Liberty Movement Party Tom Tom Woods macy Tom Woods America Chris Bongo facebook Maecenas Caucus Muses Caucus FBI New York City Loser Brigade
Pocast: A Supreme Court Preview

The BreakPoint Podcast

24:17 min | 1 year ago

Pocast: A Supreme Court Preview

"I'm Shane Morris with the Colson Center for Christian worldview in Nineteen sixteen the US Congress passed a law saying the Supreme Court of the United States would convene on the first Monday of October. It has done so every year since this Monday October. Seventh the court will begin its annual session now. The Supreme Court's decisions fans are always important but this year promises to be particularly interesting. If you care about life marriage religious liberty and related issues that's why we wanted to bring Elizabeth slattery to the breakpoint podcast to give us a preview of the upcoming session. Elizabeth slattery is a legal fellow at the Heritage Foundation's Edwin MEESE Center for Legal and Judicial Studies in that role she analyzes cases before the Supreme Court she also studies judicial nominations and the proper role of the courts her work includes testimony before the US House of Representatives and our commentaries have appeared in the Washington Post The Washington Times national review and US News and World Report. She also hosts Skoda's one. Oh One podcast breaking down what's happening at the Supreme Court. Elizabeth slattery gives us a preview of the upcoming Supreme Court session in this conversation with the president of the Colson Center John Stonestreet walk into the break point podcasts we are facing now l. another term at the US Supreme Court and as we've talked about on all kinds of levels at breakpoint on breakpoint commentaries there have been a lot of of cases that are of interest Christians just recently Elizabeth slattery who's illegal fellow and Appellate Advocacy Program Manager for the MEESE Center for Legal and judicial initial studies and let me just say Elizabeth. That's one great title right there. she is at the Heritage Foundation she researches and writes on the rule of law separation of powers civil rights and other constitutional issues and at the Heritage Foundation and we'll link to this on our website which is breakpoint dot org. She's written piece basically over reviewing what we can expect back from this two thousand nineteen to twenty a term of the US Supreme Court so Elizabeth. I'm just really glad that you are able to come on and help us think through this. Thanks for having me so. Let's start with the you know. The cases that have been the most high profile of interest for people of faith have been these cases that that have been these collision cases between sexual freedom and religious liberty and obviously the Jack Phillips case masterpiece cake shop and it looks like we we have another one of those types of cases. Maybe more than one that we're looking at in this term. Can you walk us through that sure so there have been a number of cases cases related to the masters cake shop case similar cases involving flora and and other people working in the wedding industry. None of them are currently before the Supreme Court but I think there is a chance that one of those could come up later in the term but that's sort of related issue is involving the federal law that prohibits habit discrimination and employment on the basis of stack and there are three cases that are coming up. They're going to be argued the second day of the term so in in just chew weeks and two of them involved claims by gay men who were fired who then brought suit against their former employer saying we were fired because of our sexual orientation mutation and that is prohibited under federal locks. There's a third case that involves gender identity rather than sexual orientation now the employers all of these cases a I look the federal law sex discrimination and sex discrimination does not include sexual orientation or gender identity and until just a few years ago all of the appeals courts that heard cases like these agreed and said that sex does not include sexual orientation or gender identity but a couple of appeals court have gone the other way now and so there was a circuit split and the Supreme Court is going to take up those cases on the second term and really what's at stake here is it is I think the broader issue is what branch of government is the appropriate one to address this issue. If the people decide that they want Federal Employment Lynch Discrimination Protections to cover sexual orientation or gender identity should go through the courts or should it go through the more accountable government to go through Congress and you know it's my hope that a majority of the Supreme Court recognized that this is policy making and that if people want us to be prohibited by federal law it needs to be a change in action by Congress rather than by the judiciary in what we're talking about. Here is how we understand. The word sex entitled seven of the Civil Rights attacked in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and I guess one of the long term implications and tell me if I'm wrong here. Elizabeth is is that if the court does decide that this word at saks which clearly wasn't on the minds of anyone who produced the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four should include sexual orientation and gender identity. I mean I think you know authority. Content here is probably pretty clear right so if that was never on the minds does this have implications for other federal legislation and not not just title seven but also title nine ten. This is going to have a ricochet effect right. Yes certainly if the court rules on it. It could have a ripple effect touching other civil rights laws as you mentioned you know this could potentially dismantle same sex sex specific bathrooms and you know we've seen conflicts with individuals gender identity becoming a problem in athletics particularly sweet actress situation where young girls competing in highschool competition are then competing keating against biological male to identifying females. That's another reason why it's better for Congress to address this issue. If the American people feel like that that needs to happen happen that Congress can craft legislation that can take account of you know religious exemption and all of these other sort of attendant effects of federalizing in writing these sorts of protection from that the Supreme Court would not be able to do in rolling. I you know I don't know how how much you're into making predictions about these things predictions about the supreme court or famously wrong right so so we're all a little bit has an to do it but it seems to me that at least over the short term we have a little bit of a different court than we then we have had in the past specifically sense some of these well since the obergefell decision right that came from Justice Kennedy just Kennedy to me seemed quite reticent that isn't to make any sort of sweeping ruling. That was GONNA be a sort of renew Roe v Wade now Bergeford came pretty close to that but he's seen has attended windsor and then of course he turned around and walked back. I think some of the implications from herberger fell in the masterpiece decision basically saying okay. This is where America's headed did but you can't be mean about it to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission. Is there a reticence on the supreme court to Redo the sort of culture war creating legislation net Roe v Wade did yes. I think a number of the justices are aware of what the general reaction and the outgrowth of Roe v Wade was that you know Justice Clarence. Thomas is is the only justice who has written on the Supreme Court saying that he thinks we should be overturned the other you know haven't had the opportunity to say whether or not they agree with that but I think there is recognition among particularly conservative members of what came out of taking that policy issue away from the American people taking it away and giving it to judges debt to decide how to deal with these policy issues so I think a number of the justices are concerned about out those sorts of they take that into account and I think that will certainly be in their minds when they're looking at the title in cases. We've talked about the Harris funeral home case. That's the the one that involves gender identity rather than sexual orientation will the court consider all three of these cases together or are they going to handle these one at a time so so they're all being argued on the same day the to sexual orientation cases have been consolidated and the Harris funeral home gender identity case is a separate standalone in case but I think there could still be separate opinions that come out from the three cases but I think they will likely you know rise and fall together okay well. Well let me ask you this be speaking of kind of the sweeping Roe v Wade. Obviously we've seen enough handmaid's tells protesters you know the last us for the rest of our lives recently but that's been the narrative of gorsuch and cavenaugh being on the court that Roe v Wade is threatened. There's nothing coming up in this term at least as far as I can see that plays into that narrative at least at this point. Is that right I think that's right and you know we heard a lot but really incendiary things with justice. Gorsuch was nominated and then Justice Cavanaugh was nominated and so far the rapid destruction of America had their opponents. foreshadowed has yet to occur and I. I don't think it's likely to happen. Obviously if there is an abortion case that comes up that will be Perhaps one of the most closely scrutinized cases come up to the court in recent memory. There are a couple of petitions right now pending before the justices right notably is a case out of Louisiana dealing with weather doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Is this sound familiar to listeners. That's because the court heard a similar tastes from Texas a couple of years ago in the term when Justice Scalia castaway and when when the court was short handed by one shots they ended up ruling for the challengers in striking down the Texas law finding that it was an undue burden on women's access to abortion now it'd be the Louisiana law are had already been passed at the time but it was sort of put on ice because it was being challenged in court. I hadn't gone into effect yet and so now that one is there's a petition before the Supreme Court should review view that law and I think there's a good chance the court could decide take up that case on the merits earlier this year chief justice Roberts along with before Liberal members the court granted the clinic petition per day of the lower court ruling which lower court ruled in favor of the state law and so the court said we're GONNA. We're in a grant the stay the law's not going to go into effect and you know that kind of extraordinary relief. It's not something they do in every case so I think that kind of signals that they may end up taking back case on the merits and you know I think we see an abortion case Surpreme Court. I think many in the mainstream media will it'll be you know a four alarm fire all hands on deck. Everyone's going to be trying to influence any of those to get them to track down this eminently reasonable law right. It is in this kind of underscores to something that we've been arguing doing which is essentially that you listen. You're not gonNA have any sort of sweeping reversal of Roe v Wade. It's going to be taken on you know kind of incrementally and this has to do with undue burdens placed on women you know what fits into that category and so on so it really inching and as you mentioned in your article and I really appreciated by the way at the beginning that folks just don't know how the Supreme Court works. I don't know as much as I really should about this. The court receives roughly seven thousand petitions. Every term agrees to review between sixty and seventy cases. They've granted review and forty two cases so there's another twenty odd cases that should fall into the schedule here depending on how the schedule works out one of the things also you point out too. Is that you whenever a nomination process happens especially with Kevin on gorsuch which was extremely culturally loud as you mentioned earlier. There's this assumption that you know. The judges are going to be the puppets of whoever nominated them justices have really turned out to be remarkably unreliable as being puppets of the president it seems they often fandel play by nominations rule as far as that goes and you said the same thing about cavenaugh and gorsuch talk a little bit about what you've seen their care so the data set on what kind of justices gorsuch and cabinet or going to be in the long term. You know it's limited at this point. We have a couple of terms for gorsuch. We have almost a full term with justice cavenaugh but what we know so far is that they are independent impartial. They have very distinct views of how they approached the law and you know they're not cookie cutter. Republican judges. If if you want to say that there are such thing as democratic or Republican judges you know for example they ended up disagreeing in thirty percent of the cases last term so you know when people assume that they're just waiting to vote in this monolithic thick block of conservative justices that kind of skews how the justices approach the law. You know to be quite frank. The more liberal wing of the court tennis is chew vote as a bloc Republican. You know the Liberals are able to appeal one conservative here when conservative there more often than the conservatives are to ever be able to get one of the liberals to cross over join them sitting. That's you know that's sort of an interesting data point that they Jim Cavanaugh. I disagree in thirty percent of the cases last term charm and we hear a lot about five four rulings. five four rulings are not that common. There are on average twenty to twenty five percent. One of the cases the cream court. Here's end up being decided by one vote you now. The vast majority decided seven to eight one or nine zero so for the most part the justices are able to coalesce and and and come to you know more than just a bare majority when they're ruling. I think we see have seen even recently the enormous respect. They tend to have for each other as sitting on the court. I mean even just recently there. Was You know very gracious. This words I think by Ruth Bader Ginsburg towards breath cavanaugh I mean I was really interesting. Development my guest today on the breakpoint passes Elizabeth slattery. She's illegal fellow and appellate with Advocacy Program Manager for the Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at the Heritage Foundation and we're talking about an overview of the Supreme Court's two thousand Nineteen Two thousand twenty Johny term. I WanNa make sure you can find Elizabeth terrific article which you can find at heritage dot. Org or come to breakpoint dot Org Click on the link there on the homepage it says says resources mentioned on the radio and podcast and we'll link to this article entitled overview of the Supreme Court's two thousand Nineteen Two thousand twenty term by my guest today Elizabeth slattery slattery we started out Elizabeth talking about what really has been the context for most of the religious freedom issues that we've seen at the court which is the collision lesion with sexual freedom but there is a decision from a few years ago an alliance defending freedom case Trinity Lutheran versus comber which came out of a weather state funds can be used for religious groups and of course strict separation between Church and state would say no. We've got another case on DOC is so this doesn't really have to do with sexual freedom or the LGBT challenge this has to do with basically this so called wall between Church and state that both the left and the right see very differently so we're talking about another case here Espinosa of versus the Montana Department of revenue talk us through that one sure this is a very important case it involves a Montana law that set up a tax credit program so that people if they decided to make a donation to this scholarship fund they would get one hundred and fifty dollar tax credit and the scholarship organization would give those funds to income eligible children to use at private schools of their choice to families would apply for their children to receive a scholarship and then decide what private school they wanted US dollars at so about as indirect as you could get from the state giving money directly to a private school but the state initially allowed parents to use these these dollars APP religious private school and after the law went into a and apparent started to take advantage of the Montana realized that well they have in this state constitutional provision called it's known as the Blaine Amendment thirty seven state tabbies that permitted public funds from uh-huh aiding religious organization and so you know these amendments were passed in the for the most part in late eighteen hundred they were intended to target and and prevent public funds from going to Catholic school because at the time public schools they were being developed. had more of a Protestant. It's been banned and they didn't want Collins going to Catholic schools at that time so the Supreme Court officers including Clarence Thomas have written about the sort of ugly discriminatory history of these amendments but nevertheless thirty seven states have them in their constitutions to this day so the state decided well. We're we're not going to allow parents to use the dollars at religious public private schools anymore a group of families that had children who they wanted to send their children to religious school school challenged it it went all the way up to the Montana Supreme Court the Montana Supreme Court said Yup we agree with Montana this violates our Blaine amendments and the remedy was at the Montana Supreme Court decided to invalidate the program in its entirety so no scholarship fund to be used at at any private schools and so that is what is at the Supreme Court and the the issue and how this ties in with the the Trinity Lutheran case that you mentioned is whether this discriminates again against the parents the families that want to use these fun at religious schools better to their free exercise of religion now in the Trinity Lutheran case in two thousand seventeen and a majority of the Supreme Court said a by the seventy two. I said that Missouri had violated the free exercise clause when it would not allow L. H. Church run day care to apply for a public grant to resurface playground scrap tires. You know Missouri said well you know we're concerned about an establishment establishment of religion here and you know if you think about using public funds Scott scrap tire program to resurfaces playground you know that gets about as far you're from what you consider an establishment of religion as I can think of you know establishment of religion you think of the state telling you what church you have to go to misstate using state funds to directly pay ministers salaries and things like that but nevertheless the Supreme Court agreed with the challenges that you can't discriminate against I church solely because of its religious identity but chief justice. Roberts wrote the majority opinion. He said this is limited to play around and resurfacing using public our grand you know don't read anything into this. This is goes further than that but now we have my case the school case until they're seeking to build on a nation of trading returned extended to school stories area. Yeah that definitely gets a lot closer to what we might think about establishment clause listen. We're we're almost out of time here but one of the most interesting things that the supreme court's looking at something that it hasn't looked at as you write in your article since two thousand and eight and that's something having to do with or two thousand eight and two thousand ten Dan I guess which has to do with the second amendment you think about all the cases have new the first amendment and as you ride or is justice. Thomas wrote the fourth amendment you know in recent years the Second Amendment it. This is as culturally controversial as it gets. That's right and you know justice. Thomas has pointed out that in the decade different graves taken taking up a second amendment case has been nearly ten years the last one the court has routinely taken up dozens upon them the first amendment cases for the amendment cases but he says that the Second Amendment is the orphan of bill of rights so the cases coming up it's a challenge to a licensing regime in in your in your city which limited individuals ability to US they have to apply for the premise applies in order to possess handguns. Dan Gone and then when you get this license you can only possessed the handgun in your home or transferred it. She one of seven gun ranges within the city you can't you couldn't take it outside of the city. You couldn't take it anywhere else you know. If you move from one apartment to another I guess you'd have to leave your handgun behind because there was no to them for moving approach to this was challenged power by a district court in New York and NFL but a second circuit court of Appeals that the regulations imposed at most trivial reveal limitation on abilities that rather than -bility to lawfully that's firearms for self defense so it now at the Prima court but the city changed its regulations so the court granted third in the case last January and had plenty of time to get up to shift so they change congratulations for that now people who have a premises license can take their hand gun to a gun range outside of the city. They can take it a new home. If they knew about the challenger. Stay you know and so the city says okay the case would move there isn't alive. She's a controversy console requirement for sure case uh-huh challengers say look we're looking for terminent binding forward-looking relief telling the city that they cannot after this case away decide to reinstate their previous regime regime and so that's why they think that the court should reach the merits of the case of course it. He says there's okay anymore. Either they they defended the country's now the regime for six years and leg and and then when it gets to the Supreme Court and they see that this might have broader implications for gun rights throughout the country they decided to try to take the case away from the Supreme Court for coming not like when we do that well well. That's going to be interesting to watch. Chaz are as you mentioned opening day which involves conversations about obamacare and immigration specifically the DACA program which that's not controversial at all and we'd love to get into that a little bit more Elizabeth but I appreciate you give us the time that you have and come to breakpoint dot org click there on the homepage on the button that says resources mentioned on the radio and podcasts and will link you to this Julie just terrific summary of the what's on the docket for the Supreme Court in this night two thousand eighteen eighteen two thousand twenty term which begins on October the seventh Elizabeth slattery is illegal fellow and Appellate Advocacy Program Manager for the MEESE Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at at the Heritage Foundation she researches and writes on the rule of law separation of powers civil rights and other constitutional issues and she has her close eye on the Supreme Court and I imagine Elizabeth you'll be continuing to write legal analysis as this docket goes forward and decisions are made. Thanks so much for having thank you so much for joining us and for shedding some light on this that was Elizabeth slattery of the Heritage Foundation discussing the upcoming session of the Supreme Court of the United States session that begins next Monday before we go. I'd like to remind you that the call center is offering a book this month that explores more indepth the issues John and Elizabeth discussed today day free to believe a powerful new book by Luke Goodrich an attorney for the becket fund for religious liberty or he is represented hobby lobby and little sisters of the poor for before the US Supreme Court you can get this new book by Luke Goodrich by going to breakpoint dot org and making a donation of any size to breakpoint the Colson center again. That's breakpoint dot org. I also want to let you know that we have a free online webinar with Luke Goodrich this Friday at noon Eastern Time The Colston Centers Warren Cole Smith Will Talk Doc with Luke about his new book and they will even be some time for you to ask questions the Golsen centers warring call Smith will talk with Luke about his new book and there will even be time for you to ask questions to participate in this unique opportunity or to find out more go to breakpoint dot org and Click on the events tab at the top of the page. Thanks for listening to today's breakpoint podcast for the Colson Center. I'm Shane Morris.

US Supreme Court Elizabeth slattery Supreme Court Montana Supreme Court Heritage Foundation Congress Roe Surpreme Court United States court of Appeals Clarence Thomas Colson Center Shane Morris MEESE Center for Legal Appellate Advocacy Program Man US justice Roberts president
The Best We Can Do  the pragmatic views of Cheryl Misak and young Frank Ramsey

Ideas

55:19 min | 7 months ago

The Best We Can Do the pragmatic views of Cheryl Misak and young Frank Ramsey

"Stir crazy from self isolating with acorn. Tv experienced the British countryside or Australian outback without leaving the house hailed a glorious streaming service by the Hollywood reporter Acorn TV is a must for crime drama and mystery enthusiasts from line of duty to midsomer murders acorn TV has beloved series from around the world all commercial free plus when you sign up for Acorn TV. You'll get exclusive originals. Such keeping faith mystery road an emmy nominated Queens of mystery available on your favorite device visit. Sign UP DOT ACORN DOT TV and use code. Cbc for an extended Thirty Day free trial ACORN TV World TV from Britain and beyond this is a CBC podcast. I'm Nola I add. It's Tuesday April seventh and this is ideas. But we're going to do our best. I was doing my best. We're really stretching and we're doing the best we can to say we're doing our best can sound like a defensive posture. We take it when we're accused of not doing enough it implies. There's something beyond our best a better way of acting a higher level of performance a gold standard. We haven't yet reached. Human beings are always fallen far short of that. But there's another way of looking at the notion of doing our best. It's not about settling for less. It's about constantly pushing for more and more and more. There is no bottom. Underneath the best that human beings can do Jeremy's act is a pragmatist in the philosophical sense of the word pragmatism in philosophy is an attempt to steer away from worrying. About what absolutely perfect or absolutely true. This is a misguided search and it can have bad consequences in its more extreme versions. It's been said that. Pragmatism is about telling metaphysics to just shot up on today's episode. We present the case for a particular moderate brand of pragmatism. That may be deeply valuable. In Times of uncertainty. This episode is also a story about an unusual and short lived pragmatist who showed up at Cambridge University one hundred years ago. Today's show is by ideas producer. Tom Howell it's called the best. We can do. The pragmatic views of Cheryl MEESE AC and young Frank Ramsey I grew up in left which Alberta had an ordinary Alberton education when I went to university also Inlet Bridge Berta at the University of Leverage. I literally didn't not flossy. What's I was Real Brat? I wanted to only Tuesday Thursday courses so I could tennis and go skiing. And one of the courses that fit into my schedule. Was this thing. Called Philosophy Cheryl. Muzak is one of the world's leading philosophers. She lives and teaches in Toronto but she admits her career in philosophy began somewhat casually. I thought as many undergraduates do flossy. Sounds a bit like psychology. I'll take it and fell in love with it right away. Why I liked the argument structure. I like trying to get to the bottom of things. And that's relief. That's as good. A an account of what philosophy is as any fluffy tries to get to the bottom of things to the most fundamental questions. The most fundamental questions are what you end up with after removing. What's vague or superficial from everyday questions like should I put this in the recycling? Apply enough pressure to a question like that and alarmingly quickly it can turn into. But what do I mean by truth? Viscous high-seas because it's an irony that the more we try to eliminate doubts and imprecisions in our thinking the more doubtful and imprecise and even sillier questions can sound. Will the sun rise drowns? That's why a subset of philosophy sprung up some one hundred fifty years ago dedicated to not letting the discussion become pointless or ludicrous. And it's this type of philosophy. That inspired Cheryl music as a young student in Left Bridge Alberta at least from Tuesday to Thursday yes. When I was an undergraduate I became interested in the homegrown flossy in the in America. It's called pragmatism pragmatism. Says that instead of trying to find pure pristine foundations for all of our knowledge. We need to ask. What is the best that fallible human beings can do and that's what truth and knowledge amounts to? It's interesting because you said that one of the reasons that you got into philosophy is wanting to get to the bottom of things. And then you're like well pragmatism. Don't cook well. It's a pragmatism. Makes what I think is a profound point which is that there is no bottom underneath the best that human beings can do to search for something absolute or pure or untainted by human concepts and human nature is to be misguided in your search. Its search for the wrong thing not only. Are you bound to be disappointed? But you're just taken off Along a garden path and it's leading new nowhere and it can have bad consequences if you think that the moral ideal is a god-like ideal and human beings are always fallen far short of that you might forgive human moral failings that too quickly right a few minutes camp to actually get anywhere near the ideal then why not just go to confession and absolved whereas if your ideal the very best that human beings can do in their relationships with others then you have a goal that's accessible. And you're actually more accountable. I think if you failed to reach it I think should explain a little back story as to why I became interested. In what makes Cheryl music in the fall of two thousand nineteen? I made an episode for ideas about my longtime intellectual hero. Another pragmatic philosopher named Richard Roti. That production involves spending a weekend among his followers. The Richard Rosie Society in the US. At the time I'd never heard of several music but then one of the rotations pulled me aside and addressed me suspiciously lawyer making this way giving giving royalty Canada. What's what's can actual leg part B. personal interesting but it succeeded in reassuring. This protein apparently been worried. I was some sort of spy. Assure me sack is like Canadian. Practice here she lucas. I think mistakenly don't like royalties turns out while my hero is a pragmatist philosopher and Cheryl music also a pragmatist philosopher. This coincidence does not mean that they agree the pragmatist. At least my sort of pragmatist. Try to do justice to both the subject of aspect of human belief and the objective aspect of human belief. We human beings evolved in a certain way we have limitations we have capacities we have needs. We have wants all of. This is very subjective. Very evolved very human and yet we human beings also aim to have our beliefs be true or get things right and that's the object of side of human belief. We don't think the truth is just whatever I happen to want to believe. We think that there's something to get right or wrong. This is a very very fine in precarious line to walk. It's very easy to fall off into the entirely. Subjective side or to fall off into the entirely objective side. So when you talk about the non ludicrous the pragmatist. Your ludicrous pragmatists While to quote from Ramsey when Ramsay died he was writing a book and we have drafts and in those drafts. Ramsey said that he was searching for a kind of pragmatism. That was known ludicrous. So Ramsey off obviously never mind because we're not on the came into prominence in the nineteen seventies Ramsey. Had William James in mind but you might have already mind yes. These days we tend to have already in mind but was now. I won't get bogged down here in the finer points of Richard brought. He's controversial but pragmatic views. I'm just alerting you to an underlying conflict namely Cheryl calls my intellectual hero ludicrous and aligns herself with a different philosophical pragmatist. Frank Ramsey the fierce battles go on among these pragmatists are as never-ending as they are intricate. And there's a large supply of heroes to choose between all competing to say the most sensible thing you could possibly say in answer to life steepest questions. I've come to Cheryl music to find out why she chose her heroes instead of mine. I had a teacher. Invasive Was very interested in the founder of American pragmatism. Ellen MC s purse Charles Sanders Purse. So as an undergraduate. You get a smorgasbord of flossy. You look at Aristotle. Look at Descartes's. I looked at purrs and I was immediately attracted to this human pragmatist. Kind of approach person's care to study logic because everybody conceives himself to be proficient enough in the art of reasoning. Already some of my reasons for being attracted to purse were non intellectual. If you like person's interesting he was really difficult. Man Brilliant wonderful logistician mathematician philosopher but. He was so difficult that he couldn't get a permanent job in academia difficult personality he would probably be diagnosed something these days so he sat in a cold attic without much adequate food and he wrote in a completely undisciplined way. He published very little because he never job. And he did write something he went off into technicalities that no one could understand because he was such a legitimate and he didn't realize it he had to make things accessible where he didn't care about his audience to make things. Accessible definition of definition is at bottom what the maximum of fragmented expresses part of. It was just a big challenge part of the attraction to purchase that it was a huge challenge. You could actually make discoveries about what purse was arguing. That was very attractive to me and still is attractive to a lot of people can we zoom in on an idea that you remember coming across or is it too hard for to explain to a non expert. Well so purse. If you like invented the pragmatists account of truth let us not pretend doubt in philosophy what we do not doubt in our hearts. Here's one truth. Many people believe that truth amounts to having a sentence literally correspond to elements in objective reality and that means that words in a sentence so this book is on the table. This book latches onto the book in front of me. The table word latches onto the table. Somehow then the correspondence theory of truth has a lot of problems with the words is on whereas that in the world. What about sentences like? It's not the case that there are any books on the table. What is that latch onto in the world? There are problems with the correspondence theory. But it's one of the major theories of truth and I think if you ask people in the Bar. What truth is they would give you some version of the correspondence theory. Challenge accepted Okay you can go to the bar tonight and ask people what's being a fragmented. I decided to go to the bar until after would finish the job at hand namely finding out what Cheryl liked about the American philosopher s purse. Another theory of truth is that there is no real truth. Truth is what ever I think it's true it's true for me and whatever you think is true is true for you. You hear this all the time. This is my truth. You have your truth is my truth. Says the kind of relativistic count of truth where there is no objective? Truth of the matter. It's just what I think. And what you think and that I think is very very dangerous account of truth it leads to impasse as I think. For instance that we find ourselves today where people are just shouting at each other shouting their trues at each other across the Great. Divide like you just decided to make truth. Synonym for opinion. Really exactly so the pragmatist account of truth. The account that purse invented is somewhere in the middle per said. Look you can't pull truth apart. From human belief it's human beliefs that are true or false and our beliefs are structured by our concepts and our language the way we've evolved their human things. It's not that their sentences in God's head that correspond to facts in the objective world. It's a human beings have believes and what truth is is human belief that is the very best. It could possibly be so. It's not that if I have very good evidence for belief here now that makes it true so it's not that my belief is the very best it can be here now so then it true. Rather it's were. I'd have all the evidence word. Have all the argument. Not just me were we to all have the right. Maximum amount of evidence and argument. And were we to agree that this was true. Then that's what truth means I didn't put it very well. Put me taking. Truth is something you worked towards and then give important. You are doing a better worse. Job of working towards ackley Cheryl Music's first philosophical hero was the founder of pragmatism. Charles Sanders purse but her current philosophical hero is who I'm most curious about. Cheryl's just emerged from a ten year project to tell the life story of Frank Ramsey in nineteen twenty. He was a sixteen year old boy. Genius who gained early admission to the University of Cambridge. In Britain. Ten years later he was dead but during that decade he became something of an academic superstar at least two the other big brains in Cambridge back. Then well he was a mathematics undergraduate but the the maths was so easy for him. He just didn't put any effort at all. Mathematics degree is really interested in philosophy. He hung around with the philosophers and some economists very remarkable that he became friends with people like canes and Russell and when he was young. That's John Maynard. Keynes the famous economist. Bertrand Russell the famous philosopher and g e Moore. Who's not so famous now but was the time. People tested their views on Mandy all the time. Famous ECONOMISTS MATHEMATICIANS PHILOSOPHERS AND. They thought that could get past. Ramsey than it was worth something and if it couldn't get past Ramsey they needed to start over again. Only a young man died at age twenty six. So who knows what we would think of him where he lived his friends and well into his eighties. Perhaps he would've flamed out perhaps turned nasty. But there's no indication of either. He was just embarking on one of his most fruitful topics. He was in the middle of a big book. He was in the middle of all sorts of absolutely innovative and interesting ideas. But they're they're all in draft form so it's very hard to figure out very few published papers. Chicago like purse. You working with scraps little working with scraps exactly when you look at those scraps and you dig around and find scraps that other people haven't seen you see the Ramsey red purse in his last year as an undergraduate you can see from his diary entries. He over excited about reading purse. He thinks back probability theory. Because of Percy's Bredon. Some great stuff was never rewriting a biography of the Ramsey that we got and then the Ramsey the missing. I'm trying not to speculate too much. So there's a lot of speculation about what Ramsay would have done. We don't know what he would have done. People say oh. He would've come up with a good result before good. All Right Kirk girdle published. What's called his. Incompleteness theorem in nineteen thirty one. Just over a year. After Ramsey died it's one of the most important discoveries in logic it showed. That math isn't quite perfect. It contains truths that cannot be proven and talking of things that can't be proven. It does seem to me that if you want to pick an intellectual hero. Someone like Frank Ramsey who dies young adulthood before they've been written let alone published. A book is a pretty good bet. Nobody knows what they were going to say so. Nobody can argue that. Your hero is wrong. Let alone ludicrous. But there is more to Frank Ramsey's brief life than speculation and promise. My name is Kumar Morton. I'm a professor of mathematics at the University of Toronto and I'm also the director of the Fields Institute for Research and Mathematical Sciences. One area where Frank Ramsey's scraps of work add up to something substantial and fairly concrete is in math. There are two whole branches of mathematics based on his ideas and a theory to his name. What me nowadays called Ramsey theory Started with one theorem in non mathematical terms. Something like you have a big enough set of data then you can probably find within it any kind of structure that you're looking for the simplest example of this is what's called the pigeonhole principle if I take. Let's set of numbers from one to end And I take more than half of those numbers then at least two will be consecutive. So I have. Let's say all the numbers from one to one hundred and I take more than half of them it in any way you like you. Select more than half of them then. Some two numbers have to be consecutive. Why because if they were all spaced to apart there they wouldn't fill up. They go pass right. So that's that's pretty basic idea limit or not. This principle is used in highly non trivial as in many. Theorems explained to me patiently. A famous example of Ramsey theory called the theorem on friends and strangers. It starts with a simple claim that two people must either have met before or not met before. Have we met before Of his party now? That definitely wasn't me okay. I'll make it more complicated. You've got three people at a party. Is that guy your friend know? Was He invited? These three people might have all met before or they could have all not met before or two of them could have met while the other one is a stranger but then it turns out that if you have more than six people in fact three. We'll know each other or three will be complete strangers. One or the other will happen. So that's at first again it. It looks surprising. It looks surprising for two reasons. Firstly that you could make such an assertion and secondly that the number required is as low as six so this suggests that there is hidden structure that even though you didn't start by imposing structures just took a group of people you didn't select them in any specific way just took a group of people and they started observing relationships of friendships between them and suddenly destruction emerges you can discover this yourself on a piece of paper draw five dots to represent five people and then take two different color patterns say red and blue and join each dot to every other and you can choose to join them with a red pen and that means that don't know each other or join them with the blue pen if they don't know each other and the game is to avoid drawing a triangle with three red sides or three blue sides with five dots. You can just about do it. But and here's what the magic emerges ask sixth dot and now the game is impossible at least three dots will all know. Each other or three dots will be meeting for the first time. And you're forced to drawer allred or an old blue triangle this idea by of structure emerging that you had not formulated as part of the thing you're studying is is really the magic of mathematics and maybe it's even the magic of all of science or maybe the magic of all of discovery to discover understand the structure that that you had not put into it but but it was there. The whole concept of Ramsey's theorem which by the way so far I've not stated in the generality that that he formulated namely that it's not just a group of six. Three people know each other in a group of end objects if any sufficiently large. And you give me a certain number are less than then there will be some subset of all elements of that set of N Elements. Any two are so. It's not just for Cleveland. You could before and higher. That's really interesting because I think it's not something you would have suspected at first nowadays after so many years we have relatively simple proof of that but when it was first stated it was A. I don't think it was expected. I think Ramsey should be considered a very important mathematician mainly because his ideas have continued to draw attention and have continued to grow beyond the initial form. The T. customink people are still investigating Implications of some of his work and taking it to new levels so I would say in. The world of mathematics still occupies an important place has professor of mathematics at the University of Toronto. Kumar Murphy also happens to be using his understanding of the Ramsey influenced fields like combinatorial and discrete mathematics to muddle the potential spread of the corona virus part of the mystique around Ramsey's Hof written philosophical ideas is the way Danz through other subjects like mathematics spawning entire fields of inquiry and upending old ways of doing things apparently without much effort. He did the same for economics. If you're an economist you think he's great because of what he did. Economics John Maynard. Keynes was the most prominent academic probably in the country. Someone had said that Cambridge should be renamed canes bridge he was so prominent canes have just published a very famous book called a treatise on probability and when Ramsay was an undergraduate he exploded Keynes's theory of probability. A FRIEND OF KANE'S CLIVE. Bell said that Ramsey made a rent in Keynes's theory that caused all the stitches to run. So if you picture a garment. Ramsey made a little tear in it and all the stitches ran and the whole garment foul apart. How decanes feel about that? Keynes took it very well and canes convinced Ramsey to write his two famous papers on economics. You're listening to a documentary. Called the best we can do that. Pragmatic views of Cheryl me. Sak and young Frank Ramsey on. Cbc Radio One in Canada across North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on our ren and around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas. You can also hear ideas on the CBC. Listen OVER EVERY. Get Your podcast. I'm Nola I ed. Hey parents if you're looking for some screen free family fund will. You're staying home. Check out the story store podcast from CBC kids and CBC Podcast New Story Store. Shorties are released every week. These short original and hilarious stories fit anywhere near day from breakfast to bedtime. The story store available on smart speakers. Or wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Frank Ramsey was a towering intellect who has massive influence over the disciplines of economics and mathematics. But when he died in nineteen thirty he was just twenty six years old by then. He was a superstar to certain professors but not to the wider public. Canadian philosopher. Cheryl MSAC is now shining a spotlight on Frank Ramsey. She sees him as one of the most important minds of the Twentieth Century while he reshaped economics mathematics. It's his philosophical pragmatism. That makes him an intellectual hero for Cheryl Muzak ideas producer. Tom Powell is finding out. Why Cheremis told me that most of us go around with something called the correspondence theory of truth in our heads. Meaning we imagine our beliefs latching onto or picturing an objective reality. That's out there as if our ideas somehow mirror nature and I think if you ask people in the bar truth is they would give you some version of the correspondents theory. Challenge accepted. Okay you can go to the bar tonight. A what's now. I accepted Cheryl's challenge during that historic period when we were allowed to go outside to bars unfortunately that period ended before. I got a chance check. Sheriff was right and the Best I could do was used facebook to track down someone. I had met in a bar a short while ago. My Name's Roger. Smith and I can definitely confirm that. The I met you Tom. How at a bar in the Dan Force where we both enjoyed music or at great? You are a person at a bar from. I'm probably going to have to add some bar ambiance to make it more convincing. So Roger What is truth I believe that truth is moral. Truth is is what we agree. Upon is the best for Society for ourselves and for other people and what is true in terms of reality again is what do our perceptions agree upon that we can hold to keep our lives together to keep the society going and to waver from that is wrong and not true because it's GonNa hurt us and does that completely makes sense pretty close pretty good no it really makes me think right because I kind of go. There's another element in there that I'm missing coming from a Christian perspective. I would secretly saved that truth. Is that what which points us to God? That's the ultimate truth hand. And that's the word of God this where you come to scriptures and that kind of thing is that which God has spoken to us as a guide to bring us forward that is true but that doesn't mean that truth that I hold as ultimate his against the truth that an easiest would hold around what is best for themselves. Other people and the society at large the truth at that point is can be agreed upon no matter what your perspective of of where the ultimate arbiter of that truth is. It's what we agree upon from our different perspectives and is not going to hurt individuals or society. Okay thank you Roger. I'll go back to the philosopher and see what she makes of. That cheers cheers. I hope the situation develops in a way that we can run into each other at a bargain in the not too distant future. Yeah Yeah No. That'd be sweet. It will be so. That's absolutely wonderful. Roger has articulated not the correspondence theory of truth. But actually Ramsey's theory of truth really quite beautifully. Well I'm Roger. Well-done Roger so Ramsey argued precisely. What Rogers I saying in that conversation that what truth is in morality here is the best for human beings. That's what truth mounts to if we could find out what really worked best really was best for human beings for human society. That's what it is for an ethical belief to be true now at the end of the conversation. Roger Appeals Not that human conception of truth but to an absolute conception of truth. What's true is really. What's in the mind of God? But of course Ramsey objected to that kind of account of truth. He happened to be an atheist. Ramsey's brother Michael. Unlike frank was a fierce in fact he became the Archbishop of Canterbury after Frank Ramsey died and Michael and frank used to have huge but very good humored arguments about whether truth was what was in the mind of God or whether it was something more human and Ramsey would say to Michael. He was searching for fairy tales. Something human beings couldn't have access to. When Michael Ramsey became archbishop of Canterbury used to drive his more conservative colleagues in the Anglican Church wild by saying he fully expected to meet Atheists in heaven. Because if anyone was going to be found in heaven it was going to be his brother. Frank who was the most decent kind person who wanted to find out what was really best for human beings so interestingly even Michael Ramsey with his feast account of truth thought that someone who really just looked after the well being in the welfare of human beings would be the kind of person who got into heaven whether or not they believed in God. That sounds pretty combative with what Roger was saying he was like. I don't disrespect an atheist point of view. They just maybe have a different arbiter of truth than I have. Yes I think that's exactly right. So Roger I think is a perfect representation of Michael Ramsey Archbishop Canterbury except in his brother's human account of truth but thinking that they're still was something over and above it. I E truth in the mind of God. Frank Ramsey didn't publish very much about philosophy. He was a mathematician and he published some influential articles on economics. But what he thought about the great fundamental questions of truth in existence has been murky. It's a couple of articles it's scattered throughout the draft of book. He never published. It's in his diary entries and reports of conversations. He had with other professors. Cheryl's convinced Ramsay was onto some brilliant ideas. Her challenge has been to work out exactly what they were. So Ramsey argued that a belief is a habit and we evaluate our habits in terms of whether or not they work. But it's not just working in the sense that it it feels to me like it's working or it makes me feel better. I think it's working round. Two is very clear that that a belief or a habit works. Only if it's connected to the facts so he gives an example of chicken who thinks a certain kind of caterpillar is poisonous and refrains from eating that kind of caterpillar exceed the green ones. So you can imagine a where. The chicken has the habit with the belief. The Caterpillar is poisonous. Doesn't eat those caterpillars but there are lots of other caterpillars to eat until the belief looks like working for the chicken but in a condition of famine in fact they are not poisonous. The chicken has a belief or a habit that works very badly. Yes she has a nicer example. I think if I have a belief in hell that belief might seem to work for me. I'm very comfortable with it. I go to a certain kind of church and we all get together and we talk about Hell and damnation might stand on the street corner and shout at people going to hell. I refrain from doing certain things in order to get myself into heaven and not into Hell but Ramsey says the belief in hell really works only if there in fact is a hell otherwise he says it's a mere waste of opportunities for enjoyment. Truth be told whatever truth is it took me several goes before. I started to get the point of these. Apparently fundamental insights into the nature of truth has Ramsey understood it. Okay so right now. I might be worried that a particular surface. Let's say the the buttons on a on a debit machine. I might be worried that they covered nineteen virus spores or whatever. You call them real on that thing. Can you apply how Ramsey would talk me through that? How does he help me there? So Ramsey's view is fundamentally commonsense view. Take a belief such as covert nineteen on my keyboard. I will act in certain ways. This is on Ramsey's view. I will clean my keyboard. I will tell my daughter not to touch it until I cleaned it. It won't be such a good belief if I if I'm paranoid and think that cope in nineteen is absolutely everywhere paralysed myself. I won't be able to do anything. So Ramsey is going to say that That your belief that discovered nineteen on the keyboard depends on whether there is in fact covert nineteen on the keyboard and what it is half that belief do certain things stay away from the keyboard for instance so this is very total logical like he says. I say there's cove in nineteen. Oh my keyboard. And he's like well that's true if there is another way of putting it. Your belief is a good belief if it leads to successful action. Says I save if you're neurotic and you think Copeland nineteen is everywhere. These are very bad believed to have and that belief is gonNA lead you astray so I don't want to get Cova. Nineteen they're all sorts of beliefs. I could adopt about Quebec nineteen and the ones that I adopt are going to be. The ones that I think are going to maximize utility I. E stopped me from getting covered nineteen but also enabled me to keep on living for instance. So if I if if I believed breathing. The air gave me cope in nineteen any air. That would be a very bad belief that it would not maximize my utility because one needs to breathe in order to live. Okay what if it were true up? Well then then. Your utilities is going to be pretty much nil because you're not long for the world but in fact happens to be a false belief as our lots of out there floating around right now so Ramsey's do is really about finding beliefs. Were habits that work in the world now. Of course right now. We're getting our best information from the people who actually know the Science. So those are the beliefs that are likely to maximize utility their beliefs. That we should be acting on in fact we see Canadians on the whole acting on those beliefs. But if you have a cockamamie belief and you act on it your utilities not going to be maximized. What do you personally like about the choice to talk about whether something works on? Ought rather than to talk about whether something is true or not part of the advantage of having a philosophical theory about what works or what functions well for human beings rather than what is absolutely true in some gods. I sense is that we don't actually have any access to what's true in God's die or in this absolute sense. It's a bit of a fairytale. This is a term. That Ramsey actually used quite often. Don't believe in fairytales. He said it's funny. That fairy tales means the truth then according to like the idea of the truth that the fairy tale yes at the absolute truth is is the Fairytale Ramsey thought. We should start with humans and stick with humans in coming to our philosophical concepts. The answers to fundamental questions are a strange mixture of the mind blowing lead simple and the mind blowing complicated. Frank Ramsey was a close friend or the closest thing to a friend of big VIC consign now victim signs a towering figure in western philosophy. But that didn't make being friends with him much fun. He was very intense. He was very very brilliant and he was very very difficult. He was described by some of his friends in Cambridge. As the most difficult person you know he got cross very easily with his friends. He gave them the silent treatment. Would drop them. He did so with Ramsey for a couple of years because they had a quarrel about Freud continues to speak to him. I spent some time trying to figure out why Ramsey said about Freud got victim. Stein so mad that they stop talking. It turned out to be something related to sex life. But back to. What's much more interesting defining truth? They can send wrote the track. Practice logical philosophic while he was on the front fighting for the Austrians in the track status but can Stein put forward the picture theory of truth and meaning. You take a complex proposition and you analyze it down to its elementary simple constituents so the cat is on the mat and you have an object cat you have an object. Matt and each of those words is supposed to reach out to reality and latch onto cattail mat and so there weren't many things that could be said to be true or false. On this account of truth because only very very simple kind of observational sentences about concrete objects like cats and mats are going to be true on this account of meaning a more abstract proposition about the nature of numbers. Or what is just or unjust. That's not going to latch onto objects in reality and so those kinds of propositions consign said were nonsensical. You couldn't say them. You could just showed more indicate them. I and this was a very famous distinction that he made in the practice between what could be sad these very very simple straightforward sentences and what could only be shown or gesture that I don't understand what shown or gesture that means if you can't say them you're not alone this was one of Ramsey's worries about the track Tata's what is the consign mean by that which can only be shown not said for Victims Stein. All the philosophy also couldn't be sad because philosophy can't be reduced to these very simple sentences reach out and grab onto elements of the objective world so vic and shine in the track. Tata's does a huge amount of philosophy. The whole toutes philosophy and then at the end he says so. I've shown philosophies nonsense it can't be said what do I make of all of the philosophy that I've just done or said and because you must use it like a ladder once you've climbed up at an overhead then you must kick it out from underneath you and never do philosophy again. Ramsey objected to this as well what we can't say we can't say and we can't whistle it either. That was rammed his way of putting your worry us. What what does it mean that? Which can only be shown? What does it mean. You're trying to whistle. Get instead of saying an hint. You're not making very good sense. So why was picking signs so brilliant? Well he put forward a conception of language and logic that was really brand new completely novel and really he. He set the tone for philosophy for a few decades. And then consign did an about-face he rejected everything in the track. Tata's and started to argue that we have to focus on meaning as the way we use the proposition. We had to start to focus on human practice this entirely. Unlike the beauty put forward in the practice but of course it was very very much like Ramsey's view so I argue the consign became the later bit consign because of Ramsey. What's the significance for Western thought of that shift in victim? Sign this thinking. Well it is one of the. It is one of the most dramatic significant shifts. In the history of flossy the consign is one of the most important philosophers ever and this complete about face was one of the most dramatic changes of mind. That history flossie has seen. There's really no pulling apart Western analytic philosophy and even continental philosophy from the later that can shine in the work. That really is most canonical of cater. A book published posthumously called the Philosophical Investigations. They consign sense in the preface that his position was influenced in ways that he can't even describe by Frank Ramsey many many years ago so Cheryl believes one of the biggest shift in western philosophy. The mysterious changing of ludvig beacon. Stein's mind had Frank Ramsey at the center of it. The two certainly spent a lot of time talking and while victims time rarely showed any respect for anyone else. He respected. Ramsey Ramsey fell ill in the autumn of one thousand nine hundred twenty nine. He had jaundice and it went on and on and on and they only realize right towards the end that something very bad was happening. They rushed in by ambulance to London. And they opened them up and they found his liberate and his kidneys and a frightful. Mass Dickens Stein had been in Vienna and he returned to England to find his friend. Frank Ramsey Very ill and immediately went to his bedside at guy's hospital in London but I was very upset. Cut Up about the fact that his friend was obviously a going to die and that was in January of Nineteen. Thirty Frank Tie January nineteenth nineteen thirty. Okay dying young is a tragedy. But it's not an argument what I'm trying to get to the bottom. I fear if there is a bottom to find is whether Frank Ramsey is a better philosopher to have as a hero than my hero Richard Rosy. So I called up the founder of the Richard Rossi Society and awesome to remind me exactly where award he had to say about the meaning of truth. Reality can cause us to change our beliefs. Christopher Powell is with the Union Institute and the University of Cincinnati Ohio. You know if we have a false belief about something that this caterpillar is not poisonous and then go on to eat it. We will encounter the brute force of reality that impacts us. When we're off the question then becomes. What is the status of that pushback? The reality gives us. Does it point us in the direction of truth or being right or is it? Is it simply an indication that we got things wrong in need to rethink what he tells us? We can try to be less wrong but we never stopped being a bit wrong. Even when we're doing our best we could always potentially do better. We're never going to know when we have arrived. At the truth. They all agree on that Meese exposition and the way she reads. Ramsey is consistent with this. Is that even if everyone else agrees? Ni- belief is right or correct. Truth means that we're aiming at something higher than that kind of agreement in the here now recognizing that a belief that we agree is justified in our community. May Well be wrong and we want to try to avoid that. And if we don't have that thing called truth that were aiming for me sack. Ramsay thing that we lose the ability to recognize when the entire community can be holding false beliefs. This issue is exactly what Cheryl points to when I asked her why. Richie isn't hurry. Intellectual Hero so. I think pragmatism divides roughly into two kinds of camps. Although they move off in between the two camps conduct pragmatists that I think is on the right track. Is that what you find? In the founder of pragmatism Charles Sanders purse and in Frank Ramsey. Who was very influenced by purse? William James the other founder of pragmatism sometimes only sometimes suggested that if it works for me to believe in God then God exists is true for me and if it works for you to not believe in God then God doesn't exist is true for you that makes truth entirely relative to individuals on occasion. James said that kind of thing and One branch of pragmatism has peeled off in that direction. Richard Roy t became the champion of that kind of pragmatism and he would occasionally mcgann like James only occasionally say things like truth is whatever your peers will let you get away with saying it does seem a bit ludicrous to say that the truth is whatever your peers. Let you get away with saying which seems to be the MO of certain political leaders. Right now and I can see why Cheryl doesn't want to let royalty get away with saying that but Chris Officer Defense. I mean he's been accused of reducing truth to merely what our peers let us get away with saying that's a quote and he did say that several times but he came to call that view misleading and a bit of. Hyperbole. So Frank Ramsey never lived to say most of the things he might have gone to say and meanwhile Richard Rotea said quite a lot of things he never really meant. This makes comparing the two pragmatist philosophers tricky. Although Chris is doing his best in this position that while will recognize that truth is objective would simply means that you know there is more to truth in what we believe or think is justified right now. There's no practical value in truth. In other words the difference between what is true. What is justified? Doesn't make a difference to us as we're trying to understand the world because there's no as we said troops don't come with a mark stamped on them to identify them so we never know when we have them in if we never know when we have them already thinks that meese acts idea of aiming at truth is really just you know an empty rhetorical move that amounts to just being open and being aware that we can always be wrong. This is the fallible point. The current crisis pandemic gives us daily reminders. About our own fallible ISM if we had another hour or seven. I'm betting we could really get Cheryl and Chris worked up into an epic pragmatist philosopher. Donnybrook over just the one aspect of that word truth. But since we don't have that I ask Cheryl to cut to the chase and tell me. The most sensible pragmatic thing her intellectual hero. Frank Ramsey ever wrote something that could be of practical use to us now in moments of such widespread uncertainty and doubt in time the world will cool and everything will die but that is a long time off still and it's present value at compound. Discount is almost nothing nor is the present less valuable because the future will be blank humanity which fills the foreground of my pitcher. I find interesting and on the whole admirable. I find just now at least the world a pleasant and exciting place. You may find it depressing. I am sorry for you and you despise me on the other hand. I pity you with reason. It is pleasant her to be thrilled than to be depressed. And not merely pleasantor but better for all one's activities. And if you take the scholarly biogas hat personally. What do you make of Ramsey's attitudes in? Does it bring you any comfort? At the moment. I think the ramseys view is right. Ramsey said that my perspective is drawn to scale stars or a small as three penny bits. what matters to me is what matters here now on earth and that is a hobby can hope for that is all we can aim for. That is all we can do. We have to find meaning within our world. Not In some supernatural world. So I happen to agree with Ramsey. Not everyone does but I think his realistic account of both proof and the meaning of life is really indicative of the condition that we human beings find ourselves in. That's beautiful thanks so much for telling me about him so it's been great pleasure. You're listening to the best. We can do the pragmatic views of Cheryl MEESE AC and young Frank Ramsey by ideas producer. Tom Howell Shirley saks new biography. Frank Ramsey Ashir excess of powers is out this month from Oxford University Press. You can go to our website. Cbc DOT CA slash ideas for details technical production. Danielle do val web producer. Lisa use. Oh senior producer. Nicholas Cage Greg. Kelly is the executive producer of ideas. And I I it for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Michael Ramsey Cheryl Ramsey Ramsey Frank Ramsey Ramsay Ramsey Cheryl MEESE AC founder Frank Ramsey Ashir Charles Sanders producer Cambridge Cambridge University Cheryl Music Michael Ramsey Archbishop Cant John Maynard Canada William James Tom Howell ACORN
Clockwise 291: My Fingers are My Meese

Clockwise

29:59 min | 1 year ago

Clockwise 291: My Fingers are My Meese

"It's time for so two hundred ninety one of the clockwise podcast firm relay FM recorded Wednesday, April twenty fourth two thousand nineteen clockwise four people four tech topics thirty minutes. Welcome back to clockwise detect podcast that's older than it's ever been. And now, it's even older. I'm your co host Dan Moore, and I am joined across the internet, but my delightful pal and co host Mr. mica sergeant how're you doing Mike? I'm doing well. I am also older. And so are you? Yeah. No. I know and I'm about to be older still. Today, we have of course to wonderful as we always do and this week. They are to my left a tech editor and reporter from CNN. It's my former colleague from world Heather Kelly. Welcome back other. Hello and to my left. It's emoji. Historian and chief emoji officer at emoji pedia. Let me say emoji one more time for Jeremy Burge. Hello, Jeremy, Mike. Hello, Dan and Hiller had the full out annual clockwise catch out. He's coming over here to catch up. It's the only place we have that's true as we do it in just thirty minutes because we're really efficient. So I'm going to kick things off with a rumor that just started circulating a day or so ago that the ipads update this year, the new version of IOS will support cursor 's mouses mouses mice. Track pads pointing devices et cetera. And so my question for you is that something that you want on your ipad. Or do you think it's not really necessary? Where do you come down on that kind of thing? Heather when we start with you. Oh, goodness. I mean early on where like this could replace a computer, but Ono there's no mouth. I kind of think we've all moved on though. And we just accept I've had for what they are which are like little entertainment boxes for your children in restaurants. And he doesn't need a mouse. But I mean, I'd give it a try, and then I would probably never use it again. My fingers are my Meese. So I don't really need a mouse or pointer because I've got fingers do that. I understand the idea there is some level of of. Oh, I don't know very close manipulation one can do when they have a curse, sir. But if you're talking about ipad pros or frankly, most of the ipad models now can accept input from the apple pencil Beit version one of virgin too. And so I don't I don't think that we need me on the ipad because we have either our finger which does well enough and for closer manipulation of the screen. You've got the apple pencil, logic, crayon, etc. Etc. Jeremy your thoughts, I mostly agree with you all I feel like if I was the the kind of person that uses the ipad with the external cable. I would like the track pad. But I I'm not that person. So yes, but I'm -solutely. It's getting more common. I do see a lot of people out and about with sort of their ipad on one of the keyboard stands. And I think that the reason I haven't got one of these people at stands because I think it would be annoying poking up your screen, and then getting back to your keyboard sort of really that much. Honestly, if I had to prioritize something they seems fine. I'm sure it's quite good for excess ability. I'm sure there's some people that that would be quite helpful for me. Personally, if I could prioritize something please put in cropping rotating video instead because I you know, when you take a video, it's the wrong, our intake change it. So do that instead of the point please. Those were the options the two things they were weighing. So that's it. That's on a big whiteboard. Yeah. I I don't know. How I don't know what to tell you, it might might be bad news. I think I'm with most of you. I think the IOS general this sort of direct touch model seemed like it was a step in the foreword department, and sort of going back to using pointed devices seems like a little like why add that layer of abstraction, I do use a keyboard standard decent amount. And in fact, I feel like I have adjusted pretty well to like type type type reach up touchscreen so much though that I find myself doing that on my laptop all the time like having to physically restrain myself from up like smudging, my screen all the time. So I actually what I really want is touch interfaces on my MAC. So if we turn that on its head. I don't know if it comes before or after the rotating video thing, but let's let's keep that in mind. I think there are some precision places where you know. This might be useful. For pro users thing about stuff, like podcast editing, or video editing. Be more useful. But as Mike said the support for apple pencil really potentially gets rid of that. So I don't know I would not put this super high. But I guess there's probably a subset of people out there who think this'll be what it takes to make this into a real, computer. So good for them. I guess then I have a question. Sorry, when you copy screen they're dragging or you just tapping. So I find like when my ipad. If I put it in the upright position, it's fine to tap on things. But if I want to drag stuff around just tip oval doing it. I know I have to do the thing where it's like, I hold it with the other hand. Yeah. It's like a full audience. Yeah. I would recommend it. Well, thank you for your thoughts on that. Let us go to our second topic which comes from Heather. Okay. So this one was probably saw this coming. The fold has folded. It was it was Samsung brilliant, terrible idea. Unlike its last terrible incident did not go up in flames. But it is no longer around. And as a tech reporter like these these failures are some of my favorite stories to cover, and I was just wondering if anybody had their own favorite absolute tech disasters from the past. So I didn't keep in mind that I was going to be the first one. And so I wrote down four different answers. I promise I'm not going to give them all because it'd be unfair. And I'm not, Dan. Dan, love you. So I'm going to go with the Amazon fire phone it. Didn't it didn't bend and break. It didn't catch fire. It didn't take off a kids hand. But it was an absolute failure. That was compared to what was it an ET game that that they dug up and like buried? Tari ET game from the eighties. Yeah. Yeah. And there's got to be a place out there somewhere where Amazon fire phones are slowly biodegrading one hopes in the ground. It I think it had like a weird. No glasses three d effect. And it was pre-. Alias say voice assistant. It was just all kinds of bad and Amazon seem to be very very bullish about it. And because of the way that Amazon is set up like they could Mark it all over the place, and everyone is just kind of like, no, we don't really want this thing. So can you just be quiet about it? And they wouldn't let it die for too long. And then finally went away, and I think people were better off for it. And I can remember everybody just sort of dogging on the Amazon fire phone. So that's that's my favorite disaster. So to speak. Jeremy, what's yours? So I'm still harboring resentment about my family's. I MAC that we bought his child. It was a Performa sixty two hundred which. Subtle looked like the MAC Elsie. It was one of those pizza box on. So you put the monitor on top of the tower. I guess the towel sideways, and we didn't know what the time because we didn't have the internet. But apparently, it was sort of notorious it was a one of a problem model. Maybe like the keyboards today. This one was known to just be a dud that would always crash, and it spent most of its life out of wasn't an apple store. I guess a MAC repair shop at the time. It pretty much taught me everything I know about troubleshooting today because as a twelve year old kid, you'd get the MAC back from the shopping awake later, it would break and native disable extensions and delete preference files and all the things. So I don't know if this happened to apple today, it would be a scandal. But at the time they had thousands of max it same to nail will kind of bases. So I think it probably that other things to worry about maybe in nineteen ninety six oh, but I still feel bad about. And if someone would like to reimburse my time child that would be great. It's funny actually had sixty three hundred CD which was also notoriously bad definitely had to lead the logic replaced on that it was mess, but pretty much for mine. I'm gonna say cast your mind back to the delightful year of two thousand five when Steve Jobs got up on stage and introduced a phone that worked with I tunes. Yes. The Motorola rocker are okay. Are was a garbage phone. That was made a deal with Motorola, it was basically a rebranded version of one of their other candy bar style phones. And it was the only smartphone that worked with tunes protected media. And I think what is my favorite bit about. This is just the fact that Steve Jobs had to go onstage talk about this thing in glowing terms, even though you know, he knew that they were building the iphone right then. And it just you know, it was going to take a couple more years to get it out. And well, this is not the infants incident where Steve Jobs through a device off the stage. That was in fact, a camera. I believe I feel like he wanted to he really wanted to hurl. This thing off the stage. It did not despite the fact that it kept going into two thousand nine. It was not a very successful device. I believe and it's interface was was pretty terrible. So, yup. Really glad that that was a thing. Well, I was gonna say when does phone, but we've had a lot of phone. So I'm going to go with the nexus q which was like three hundred dollar little media player server thing that had nnounced I think in two thousand two thousand twelve and then make sheltered about a year later. And I think about it a lot because I imagine also that there is a warehouse filled with these like black bowling ball devices that somebody's gonna uncover a few hundred thousand years and go what this feel it on here. And I you know, I thought it was really cool in the came out. And I wanted one, and it looked great, and it just it just died, and it was a little sad. So that would be my pick. There are a lot of other options. I sort of went back and went down memory lane, thorough, hotter, really bad tech products that we could have chosen, but we don't have the time because we are already two topics in which of course, means it is halftime here clockwise, and this week's episode is brought to you by our good friends at Lynn owed winnowed, you can instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the cloud, and you can get a server running just seconds with your choice of Lennox resources, and node location lynyrd has hundreds of thousands of customers that might seem a lot. But they're all looked after by limos incredible twenty four seven support team. If you ever run into any problems, you can drop an Email. You can give them a call. You can chat over IRC in the community. If that's easier. I hear they take pigeons. Ravens if you're up in the the Nightwatch territory, whatever suits you best. They have super useful guides and support documentation. So if you just need to quickly look something up and figure out how to do it on your own. You can do that. I've used many of their guides. They are excellent. They've got a new management panel. That's. Now. In beta cloud, Lynn dot com. It's a single page application built using the cutting edge react Jasdaq and his back entirely by public API. And it's all open source. Plus they feature to factor indication to keep you and all your data safe and secure winnowed has pricing options to suit everybody. Their plan started gigabyte of ram for just five dollars a month. And they offer high memory plant starting sixteen bytes ram and has a special offer for you. Because you listen to this show, you can go to Lynda dot com slash clockwise and use promo code collect wise two thousand nineteen to twenty dollars towards any plan on that one gigabyte of ram plan. That's four free months and with a seven day money back guarantee, you have absolutely nothing to lose. So give Linda try today. That's Lynagh dot com slash clockwise and promo code clockwise two thousand nineteen to learn more sign up and make the most of that twenty dollars credit. Our thanks to Leno for the support of this show and all of relay FM that brings halftime to an end. So we turn it over to Mike. So a Google subsidiary has just recently received FAA approval to be an airline. And what this does it's a drone delivery business. And now that it is approved as an airline. They're doing some tests in Virginia to do actual like package delivery to different homes. So my question for you as we continue to see companies kind of do test programs, and this one sort of do the first real deal program. What are your thoughts on drone delivery being a potential future for us? Jeremy we'll start with you. This is Tom. I I I feel like it's one of those sort of like visions from the sixties of the future. And you know, we're going to be all the Jetsons. And we're gonna be flying impersonal 'cause we're gonna have Jordan's like this people who understand transport and delivery, and and and this things that work in cities in particular where we've got the biggest issue, right? There's not much space for a lot of people. And that's why joins don't work because the toll buildings and narrow straits. That's that's the challenging pot and this ways to handle that sort of cog bike deliveries e bikes, you can get big trucks loaded onto small little vans. And you can do all kinds of things in cities that a smarter news the straits efficiently and get things out there and then in the countryside. What do you need a journal for is the highway to the middle of no way, you can this thrive down the street and this plenty of room. I do not understand why this is considered to be a thing with all the companies freaking out thinking. Amazon's doing it. We've got to get in on this. Or is there some secret formula? But I'm not aware of that this is necessary for something maybe one of you is very pro drone delivery. And can explain to me when adjourn would be better than a truck? An e bike anything else. Oughta join I don't get it. Drones are always. But now that's not true. I. Yeah. I'm kind of with you. I think this seems like one of those novelty things like in people's heads seems a lot smarter that it seems like it's potentially faster right there sort of straight line paths rather than having to follow streets, and whatever. But I gotta think that like, you know, certainly the stuff they're starting with now the drones it's gotta be fairly small because the Germans carrying capacity is not enormous. And so potentially that could take the weight off having lots of cars drive around trucks delivery, truck, showing up with all these boxes if you're just ordering something that's that's really small and light and maybe that helps with pollution. But I also don't feel great about all these drones buzzing around especially because we've certainly seen recently incidents with drones affecting things like airports when people sort of maliciously decided they wanted to screw with people at airports, and I just don't know how about the cluttering up of all the airspace. Are they're going to be thousands of these things just whizzing back and forth. What happens when they hit birds happens when? They lose power suddenly crashed into the streets. Like, I just feel like I feel like this probably causes more problems than it, actually solves. I did like the one I guess they were testing down in Australia where delivered like a spread. So and it's like oh good flying economist robot with hot liquid what could possibly go wrong with that Alicia. Yeah. It's just open your mouth, and pour it right in my mind. We've done this to ourselves. It's all on us. What do you think about drones delivering all your stuff that leads beautifully to the thing that I think about most about this is that I cannot wait for the first lawsuit say that especially dropped on your head and your burnt are you going to see the restaurant the barista the person who did the drone packaging, you know, before it took off the dome company Google, they're going to be injuries. Maybe a few like drone burrito deaths, and they're going to be some lawsuits. It's going to be. Interesting to see how that unfolds I will now also defend the drones. In some countries. Like, it's ridiculous in the US and all countries, it just doesn't make sense. But there were some really cool stories of them being used in countries where the infrastructure was not great and traveling by land in a car could take hours, and they were using it to take blood from point a to point. Like eight times faster than they could drive it there, take a motorcycle. And that that was cool. It would also be interesting if the blood out of the sky and landed on somebody and that is another lawsuit. I would watch carefully. Alrighty. So I think I've learned today that Heather's middle name is shot and Freud. But other than that. I really for the most part. Yeah, I agree that this is one of those things where in many places, it feels like it's solving a problem that doesn't actually exist. But in those particular places where transfusions and vaccines and even think I didn't see too wasn't too long ago that I saw something about like transplant material being taken via drone that is where I think there's some really cool stuff to this. That makes sense. Interestingly the I can't remember which. Virginia government person was talking about this. If it was the mayor or something like that in within the city, or whatever whoever it was they were saying that they liked the idea. Oh, the county administrator was saying that it would be good because it is it is very mountainous in south West Virginia. And so apparently, it can be easier to fly a drone as opposed to drive those big delivery trucks and in the mountains, whether or not that's a good enough excuse, I don't know. But certainly an interesting thing on the less, and if we if we don't fix our climate change future, we might like it if we're all living in rising water levels on little islands. I could have maybe these companies are up to they can pick a little floating islands with drugs deliveries getting to all of us. They've plugged it into their AI systems and have run thirty forty fifty years at of the future money that long and. Yeah, that's what it's what it's going to be drones everywhere. All right. Thank you all for your answers on that. Let's go to our last topic which comes from Jeremy. Our breaking news. I am about to move from London onto a I've just bought a boat and that to go live in a boat and travel around the countryside and the real story, and I've been selling myself and all my things it's annoying. It's really annoying selling things telling bunch of tech stuff. Do does the side gum tree exist in the US twenty of you have any of us. It's like Craigslist. I've heard of it. But I only knew it from Australia because of trillion podcast. I listen to. I think I don't know which I, but as far as I can tell it's like, it's just the same as Craigslist. But I'll put things up put my printer up all my airport express up there. You know, things that are worth something to someone. And then you get these sort of inquiries from people going on high is still available in your right back in one minute and say, yes, it is. And then you never hear from them again. What are you doing? Who is sending these inquiries and then just never following up. What is wrong with everybody? Is that me? Anyway, before I go on before I fill up the rest of the time complaining about people on the internet. Could you tell me what you do with all your old text off? Do you sell? It you give it away. What do you do? I really thought this would give me a referendum on whether or not we thought it was just, you know, Jeremy. Yeah. I, you know, even weird situation where for a long time all the tech I acquired was via work, and it wasn't stuff that I was free to sell because it was given to me as review units these days, I tend to buy much more of the tech for myself. I tend to use it a lot longer to because I'm also not on a huge companies budget where I can just buy new stuff every year. So some of the stuff I've decided to get built in replacement for for example, I'm on the iphone upgrade program. So I don't have to worry about getting rid of an old phone every year. I just want it out for a new phone apple take sealed phone and probably sells to somebody else. A lot of money on the occasions where I have sold stuff off. I often use gazelle or a service like that where you can sensually they make it really easy to sell off technology. But they again, this challenge there is that it's very specific you can sell off like a phone or a tablet pretty easily. But if you've got sort of random pieces of technology that you've cumulated it's. It's not really set up for that. So I haven't really tried to do stuff on Craigslist or the equivalent or EBay all of that strikes me as just way more trouble than it's actually worth. I do know some people who have had success just putting up their own little like garage sale pages. Essentially and be like I have these things peas feel free to go and buy them directly from me rather than using an intermediary. But that's also a lot of work. So for the most part, I tend to try to get around that by giving away my old tech. Whether it be to family members or friends who just need something that has outlived its usefulness for me, but possibly not for them. So yeah. Or in the end, I probably just end up with way more old tech than I need and eventually end up just recycling it and giving up getting up angle. So a thing I know you can do, and I don't want to do this that you can donate it to like local schools, and libraries, usually appreciate technology. I'm still in the boat almost all my technology being like review units from companies, and it is my secret. Shame that haunts me. It used to be a closet in my house, but to avoid the divorce. I brought it to my office where it is also still in the closet, and I need to send a lot of it back. I get a lot of emails from companies, but there's also things like a bag of nexus phones. And I don't I don't know what to do with them. I might just like leave them on the street corner. And hope somebody's. But back in the day. I used to do everything on EBay, and, you know, make some cash, but I would never ever sell a company's phone because that is how you get fired. For me. I have sold a lot of my old apple stuff on gazelle others of it. I've given away to family members or friends. My old that apple watch out. I used to use before I got the new one went to my partner my old. I Pat many went to my grandma she loves it so much, and so it just depends. If I have like, it is a sort of gut check algorithm that I look at the price that I can get on the product. And if my gut says, no, then I keep that thing. And I give it to someone instead of selling it. And so yeah, just kind of depends on what it is. But gazelle has been the one that I use the most. But there is a company it's called orchard and. It gave me a little bit more money for my iphone before I went to the apple upgrade program. And so I ended up sort of comparing prices between orchard and gazelle, and I was able to get more money from orchard for my phone. And then I sold a MAC book on gazelle and made a good amount of money. I tend to not like the more active approaches like with EBay and things like that. Because I have to worry about shipping, and I have to worry about making sure that they pay me and have to do all of that stuff that I don't really want to have to worry about at all. So it's kind of like a mixture of being lazy and a mixture of of determining value, and then going from there to decide whether I choose to sell it or keep it and give it to someone. But yeah, I mean when you're going onto a boat. That's a lot of. Yeah. A lot of stuff to get rid of. Yeah. So it's it's been fun. Yeah. I think it is every time. I always do the thing you look up some of these voices. I sold a few things through Apple's sort of. They've got a re I guess sevice gazelle with I'll buy things back off you. But then you look at the prices, and it's it's very lower for some of them. Honestly, I think they gave me something like thirty pounds on my apple watching. I don't know then obvious sometimes you don't want to give it to family and friends. I don't wanna give someone a three year old apple watch. Oh full year old apple watch. Because I feel most I'd prefer them. Either have good one on not one at all rattled and give them some kind of low end. So I've done a mixture I have done what you've said Heather, I've I have literally sometimes when I get something. It's just not worth selling put a little sign out the front of my house. I please take and put out various bits of tech. And they always go in a few allies drones by and pick it up. She. I don't know. There's no good answers. I think it is. Also just me to answer the question. Well, we've solved that problem at least. And the good news is that brings us to the end of our four topics. We've just enough time for our bonus topic. But I want to tell you a little bit about our other sponsor today. This episode of clockwise is brought to you by back. Blaze. The unlimited cloud backup for maxim PC's starts at just six dollars per month. I myself have been the victim of debut loss disaster. It was many years ago. The pain is still fresh. I don't like to talk about it too much. But essentially, I was working on stuff very creative writing project, and it all disappeared in a terrible, cloud storage mishap. But perhaps if I had had a back plays backup. That would not have been a problem. I recommend people science back believes because it's always good to have a backup. That is not in your house. God forbid anything happen to all those hard drives in computers that are in your home in one very convenient location. That could be the subject of some sort of terrible mishap. It's good to have your data backup securely off site. So you can sign up for a fifth. Day free trial with no credit card required at black Beck. Lease dot com slash clockwise, backwards back documents music's photos videos, during projects pretty much everything that is important to you. And back lays knows their stuff. They've backed up seven hundred fifty Pedder bites in counting. That's the equivalent of seven hundred and fifty million gigabytes these guys in other stuff having a backup means a total peace of mind difference between a data disaster, costing hours upon hours of work and just having a hard drive with all your replacement data shipped right to you. So avoid that looming data disaster, go to back, blaze dot com slash clockwise. For your unrestricted retrial, and let them know you heard about him here on clockwise that's back blaze dot com. Such clockwise go there now, thanks to back blaze for saving us from countless data disasters and for their support of this show and all of rela- FM. All right this week bonus topic this weekend marks the release of ventures and game like fifty thousandth movie in the franchise. So yeah, let's just do it who is your favorite avenger. And if you don't have one I'm just going to give you one. That's how it works. Heather my favorite vendors the war because I am a human with. Oh god. I love it. My I think this counts mantis, I really like mantis mantis is so cool legit. Is the event the one with the little tree? A little tree guy all very cute. And for me, captain America. I'm an old standby t's a handsome, man. What can I say? And he's from my neck of the woods. So that that helps to there we go we've established now who will live and who will die which is great. And we have reached the end of our show, which means all we have to do is. Thank our wonderful guests Heather Kelly. Thank you so much for being here this week. Thank you next time. It'll be better. Jeremy birds. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you. I'll come to you from the canals of the UK next time. That's so fun and Mike and Mike. We should go in a boat sometime or something. But yeah, yeah. I live right next to a very popular lake destination. So man, I've got a lot of water near where I live in probably more and more as time goes by. Do on from different books. On a different the quad boat cast, but we will not do that next week. So until then I remind you watch what you say and keep watching the clock by everybody.

Apple Jeremy Burge Heather Kelly Mike Amazon Dan Moore Craigslist EBay US Google Virginia Australia Steve Jobs Motorola CNN Meese
Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II: The Partnership that Changed the World

Uncommon Knowledge

34:59 min | 1 year ago

Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II: The Partnership that Changed the World

"Ronald Reagan and Pope, John Paul the second the partnership that changed the world today. We're in Washington at a conference devoted to that subject with us today, and I witnessed to the relationship between President Reagan and Pope, John Paul the second the former attorney general of the United States, Edwin Meese, the third. Welcome to uncommon knowledge. I'm Peter Robinson, a graduate of Yale and the law school at the university of California at Berkeley, Edwin Meese, the third served as Legal Affairs secretary for the newly elected governor of California Ronald Reagan from nineteen sixty seven to nineteen sixty eight and then as chief of staff to the governor from nineteen sixty nine until governor Reagan left office in early nineteen seventy five from nine hundred eighty one one thousand nine hundred five Mr. Meese served in the Reagan administration as counselor to the president from one thousand nine hundred five until the end of the administration. He served as the seventy fifth attorney general of the United States, Mr. Meese now holds emeritus status as the heritage foundation's Ronald Reagan share and public policy and America's once again is distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution. No, one knew Ronald Reagan better. And this is Ronald Reagan on attorney general Meese if Ed Meese is not a good, man. There are no good men. At add welcome. Thank you. Two quotations both from the both from nine hundred eighty two one is the historian Arthur Slesinger junior. He's writing after a visit to Moscow, quote, those in the US who think the Soviet Union is on the verge of collapse are kidding themselves. The second is Ronald Reagan addressing the British parliament also in one thousand nine hundred to quote in an ironic sense. Karl Marx it was right? We are witnessing today a great revolutionary crisis. But the crisis is happening not in the west but in the Soviet Union close quote. How did Ronald Reagan of Eureka college in Illinois myths, what the great historian Arthur Slesinger junior of Harvard bigger? How did Ronald Reagan see what Arthur Slesinger junior of Harvard University missed? Well, one of the things is Ronald Reagan went into that study of communism with an open mind, and it was not determined by his ideology has I suspect Mr. Schlesinger, at least was somewhat misguided by his own ideology. But with Ronald Reagan, he learned first of all most people don't realize Ronald Reagan was a beret shis reader. He liked to study. He studied the founding. He was very well versed in the constitution. He was well versed in the bible. He had an enormous repertoire of information that he used that's why they're discussion was given this morning about his speech. Adding he's he before he would do anything else before the speech writers would get working. He would give the concept of the speech and then later on they went he edited really based upon all the things that he knew. But one of the things he knew was communism because in the nineteen forties when he was president of the Screen Actors Guild as he called it his union, the communist party USA was tried to take over the movie industry because they wanted to use it for propaganda Bisley. And so they were infiltrating the various unions, the cameraman's union, the grips union stage managers union, and they tried to also take over the Screen Actors Guild. And so Ronald Reagan, literally led all of those unions in defeating the communists that got him interested in the subject, and he read a great deal about it. Both domestic communism communism's theory and also international communism. And so he had formed his own ideas by the time, he became governor. Really and already was talking about these ideas of how do we overcome? What was then our enemy in the Cold War? That's I'm embarrassed to admit this. But the way you put it just now had never occurred to me before we listened this morning to the panel of polls talk about what communism was like obviously for Ronald Reagan in Hollywood in those days. It was not like living in Poland. But he had direct experience of them. Yes. He did. Even to the point where he would come to the to work in the studios armed because there were threats on his life. A man with a plan. Let me quote, your nineteen Ninety-two memoir with Reagan, quote Reagan was more than simply anticommunist he was an anticommunist with a game plan. Close quote. Can you explain that? Well, he actually had a strategy. He felt first of all he knew that they were vulnerable from an economic standpoint. Because so much of all of their national wealth really was being put into supporting their military and their aggressiveness around the world. And so he knew they were economically vulnerable. But he also knew and he had this strong belief that treat him openly will overcome oppression. And so he knew that that it's very difficult for any government, even a very oppressive government like the Soviets had to keep their people under wraps for a long period of time. And that the human spirit would result in people wanting to be free, and he was very sympathetic to the cap. Nations, particularly because these were not just Russians who happened to be Soviet form of government. But these were countries that many of them that had been free the for they'd been taken over by the Soviet movement at I just want to. I'm going to go back to this point because it's so basic, and it's the kind of thing that's likely to be forgotten and coming years, and that is the extent to which Ronald Reagan in holding these views and acting on them stood out. So Richard Nixon Henry Kissinger the order of the day was detente, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford became president. After Nixon resigned. He refused to meet Alexander Solzhenitsyn because of fears of offending the Soviet Union. Jimmy Carter gave a speech at Notre Dame in which he talked about overcoming are quote in ordinate fear of communism. And then this is this is this is absolutely the dominant mode of thinking in both parties Nixon Carter. And then of course, we have dig Allen's famous account. Ronald Reagan in nineteen seventy seven is a former governor he hasn't declared for president yet, and they're talking about foreign policy and Ronald. Reagan says dick would you like to hear my theory of the Cold War? We'll of course, governor my theory of the Cold War's simple, we win, and they lose the question is what gave him whatever it was the courage. The insight how how how did he so self-confidently place himself in opposition to the entire mindset? Well, he wasn't just being facetious as some people have used him. But at the time writing when that became known, but actually what he was saying is I have a strategy which is not just giving in or allowing a moral equivalency between Marxism and freedom is matter of knowing their ability both from an ideological standpoint. From an economic standpoint it was his feeling that they can be beaten and that freedom can win. In other words, it was a belief in the system that had been the foundation for American thought American political thought since. The seventeen eighty s and he felt that what we knew in this country are sense of freedom that that can overcome even the tyranny of a Soviet Union you right in with Reagan, you describe the elements of the president's thinking, and you write this, quote, it followed that the United States in the western world in general should stop retreating before the communist challenge and begin competing in earnest against the Soviets. Again, explain well, it was an idea of competing in a number of ways, it was not to engage in military action. Because that's the last thing runaway to Reagan wanted to do or felt it was necessary to do but to compete in terms of economics to compete in terms of information to compete in terms of persuasion of people to support resistance movements in the in the communist world to support leaders. Like electro as and others like that. In other words, to actually let people around the world know that the Marxism Leninism is not for ordained and is not necessarily going to succeed. But in fact, there can be strong non-military, but nevertheless, ideological you might say. In some ways striking the sense of patriotism in some ways faith that there are a number of ways in which to compete with an ultimately to overcome the whole communist regime. The strategic defense initiative or STI you held the first meetings on that subject and your office in the west wing and then in a televised address in from the Oval Office on March twenty third nineteen Eighty-three the president announced the initiative research that might lead to assist them that would enable us to destroy incoming ballistic missiles before they could reach their targets, no longer mutual assured destruction but actual defense against incoming missiles, how did that fit into the president's game plan? Well, Ronald Reagan had always said, and this goes back to his days as governor that a nuclear war could not be one and should never be fought. Because the destruction of any such kind of a conflict would just be would wipe out not just one nation, but perhaps many nations, and so that's why he felt we must be able to do something better than that. And he had met with Edward teller. For example, physicists the ES L win when he was governor because Intel. Her was then at the university of California, and he talked with him, and he talked with others. And that was why when a group of people have been working on this, Danny Graham, and others have been working on this ideal. So, and that's why we had this meeting in my office with some people who were very interested in the subject. And so as a result, we put together a conference with the governor then with the president in one thousand nine hundred two with Edward teller and that led then to his idea of being fleshed out into an actual strategy. And then the next step was to talk with the joint chiefs of staff, and there's always within the military. There's always a lot of competition for budget dollars. And so there was some resistance in certain areas of the Pentagon. But Ronald Reagan as he had them develop a strategic plan for our defense said, and I want you to also look at the idea of a strategic defense initiative of ballistic missile defense system, and they came back to him. About eight months later with their plan, and one of the things they said that as we have looked into it the choice chiefs believe that strategic defense initiative a way of combating nuclear war through missile defense is not only militarily necessite and necessary, but it is also morally necessary, and so they really gave him the assurance that he was on the right track with STI, and I might say the if if the nation had pursued STI with the same energy and enthusiasm that he gave it during the rest of his term as president. Then I think today, we would have a very robust system already deployed and pay a lot safer in view. What's happening around the world with two nations that now have nuclear capabilities, which weren't even contemplated as potential nuclear opponents at that time, North Korea and North Korea. And Iran and Iran. The New York Times called the strategic defense initiative. Quote. I'm not making this up on quoting a pipedream close quote. Margaret Thatcher, prime minister Thatcher had doubts about it at the time. But in her memoirs, she wrote that looking back on it quote Ronald Reagan's original decision on STI was the single most important of his presidency close quote now, can you explain what the New York Times meant what they thought they meant when they referred to as d is a pipe dream. Well. The New York Times as is. Often rolling. Let's put it that way, charitably and and. And they were so wrapped up in this whole idea of deterrent. And also, quite frankly, not really believing that the communist Soviet communism was as much of a threat. They were they were part of that group that felt that even the moral equivalency ideas, we're not foreign to the New York Times. And so that was why they just had no confidence whatsoever. Now with Margaret Thatcher. Was it was interesting because basically the whole idea of. Deter rather of a hedge against war and the nuclear balance, and those kinds of things we're something that in Europe was very much the basic idea in the basic foundation of the defense system at that time just as NATO was going to be installing nuclear or potentially nuclear weapons in Europe to combat what the Soviet Union already had there. And that that sort of that concept, and one of the things she was worried about as I read the materials about here later was she was worried that somehow this would would violate or would degrade that sense of nuclear balance that was preventing war in Europe. And so I think the more she learned and as indicated by what you've mentioned there. I think she really came to understand what Ronald Reagan had in mind, and his idea was that we have technological capability. These that were never thought of one generation ago right for at particularly the generation that preceded is and look at all the things that have happened there. Why can't we put that same energy that same good thinking that same expiration into something that would really prevent nuclear war in the future. And it was also correct me if I'm mistaken, it was also quite an aggressive move. You can't do something like this strategic defense initiative the research unless you have a buoyant economy and technical dynamism of the kinds of Soviets could never match. That's correct. And actually, the strong economy was one of the major strategies that he had in dealing with the whole Soviet movement. You remember when he took office in nineteen Eighty-one we had three major problems in our country number one. We had the deepest economic crisis. We'd had since the great depression. Secondly, we had a national security threat, and we were. Had a great deal in jeopardy potentially. Because on the one hand we had an increasingly aggressive Soviet Union. They would already captivated a good deal of eastern central Europe. They were operating their or their satellites were in Africa. We had a Soviet bastion really in Cuba ninety miles off our shore. We had a Marxist bastion in Nicaragua. Which was subverting El Salvador, so our own hemisphere was now under attack. And so it was really a very serious situation. That's why Ronald Reagan was so intent of number one getting a strong economy number two of the problem is while the Soviets were more aggressive our military had declined considerably in the aftermath of the Vietnam war. So another important thing was to take on the military and build up the military to where we had traditionally been a since during and since World War Two. And then finally he believed it was necessary to engage the Soviet Union on a moral plane. That's why the evil speed the Lumpar the evil empire speech, and the focus of evil that sort of thing that he felt that was important to raise those issues as it was to do the economic and the military and the diplomatic strategies once again from your memoir with Reagan, quote, a vivid example of the Reagan strategy and action was the liberation of Poland Reagan conducted this effort in concert with Pope, John Paul the second himself, a native of Poland whom the president greatly admired close, quote, let's let me ask a word or two about the relationship between those two men. Ronald Reagan is raised. A small we've heard that his father was Catholic. But his mother was a member of a small Protestant denomination the disciples of Christ. And although I think everyone around him understood he was a man of faith organized religion. Well, he didn't go to church often as president. He said it was because of the disruption of the secret service true enough. But it's also organized religion seems not to play a central role in his thinking relationship with God. Yes. And then Ronald Reagan admires and cooperates with or coordinates actions with the leader of the biggest of the the most organized denomination that exists. How'd explain how what what is it in John Paul the second that a Protestant kid from the midwest appreciates? Well, first of all Ronald Reagan had a very strong faith. He was he had been involved in church activities as a kid. His mother was very active in her church. And she made sure that he was. Very active in all the way in through his high school years before he went to college. He was very active member of that church and beyond that he also was very well rid. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of the bible, Paul Kengo who was here earlier today as written about Ronald Reagan and his religious faith, and one of the things he pointed out that Ronald Reagan had more allusions to biblical topics and biblical verses and so on in his speeches than all the other presidents put together, and so religion was very important part of his life. The reason you didn't see much about it was he never wanted anyone to think that he was using his religion for political purposes or that he was showing off how religious he was I suspected the actions of some previous presidents may have had something to do with that aversion to being looked in that direction, but in any event, but just in his daily life in everyday conversation. And it's been very. Interesting just within the last month now to have believe it or not in the Washington Post copies of a letter that he wrote. Yes to Nancy's father as he was dying to to give him a almost a capsule version of his religious faith, hoping that that was something that loyal Davis. Dr Davis would be helpful to him before he passed on December thirteen nineteen Eighty-one jer. General Jerry is L ski declares martial law in Poland cuts off communications with the outside world arrests six thousand members of solidarity on and on and on it goes and. The president and Pope John Paul the second meet in one thousand nine hundred three as I recall, there's coordination of some kind. That's what I want to ask you about eighty to eighty to eighty two. I'm sorry. I misspoke June June of eighty two solidarity re we know the story there's a decade solidarity regains its legal status in one thousand nine hundred nine in one thousand nine hundred ninety Viansa takes office as president of a democratic Poland. Now. Couple of quotations once again, dick Allen, Richard Alan, the president's first national security security advisor, quote, this relationship between Reagan and the pope this was one of the great secret alliances of all time, second quotation, George Weigel. John Paul the second's biographer the claim that the two men entered into a conspiracy to affect the downfall of communism is journalistic fantasy close quote. So how do you characterize what took place between the White House and the Vatican? And between those two men was the correct way for us to understand it. Well, it's interesting that even last night there was a little bit of a dispute, but yes to the people who were speaking about what just what this was. And I think that George it's somewhere between dick Allen, George Weigel. I think I think there's no question. I believe that what you had here. First of all going back to Ronald Reagan and his religious faith. I think it was that faith, which which made him in mind. In the pope, and particularly this pope because you had a very strong person on behalf of his his faith on behalf of his church. And that the whole thing of what he had done up to that time. Ronald Reagan admired and mired him as a as the leader of his church. So so it was natural. I think for him to admire that kind of leadership, but beyond that, then what you had was you had two people both leaders one in the secular world one in the religious world with parallel interests. And so when those parallel interests were obvious as what happened in Poland there where they were under attack. If you will then it was logical. Then for Ronald Reagan, particularly with his ideas about comp- defeating communism to cooperate. And I'd say what you have is parallel interests. I it was not as George Weigel says it was not some deal or as car. Bernstein wrote about it was not an alliance or treaty or anything like that. What it was was to people with interests in common who were cooperating, and as they cooperated learn to trust and appreciate and like each other. Now you sat on the national Security Council for all eight years of the administration. Let me ask a couple of questions if I'm asking for classified information, just slapped me, but a couple of questions jail. How many times how many times did you believe there was a credible threat that the Soviets might roll into Poland? I don't. Well. I think there was always that possibility. But I don't remember it at any time particularly during during during the year nineteen Eighty-one where that appeared to be an imminent threat. I see in other words, the Soviets always had large military forces, and they always were using them to oppress, or at least be at threat to a whole number of nations, the Balkan countries and several others. But the idea of an imminent threat of that. I don't think was at least I can't remember that being talked about it prior to descend the Ronald Reagan's taking office and the military build up. Of course, he barely begun by nineteen Eighty-one. But did that change the psychology was there's some sense in which the American. Was there some sentence which Ronald Reagan's presence would have made the Soviets think twice from the military point of view. Well, I think that in all probability the answer is. Yes, we don't know. Of course, what is happening at the present time Iliad union as you remember Brezhnev was on his last legs. Yes. And then you had Andro offense you go. And as Ronald Reagan said when it came to whether he would meet with us. So you leaders he's this. I want to meet with them. But they keep dying on me. Well, finally in nineteen eighty-five, he got a live one, and Gorbachev, and and I think that that was very important because at that time, Gorbachev was was a diehard communist no question about it. But he also understood the west better than his predecessors. And therefore, I think he realized that the United States certainly by the time he became general secretary in one thousand nine hundred five he realized the American military was now going to be the most powerful military in the world. And it was a force that was enough to so that the Soviet Union did not have military superiority, which they essentially had up until that time, right? One more question about your years on the national Security Council. We read read to hear this book that book another article. Get to my understanding, which is limited. It's a kind of impressionism, and I want to ask you to fill me Philipson if you would Bill Casey with CI is making sure that solidarity. He's working with lane Kirkland today. F L CEO to make sure solidarity gets funds copying machines and so forth. Then. Judge Clark and his successors as national security advisers are giving information to the Vatican. They're sharing information with the Vatican Vatican diplomatic corps. His sources we don't have and Vernon Walters. Former general Vernon Walters access a kind of emissary he visits the Vatican. As I recall, it's in the range of a dozen times all that happened. Right. So the coordination is constant in quite a high level. There's a lot going on between the what the Reagan White House and the John Paul the second Vatican yet. All right. If you feel the urge to elaborate get into it. Well, it was a logical follow-up to do this to provide the ways in which without using military force. We can strengthen those forces which were combating Marxism, and which were constantly moving towards organizing people in the various countries under the yoke of the Soviet Union and organizing resistance, and ultimately organizing a situation where it would not be possible for the Soviet Union to continue, particularly with their aggression. But let alone just to maintain where they were at that particular time. So it was a way in which to carry out the strategy that Ronald Reagan had moral engagement making it very clear through the diplomatic contacts with the Soviet Union that we would not stand for anymore aggression, even admit using military force. Now, it was never plainly said those words, but it was very clear that we would not take anymore aggression. Such as they had had in Afghanistan and other places. And then Thirdly that we would do everything we can to rule back the previous Soviet aggression. And that was where the assistance information assistance intelligence assistance information to people revving up Radio, Free, Europe and Radio Liberty, all of those kinds of non-military ways in which to provide resistance to the Soviets. And if I may a couple of last questions here when he visited Washington in two thousand and four for President Reagan's funeral Mikhail. Gorbachev was asked if Ronald Reagan won the Cold War and his reply was, quote, that's not serious close quote and the article in the Washington Post continued, quote, the changes, Gorbachev wrought in the Soviet Union were undertaken he argued not because of any foreign pressure were concerned, but because Russia was dying under the weight of the Stalinist system close quote. The Soviet Union just fell in under the weight of its own rotten system, and it would have done that. If Ronald Reagan had never been born. How do you answer that will just by looking at the facts, what would have happened? I think if they're not been for Ronald Reagan a lot of and the United States having build up its strength, and so on and the other things that taken place the Soviet Union might have fallen on the weight of all of its wrongdoing an economic wrongdoing, its military buildup and all that, but it would have taken at least probably two three four decades and may never have happened. Because one of the things that the Soviets would have done in. Gorbachev would have done it if he'd found his predecessors was at the soon as there was any armed resistance or any popular uprising he would have called in the troops and put it down. And so what Ronald Reagan did was create a situation in which number one the Soviets could not continue. You as they had been either with aggression or even with captivating the other nations and so on perpetually. But also the fact that Gorbachev was not able to maintain the Soviet primacy over these other countries perpetually, and that's why I think that if we're not for Ronald Reagan. It would have been perhaps several decades before the Soviets would have phone or maybe never because one of the things they would have done is utilized their force than in order to get more funds more resources, and that sort of thing they were already working on things technologically with pipelines and other things to improve their economic situation which Ronald Reagan stopped, and then and the economic warfare along with the information warfare and other types of warfare together. I think was what ultimately led to their demise. The wall coming down through popular resistance in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and then ultimately, the employees of the Soviet. At union in nineteen Ninety-one attorney general Meese in Rome in February nineteen Eighty-eight had a private meeting with Pope, John Paul the second. I've already asked you to tell us what happened on the national Security Council. Can you let us in on what you in the pope disgust? It was a great meeting. It was agreed the the opportunity to to meet this great man and everything that's been said about him is actually true from my standpoint, both what I know about them. But also meeting him you knew that God had taken care of the church by having a leader such as that to be the pope at that particular point in history. But the the opportunity just to talk with him for fifteen or twenty minutes was just a great privilege for me. And we talked about some of the things that again, we are two countries had in common. And that was of course, the morality of youth was a topic very much on his mind and something that we were concerned about in our in the Justice department and elsewhere, we talked about the drug problem in the United States. We also talked about how some of the Catholic bishops which you've heard a little bit about that last night. I believe how there was some problems with them in the United States in the United States doing. The things that we're inimitable to what Ronald Reagan was trying to do in some of these other areas in which the pope was said, well, you know, sometimes even bishops make mistakes. And so it was really a great conversation. And I remember vividly stay did you walk out of that meeting? Just as Lutheran as you were when you walked in. I believe I did. But Lutheran with great appreciation for the head of the Catholic church less question. Nobody under thirty thirty grown people. Nobody under thirty can remember a single event that we just talked about. So for your think of your grandchildren, think of your grandchildren. You have great, grandchildren. What do they need to hold onto can use some up? Ronald Reagan what he meant to the country in the world, can you summit up in a couple of sentences. What do they need to hold onto? I think they need to hold onto the fact that what our founders of the United States had in mind as the basic principles and the foundation for their thinking, the sense of freedom, the sense of responsibility, those kinds of concepts are as important today as they were two centuries ago and will be over the next centuries in the future, they have to know that. But in order to know that they also have to know our history history is extremely important. Ronald Reagan had studied history minute lately. And so he was able to incorporate the fund foundation and the origins of the country into almost everything he did. And so that's why his concern about the constitution. Why he was so concerned about appointing judges who would be faithful to the constitution. It was a part of his being. And so we have to have new young people understand our history. But also understand what freedom is all about. And also to have some idea of what happened. During the Cold War. So that they can understand why it was so important to free Poland and the other captain nations. And if if they will have this understanding of history, and it's and the perspective on why that's important to the freedom of the other peoples in the world, particularly to continue in freedom in this country. I think then they will have the background they need. It's not happening now in our education systems, and I think both at the high school, even the grammar school level and also at the higher education level. This is probably the greatest challenge that we have as far as providing future generations with the basic understanding, they need of our history and the principals and the and the both moral and also a patriotic foundations which gotten us to this particular point in our history and the history of the world at when he's the third. Thank you.

President Reagan Soviet Union president Poland United States Pope John Paul Reagan administration Reagan White House Europe national Security Council Screen Actors Guild general Meese university of California Edward teller Jimmy Carter Karl Marx Edwin Meese attorney George Weigel
Semantic search at Github

Data Skeptic

34:56 min | 1 year ago

Semantic search at Github

"Computer languages are. Definitely not natural language is. I don't think anyone needs me to elaborate on that. But code is often sprinkled out with natural language bits inside of it, as I assume most listeners already know this includes but is not limited to comments in the code in basically, every language above assembly languages, there's some mechanism for including sections of text inside your code, which are going to be ignored by the compiler whereby the interpreter the transpire or whatever sort of pilot. You've got these days off the top of my head. I can't remember how you do them in list. But other than that every language it's a convenient way to documentary code with nothing other than natural language. How ease then? Of course, not every program or does it and of those that do not all of them do it. Well, we've all been guilty of that. But despite the fuzziness about the usefulness of these comments, let's acknowledge there's a huge amount of natural language data sitting baked inside most code bases. Not being put too much use beyond the occasional. Greg statement crafted defined some area in need of a bit more attention. In addition to comments, many languages, support more formal meditating python. For example, sports concept called doc strings. Doc string is a string declared with triple quotes at the beginning of the end and always places the first line in class or function. There's a few other technicalities and formalities you should be aware of if you're python code or, but I'm not going to get into that. Here. A good doctoring describes what a function does not the manner in which doesn't. In nicer, ID, ease that clever ways of capturing this in providing hints to the coder about the functionality of various methods. They might be access and beyond that, there's some really cool tools out there that can automatically turn code or turn the doctrines things like that into formal documentation. Do that dynamically said auto updates to give you free nights CSS things. You can get through it. Great stuff. But beyond that, it's still mostly just basic tech. Search at least in the stuff I've encountered a third and final category here or commit messages. The messages coders right to describe the bundle of changes. They're gonna make push to source control, which if you're doing the commit messages correctly, and many of you are not there meant to describe the gist of the functionality your adding or the pub your fix. And again searchable, but not usually at anything more than what you do with elastic search or some other full text search tool, but it does seem like a commit message might be a lot more useful, doesn't it. What about the comments in the dock strings? You know, there's a vast corporate just sitting there open source projects and publicly visible projects code shirts messy, but it's big and couldn't it be something novel. You would do with that linking the language to the code in the most lazy way possible. I've thought about this a lot life. I've thought about thinking about it. I've taken literally no action to do anything. And that's why I was thrilled to come across a great post on the gida engineering blog, titled towards natural language semantic code search. That's by Hammill Hussein who we're going to talk to today and co author Hoshi on Wu, but before we get into that a quick section some you might feel free to skip. If you're more advanced senior level data scientists, but for those of you who won't hit the plus thirty second button a few times butts have some quick mini Minneapolis odes here. Prep for some of the concepts that are gonna come up in this interview. Let's start with cosign distance Ivette most listener. No, this one that sort of a measure of the distance between two angles two vectors. Okay. Well, in what space your basic, math class in the plane of your piece of paper the x and the y we can picture that in three dimensions. Most of us can't draw nor can we picture it and Ford I mentioned, you could argue color and time and things like that. But, you know, not really, but there's lots of spaces out there for whatever you're doing, however, many parameters you need to fully specify. That's the space span of all values within that space, and the topic of imbedding spaces is gonna come up awful lot in this series. And I oh you a deeper dive on it. That's definitely coming. So for now when you hear his talk about embedding 's word to vacuum that sort of thing, we'll get to it. If you need the high level here, it is algorithms like word to vac are while the based on neural networks, but really they're especially good mapping mapping. That are learned unsupervised fashion, usually a mapping from your text to some vector space, and these vector spaces they might as well be random numbers in a way, they aren't quite intuitive. But they're affected. You can take any text find out where it belongs in that vector space. If it's constructed in a useful way. Well, things that are near one another share a similar meeting things that don't share a similar meaning distant from one another. We'll be getting all that. And just a few weeks last note here seek to seek models which were also going to get to a little bit. After that these are fancy new technique for mapping between two sequences. They've proven very effective in translations, something like English Spanish, maybe even python to arm. Who knows they're also neural network models just in a different architecture than the word to vet one. That ought to keep you covered for this episode. Let's get into the interview. My name's Hamill Hussein I currently a data scientists hosing machine learning, I get hub most listeners are gonna know about get hub. I don't know how you couldn't. If you're interested in data, and technology and things like that. I am Agean. There's a lot of interesting projects to work on their what sort of specific things you get into general Meese specifically what I'm working on right now is representation learning of code. You know, you might see in machine learning how to extract features from images or extract features from natural language code is is not a natural language. It's something different the different animal in self account. Looks like natural language in that it's text. You know, there's a lot of natural language inside code comments, even code itself contain some semantics like variable names have meaning in things like that. But it's also structured code, and it sort of thinking about how to learn rep. Presentations code. So we can do some downstream tasks like classify bits of code in into certain categories are to automatically detect bugs or to do things. Like search, you know, like semantic search of code and all kinds of other things that I haven't thought of doing it, you know. So that's the kind of research that I'm working on more recently. I love to delve into more of this comparison of code versus natural language, you point out a couple interesting comparisons. You I thought in my mind there were two big ones. One is that it seems like you'd get an advantage because code is very well structured, you know, it has syntax in the compiler will reject a lot of things. Whereas in English, you know, people are very forgiving. I don't even have to speak in complete sentences, and we can probably understand each other yet on the other hand if I look at any text of English paragraph. I generally kinda get the sense of it on one read, but I've looked back at some of my code from years ago. I literally have no idea what it's doing. So how? Apples to apples of a comparison. Is it to look at techniques? We might apply to natural language for supply to code. A lot of times the first thing that folks do when they're looking at code in trying to do things like things I described like searcher classification of code is to actually just treat code is natural language in the reason, they do that is because there's a lot of tools in pipelines and in things like that already set up for natural language because people have been are working on natural language in the wild. And the kind of set a baseline oftentimes of what we can do is just to kind of see what happens when you treat code is natural language in lease start from there. And then try to improve on that try to inject your domain knowledge about code in tried to make incremental improvements on that. So one of the first things that really caught my attention when I reached out to you was a project you're working on doing semantic search for get hub. Can you maybe for people who don't know I start with the definition of what is semantic search? So right now when. You search for coat on get hub? It's keyword search. So either you have to be familiar with the syntax that you're looking for are you have to be able to intimidate what comments might meet around the code that. You're searching for the might not even be comments on the code name. Even if they are, you know, that might not be a match between the keywords in your query in keywords in the comments are the coat in. So we could do better than that ninety of semantic. Search of code is can we search code semantically for sort of a general meaning of what you know what the code is doing in. That's not sensitive to keywords. So that you know, if you try if you type in the word sort or the word order, the kind of bring you to the same place, and you can find the code that that does that even if there's no intersection between any of the tokens in your query in the Cote sounds magical, but there's actually techniques that we can use to try to attack that problem. I guess the problem for me became very relevant the other day when I was working on a project and somewhere in the project some bit of code was closing consis stream, and I did not want to do that. And I had no idea where it was happening. I did a plain old tech search for dot close that brought me to many things, and I couldn't think of the names of the variables that were probably used. So I was sort of stuck what might I have been able to type in that. In theory could have found that exact point. I was looking for us. That idea was magic search has you would type in that exact thing the exact phrase closing stream. And then that is you would be able to find the code does. So I couldn't find it. What about the system you're envisioning would allow that system to find it? So the the system I've envisioning a would map code into in language both into common representation. So that when you write a query, you can find code that cemented cly close to. Your query terms, and I can get into hollow exactly do that. But that's the general idea when things are semantically close in English. I feel like I have a good understanding of that saying I need to give my pet a bath versus I need to take the bird to a shower. You know, human beings can hear that and say what's the same idea in code? Is. It a direct translation is it just that you know, I can have a four Looper awhile loop ineffectively. They're the same thing if the logic all works out, so a little bit more complicated. In your intuition is cracked is not as straightforward. Let's say natural language. However, from, you know, machine learning standpoint, there's lots of data in the wild labeled data, and the reason is labeled is there's tons of code in open source in on public repositories out there that have comments we can affectively use that to train models that can learn a correspondence between language in coat, and that is kind of the general idea of how. You can try to map language in code together. So by seeing many different examples of language in code weakened. Try to generalize over the space. And, you know, make it such that you can write a query and then fine code that. Does that acquire this not sensitive to your keywords because you've seen in the data many different variants of language, and you can refine that in a lot of other approaches, but this I'm just trying to give high level intuition. Yeah. Yeah. While so it really was startling to me. When I I read your blog post about the opportunity through so many public projects on get hub at the huge data set. You know, what a great opportunity to go in and maybe do some mapping like you're describing. But it also occurs to me that despite the fact that you have commit messages in you have code comments in python. You have doctoring similar things like that lots of languages the result of English. They're sitting next to the text in fairness, I can't say that I always have. Left. The best comments in my code, or the clearest doc strings, and that sort of thing is there any cleanup step you have to do to find code. That is well described in the English annotations or any language annotations. I guess my short answer to that is there's definitely tons of noise. Neil. That is exactly what I suppose like machine learning will help us out with is to kind of find the patterns, even though that there's a lot of noise in the data. Generally, speaking, don't really clean up the comments so much in this kind of lead them as they are with the general idea, there's so much data that you're still able to learn patterns over the entire corpus earlier in the show. We'll have had a little intro where we talk about word to vacuum embedding. So we can trust that listeners have at least a very high level background in that I believe you employees imbedding pretty heavily in the project. Can you describe how you put those two work? I will do wanna mention that the technique describing the blog post. Is a little bit different than the technique that I'm experimenting with currently if the blog basically uses as a as the data set functions in methods paired with their dock strings Thon, traditionally as a convention when you declare a function or method, you know, you can describe a one line summary of what that function does. Now is not mandatory that you do that. But as python convention until it's not always there. But it occurs a lot in. So that's the kind of data said there were new using in this example, in the blog we need to represent language as in bedding, specifically these dock streaks. So kind of in contrast to the word in beddings where you have embedding for each word. We want to find a way to create an embedding for the sentence or that one line doc string in similarly we want to create an embedding for the coat. You know, we wanna have some fixed length embedding for the code as well. And idea is can we learn imbedding for both the dock string in the code such that when you have some sentence that corresponds to code that does this that thing than you can learn that embedding will be very similar and by similar I mean in some kind of mathematical sense. So in the blog I use cosign distance in the architecture and the blog basically forces neural network to try to learn in betting for both code in text that forces them into the same embedding space in. So the way dude on the blog sexually I kind of pre-training a model that learns to produce the dock string itself from code a sequence sequence model that just means that we take an input sequence which is a code. And we try to predict like some output sequence, which is text in the dock street inside. That model you have some hidden representation of the coat and that is used to produce the doctoring. So basically we borrowed that. And we say, okay, we have learned in encoder for this code something that can take this code in producing embedding on route to doing the dock string. But we don't care about the dachshund, and it was just fun to show that in log similarly, you know, we took a different model a language model in language model is just a model that given n words can you can you predict the next word just for ease of understanding? I took all the doc strings in the corpus concatenation them all together in kind of chop them up into very specific way. Instead. Okay. I'm just gonna let model read this. These docs, strings I'm gonna try to predict the next word in the dock Strang. I'm the slide like sliding window over all of this. It's kind of like word toback in the sense that you learn associations between. Words in essentially, I just take that model in I take some internal state of model in. I basically averaged the word embedding 's of the sentence. That's not really what is not working betting. But we just for simplicity in just I understanding legis say, I use this language model to create this embedding for the dock string. So I have one model that doesn't betting doc string one model that can create imbedding for code the two seven models. They differ two separate purposes of embedding don't relate to each other. Then I kind of take that model that where produced doc strings in. I know it works 'cause I can inspect the dock strings can see that is producing sensible doc strings instead of producing doc strings. Can you predict the imbedding for the doctoring said just replace the target variable instead of being the docks during the embedding for the doctoring so them with that gives me as a model that? Can map code to embedding the model that maps code to the embedding that embedding is in the same space as natural language because that's the one that has embedding from language model. I know this is a lot of things I'm saying maybe using like, I don't know if it's easy to explain this without pictures. What? Yeah, I'm following. Because I read the excellent blog post and some of the figures that are there. But I think we've got a couple of translation steps to find sort of what is that vector space. Look like than the one that shares code in language, can you tell us a little bit about that space. You know, the what you built the model number of nodes in the sort of thing we really just arbitrarily picked in betting size for this common embedding size. So I think I may have picked five hundred as the size of the meeting -solutely five hundred numbers that represent code five numbers represent language. So as far as what the space, look like you can like visualize the space, and if you do that like, let's say you visualize the representations for the code. You'll see like code sort of grouped together you'll see like machine learning code. You'll see web code maybe some other infrastructure code different topics basically in their kind of group together. Other it reinforces like, there's some semantic. Meaning this when capture by these imbedding, the same thing, you can do kind of like a reverse look of you can just write your own sentence about something in see what the closest doc string in the embedding space is and if you can do that check you can you'll see oh, you you'll getting very similar similar doc strings to the one that you you are supplying in the imbedding space. So that's kind of how it feels on looks in how you can inspect it from a human sense. I know that a lot of those systems in a lot of natural language processing methodologies in general tend to do better the larger the corporeal able to give it can you? Tell me a little bit about your data collection process, and how many documents if you call them documents is single pieces of code or snippets or whatever. But how much data have you amassed to get the project to the state? It's today for this project that use a publicly available data set. Not something collected from inside. But rather from outside. There's there's a excellent open source project called good hub archive. It's also sponsored by some generous people at Google who his essentially scrape get hub public repositories in put it in big query bakeries in interface where you can you can go on Google cloud, and you can query all of this hub data in. So that's the mechanism used to actually get this. Because I wanted to make give people sort of given end to end to'real in show, folks, how to get this data themselves in other data for other languages. They wanted to until a used that night amassed, I think little bit over a million distinct Haiphong methods and functions in doctrine pairs on. There's a lot more things that without doc strings, without you know, our code that maybe wasn't well formed that couldn't be parts, but that's part of the cleaning process. The first step was to get all this code and of. Blobs of Kobe sickly. It's the data looks like it's this text. And you know, there's doctoring in code together. Just like how you would expect next to use something called abstracts in trees every language has some kind of Parsa built in. So for example, python has the modules called AST? You can use that to parse python self any. It will parse the text in. It will tell you. This is a comment. This is a function this method so on and so forth. So we use that to extract the doctoring and the code separately in sort of departure all of this text into constituent parts. And then we do some cleaning some deducing because a lot of duplicate code up there that's really important in. I should mention like in the blog post. I limited to some notion of popular repositories, something that had at least a couple of stars are at least, you know, some level of. Activity because there's definitely a lot of noise. So I just had some rough years sticks to kind of try to get a little bit higher quality data set. Listeners if you could see my calendar, you would not be envious, I'm desperately overbooked. But I can always find five minutes a day. And I use that to check out the brilliant dot org. Problem of the day. I mean, sure I aspire to take more of their courses, and I do from time to time. But I make sure not to miss their daily problems ever. In fact, let's do some multitasking here. I'm gonna do the problem of the day right now. Oh, there's two today. One in science and engineering Ted, noisy night sky and one in math and logic, titled rational or irrational was definitely the one for me. Plus check it out today's math and logic problem is an interesting one. There's a spiral of triangles. I see some right angles and some measurements. Man, I've got to figure this out. And really you have to see the image to appreciate it. I'm being asked what is the link of h the longest line segment, and to be honest with you, I don't know the answer, right? Away. I know the square root of two is going to be involved somehow, and I'm going to hurry up this ad so I can go and do this problem. You know, I find I need constant challenges to keep my math up. And that's why I love the challenges. I find at the brigand daily problems. And the other reason I get over there every day is because the daily problems expire if you're not a subscriber. And if you just got back from a long vacation like I recently did hoping to catch up. That's the time to go premium and brilliant, a super affordable for anybody. So what are you waiting for? You can go try it for free at brilliant dot org slash data skeptic finish your day. Just a little bit smarter. We think brilliant dot org for their continuing support. And we've worked out a deal with them. So the first two hundred of you to sign up via our link get twenty percent off the annual subscription totally worth it. And with it, you can view all of the daily problems in the archive, those alone. Make it worth it. Let alone all the great courses. They've got. So if you've got five minutes a day, use brilliant daily to challenge yourself, do that at brilliant dot org slash data skeptic one more time, that's brilliant dot org slash data skeptic. So you're talking about working only in python? Then if it's all dock strings as the language component. Correct. Yes. So this example, was hyphen. And the reason I chose that. It's it's important when you're doing this problem any machine learning problem to get familiar with the domain and to be familiar with the data working with and in this case being a data scientist, I'm very comfortable with python. And so I naturally gravitated towards that as as a data set rather than some language that I don't know anything about and it would be hard for me to debugged. If something went wrong with a parsing of the language in other things as I'm thinking about the models. You built I know that attention is a big component of good natural language processing systems because we need to sort of. Remember what happened? Earlier in a sentence or earlier in a paragraph and the same is true in code rights. Certain lines the beginning of function might be highly relevant for some activity going on at the bottom. Did you have to do any tweaking or, you know, hybrid parameter tuning in that regard to suit your work to fit the code language, examples you were working with? Yes. So okay. I hear kind of two questions one is about attention. So actually in the blog posts at don't use a tension. But in my current research, I'm using a completely new architecture, which is one model to learn a joint vector space between code language in the blog posts, there's three models kind of, you know, all working together little bit more complicated, or it's law more complicated. Actually, I don't use that attention mechanism kept it as simple as possible. You don't need. You can just use basic approaches, and you can get really far to get people excited about doing more. But I will share that. Attention does in the in the new research, I'm doing with the one model that learns joined vector space in action. It makes a huge difference. If you wanna treat code as natural language the second question for the Hyperion tuning I did some limited tuning but not much. The hyper is tuned were mostly learning rate and the number of parameters in the model. So either the number of layers are the number of nodes any slayer, I kind of gravitated towards keeping it as the minimal complexity that works because a wanted to keep it simple for the blog. That was my other goal of hyper tuning was simplified as much as possible. So you think you'd alluded to this a little bit earlier that a lot of the libraries out there and code examples in the folk wisdom about how to do these sorts of projects, it's really biased heavily towards people working on natural language. There isn't so much on code, exactly. Based on your experience after this work and in. Into your continued work as well. Do you have any wisdom for the different challenges between tackling these two similar yet different problems? I'm actually really fortunate to work with some really great researchers in this area of doing machine learning on code as you aware get acquired by Microsoft recently. There's some people had their that have been researching this topic for some time and has studied doing machine learning on code, but taking advantage of the structure of code. So one idea is to represent code as a graph in to make the edges of the graph. There's different relationships. They can have in co. So there's something called control flow. There's data flow in there's other types of connections that you can have between different variables in the code and actually represent code as a graph in a new something graph neural network to try to extract features from the code that is a ongoing bit of research. They've actually been some papers released colleagues at a have Milton in Mark at Microsoft research that. That have shown the really good results on certain tasks that are improvement of natural language approaches. There's ongoing research on leveraging that type of technique and even combining it with the natural language technique to do these stats. That's what I'm working on right now. One of the examples in the blog posts that caught my attention was when you're showing how the semantic search works. The search was creating reactive plot. And what the first result was was a nice little snippet of Matt plot lib code the type of code that a fledgling python programmer finds himself looking quite often just to do all the fine tuning and tweaking and nowhere in that code snippet. Did the words create interactive plot appear it it's obviously not a leap. It's the correct answer. But it's the surprising result. Do you have any similar results that you found of in the once you got to playing around with the models? Yeah. Kind of the I guess the flagship example, that's the headline on the block. Is paying arrest API in results? And then you'll see the results don't contain the word paying arrest API or any of that. But that's what that code does. Actually, it's actually hard to find those examples because people do a lot of people do a good job of native naming their variables making it informative. You would think that you would write code to where even if you don't have comments in the code based on the variable names in the naming of things you would get an idea explicitly almost what that code does. So it is hard to find examples. Sometimes that don't have any intersection whatsoever between code in the description of what that code does. That's why like the example it really helps to eliminate what semantic searches. Absolutely. Yeah. Could you tell us a little bit about ways in which you see projects like this expanding the future may be touch on some of your current work and things you're excited about in the field. Yeah. I think this type of search would work. Well, when you try to scope it to repo, our user or organization kind of cases where you said where you know, there's code in this repo or in this area. That does something you just can't seem to find anything that will be a big boon to people being on boarded onto projects. I also can see that you know, you can because you can learning representations of code. You mentioned earlier that code is very English Centric in right now when you're searching for code in in the discourse of code, whether that's issues on good hub or even stack overflow or anything like that. It's very English Centric. I can imagine it's hard to find code if not English speaker. This will be really exciting. This representational learning of code because this could allow you to a math any language to this vector space. So you can find code, regardless of your native language in in that's powerful to bring more people into the fold of writing code, the more inclusive profession will too. Wind up. You know, this probably would have helped me a lot earlier today if it had been rolled out into production, get hub. What are the chances will see that? You've planted a seed here. Individually users of get will have access to powerful search technology like this. This is still very active area research. There's no promises that I can make their we still have to really bet it out in tested and see if there's something that will really work. And in the meantime, we are improving. Our search are the Visser's that we have making sure that it works in adding functionality in baseline functionality to that as well. So, you know, it depends on many things, but I'm pretty hopeful that this is going somewhere, and it will help the community in one way or the other. It might turn up in search in my turn up in some other feature like bug detection. But I think it's a fruitful area of of investigation. Definitely I have a strong feeling that in the next at no ten years down the road. I'm gonna say something about. Back when I was your age. We didn't have this really feels like we're on the verge of having this breakthrough. And it's gonna change coding quite a bit. I imagine. Yes. I see a lot of people involved in this space actually seen demos from different folks. Doing semantic search of code and doing machine learning on code and all kinds of startups doing things like fixing your code medically. Mike seen a lot of different intelligent conversational type of bots with limited functionality, but still useful doing things like system. People with code reviews are developer tools haven't changed in a very long time. That's really interesting. I think there is like you said ripe opportunity to really have like a step change in in in our tools. Absolutely will one of the great parts about the blog post as well as you shared open source all of your resources in it's an open data set. So this is a very repeatable process. What would it take for someone to fire this up and walk in your footsteps? Yes. I would say, you know, one thing that will make things easier is to avail yourself of the Docker container. So that you don't have to install everything from scratch and get all the dependencies working yourself. You know, use that in use your favorite cloud provider. Whether it's AWS or C P or Zoar get a decent. GP instance, Laura if you have one at home, that's fine too. Definitely would use the Docker container because that eliminates a lot of complexity with getting started. I think that's why I have this Docker container because I think that's where people can give up if they tried to do it without them. We'll hamill. Thank you so much for coming on the show and chatting about the project. This is really exciting. And I think really novel interesting work, and I'm glad it's open source that people can follow it to maybe find new innovative ways to be inspired by. Yeah. Absolutely. I would be thrilled to. Have people check out the repo comment on their ideas and their learnings?

Hammill Hussein co Minneapolis scientist Greg Google Meese Microsoft Hoshi Neil Visser Mike
Flywheel Model: Amazon Business Strategy

Digital Business Models

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Flywheel Model: Amazon Business Strategy

"Back in two thousand one jeff basis sketched on and knocking what would become the amazon strategy for years to come. He called it the amazon cycle and we like to call these sorts of model a flywheel model so these new episode of the business pills part of the digital business on this podcast offered by the four week n._b._a. Dot com if you like this kind of content go for more on four-week ambi dot com now. Let's get back to the amazon fly without us. They work. Let's remember that we were baked in two thousand one just after the explosion of the dot com bubble and many startups at field also because they did manage to understand that actually the internet required added a new way of doing business so it was not just a new distribution channel it was just a catalyzer for new business models jeff carr's understood that back in the days and that's also how he came up and how he sketched these to cycle or these flyweight model now take me highlight three higher level concepts before we move forward to the to the model first of all these flight will model up especially when we move from a more traditional business model which we can call lenient or a pipeline depending of the different orders and now they define it to a platform business pod on which we all agree on which <hes> mostly are the businesses that dominate today tech poured like google business <hes> lincoln cora and so on and so forth so those platform visas models really are new ways of doing business and they <hes> move from traditional sales funnel. If you know what that is that's really <hes> imaginary representation of the journey your <unk> customer my go-to before becoming a customer and that's just an imaginary representation because i want to light that in many cases the customers come to us innovatory and linear fashion but it's very important to understand that when we move from linear business model to applause from mrs model actually really we go from my seats funnel model to a flywheel model and the third aspect and so this was the second point is that when we look at the platform meese model we move from a financial model where we look at high profit margin where instead we have a model where we look at cash flows news now if you managed or if you happen to be a financial analyst throughout the years which managed to look at amazon financial statements seen since its inception up to probably two thousand fifteen you might have noticed actually amazon didn't make much profit and it was actually running at very low. Oh extremely low profit margin if not inexistent prophets now the thing is though amazon did produce a lot of cash through its l. probational efficiency and it was investing this cash back into the operations so that it could improve the cost structure of the business so so that's why when we move from that from this model we can agree or not and it's really up to whatever is going to try out the strategy a ah flywheel business model driven by platform business more than actually sorry. A fly will model driven by a platform. Mrs model can can be a pretty aggressive model that looks at growth over anything gas and saw growth a disruption would be the primary two elements of those modern modern so again we can agree or not this kind of view of the business word but that's the way it is now. Let me explain the fly with model in detainees. His amazon started from the customer experience so this we model starts from a customer centric view of the business world so you look at customer experience as the propeller of the initial flywheel of momentum and these customers that get to your europe business business. They become the primary actually <hes> ambassador sedate so they start a reference. Your business world amount takes off and you get more traffic traffic as you get more traffic and you become more popular in the case of amazon more sellers wanted to join the platform is means that more people were willing more sailors third party sellers were willing to offer items on amazon store and this go to another aspect to another step which is wider selection so i'm now could not only offer its own products could offer third party not products which widen it the selection and made the customer experience even better so this one aspect of the model of the fly will model but then as emerton would grow its business would also improve its cost structure which in turn would actually lower the prices that will be passed on onto customers and so in this way you see the customer experience is not just improving on on on a linear fashion is actually improving on an exponential way so not all the customers are happier because you know they have a wide selection but they also have lower pies and they're also. Are you know very happy.

amazon jeff carr financial analyst google meese lincoln cora four week four-week
Episode 6 Sell or Be Sold by Grant Cardone

Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

19:11 min | 1 year ago

Episode 6 Sell or Be Sold by Grant Cardone

"Growing their beauty business mass doesn't have to be overwhelming. It's all about mastering a few key strategies and systems to save you time. Welcome to beauty marketing simplified podcast dedicated to helping you on your entrepreneurial journey. I'm your host April niece. I'm a permanent cosmetic medic artists that built my six year business while only working three days a week and raising twin toddlers. I'm here to tell you is possible for you to with with a background in marketing. It's my mission to help. Women Worldwide debt more prophets while pursuing their passion and purpose. Let's transform your your beauty business for more income and less stress starting right now. Welcome back to the beauty marketing simplified podcast episode six today. We're talking about how to get more sales in your beauty business so I was reading the book sell or be sold written by grant carbone and there's so many juicy tidbits in this book and I thought I really need to do a podcast on this but they're so much so the break it up into a two part series and I'll probably be referencing some of my favorite quotes and tell you some of the takeaways and and I'll tell you three of the big takeaways on this first part and then we'll talk about the other takeaways on another episode so so I think when it comes to sales we all have different opinions and different mindsets and it can be that we grew up with these mindset said somewhere along the way you encountered someone that was pushy or that conjured up this idea of this negative slimy salesperson person and therefore it really makes us feel a certain way when it comes to selling in our own business so I take away the is that you must sell and definitely if you are in business if you're doing anything in life. The book makes a really really good point that it is important to know sales to be successful and selling starts when we're young our parents sell us on a certain way to be the and maybe what a definition of happiness is and if you look at our kids. Our kids are really the some of the best sales people on the planet. Kids are super passionate. They're very persistent and they know how to break their parents down and kind of break your resistance in in order to get what they want so kids are naturally very persuasive and we don't want to break our clients down and we don't want to be that fast talking swindler or confrontational or a high pressure salesperson so when we think about sales we try to avoid those things and that also leads to ideas of rejections so therefore we sometimes we'll shy away from sales but we need to be aware of the different techniques to convey okay the value of our services and the best way to get past these negative ideas that you have about selling and about being that pushy sales person is to rethink your past experiences and also tap into the value of the services that you provide and start to express express that with confidence so that when you do that you know that you can better serve your clients and you can talk about the actual actual procedures and the benefits so the first two chapters of the book the author. Again Grant Cardona is talking about how sales is essential for every area the of life and learning the skill of communication and persuasion and negotiation is critical so in chapter one. It's titled Title is selling a way of life and this is your ability to persuade or negotiate or convince others and it does affect every area of of your life and it will determine how well you survive and the author makes a great point to think that sales is not negative ebb and to take away the bad connotation but instead to think about sales as really persuading others or convincing others of something something whether it's a movie or a great restaurant again. It doesn't have to be something negative. It's just that they will maybe see something with your point of view selling is defined by Webster's dictionary as the action of persuading or influencing another to a course of action or the acceptance of something and again. The other is making a point in chapter one that in every exchange of ideas or communication. There's a sale being made so that it's really affecting every area of your life and one of the best quotes he has that relates to us as beauty business owners is the truth is businesses fail first and foremost because their ideas weren't sold quickly enough and therefore they ran out of money so no business owner can build a business without understanding the critical element of selling and it's so true we we are in a beauty business and we have to persuade others of the benefits and really help them understand the transformation and that's that's really what selling is about not about being pushy. It's just about showing others the true value of the service it will be very difficult to have a successful business silence without the ability to persuade others on why they should come to you further services so the second point is that you have to. I Sell Sal yourself so in chapter. Five author talks about the most important sale is to sell yourself because when you are sold on the benefits that you who provide then it's much easier to tell others you know I just use the example of a great restaurant or a fantastic movie. When you kind of Stumble Stumble upon these things it's very easy for you to tell others in fact you can't stop telling others about your favorite restaurant or benefits and and yet when it comes to our own services we look at it as being self promoting and over the top and self-serving and so really having a reframe of that again in selling yourself on the benefits in order to become a great salesperson and successful in your beauty business. You have to sell yourself on what you're selling meaning. You have to truly believe in your services. You have to be confident not arrogant again and not self-righteous but you need to believe that you have the solution for your client for me. Personally I believe so strongly in the systems and the strategies is that I teach to other professionals and the level of care and support that I give them with the coaching that I believe nothing else can compare hair to what I provide. It's truly unique market and I don't say that in a boasting way and I don't say that in a way that is arrogant I just say see that as I truly believe in the services and I've also seen it from my students and I've heard that for my students as well so I've seen it from the result so sure there are other beauty coaches out there but I'm convinced that what I'm offering cannot be provided by somebody else first of all I have my unique system and method the amplify method but also what I do is truly unique and that's what conviction is. It's a firmly held belief and that's the way I want you to view your services and sure we are all human and there are times of uncertainty in doubt and you heard me talk about Imposter Syndrome on one of the earlier episodes however the key is taking time to become a thoroughly sold on the services you provide I'm sure you've heard the story of Love David and Goliath and David being a small boy he beat the giant Goliath and he beat the giant not because because he was capable but that he really believed he could and if you look at certain brands like apple and starbucks the people that buy hi those products are sold on the idea that those products are superior right so they really believe in those brands and that's why they will wait in line overnight for the new release of the new iphone and that's why they will pay three times the price. I won't say the same Same Cup of coffee but they will pay three times the price for a cup of coffee because they believe in the product they're really sold on the product and the brand so most buyers would rather pay more and make the right decision then pay less and make a mistake so the art of selling is to convey to the client that buying your services is the right decision and that you are the right professional for them so number three takeaway is that sales is not about the money one of the quotes in chapter five that really shook me was if a person won't spend money order tends to be really cheap on how he spends his own money than they'll have trouble getting others to spend money so again again to break that down. If you are someone that again has a negative view about money or tends to feel a certain in way about spending money then it will be hard to convince others to spend money on your services now growing up with very frugal frugal parents and you've heard me talk about all of my clothes or most of my clothes coming from garage sales and so forth I had a hard time with this. My mindset was again and with always saving and holding tight to my money and over time I've been able to change the way I think about things when I was growing up. I couldn't buy an outfit unless it was on sale because I thought that paying full price for something and was considered bad and now I've come a long way and I still like a good sale but I can really value that. It's not always the importance of finding a bargain but finding a good investment and the thing about that is I've also invested a lot in my business so I've been able to see the return on my my investment and now I value things differently so I look at certain items as investments in able to spend money in a different way okay and have a different relationship with money. Remember money is considered currency and currency means that it comes and it goes and there's a flow to it so if you're holding on tightly to it it might be hard to convince others to let go of their money to pay for your services just some food for thought there and so in the end we all had times where we've overspent and we've gone over budget and we've made some bad buying decisions but understanding that sales is not about price as much as it is about the confidence that we are buying something that will solve our problems right so so again money mindset or issues around money and concerns ron money. It's really a mental game because our world is an abundant world. There is is not a shortage issue. It's really that abundance is all around us and so we really need to look at that abundance Indi- and start to change our mindset about money and really realized that sales is not about the money it is really about again the value and and the value our clients solving their problems with our services. The fourth takeaway is sales is about people so taking time to figure out what the client wants and needs by asking the appropriate questions and having that communication with them before the sales begins so what what do you want this service to do for you. You know that might be something that you say to them. You know will you looking to get and really figuring out where they are and and what they're feeling before they buy and the transfer in conveying again at the value of the transformation when my husband and I were on our honeymoon we we traveled to Greece and also Turkey and so the story of being in Istanbul and buying a rug we did buy a beautiful rug which I love by the way but it was quite an adventure and it was all afternoon to talk to this man about our life and our story and his story and again it just brought home the point that that sales is about people in the fifth takeaway is now that you understand that selling isn't bad and it's really about how you change your way of thinking about sales and then also committing to greatness in all aspects of Your Business and that includes sales and marketing so there will always be competition in our industry. It's growing faster and therefore it might be tempting to kind of blame others. There's an industry and like examples to say oh. There's a lack of training or a lack of regulation and that's why business isn't doing well so it's tempting a to blame others but we really have to change our mindset about sales and our commitment to grow our business because when your commitment level changes so so your results so does your success in fact your success is indirect portion to the strategies that you employ in your business business your mindset and your commitment to action. I always say learners are earners but action takers. I are the real moneymakers and here's a quote from chapter three that is titled. The professional or the amateur and he says the difference between between mediocrity and greatness lies in being committed to the profession and being consumed by the desire to be great and and the dedication to learn the trade he goes on to say that you must think differently act differently and work differently to be a professional and to be truly truly great anything. You must devote yourself completely. I love that too. I think that you know again. It's easy to look around and compare our business to other our businesses and since I'm just loading you up on quotes. I'll give you another quote. You've heard the quote. The grass is always greener where you water it so so when we look at other people's business and it looks like they have greener grass it's because there was someone there that was committed to taking care of it to helping to grow their business and helping to again grow the grass and grow their business same can be said of our beauty business so really again just to recap those five takeaways and really again to start to think differently about selling and really to think about about how it's not about being pushy or a fast talking confrontational high pressure but really about conveying the value number one is that you have to change your mindset and know that sales is something that is part of life and definitely important mm for growing your beauty business number two is to sell yourself again to be sold on all of your benefits and really see that it's not about arrogance or self righteousness. It's really about that if you are not telling clients about your services your really doing them a disservice because you have a solution to their problems and you have a way of helping them and you're kind of keeping it from them. Number three is sales sales is not about the money which can be kind of tricky but again understanding that sales is really about an exchange of value number four is that sales is about people really finding out what they need and serving them in that way and number five is being committed to greatness ness in all areas of your business and that means by stepping up your marketing and stepping up your sales. Those are the first five takeaways from the book sell or be sold by grant cartoon and again. Hopefully you have gotten value out of this and are really going to start to think about sales in your business in a new way. Today's episode was brought to you by April meese incorporated so we are opening up. The doors is to my signature program. I have rebranded it and restructured it so it's more streamline with all of the great benefits and you'll hear some of the upcoming testimonials we only offer this program twice a year and were opening their doors in October so mark your calendar. The new name is elevate so if you would like to elevate your beauty business and be the go-to stand out beauty professional in your area then this is the program for you. It's unlike any other program again. It is my signature formulation to help you attract more more clients and have more income with less stress so again mark your calendars for mid October. There will be more details coming soon and you can elevate your beauty business. Thank you for listening to another episode so of the beauty marketing simplified podcast and if you enjoy today's episode we would love to hear from you. Insure you subscribe download and also so meet us a review. Let us know any topics that you would like to hear about and also referred to a friend. Thank you again for joining us on signing off. This is April grace hugs and high fine next week.

business owner David grant carbone Grant Cardona Greece Istanbul Webster April meese ron starbucks apple Goliath three days six year
258: Beating SIBO, IBS, and Histamine Intolerance With A Gutsy Girl Sarah Kay Hoffman

The Healthy Moms Podcast

56:06 min | 1 year ago

258: Beating SIBO, IBS, and Histamine Intolerance With A Gutsy Girl Sarah Kay Hoffman

"The. Bobby podcast. This episode is powered by a ritual. They make vitamins specifically designed just for women ritual vitamins contain night essential nutrients that most women just don't get enough of including vitamin B, twelve as medical Bauman form only, and not this medical Gasset d three K to buy e omega three fatty acids. Moron curated iron and proprietary form of magnesium where all supplies all of these informs that are easily absorbed, and utilized anther capitals are vegan gluten free allergen free and non GMO. They have it both a prenatal and irregular women's multivitamin both designed specifically for men and senators take for women's hormones, did you know, for instance that forty percent of women cannot properly use full of acid due to Mt Jaffar, gene, variation. Ritual contains a natural form of fully and synergistic nutrients, so the entire multi is more effective, especially important prepregnancy or during pregnancy because during pregnancy, especially full late vital, according to OBGYN, Jason Robert most women, don't find out they're pregnant until about four to seven weeks, pregnant, which is past the twenty days in the twenty eight days. The baby's organs are rapidly forming, and the neural tube, which becomes the central nervous system, and the vertebral column is almost completely formed and closed by the end of twenty eight days. In other words, you need those nutrients in your body, before you get pregnant, the essential nutrients folate helps promote healthy development of the neural tube. And this is why many doctors recommend taking a quality prenatal for several months before trying to get pregnant ritual. Makes this easy with both in prenatal and irregular women's multi-vitamin and you can learn more about both by going to wellness mama dot com. Or it's. Slash go forward slash ritual. So again, wellness mama dot com for its lash go forward slash are not you up. This episode is brought to you by kettle and fire bone. Broth and soups, I have used these products for years. And I always keep my pantry while stopped. They have chicken bone broth beef bone broth, and new chicken mushroom, Bobrov, which is delicious. Those are all great as base for soups, or even to sipped on their own. But cuddle envir- also now has tomato butternut and Meese. Oh soups, which are often incorporated, as part of a meal in our house. They're newest products are a grasp had chili and a Thai chicken soup. These are great meals all on their own, and they make last minute dinner, so easy at my house. There broths are made from grasp head, and pasture animal bones, and they're great source of collagen and amino acids like Pearleen glycemic, I college, and some form everyday and kettle environments it. Super tasty to do this. You can learn more go to kettle and fire dot com. Forward slash while Mesaba and use the code while my twenty to save twenty percent on your order. So again, kettle and fire, all spelled out. KT. L. E. A. N. D. F I R, E dot com forward slash mollis, mama and make sure to use the code modest mama. Twenty to save twenty percent. Hello, and welcome to the wellness mama podcast. I'm Katie from on this dot com and I'm here today with someone I was so excited to meet recently, Sarah k Hoffman is the founder of a gutsy girl, which is a website. I've been following for a long time. It's an online community geared toward women who are looking for a reasonable coach for healing things like IBS IB CBO, hormonal problems acne and more. She is a gut researcher and a journalist who seeks out highly detailed information, and then condenses it into digestible ways for women worldwide and her writing style is so conversational and find and I feel like I know you so, well, already even though we only met recently, and you're also the mom to three absolutely adorable children. So we'll talk a little bit about motherhood today, too. But welcome, thanks for being here. Thank you, Katya. I feel like I'm on a celebrity podcast today. So exciting because I followed your work for years now. So I'm really excited to. Here with you only. Gosh, I'm excited. You're here. And I feel the same way I followed you for so long. I'm a little bit like starstruck today, and with a name like a gutsy your I feel like that's where we have to start. So I'm sure like my thyroid journey, for instance, it's probably a long journey, but I would love to hear your gut health journey and just your story because I know this has been a research for you for a while. I have pretty much been on this journey for over ten years now at well over ten years, but I think might journey pretty much started in two thousand eight when I was diagnosed with colitis, and it was shortly before my wedding and a new something was off. And we couldn't really figure out what so I decided that we should probably just do the colonoscopy end endorse copy. And they found that I had quite us. I had a pretty mild form of it called practice which affects the lowest part of the Cohen, the rectum and my journey. Began then but I don't really consider it to truly have begun until two thousand nine when I came upon the gap STA hit. So from two thousand eight to two thousand nine I just tried everything I worked with the nutritionist, I traveled in aired everything that I could on my own and, you know, at the time, I would just read articles that would tell us what things were healthy for the guy. More vegetables fruits, whole grains, probiotics prebiotics all the things and we just couldn't get better. And then in two thousand nine I stumbled upon the gap style in actually brought it to my nutritious, because it was something that was so different than anything that I had ever thought of or tried. So I'm sure you're familiar with the gap stay at right? Yeah. Absolutely. We have experienced in the past as well. Yeah. So the outside just for anyone listening, the gutten psychology syndrome. It was it's developed by Dr Natasha Campbell McBride, and it basically the foundation of it was a lot of meat broth fats very little carbohydrates or anything that could really like sit in the gut in ferment, and I started in within days, I felt better in. It was the first time I in tire life. I felt like I could actually heal and that diet was playing you know, into me getting better or prohibiting me from getting better. So I did that. I did that in two thousand nine and I stayed on it for quite a long time. I talk a lot about the gas STA today as far as it changed my life, book changed my life, everything about it changed my life. But, but the problem was I stayed on for far too long. And so I kind of went. On and off it from two thousand nine until December of twenty fourteen I just played around with different things, I would feel, well, then I would not end end the cycle just kind of kept going, so what happened in two thousand and twelve kind of rate in be like, in the middle of their is. I went through a very vicious cycle of IBF and for anyone out there that listening that's gone through that, you know what it means. It's a lot of different shots hormones in really lake manipulating everything about your cycle in. And I think, you know, it all played into my deep already rooted, hormonal issues in also might got issues. And so, at the end of twenty twelve when that failed that IVF cycle. My husband and I took a trip. Up to Sedona. And it was there when I just had this. Just this whole revelation if you like I just wanted everything about my life to change. I wanted to get well, I didn't want to dwell anymore in infertility or not having children. I just wanted to really just want to term life round make things like is positive is possible and at end I really devoted my time in my energy is in Sedona at that moment to researching and learning everything and spinning positive. So it was there that gutsy girl was born because it would play into this whole idea that I'm sitting here with all these gut issues in my stomach is just in misery. Now, I've just gone through really long, intense period of IBF and infertility. I made it my mission that with a gutsy girls, obviously, on gut with gutsy, but also just to build this community, the support community for women that were going through all the things I was in what I learned than what I've learned since then is that women typically that have IBS or Idi it always goes along with something else. So, you know, low thyroid or infertility skin, skin issues, or always goes along with all these other things. But all of these other things are very isolating, and you can feel so alone. So a gutsy girl was born in then yelich you said, I just researching kep learning December of twenty fourteen while actually about a year after that we ended up, this is a whole 'nother, part of my story, too. But we ended up a adopting our first daughter, and she was a micro preemie. And so when she was two months old by the time, we got her, she was still only five pounds. So I was up. I was already sick still, but I was up almost like twenty four seven I think I think I may be got three or four hours of sleep a night for months in months on end just, you know, the cycle of feeding and sleeping and feeding and sleeping and all of that. So it was about November of twenty fourteen when I just absolutely hit rock bottom. I have blog posts on my site that you can see my face. My peril, dermatitis was the worst. It's ever been in my entire life covered. My face was covered my stomach bloated. And then, you know, things will go through me and I just I, I could not catch a break. It seemed like so at that point I started seeing a functional practitioner in California, three lived at the time. And I he really changed my entire life because instead of just doing the test. The awesome. The endoscopies the regular blood tests. He dug into every last thing that he thought could be going on. And we found out that I had CBO, which is small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. I'm sure you know, and that has kind of been the start to my real journey. I think I mean, even though the colitis diagnosis and everything, but I believe that it's really been the CBO that's been my, my underlying issue. The bottleneck to all of all of everything in. So once I was diagnosed with that than at the beginning of twenty fifteen is when I really believe I started the heal. Wow. Yeah. Hear so much of my own story in your story mine was related to thyroid, but just that long process of having to very much like figure it out on your own and thankfully, there are great practitioners that we can bring in and having our corner. But that's something I've learned so much through my own journey is the end of the day. We can't outsource our health and seems like you found this out as well that you can learn from so many different sources, but truly the end, it's figuring out that personalized Vermeille Shen, and applying it to yourself. And I think that's something that you do so well on your website is to give people the tools and empower them to go down that road and figure out their own steps in their own things. And, and what the also that I loved, and what you just said, was about starting a gutsy girl for the community side, because I think that is one of the most overlooked aspects of health and I talk about it all the time now because I think it's so important it's thing that's missing so much in our modern world is true community since I love that you working an are working to build this community for women who are all in this. Journey together. I think that's so beautiful. And you mentioned CBO. So some listeners may know we had a journey with this as well in our house. My husband in twenty twelve appendix ruptured and the secondary infection from that, which required, lots and lots of antibiotics. And I think he had a flesh eating bacteria was a pretty severe thing, but it led to him getting CBO. And this is in the also had to kind of figure out how to tackle as well. So I'd love if we could talk about it, because I suspect, there are a lot of people suffering with some version of CBO. Even if it's a very mild case that may not even know because for him, it was a couple of years before he finally, put the pieces together and got a diagnosis and the testing, they do for cbo's, not like common testing, you would get a regular lab panel. So a lot of people may have it and it kind of fly under the radar. So walk us through maybe how you found out you had CBO. And then how you started to tackle that. Yes. Oh my prediction. I've been saying this for quite some time now is that. That, you know, when I was diagnosed with it in two thousand fourteen like what's CBO and now it's becoming even more common. But my prediction is that within the next few years, it's going to be a very common thing that even western doctors are going to be doing testing for, and people are going to be diagnosed with left and right? Because I think it is so common in such an under while see the thing is, it's such an underlying thing. Like you said when your husband's appendix ruptured that came along with it. It's an underlying thing, but usually, there's also an underlying thing with CBO. It's just like this maze in this mess, but it Siebel goes hand in hand with so many other conditions that I just see it's gonna completely increase in the diagnosis with. So I was diagnosed with it in twenty fourteen and I would have never known had I not gone to that doctor who kind of specialize in that he's special. Allies in. He's a he's actually Chris Crushers doctor at the Californian super functional medicine in. He studied a lot about CBO in line disease, which those go hand in hand a lot as well. So I think he was already kind of looking for that. Maybe I just got lucky that I happen to see him. But my symptoms were very, very classic CBO symptoms. I could eat one thing and be so bloated. I mean so dependent perspective at the height of the whole infertility journey. I remember I was in the airport and woman came up to me and said, oh, when are you do and I just started crying? But, like, I'm, I'm not I have CBO. Thank you, and am in, in fertile. But yet, so bloating, it's just this like horrible awful. I always said it felt like gremlins pushing against your stomach in trying to get out that was one of my big symptoms. My other one was the acnes period. Matata so badly covered my almost my entire face all around, my nose may chin rarely scaly rash, and then the other very classic symptoms. I had was I was always like I could eat a four course meal in within ten fifteen minutes. I was starving again. I could never eat enough, and it wasn't it wasn't that I gained a lot of weight, or a lot of people will lose a lot of weight with CBO. I just kind of maintained because I was very very deficient in a lot of nutrients by the time I was diagnosed, I was so severely deficient b twelve that he started me on injections to my stomach immediately. I had a lot of joint pain. We always thought that it was, it was from gluten, which it may have been. But I had a lot of joint pain. I was very, very tired. I mean, that's I, I would say that's probably one of the symptoms that looking back for years now. Very tired and. And then the other classic symptom I think which people don't like to talk about. But it's true is I could be in a room and barely any gas come out of me, but the entire room would just like smell so bad because it's because what happens with CBO is there's just so much bacteria that stays in your small intestine. The small intestine is supposed to have bacteria but you're not supposed to have that much. And it just like food for men's there in like it's almost like it feels like it's Roddy. That's kind of what your insides feel like in. So I because I had so many classic symptoms. I could communicate this to him. He tested me for it with the breath test right away. And sure enough. That's what I had. So that was kind of my journey within how I knew. But having said that CBO is I'm not sure what your husband's experience has been like with it. But CBO is one of those things that is so hard to get rid. Of most people you don't just do a course of, you know, the herbal antibiotic or the antibiotic or both in your better in its in done. I mean, most people it just keep it keeps going and going going until which is what I figured out. You really start to address. Whatever is underlying. Yeah. We had the exact same experience in some of those classic symptoms as well. Especially the bleeding and to be honest, I feel bad. But for a few months, I kind of, like, downplayed it or didn't really like will stop eating so much meal, or like I don't know why you're bloated or takes HCL or whatever. And I didn't really understand just how uncomfortable that really can be. And then once we got the diagnosis, it was such a long process. You're right. Because like a lot of stuff you can figure out remedies were pretty easily. And this, I felt like we were just doing battle with this thing that every time we would cut off its head comeback bicker, and it was one more frustrating things we've ever had to deal with. And I'm curious what your what the things were that helps you? And again, this is all I know very. Personalized. So I don't think either of our cases is going to be prescriptive, but I think you can learn from some of the commonalities that help people. So for him, he actually did a twenty one they elemental diet with this essentially fasting with very specific protocols. And then we did this L like, along very careful diet after that with the early on about six and a lot of up laments. But I'm curious what kind of finally stuck in what works for you? Okay. So in the beginning, I was very adamant that I did not want to take any, any Vallat X because kept telling myself. Well, this, this was part of the problem why got here in the first place at grew up on antibiotics, I was chronically ill my entire junior year of college that ended up in a tonsilectomy you know, just so I was really adamant. So my doctor Mckee completely agreed in we chide the herbal the herbal antibiotic row. Everything from neem Burba rain Alumax combinations. He gave me different. It was called GI synergy in. It was just kind of like a bunch of diff. Herbs in one hell, I would, you know, whatever I did all of the things and I try that religiously for, I don't know few months, and I wasn't getting any better. In fact, I was getting worse. And so he said, I think you're going to need the, you know, in hindsight, what I learned about the CBO antibiotics is that they stay localized to the small intestine in. It doesn't really disrupt your entire gut. So I mean if I had. I'm like I say, I'm the Queen of justification if I'm gonna justify it's, it's going to be that. But, but I knew regardless at that point, I just wanted to feel better. So at the when I was I, I ag- nosed with it. I was just diagnosed with hydrogen version. So are not sure what your husband was. But there's hydrogen methane dominant so, in beginnings, hydrogen. So the antibiotic that I took right away was reflects men in my doctor so thankful. He always was able to get me twenty one days to twenty eight days what I've learned what I've heard from other people's experiences when they only had two week course they relapse within days of being done with it. And it makes sense to me too, because I never felt well until about day, twenty one I almost would give up on even the antibiotics, all sudden, it was like some magic happen on day twenty one so much better. But so I did the antibiotic and I stayed feeling. Well after that for quite some time, what I did from a dietary standpoint at that time was, I did during antibiotic, I would always be eating mops. And I didn't really wasn't really concerned too much about, you know what I was eating and then afterwards so that so that all of the bacteria, come up to play the theory in, then you, quote unquote can target with antibiotic in after the antibiotic, I would follow a more like a pretty strict diet, like a lower Fahd mop diet mixed with some gaps or some SC. I just kind of knew what my body what worked what, what would it work and the problem with that? There's no, I think that's a great protocol. I think I think any protocol do this elementary which by the way, I've never done. I've always been very interested in it, but I'm too afraid to not eat anything for twenty one days or longer, I think whatever protocol you're going to do can work and is fine. But I kept relapsing, so I think since twenty fourteen I relapse either three or four. Times and each time I relaxed I would I either had hydrogen methane dominant or both. So whenever the methane came into it, then I was not only on reflects men for twenty days. But then you also have to add another antibiotic called Nehemiah soon, and I think that's always just that's always, like for fourteen days, but I would do that. And again, I would feel better for quite some time than it would relapse until it was the bout this last last year last March was the last time so about a year ago that I ever relapsed. I did the antibiotics again. I did the food thing again. But what changed was that? We really started to focus on. Why was I relapsed so much? And I believe that until you do that. It's you can never it. Can it will never go away in for me? I had barely any stomach acid. So you had mentioned the H, C L so, adding in doing HCL appropriately was critical and to this day is critical for me. So I I very religious to the age. C L to my digestive enzymes. Those are the two biggest things every single day that I make sure I keep up with, with my stomach, but be beyond the supplements. And the, the medication the biggest thing was the lifestyle. What I found was every single time I relapse it was always during high stress periods. And I had to really dig deep and try to figure out what was causing all this stress anxiety, and it took more far more than diet in supplements. It took therapies took journaling, like it, it sounds, so who, but I have been feeling the best, I have in my entire life for over a year now, in, so I think when you're talking about healing CBO, it's just so important to know, like, really what's going on under Neath so that you can I view food now and supplements and therapies in anything else you wanna do his tools. They're just tools to keep you. Well, yeah, absolutely. And I think you made a couple of really important wines in your response. Now, one being that the antibiotics us with CBO are very unique. And while for instance my kids have never had antibiotics because they've never needed it. But I absolutely think there's a time in a place for certain antibiotics. I mean, certainly I think we can agree that there perhaps overused in some scenarios, but this is like one of those scenarios that if you need them, you need them, period. And I love that you like shared your story on that. And brought that up because I think, especially in this natural health world, there's tendency to like, antibiotics are always bad, and they're definitely not always bad. So I love that. You shared that part of your story. And also that you mentioned HCL. This was so key for him as well. And he also to this day takes HCL. This is actually another area where we're going to see slight growing awareness about this. I think a lot of people have that, even if it's like a very sub clinical, they wouldn't necessarily notice until they started taking the and then they notice how much better, they feel. So I'm curious for you. Like, how did you find out that, that was a key, and then just curious what your daily regimen looks like with that. Because like I said it's been life changing for him to. Yeah. So as we age naturally, decrease the amount of stomach acid you. Have. So that's kind of like one problem with the whole stomach acid thing, the other part is that traditional doctors, they'll, they'll see like a problem like GERD or any kind of like stomach acid issues as oh. You have too much. So, what's reduce it when that might not actually be the case? So then you're reducing what was already too low of so. Mike acid into even lower stomach acid. And the thing is that I wrote a blog post the PD to the stomach, like you the stomach needs to be very acidic that that's what helps break down the food. The problem with CBO is your food doesn't break down in the small testify. Don't have. If you don't have the adequate stomach acid in order to break down it just sits there for months in. That's when all the problems arise, so for me with the stomach acid. I'm very, very open about this to to this day. It's something that I was not very open about for a long time. But earlier in my days, you know, high school. Probably started in high school college even through my wedding. When I was diagnosed from Clayton in two thousand eight I was I always followed very strict diets. I was always on some kind of diet. I, I can't even tell you all of the crazy diets, I've done in my entire life in, in. It's why I'm really really a proponent of this idea that got healing is not a diet. 'cause I think too many women are trying to make it into this restrictive diet. But I have been on those diets in, that's what got me so sick in the first place. So my doctor that's, that's kind of what we how we stumbled upon the idea that, that I probably had ruined a lot of depleted. A lot of my stomach acid in so the way that we tested it is just there at home test with each Seattle pills. So there's a there's a tutorial on my website in how how you do it. But I mean it was very simple. It was with a lot. A protein meeting, you know, half Cupper more, I would take one HCL Pell, I felt nothing then I would take the next time I tried it. I would take two with protein felt nothing Antill. I got all the way up to, like, I think at one point like thirteen each C L pills. And I still wasn't feeling anything. But at that point, what happens is it becomes very counterproductive to go up more. Because then you're drinking so much water while you're eating your meals, and in order to take these pills in. We should never be drinking that much water while we're eating that also like is not good for digestion. So my doctor what we decided to do. I think in also I mean that's just that's hi was never going to be taking ten or more pills in one sitting. So even if it's age jail. So I think what we did was we just kinda normalize it. I think he had me taking in the beginning five or six each Seattle until the day. I felt a little burning sensation. That means that then you're producing enough stomach acid and you don't need that many anymore. So I did that for a very long time. I mean, I say that five or six I don't even know probably for couple years, and then today down to like two one or two I could probably do without, but I'm just so I don't like overcautious. I don't feel anything at two in so, yeah, that's kind of the process that we went through again. I have to to'real how to do it, but I didn't holding hands with my functional practitioner because it needed, so many of them. I feel like if you really have that low of stomach acid to be really careful in should work with your doctor. And how what's the right place to start and just stay consistent with that amount until you're ready to reduce? That's great advice. And I will make sure we linked to your post about that, so that people can read for themselves echo, your encouragement to always find a practitioner, you can have in your corner because it's. To have someone that has been there. You can ask advice to, and you mentioned Fahd maps a few minutes ago. So I love for you to walk us through what those are and how they come into play. Yeah. I actually just released an e book all about the low Fahd Mont diet, not really about the loaf. I'm up diet. But about how if you have CBO Andrew following a low Fahd mop diet to be able to eat more things and still he'll so five up stands for, for mental oligosaccharides dissect rides model. Sacrifice impales. So they're just things that are found in our food, in a thing, with ops is that I'll never forget. I went to see an aunt in southern California. Once I got there shortly after my c diagnosis in, she told me that she was she was making some meal for dinner had apples onions, garlic in it. And I said, don't worry about me. I'm just gonna go down the street to grab something. I'll make my own food and remember she made the comments to me. What now you can't eat healthy things, like apples, onions and garlic. That's the thing about the Fadh moths is that they are healthy, things, quote, unquote, healthy things that, you know, we think normal people should be able to eat all the time in in abundance, because they're so good for us. But the problem is that they contain, some, you know, a fod mop in some way, shape, or form. And it just it doesn't for meant right for people that have CBO. So yeah, it's just they're just classifications of food pretty much in. They are a collection of short chain carbohydrates, that are not absorbed, properly in the gut, and when they're not absorb properly in the gut, they can trigger symptoms in people with IBS. Got it in no something else that comes into play sometimes with these particular conditions his things. Histamine intolerance. So I'm curious if you have personal experience with that. And what you've learned about that if so during your journey. Yes. So I actually don't have anything with histamine intolerance, not that I know of are mean obviously, once you start going out one rabbit hole. I could find myself in so you know going on so many other ones, I've just chosen not to bet said, have written about histamine intolerance before because so many people with CBO do have history on tolerance in can't eat a lot of things. And I know a lot of the histamine intolerance. I'm not sure what your symptoms are like, but it's a lot of like hives red eyes nasal congestion, headaches running. No, it's like that. I've never had anything like that. So I know that it's very common with people that have CBO, which also been Hiatt even more, unfortunately. And also, I know that you and I on the same page with wrestling thing I love about the thrive probiotic is that it there are no history than there are a lot of probiotics, so the way that I tell people relate to approach CBO mixed with a low histamine diet is to, I always say whatever, whatever you're really trying to address most do that. I in then and then add to it. So for me, like with CBO inclines or CBO knows I'll take CBO in the low thyroid. My main goal there was to heal the CBO because then the trickle effect everything starts healing as well. But so healing the CBO for me meant to follow low five map this that and the other. But if I also wanted to then compound it with the fired than I. Would try to add foods in that would also work with low Fahima to help the fire eight. So the same thing goes for when people ask me about the alot histamine diet with a low fat diet. So if you if cbo's the most important thing to you start there, then you take, you know, there's low histamine diet was like eggs eggs, are low Fahd so great. Keep keep it there. Or just that's how that's how I think it works best when you have a combination of a lot of things going on. Yeah, that's great advice. And yet, definitely were on the same page with the probiotics brings up another good point, because products can be a really confusing topic. You have any kind of gut issue. I feel like I know like on the gaps died. When we did that they were very specific probiotic recommendations, and the probiotic, I now use also just drive. It was not even bailable back then. And so there's so many different options now. But do you have any like, general guidelines for that from what I've read in from our experience with my husband's CBO, some probiotics can actually make things worse? If you. Just kind of biotic it yet. There's a I I write a lot about my blog. But one of my favorite pulse ever wrote about this was should I take a probiotic with CBO? That is before I met just thrive, but even still I do still take very same approach because it is such a subjective topic in the, the healing Sima world in, I think, when it really comes down to is, what stage are you in and what kind of probiotic are you taking? So, you know, I, I don't remember exactly which probiotic it was. It doesn't really matter. But I was taking it when I was trying to along with antibiotics? Also I could've euro, why kept being so bloated. So my doctor said, try just try cutting the probiotic for a while and see what happens ensure off, I started feeling much better. So whatever was in that probiotic was not working in that stage that particular stage of healing, so a lot of times once I would feel better in my symptoms were kind. Had really diminished, I would start taking the probiotic again so that I could repopulate anything that I needed to continue repopulated. You know, I think that it's just such a tricky tricky topic. I have been taking just thrive for a couple months now and it's been incredible for me. And I know other people that have active CBO are taking it. And they say that it's working for them as well. I think when it comes down to probiotics, you really have to look at the strains in the species on their soul. In addition to my I really feel like a lot of supplements are so much snake oil at this point because there's the market is just flooded with 'em. And you really have to have a new blog post to about got healing with minimal supplements. You know there's just like a few that I take now because the more supplements, we take the less. We'd no really. What's working on? What's not in the less were able to really investigate into know. What is in that capsule, in what are we taking? What are what are their tests? How do they test it? Where are they sourcing their ingredients? You know, there's so many different things like a proactive is not just a provide. I, I always think about that old activity commercial where they talked about that yogurt is so great for you guys probiotics, but, like look at the ingredients, you know, I think I just feel like that with, with all probiotics in, especially if you have CBO and choosing the right probiotic agree completely end. That's what I loved about these specifically as them being spore based there so much less reactive. Like like you said, they don't have the histamine or dairy or a lot of the things that if you have any kind of special condition, you may be voiding. And so I've heard the same thing for my readers. Just it's helped so many people in down a lot. Like you my husband takes each L and those probiotics daily, and then everything else kind of is in rotation. Razz needed. But those are his two non-negotiables. Miss episode is powered by ritual name AAC vitamins, specifically designed just for it virtual vitamins contain night essential nutrients that most women just don't get enough of including vitamin B, twelve as medical ballum form full late, and not this medical Gasset d three K to vitamin E, omega three fatty acids, boron. He lated iron and proprietary form of magnesium ritual supplies. All of these informs that are easily absorbed in new lies and their capitals are vegan gluten free allergen free and non GMO. They have both a prenatal and a regular women's multivitamin, both designed, specifically women and synergistic for women's hormones, did, you know, for instance, that forty percents of women cannot properly use full of asset due to 'em teach our gene, variation ritual contains a notch. True form of full eight and synergetic nutrients. So the entire multi is more effective is a specially important prepregnancy or during pregnancy because during pregnancy, especially full late is vital. According to GYN, Jason, Robert most women, don't find out they're pregnant until about four to seven weeks pregnant, which is past the first week days in the first twenty eight days. The baby's organs are rapidly forming, and the neural tube, which becomes the central nervous system and the vertebral column his almost completely formed an closed by the end of twenty eight days. In other words, you need those nutrients in your body, before you get pregnant, the essential nutrient folate helps promote healthy development of the neural tube. And this is why many doctors recommend taking quality prenatal for several months before trying to get pregnant ritual makes this easy with both in prenatal, and a regular women's multi-vitamin. And you can learn more about both by going to wellness MoMA dot com. Forward slash go. Forward slash ritual. So get known as mama dot com forward slash go forward slash our IT you out. This episode is brought to you by cuddle and fire bone. Broth and soups, I have used these products for years. And I always keep my pantry while stopped. They have chicken broth beef bone broth and a new chicken mushroom bone broth. Which is delicious. Those are all great as a base for soups for even just sift on their own. But pedal, envir- also now has tomato butternut and Meese. Oh soups, which are often incorporated, as part of a meal in our house. They're newest products are a grasp chili and a Thai chicken soup. These are great meals all on their own, and they make last minute dinner, so easy at my house, their breast or made from grasp head and pastured animal bones. And they're great source of collagen and amino acids like Pearleen glycemic, I cooperate college in some form everyday, and kettle and fire makes it super tasty to do this. You can learn more go to kettle and fire dot com. Forward slash wellness mama and use the code wellness mama. Twenty. To save twenty percent on your order. So again, kettle and fire all spell it out. ET. L. E. A. N. D F. I R, E dot com forward slash moments. Mama and make sure to use the code Melnace mama. Twenty to save. Twenty percent. We've been talking like I said, I hear so much of my story was thyroid related, but just that journey of having to figure out what was wrong, and then that slow journey of healing, and something that's always top of mind for me is how can I do as much as possible to give my kids foundation, so that they never have to deal with problems like this, and I know as a mom, that's probably something that you throw thought through a lot as well. And you write a lot about your family, and raising healthy families. So I love to chemist which gears a little bit and transition into the head, and I'm just curious, if there are any things you do with your kids, specifically just to give them a really good, healthy solid foundation in life, will, I will I have to say that I am I wrote it down immediately that your children, all of your children, have never had antibiotics. That is incredible. That is just so fascinating to me. I need to have offline conversation with you about that. My children, have had antibiotics but again, I just have to take out any anything that I feel about that. So all three may children are adopted on all we adopted all three of them from the foster care system. And they came to us all as babies pretty much babies, but they were all prematurely born and were born into the world under less than ideal circumstances in. So people say that it's just perfect. You know, it, it was so meant to be that I got the children that I did because I actually have a tab on my website called gutsy children, because all three of my children, have some sort of gut or another issue that is playing into their gut issue. So my oldest has severe eggs and my middle child was just nosed with intestinal. Parasites and he also has stomach acid squeezy on enzymes, and then the baby, she's not a baby in March almost three but she definitely has a lot of stomach issues. And we're just treating her as if she had intestinal parasites because my middle child is her biological, brother. And they have a very, very similar like everything they really loaded, and they just yeah. So we're treating them the same. But what I do for them is I approach their diet in their lifestyle as sanely as possible. But without normalizing it if that makes sense, so, you know, like I feel like it's so normal for kids to wake up in each, sugary cereals, in, you know, live off of that stuff all day in my children don't, and I think that's okay. We, we have treats, of course, we do like any other family, when they when they're out in public school, whatever they, it's okay, we have to be very, very, very careful with gluten dairy. None of them are gluten dairy so were pretty strict on that. Now in fact, my middle child has the parasites. He got into gluten on Sunday, head rashes all over his face. So I it was is just another. Confirmation from your y y we live like this. I really like make things fun. You know, instead of for example, instead of like normal catch up on their with their stuff. I give the surprising tins catch up, and we always call it mommy special whatever. So mommy special catch up, or we do coconut amino. It's mommy special sauce, and they think that's fun. I just make things fun for them. And like it's really really things taste normal to them. Everything does people just can't believe that, you know, they wanna eat vegetables, and they want, you know, potatoes in fruit than and that's just because that's children. Do as they see, you know, they want to be like us, they want to mirror, the things that we're doing in. That's just how we live, you know, I'm not trying to not trying to, you know, be this outstanding mother of the year with how I feed them in things that we. Do. I'm just trying to set them up for a healthy life, because I know in my research, in my own life that taking care of the gut in taking care of yourself has incredible impacts on your life, and in, because so much of the immune system lies in your gut. If, if I don't take care of it for them and help them teach them why it's important. I don't you know, I don't know what could lie ahead for them. So I think that's why I'm so passionate about it. They take enzymes before they eats while we do the just drive probiotic, I opened the capsule in put it in their food, take me like half. One, obviously instead of a full one and in just take the fish oil and beyond that, pretty, pretty normal the other awesome that you are their mom. 'cause it's like that is a perfect match in. Thank goodness that they have you and I think that's also important that you mentioned trying to keep that. Mindset sane, 'cause we also definitely don't wanna raise our kids with could of any kind of issues around food, or like any kind of long complex. It's going to last into adulthood, as sounds like you're taking an amazing approach, and I also love that you brought up exa because that's something that in, in our time with the gaps died, of course, you learn that skin health is so tied to gut health and I hear from a lot of moms, I think Xmas also on the rise. But a lot of moms whose children are struggling through that. And that was thing. I had to learn to is it doesn't matter necessarily what you put on top of the skin if Xmas happening, there's the inside the body that's also going on. You have to address both of those two are, there things that you found, especially helpful on XM aside, because I know a lot of parents are in that right now. Yeah. The thing with you know, I love skin care, I, you know, beauty counters my jam whatever. But I think too many people are trying to say, like for adults in for kids, in for everyone that, you know, all these topical things it's going to turn your life round. Your skin's going to be great in three days, and that's just not the case. My peril, dermatitis was never going to go away. No matter what kind of product use it all came back to my gut when my CBO was healed. It just hold on quote magically went away and the same thing happened with my daughter that has eggs, emerged, she got it so badly. It was not too long ago in its it started popping up on her hands, and then we finally little bombs everything's started as little bumps almost that just expanded into, like large rashy things on our hands in back in our all over her face. In fact, one Sunday morning on my birth. Say she she said, her heart was kind of beating fast and because she had these rashes. All right. Uh so worried, I took her into the emergency room right away. And she had had this eggs, among going on for quite some time. And so, of course, their solution was a topical steroid. So I was not in favor of that. But at that point, she had gotten so bad. So we used it just for a couple of days, not very long. But at that point immediately, I cut all she, she had been basically living on dare. She loves there. What can doesn't right? But so we I, I did all the things from a dietary Sam, because I knew from my own experience payroll, dermatitis that, that the topical stuff is just one matter. If we help everything else, so to cut the dairy in cuppa gluten. And she started drinking more bone. Broth I would have do enzymes before she aids fishy oils, which she calls it also pretty soothing, and then it just really started to go away on its own. I mean I don't think so that was in February. I don't think she's at any dairy gluten since then. I don't wanna keep that out of her diet forever in. So we're trying to get her blood test to see really what she's intolerant. She's doing a stool, she's currently in the process of doing a stool sample to see if there's something going on. But the functional doctor that were working with thinks that it's probably some food that's really causing eggs, muscle, the other thing that they allot time will tell you to give up would be like eggs and nuts for me. I have a hard time giving up all the things for children just because I do not want to set them up for a lifetime of fear with food or anything like that. So I chose to she doesn't do many eggs to begin with. So that's why take it out. But I just chose Darien gluten for right now in it health it she hurt she's perfect. Now, again, her skin is completely clear. We put you know, just like gentle lotion on it. Keep it hydrated. I tell her make sure she's drinking more water. We reduce a little bit more of the unnecessary sugars. She, we got a note from the doctor so that both she. In her brother, can we bring our own snacks to preschool, which has helped a lot because, you know, there's no dairy gluten in it. And I think that's, that's the biggest thing. That's awesome. It's yeah. I think sounds like you're doing an amazing job in think that's gonna be so helpful to so many parents who are listening, and I also can't believe how quickly our time has owned by because I could talk to you all day long. Have couple of questions left to ask at the end the first being if there is a book or a couple of books that have really changed your life and if so what they are in y okay, so I, I've mentioned it already before, but I have I mean, there can be so many fun books that I share and a lot of life life changing books, but I honestly I'm thinking about this in the book that has truly changed. My life was the gaps diet. While I don't or the gun psychology syndrome book by Dr Natasha and while I don't believe in it for any. He long term solution. I believe in the foundation of what she saying. You know, the, the gotten psychology syndrome. It's not just Gus up at all the other things that that go along with it. Autism dyslexia. Depressions gets Friday at eighty dean all these things we don't realize how much the gut in the brain worked together. And I have read this book, I can't even tell you how many times I have little bookmarks everywhere in it. She's just it's just a really great book that truly changed my life because it had it not been for that book in me learning the art of making my own bone. Broth in two thousand nine I would never probably be Ryan today. So I'm very grateful for that book, and then the other that I just honestly, think that changes my life all the time I read it is the bible. It's a book that not a lot of people would say. But it does. I you know, like I said on this journey, I have had. So many ups and downs like so many awful things so many great things. But the one thing see consistent is me reading the bible. And that I know that such a topic that people don't talk about these days, but I have to say because it really is. So those two blocks awesome in lastly, any closing advice that you give to parents to someone suffering with gut issues or just in general. Well, I think the best piece of ice, I give to everybody is to test in not guess, so, I feel like we have access to so much information these days on the internet. You know, with just like open up a browser in, you can diagnose yourself with advanced stage for cancer today. But the reality is that you have got to just go to the doctor and get tested and Dr Google is not inappropriate test for you. I have a. Blog post on my site. It's a beginner's guide to digestive health testing in it really takes people through the process, 'cause I think that there is, you know, there's, there's different steps to testing, you decide that you're going to get tested versus self diagnosing on, then you decide, are you gonna go, the western or western doctor, or functional integrative doctor, then, you know, they're steps that you should end can take to prepare for your first appointment. And you can use Dr Google for that, you know, like Z different symptoms that make sense, different things that you wanna bring up with your doctor different tests, that your doctor might not automatically test, you for, but you feel like you want you are you're in charge in, so you get to go to them in you to tell them, I would like to be tested for XYZ. Here's my sentence. This is what's going on. This is what I think, if you have additional thoughts to add to it. Great, let's work together. But I that's my biggest piece of. Vice is to just know what's wrong before south diagnosing, doing all the diets in all the supplements in medications, and it's just your, your people always ask me, how long will it take to heal, my gut, and I tell them as soon as you have in accurate diagnosis? And then you get on the path to healing the cause of that diagnosis. That's how long it's going to take you Levette in such a perfect place to end. I know that you are busy mom in businesswoman them, so appreciative that you took the time to be here today. This episode was mazing going to help a lot of people and I appreciate you so much. Thanks so much. Katy in. Thank you to all of you for listening and for sharing your most valuable asset of your time with us. We're so grateful for you. And I hope that you will join me again, on the next episode of the wellness mama podcast. If you're enjoying these interviews, would you please take two minutes to leave a rating or review on I tunes for me doing this helps more people to find the podcast, which means even more moms and families can benefit from the information. I really appreciate your time. And thanks as always for listening.

CBO antibiotics histamine California Meese IBS Mt Jaffar IBF Bobby researcher Bauman Cohen Sedona Sarah k Hoffman Jason Robert
Half Size Me: How To Change Your Mind and Habits

Half Size Me

47:12 min | 1 year ago

Half Size Me: How To Change Your Mind and Habits

"Half size me episode three seventy seven brought to you by the half size me community to become a community member. Please go to half's is me dot com forward slash join. He is just. Speaking as fine come on the finish has round fully. Pasta on your way. Day. Don't you? Those guns. You could. No, you'll do. Hello. And welcome back to another episode of the house is me show. I am hoping that you were having a fantastic week. And I just wanna to take a moment for those of you who might be tuning in for the first time. I am your host. Heather I have battled my weight since I was a very young kid. I've struggled with my own binge eating issues, which started around the age of eight to nine and I hit my all time highest weight in two thousand six of well over three hundred pounds, and I spent about five years losing, the weight using a totally different mindset and approach, and I have been keeping it off since twenty twelve which for me is where all the glory is you I've lost weight. So many times it's really about. How do you keep it off? That's to me the goal. And so I'm really proud of myself every single day that I continue to focus on this. And I continue to make this a part of my life because I know that Heather who was well over three hundred pounds would want me to be doing the work in remembrance of all the effort. She put in. To this journey. It's that sense of appreciation for the hard work that was done. So I just want to say, I am so grateful to be here with you every single week and this week we have a beautiful guest. We have Connie. She is a half size me community member. She opens up, and she shares so much of her struggle, which I know will resonate with so many of you the thing I really appreciate it with Connie coming on and sharing as she talked about how her father's passing away really impacted her. And I've noticed more and more in the community. How so many people are sharing that loved ones or people they care for have passed away and how much that has really resonated with them and really motivated them even more than they were before. And so I just want to encourage you. It's tragic when we lose somebody we love, and it can be very heart wrenching. But there's a couple of things I focus on when I lose someone. I love one. What can I learn from the experience, and what lessons can I apply to my life, and to water all the gifts that I got from that person being in my life because my experience. Has been there's no guarantees. So every day. I get with somebody every gift that they bring me that day. That's something that I am not entitled to it was something that I was given that moment, and I can appreciate it or I can always be wanting more and more and more, and that's really a hard thing. But I try to keep myself grounded in that. Because if I look at what I've received, and I'm thankful for it. Immediately makes me feel fulfilled. Now versus obi's are all the things I won't get an I missing out on which is that feeling of lack, and I just want to encourage those of you who are missing somebody right now, whoever it is that they've giving gifts to you. And just try for a minute to reflect on those and just really absorb that an allow that to maybe make your heart feel a little bit fuller today. All right. And so there's a few things I want to let you know, if you have not gotten on the VIP newsletter. What's going on? I'm giving you tons of goodies. I'm giving you the permanent fat loss crash. Course five lessons, you'll get them in five days on how to lose weight and keep it off for the long term. All you have to do is go to house is me dot com slash VIP. And then I'll send that to you. The other thing you're going to get our mindset tips and tricks, which trust me, you need them. Because what I spent most of my time doing coaching is helping people not travel down scary spiral rabbit, holes of despair and all the things that they're doing wrong or how they're inadequate or all the fears that they have it's really pushing back you're thinking in order to do the very repetitive boring mundane tasks of losing weight or managing your weight. The other thing you're going to get is you're going to have an opportunity to submit questions for upcoming ask coach, Heather episodes. You're also gonna have an opportunity to request a coaching call with me randomly selecting two per month. So just wanna make sure you understand that it may not mean every individual gets a call. But it gives you the opportunity to be put in with everyone and get possibly selected. You also will be getting better. Discount codes on all my products. I'm turning out quite a bit of products this year. So just to give you an idea of my mastering the calories teaching toolkit for all of you that want help with calories and figuring them out. I have fight the weight gain, which is Oliver people who are either have gained weight or are in the process of gaining weight. And they want to get it under control. I have another teaching tool kit end emotional eating a lot of people struggling with emotional eating. This is going to be a great set of lessons for you to follow to begin to control that. And then I have my wonderful coaching cast, which are Meese sending you audio messages. Daily to help you with specific things like not quitting escaping the food prison or other way of explaining it would be random nighttime eating greasing impulsive thing. And then stop dieting and start losing which is how to start to move away from diets and start learning how to take what you're doing in your life and transform it. So not only can you lose weight, but you can keep it off long term. And then I've got enough. Teaching tool kit in the works right now that is not currently available yet. But it will be transforming your travel come summertime, I get an onslaught of emails and questions regarding how do I travel and not gain a bunch of weight? So that's going to be a teaching tool kit for you, those of you going on occasions hoping to have that available by the beginning of June. So I just want to let you know, all of that is available to you. You'll get information in good discount codes on the VIP. Make sure you get signed up. How size me dot com forward slash VIP. You have a wonderful week. Enjoy this interview with Connie. And I'll talk to you soon. Ladies and gentlemen. I have a wonderful treat for you. Today. I have misconduct on the line. She's a half seismic community member. And she has graciously come on today to share her weight loss story Connie would you like to say Hello everyone. Hi, everybody. If great to be on here are right. So Connie you, and I have had a chance to talk one on one. You know, of course, you've been in the community and you've been sharing, but the listeners this might be their very first exposure to you so weird you mind, maybe taking us back a little ways in your past and sharing with us. One was the first memory or thought that you had that maybe you were having a problem with body weight or body image. That would have been my teenage years probably about I'd say probably fourteen or fifteen years of years of age. I was in the marching band at school, and my mom helped with the uniforms every year. And so basically, they would kind of anybody that was new in the band would have to be fitted for uniform anybody that had been in the band for a while. Each year, they got fitted again to make sure you know. Of course, you know, different things happened with your body and that year, I was trying on my uniform, and it was snug, and I can't remember for sure if but I'm guessing I probably had to get another uniform unless they can take in that uniform up, you know, could let it out a little bit. But that was come person memory of having a problem because really before that when I was little I was pretty skinny, you know, and and was real active. So that was the first rookie election in during that time period. Do you remember was there any discussion about putting you on a diet or going to focus on weight loss? Or was that none in issue at that time? I chose to do something about it. I don't think I don't think that my mom really brought it up to me. I think it was more me. The and saying, okay, you know, what can I do? And I ended up just deciding to go on slimfast. All right. So you were on slimfast and it still that fourteen fifteen years of age area. I would say so maybe fifteen sixteen because I do remember actually pretty much sane on it. I think through my senior year. It didn't take me that long to lose the weight. But I just remember trying to you know, continue making sure that I didn't gain away back. All right. So after high school, you were assuming down at a weight that you felt comfortable is that correct? Yes. Okay. And at that point what happened next were you venturing into college or the workforce? And were you able to kind of continue to keep your weight in check was it something that was again becoming a concern for you. It became somewhat of a concern. My husband who we had been dating at the time. And we went on a trip over the summer. Just a couple of weeks, but you know, kind of eating fast food and stuff like that. And we ended up loping. So then being that he was in the military. We were dealing with an airman salary, and so not a lot of money. Plus, you know, being newlywed being out on my own having I had cooked before when I was growing up. But this was more of me cooking for us. And so just you know, kind of really a lot of times doing like hamburger helper or something like that. And just not doing portions like I should have done. We would also I can remember at that time. Little Caesars had like some crazy specials and so you get like two pizzas for real cheap. And so we would go and get those pizzas. And I mean, we ate him over several days. But again the portion sizes were not. Yeah. And I see this as being a real problem for a lot of people when they first get married one. It could be they don't have really much cooking skills, or it could be a lack of budget, or it could be just they never really had that responsibility. And they're not sure how to go about it. And so when you reflect back on that time, what would be some advice now with the wisdom that you have that you would give to a fairly newlywed couple when it comes to eating behaviors. I mean, what what have you learned since then, thankfully, now, we have the internet. So there's so much out there that you can find there's, you know, even if you don't know how to do something you can look on YouTube or their websites that have classes and things that that you can learn. So my advice would be to get on their try to find some healthy alternatives that that are kind of within your price range and really just watching your portions. We don't we don't realize. Is a lot of times. And also another thing that I was thinking of this morning to one thing that I noticed with my mother-in-law when we would go over there to eat like, she would have maybe spaghetti for dinner. But she also would incorporate applesauce unisom bread on the side. So it wasn't just the spaghetti. Which was kind of what I was used to growing up with you know, you had the one thing. I mean, you might have Rosen potatoes or something. But like if you were having spaghetti, you'd have the spaghetti in the bread, and that was pretty much it, she was incorporating the applesauce, which was a big thing, you know, so to try, and, you know, just incorporate different things a salad I have salads almost every night about the only time. I don't is if we're having soup, but other than that, I typically do have salad and that helps so that I'm not. Worrying so much, you know, like because otherwise I would want to maybe double my portion, which isn't exactly advisable. So that would be my suggestion would you know, to to watch your portions, and again get online and check out some different websites that may be have some good healthy recipes so say somebody's brain newlywed there. I know because I just had a family member. She got married in a really young twenties, and she's still kind of living with her parents. You may not have all the culinary skills. You might not know all the nutritional stuff. But you know, what you could do you could buy a couple bags of like, the salad mixes, you could get some some different cans of soup, and you could have some different types of fruit on the side. Like you mentioned apple saw she could do a Nochur added canned fruit. Like, these are all fairly inexpensive things that you could have on hand. So even if you were getting the pizza out or having a frozen pizza to your point having a bowl of low calorie soup with it. It's gonna fill you up eat less. Pizza that might be a good little fix for somebody until they can figure out how they wanna cook. Or how they wanna prepare meals and getting consistently with meal planning. Right. So Mary getting used this was the weight pennant creeping up a little bit as you were eating these like different foods than what you had eaten before. Yeah. And I would say I've probably was probably about where I had been when I again went on plumbfast when I first noticed it in high school, it wasn't because really was trying to think of how much weight I probably lost at that point. I probably lost about twenty five thirty pounds. So compared to what I had to lose this last year that wasn't a huge amount. So I think I was probably about what I had been back at that fourteen fifteen year old cell were you feeling the desire to go back to slimfast because a lot of times when people seemingly have success with something? They will always try to go back to it. Even though I make the argument, you know, if it was really something sustainable and maintainable you probably wouldn't have stopped doing it to begin with. But but was that urge to go back to slimfast during that time? Do you? Remember, there was to an extent because again with the slimfast you're typically doing like a morning shake in a lunch shake, and so there was kind of that while let me try that again. And then I can just have regular food at dinner. But I would tend to do that. Maybe I short period of time. And I did that every once in a while throughout the years. I would do that. But it was never anything that. I stuck with for very long got it. Okay. So at this point that's not feeling right for you to stick with permanently. And what were you choosing to do as far as moving forward with your career moving forward into married life where you're going to attempt at some point. Do you think? Different approach was it one of the things that you were really unhappy with where your weight was. And you're looking for other options, I was unhappy with my weight, but I was trying to go through like, maybe just do some exercise not really changed my eating habits, but at least exercise, and again, I look back now and think if I would've just had what I the access to the internet that I have now I probably could have done some of the things that I was trying to do. But I didn't stick with. I was very much for example. I would go out to the base and I tried to track which track with like a quarter of a mile. You know, I couldn't even get maybe halfway around it without stopping to walk. You know, I try to run it in. So I just got very frustrated where now, you know, you have the couch to five K program, and you have different programs out there and very supportive running community that that will kind of get you going. And so maybe if I would have. Had that back. Then I think I could have stuck with it. But that was kind of what I was doing was just exercising and not changing my eating, sure. And a lot of people do gravitate towards it at first because it might feel doable. If you'll a little less restrictive in what I normally see is when someone does bring in exercise, sometimes the wait will turn down initially for a little while if the eating stays the same, but then eventually it levels back out. And so until somebody's willing to focus on the food, the weight loss doesn't usually continue to progress is that what you ran into. I don't know if I really lost too much weight. I don't even remember we have scale. So I don't know, you know, I mean, it would have been very minimal if I lost anything at that point. All right. And so what was the moment for you? Because obviously you're exercising. You're trying to find your footing there. You are not completely happy with your body weight. But you're kind of back at what? You were back in fourteen fifteen years of age at what point in your journey. Do you remember thinking I want to really make different change here? I want to figure out how to eat in a more sustainable way. Was there a one specific moment or maybe accumulation of different events that led you to that point. I would say kind of both probably the one big thing for me was when my dad passed away, and that was it's been almost ten years ago. So I had several years leading up to it where I would think, oh, I really wanna lose the weight. I was very unhappy. Because I had gotten a lot bigger over those years, and I did really want to change. But I really not changing the eating habits wasn't working. Or if I try something like, I tried the Atkins that just was not something that I mean, I don't remember if I got through the first two weeks, it just like it made me sick at my stomach. And so that wasn't. Working. I tried exercise at various points throughout the years in different forms of exercise again with not changing my eating habits, it wasn't helping. And so when my dad passed away, he was he had congestive heart failure. And he just seen, you know, the pain that he was in, you know, the shortness of breath and everything like that. And so about six months after he had passed away was when I kind of had this, you know. And I had lost weight before that a couple of different times that really throughout the different times. My mindset has changed. And I mean, really, my mindset improved the most this time. But again that was kind of my big thing with seen him go through that and thinking to myself, you know, he had congestive heart failure he had had a a major heart attack and had to have quintupled bypass when our daughter was a year old. So those types of things, and I thought if I don't make some changes I could end up being in the same position. And so that was kind of my big wake-up call. I guess I would say, right. Yeah. That's what I tend to hear from a lot of people is it could be watching apparent go through something like that or a spouse or a friend that's of the same age as you that maybe that realization of our mortality right and questioning about our decisions. And so in that you said something really interesting, you're said, your mindset had started to change its even changed more as late. So what would we have seen going on in your mind before your father passing away? And what do you see as being different? Now. I always think is interesting. We throw this idea of mindset around right? You'll hear those words, you know. Oh, change your mindset. But sometimes it actually helps if we shine a big light on what we're talking about. So what was the mindset before your dad passed away? And what would you say is different now in your mindset, comparatively speaking probably the big thing for me is again what? You mentioned the sustainability and that was something. And really it took you say me here in you say that on one of the podcasts when it finally clicked, and it's crazy that you would think that all of these years that I've been dieting and exercising and things like that. You would think it would have clicked that. Okay. I have to do something to make this last. But it didn't until I heard you say, and you, and you talk about the fact that you have to find something that you can do for the rest of your life that you can be happy with a way that you can live because this is not an in thing. And I had heard something kind of like that in the past. But I guess it never really clicked as as much as it did hearing it from you. So I would say before I was very much. I wanted to lose the weight I wanted to better, which you know. I mean, that's a good. Thing. You know, I was very unhappy. With the way, I looked. I did not have the energy to do a lot of things. But I just kind of continued to lose the weight, and then and the other thing, I think that goes along with mindset is you have that in date in mind, and I've seen different things lightly about that that have and it's like, Yep. That's exactly right. Because you say, well, I'm gonna go on this side it and this is my goal weight. And this is the date that I want to see that gold met. But you don't stop and think or at least I didn't especially initially that I'm going to have to continue to watch what I eat. I can't go back to what I did before. And I use that as an example because one of the diets that I had done in the path. I kind of did that and I reached my goal way. And it was like. Oh, I can finally let off and I can, you know, go back to eating well, I maintain it for a little while but not for any real length of time. And so that's a big thing. I so love what I just heard you say, so if I were to have mind, a versus mind be sounds like mind was very concerned about the immediate results of the weight loss. It was about getting to that. Like you said that date that goal number. But it was really never even remotely thinking about anything past that date. But now this mind be is saying, hey, whatever were willing to do to get to that goal. We've got to say to ourselves is this something that will be able to carry on past that point into the forever future. Yes. Very much. So got it. All right. So what does it what does that look like on a practical level, then so a Moi's very shocked? And I know I've done these kinds of things to were. We'll. Do some really extreme things to lose weight. And then people will say, I'll do anything to lose weight, and that's truly that discarding of thought of what will it be like once I hit the goal versus somebody who's trying to focus on that idea of it being a forever journey that you're never really going to get out of right? You're just going to continue on, but maybe just alter a few small things. So what did the eating look like for you bring a versus brain be wooded, the actively look like, and how were you talking to yourself differently in those two scenarios as far as the eating? Well, one of the first diets that I did post high school was kind of I would say based on the poop pyramid. And so like, it would say you can have X number of servings of rice, and Brad and things like that. You can have X number servings of lead a day, and and so it was very structured that was probably one of the stricter ones as well as the ad. Can you know with the no carbs where now I in in this again has evolved throughout the process. And so now, I'm kind of like what can I have were? I guess I would say I don't wanna cut anything out that would be a big thing. And I think I've heard you say that like an interim kind of strict on myself about that. And I try not to push that on other people it's kinda hard 'cause I wanna see them healthy as well. But just not say, no to anything, you know, just realizing that I can have pizza or I can have cake. I can have those things that I enjoy I just can't have as much, and I can't have them all the time so in so that's been a big changer as far as because again, the mindset before was during that whole diet period. I couldn't. Have those or at least I didn't allow myself to I was very especially the early one. I was very strict on what I allowed myself to have in. I just stuck to it and very rigid. I kinda tend to be a perfectionist, and I was a perfectionist Inada areas. Well, where and so then again, it got me when I got to that date. It was like freedom, and I could go crazy now, I know and and even through this last time leasing the weight, I would kind of plan. So that if I wanted to go have coffee with my friend, I can have coffee, you know, we could get a lot. Hey, or or a cappuccino or whatever we wanted, and I just knew to kind of work that around through my calorie budget through my exercise, whatever. But I knew I could still have it. And another thing that I learned through you, which I have loved was finding something that. That let's say, for example, pizza find a way to eat it that is a little bit more healthy. So I can still enjoy it. But just find a better way of eating it. And yes, we still occasionally will get Domino's or or Pizza Hut or whatever. But I also like, for example, we use the lavish bread and I use like the Turkey crumbles and things like that until I can kind of have a really good pizza. That's billing but way, less calories than I would if I have the Domino's or the Pizza Hut. So it was like the old brain thought process was very restrictive, eat these foods. Don't eat these foods. I'm assuming pizza was not part of it. Yeah. The new one is and what I love is. You said I don't say no in. Honestly, we don't realize the power of our words until we change them when I was kind of in this mindset for for my twenties, would I realized was I was anxious and stress because I felt like I was saying I couldn't have so many things right? I can't have pizza. I can't have ice cream and I felt this anxiety building in myself. Of course, I was going to sabotage, right? Like, it was only a matter of time. But as soon as I changed that dialogue, and I said, Heather, no, you can absolutely have you screamin pizza. We'll go out and have it at a restaurant though. You're not going to bring it home and have it as much as you want that was the little pivot. So when I started saying, yes and being less restrictive it made it easier to be compliant with what it was. I was trying to do. Did you feel a shift at all? When you started talking a little differently to yourself. Yes. And I would say especially now, I don't. Know that I even would have said that when I started this last time. But now, I do like I feel like I know the thing that I need to do because before it took a lot to get me to lose the weight because again, I had that mindset of well, I'm going to have to go back to starving myself. The starving myself. But in my brain, you know, it was like why can't have all the things. So that was what I told myself. And so that was always took something like my father passing away and having that epiphany that hey, you better change or you could end up like that as well. Or like this last time when I was injured, and then it was like, okay. Well, part of the reason that you got this way was because you are having you have a weight problem. And you've let yourself go and you are now in this position. And if you don't change, you know, you may never get back to being active again, and I was just not ready to stop living. But again now, I know that because again, the mindset was well, then I have to starve myself or I can't have the good stuff. You know, for let's say, it takes me, eight months or year, whatever. And I knew that. It was like major to me. And so now, even if I would gain the way back, which I hope I know. But even if I did I would know what it's really not that bad. And the things that I am eating are not that bad, and I don't have to be so restrictive. And so that's kind of my my mindset change in that. So what I hear in all of this is this idea of by giving permission by by not saying, you can't have these things you remove a layer of resistance from actually doing the thing you needed to do which was was lowering your calories to get to a point where you could lose weight. But as long as you had the belief I can't have pizza. I can't have all the quote, unquote, good things then there was like this immediate wall that went up, and you were like, you know, what not ready to cross that boundary. Right. But now that we see all foods or permitted, and we can have them and we do like slightly later versions of them. It removes that layer of barrier. Do you agree? Yes. Most definitely. And this is an important thing to bring up because people pick really restrictive diets where they feel they can't have all those things, and they white knuckle it to get through six eight weeks, whatever. And then inevitably they hit that wall where they're like, man. I miss pizza, man. I miss ice cream. I don't know if that's when that moment happens that maintainable sustainable question gets played, which is I don't know if I can do this for the rest of my life, and this feels really difficult, but they're so burn out from doing it that to your point. They don't they have a hard time getting back to something that will create weight loss because in their mind, they're so attached us idea of being restriction. And we've got a really work on that. So we release this layer of resistance to doing the process. Yes. So you're in the community. I offer up open office our coaching sessions for community members. Specifically, and you reached out to me you had lost. A good amount of weight and for the listeners, you could share with them how much total you've lost. But you were kind of running into a little bit of a problem after losing the weight. It's interesting we think sometimes when we get to that goal number everything is smooth sailing after that, right? But I get lots of questions from people who listen to the show that have lost weight and they're struggling after they lost the weight. So could you maybe share how much you lost? And then what was the struggle point? You wanted to share with me and our coaching call together. I have now lost seventy eight pounds. I think at that time it was probably maybe round sixty eight pounds. Because once I went into maintenance, I still did lose a little bit. But when I talk to you, I think I had just went into maintenance. And so I was kind of just trying to make sure I had figured out my TD e and I was trying to you know, I was thinking that was my correct Hedy e but then I had like had a flight gain or something, and it was only. Like a pound or two. But you know, that that panic set in that. Oh, no, I've overdone it. And what am I going to do now? And so I was wanting to talk to you. And and just kind of make sure that you know, what I was doing. And you have mentioned before, you know, give it six weeks, you know, because we do have different books, especially with women, you know, different things happen throughout the month. So give it to six weeks. So that was kind of what I was wanting to make sure that you know, what was going on. And then I had an overshot that. And now he's going to gain the weight back or you know, even even a little bit. I didn't wanna see that scale go up. Right. And this is why I'm so thankful we're talking about this. Because a lot of women will lose weight, and they are petrified to go up to maintenance calories because of what you just said. They're scared to see the scale change at all in a direction and. And then they kind of get their got their body condition to stay at those weight loss calories, and guess what? Those weight loss calories. Become their maintenance calories because metabolism is very adjustable. It is not a fixed point if you change exercise if you change nutrition, if you change calorie composition of food all of those things can increase or decrease metabolism age, all those factors. Right. And so I see women locking themselves into diet calories for maintenance calories because they're so afraid of that transition, and since you have experienced that six weeks since you're you survive to tell the tale as they say what I would like for you to do is just share what that was like. And what did you learn from that process? How did you handle that six week timeframe, what did you walk away with knowledge wise? And what would you say to a woman who may be was afraid to do what you did? I would say in ended up being. Okay. I think I had kind. Done at the at that point. My TD e calories were probably pretty accurate do whether and things we are exercises changed. So I can totally relate to what you're talking about that, you know, the metabolism kind of changes and things because we were doing kind of the we were doing some long runs because we are hoping to do a half marathon this year and all of a sudden with we had heavy rain. So some of the routes that we would normally taken were washed out, and we didn't want to be running the same route all the time. And so just different things changed, and you know, now lately we've been having to go to the gym and run on what everybody calls the dread mill. So, you know, my exercise is kind of changed a little bit. So I've had to adjust that honestly, I would just say just say, you know, just stay calm. And again as long as you're not in that mindset, or as long as you're not in a point where you feel like you can't do this for the rest of your life. Then you shouldn't have a problem if where you're going to run into the problem is if you're not planning to do this for the rest of your life, whatever you're doing now. And and I don't mean calorie wise, I mean, I guess some ways I do. But again, just the things that you're eating the exercise that you're doing, you know, if you're happy, and you're enjoying your life at this point. And you're not feeling like you're really missing out on all that much. Then you're going to be fine going through that. Six weeks. And yes, you may have to make some adjustments after that maybe up baby down. I mean, I'm getting ready to turn another year older. So he knows what that's going to do to my metabolism either. So, you know, just I would just say just stick with the process don't panic in like you said give it to six weeks and see what happens don't worry about every little pound that that slips on. And you may be pleasantly surprised like I was where you may actually end up even losing more. It just depends. Honestly, I see that more often than not to be honest with you, the losing more is you generally increase. But but to your point I'm sure in that six week time, even if the numbers were off a little bit you probably didn't see twenty pound gain on the scale in six weeks. Even if you're over shooting your calories by a few hundred you might see a pound true gain of body fat over the course of six weeks. It's nothing is nothing worthy to get yourself. So bunch. Up over that. You don't let the process play out. Right. And that's what I kinda see is on the day to day basis. Our body weight can fluctuate five to six pounds either direction. And so we think that means true fat week game. But really, it's water fluctuations. And so what we need to do is calm ourselves and say, hey, let's use some just basic knowledge here unless I'm overshooting my calories by three thousand five hundred per week. I'm not gaining a pound a week. Right. I mean, that's not possible. And so a lot of what I'm seeing on a day to day basis as those water fluctuations, and that's totally normal. What we're really looking at is your trend line over time when it comes to the weight, and so you basically feel like that six week time frame it might have felt like a longtime. Right. It might have felt kinda scary. But ultimately when you came on the other side, no big damage was done. Right. Correct. Okay. So since that point because that was like last summer, you continue to lose some more. So now you said you're seventy eight down. That's awesome. And. What is the plan moving forward as far as weight loss weight maintenance? Where's the goal going into the future? Really? It's just the weight maintenance, I'm happy with where I'm at. And honestly, my doctor might say something different. But unless they tell me that I've got major health risks or something that I need to lose more. I'm very happy with where I'm at my husband is very happy with where I'm at at an I am kind of careful with myself. I tend to lose the weight in my face and neck area quickly. I don't want to get to where I look to thin. So I just I use my husband is a guide to to kind of say, okay. You know, I don't want to give up on this. Or I don't want to say, maybe I would think I could lose another ten pounds. I don't want to put that off. If maybe I should. But I also don't want to do. Do it. If I if I don't really need to you know, I will be happy with where I'm at and be at really the best way that or the healthiest that I could be I would say I like what you just said there because what you said was there's probably multiple thoughts that can go on at the same time. Right. One thought could be well, I wanna be the weight that my doctor has assigned to me or I want to be the weight that I was on such and such a date such and such a point. So that that constant struggle of wanting to attain a number that either someone has said or that you have believed in the past to be a number you should get. And then what I hear is. You've got these physical athletic goals, and it's also about feeling well and being able to perform well, and then there is the quality of life, which is when we diet, and this is something all women wanna think about when we die. We're putting our bodies under stress just like running put your body under stress just like doing a lot of. Repetitive action can be putting your body under stress, and we sometimes have to ask ourselves at what point is enough enough. And we're we really happiest you know, where we happiest where we are fittest. And that we can enjoy our life and not enjoyment of life factor. I find sometimes gets lost in the shuffle in the pursuit of a weight goal. And it sounds like you're considering that. Yes. So if I could send you back in time to any of these old versions of you, the fourteen year old version that started the slim fast diet, the version of you that was married the version of you that may be did the more Atkins, pyramid style dieting. Where would you want me to send you back in your time line? And what message would you want to deliver to that version of yourself? What would you want to say to her to maybe either spur change a little bit earlier or maybe to help guide her or offer her some different thoughts than what she was having? Where would you want to go? And what would you wanna say? I think maybe the person in my early twenties, or even you know, even my nineteen year old self eighteen nineteen year old self when I was first married and just to be able to go and find somebody that, you know, because again, like I said, we we now we have the internet, but back then I didn't really feel like I had anybody that that would have had the knowledge to kind of help me along and into kind of incur verge me as far as the exercise, you know, don't just give up because it hurts. I mean, I remember being in high school and trying out for cross country. And I went to one practice, and I gave up because it was hard it. So you know, that would be my thing would be to find somebody that could be supportive in any courage. Ing and maybe show me. Okay. We'll yeah. Let's let's incorporate some extra. Cise. But also, let's find some healthy ways to eat. Let's, you know, maybe like you had talked about in incorporating some healthy things into your meal rather than just having the hamburger helper, or you know, because money was an issue or whatever. So basically, some ideas of things to slightly alter into look for encouragement and somebody who would push you just a little bit. But also kind of have your best interest at heart. Yes. So love this. All right. My dear I am. So incredibly inspired by your story, some notes we have to go through multiple attempts at this to get it right in. Unfortunately, I see many people giving up prematurely because they say, well, Heather I've tried the so many times, and I just don't think I'm ever going to get where I wanna be or I feel like every time. I do this. I crash after a short period of time, you know, for someone who's thinking that and hearing how you had. To go through various attempts to get where you are today. What would you say to that person? I would just say don't give up. I would say, you know, reach out to somebody try and find somebody that that you can talk to about it. And you know, maybe somebody that you've seen be successful at losing weight, even though and Nusa something that I've learned from you that the success is how long you maintain it. You know, it's easy to lose the way for some people. But the success comes when you maintain it. So find somebody that that you see that you feel would be an encouragement that would be willing to help you. And maybe, you know, find a podcast, listen to half size, new dot com or have seismic podcast this don't give up because you're worth it. And you can do it. You just need to to just keep going this stick with it. Is the idea of being either the fixed mindset versus the growth mindset, right? It's it's saying there's no way any human being on planet earth can know everything there is to know about any one given subject whether we're talking weight loss. Whether we're talking painting, there's always room to learn more. There's always room to grow, and if you can embrace this idea of a growth or learning mindset, what you can do is start to say, hey, what didn't work about all those other attempts. I've made it weight loss. What can what information? Can I take away from that? And say, you know, I'm not going to do that again. But maybe I can start taking in some different ideas. And that's was awesome. Is that as we get older as we progress? We learn new things we can really take what we learn in apply it in a different way. And I think it's that willingness to see yourself as that forever learner, the the forever growing person who's going to be changing and not that you're fixed fixed meaning locked into where you are right now. Yes, very true. Well, I have totally love talking to you. And I know the listeners have enjoyed listening to all of your knowledge and wisdom, and if somebody wanted to reach out to you or connect with you how could they go about doing that? Well, I have my Email address or you have my Email address. And so you can reach out through the half size knee community, and Heather can put you in contact with me. But also, I do have a Facebook group. It's called it's all about change. And if he would like to join that it's just a small group of people just kind of be supportive to each other. And and Charon recipes and food ideas and things like that if you would like to join that that's fine. Displease make note when you asked to join that you heard this heard about it on the half size me podcast. So that I know that it somebody that listened to the podcast and in wants to join all right? And so that was all about the changes that right? It's all about change. It's all about change. Okay. Perfect. And yet, and again, if you have a question for Connie, and you want me to forward it onto her just reference this podcast number and let me know, and I will be more than happy to forward those on. Thank you. You so very much for your time today and your wisdom and your thoughts because as you're growing and changing in this week and help other people maybe some different things that they might have seen before. So I just truly thankful you came on. Well, thank you so much for having me. Thank you for listening. Be sure to visit house is dot com. Check back often for your daily dose of inspiration because you are worth it. The information you here on this podcast is for informational purposes. Only the host is not a medical professional. You should always consult with your doctor nurse or other certified health professional before beginning any diet or fitness program.

Connie Heather pizza slimfast obi YouTube Facebook Domino heart attack Meese Oliver Rosen Pizza Hut Pizza Hut apple Mary
09: MONEY MINDSET  CREATING A NEW RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MONEY

Happy Abundant Hippies

31:44 min | 1 year ago

09: MONEY MINDSET CREATING A NEW RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MONEY

"Value. It's the mental idea that gives it more value. I want you to pay attention to this. It's the mental idea of money that gives it its power welcome to the happy of undeterred hippies podcast. My name is Hannah vezzano, and I'm the happy rich hippy. My mission is to create a community of happy spiritual souls and provide them with tools resources and guidance to expand mentally emotionally, financially and spiritual get ready to use the power of your mind to manifest the lifestyle and freedom, you desire, so welcome. Welcome. Welcome to the happy abundant hippies. I'm abundant happy of unto hippies podcast. I'm really really glad to have you year. Today's episode is going to be all about money minds us, let me let me start off by saying and telling you guys that I love money. I love money. I said there you go. How what I wanted to take. I want you to take really quick second. And think about how that made you feel reflect for a second. How Meese the statement? I love money makes you feel let me know what the statement. I love money brings up to mind so reflect on that. And while we get into today's episode. So today's episode is going to be all about money as figured we're going to talk about the relate your relationship with one money. How to look at money through a different lens through and energetic loans versus through a physical immaterial M's. And I'm also going to go through the top five self limiting money beliefs and how to change those beliefs. So that you're able to actually use the power of your mind to manifest the kind of money that you want to make. So we're going to work on proving your money excuse me improving. Your mindset about money. And creating new statements do believes to help you attract more money and have a better relationship. But before we get started I did want to announce the winner of the giveaway. So I'm going to do nine giveaways every single week. And if you guys wanna hear what the giveaways how to entered in the giveaway, I'm gonna go ahead and included at the end of this episode because I don't want it to in fear with the interfere with this episodes. I'm going to leave at the end. So I'll go into the Geary at the end like I said and how to enter congratulations. Congratulations spurt any you on this week's giveaway. So you are getting a beautiful three piece. Bundle with three inch sage stick a Salamat. Crystal, Anna mini pocket journal to fill you fill your life with more gratitude positive energy and a help you create zen and peaceful space. So I hope you enjoy Britney. Thank you so much for the feedback that you left a really really appreciate it and eight other. You guys have the opportunity to enter into this giveaway. Listen till the Antic know-how, congratulations. I hope you enjoy it. And I'll be reaching out to you to discuss details now back to money. So let's let's reflect about how did the statement? I love money. Make you feel. Did it make you think that was selfish or less spiritual? Dude, he think that I'm lying to myself, or do you think that I worked really really hard to get to that point. Or do you think that I have a lot of money, or you know, what does a lot of money mean to you? So I want you to really start thinking about this concept. If you want to improve your relationship with money, if you wanted to get more money into your life. Listen to this episode because as really gonna change your perspective of money, and what money means, so, you know, so many people want more money, but they get frustrated and when it's not there. It's kind of like wanting a life partner wanting a husband wanna wife yawn, say whatever it is. But getting upset when you see a happy married couple or renew. See your best friend really having make having better relationships than you and being envious or angry about that. Really? That's the kind of relationship that you have with money in order to bring in more money into your life. That so in order to bring money into your life. You have to Kerr. And if you want money to create a positive impact in your life. You must have a positive relationship with money. But here's a question for you. What is money? So I have had to reconstruct my view of money because I grew up in a very I didn't grow up, you know, very abundant. I grew up through food stamps. You know, my family had food stems a my parents had eight kids. So I grew up and being given food stamps, and that's how my is derived. Also, my dad got injured in one of his jobs, and eventually his income from his job when away and we had to start relying on other people other circumstances or other organizations, so you can see the belief that I had to go through with money was the fact that other people had to give it to me, I built this belief, but I had to work through this belief, and the one thing that I realized in. And so many people see money as just the physical representations tangible cash, the credit, the mortgage, etc. But they feel to really understand that money kinda like all things including you is all energy. It is a form of energy. So to kind of get a little bit more into that the tangible cash itself is worthless. If we as a society didn't give it value. So the reason it means something is because we as a society. Agreed. Hey, this dollar is Representative of a dollar, and it will give you this amount five thousand dollars. I Representative this, and this is what it will give you. So we decided to give value, and it's it's the mutton mental idea that we have about money has more value because we give it more value. It's the I in mental idea that gives it more value. I want you to. Pay attention to this. It's the mental idea of money that gives it its power. It's a what we what we believe. It will give us that we continue chasing not just simply the physical aspect of money. There is something that we're all chasing. We're all chasing the feeling of having money. The physical aspect of it is what we associate with money. But we're actually chasing the feeling that comes with money were chasing, the abundance feeling rather than the actual cash. So think about it. So if you have had a job, and you you got a raise or a bonus. And it made you feel good. But then you spent the money or put her way or it went somewhere. And then you went back to the same level of disposable income you had before. So even though you had more money, you know, according to your paycheck. You didn't feel like you had that same amount money. Because of that case, you may have the idea that. In that specific example that idea that you are always limited to this amount of income. But we'll go into those a little bit later. So I really encourage you guys. So if you like this give it a heart of thumbs up. Let me know that you're like this topic. I encourage everyone to release start thinking about money in a different way and have a different relationship with money. So I want you to encourage to see as a feeling that you want see that you can get those feelings with or without a physical manifestation of the cash because in the end, if you have the feeling that you want if you have a great community, if you have a happy home, if you have put on your table, and those are the things that make you feel good that make you feel abundant if you had five dollars in your in your Bank account, you still feel abundant because there are other things or not other things you are experiencing the emotion. The. Feeling of abundance that cash won't matter. So I might have asked yourself how do you feel about those who have money what was your experience with money growing up? Did you feel lack of money or did you get an overabundance? And how have those specific experiences impacted you impacted your relationship with money? This can be a really great journaling exercise. If you want to improve your relationship with money, but even improve your relationship with money, but also. Leave behind old beliefs and old. Energy. That's just stagnated because you had a negative experience. And thus you associated. Thus you associated having a lack of money as negative or you associated money as negative a really good sentence that you can start in continue would be I would love more money. But and then write whatever comes to mind after that, but part, so I would love more money, but blink lick that will give you an idea of what kind of relationship you have with your money. So you know, I would love more soak. Let me for me, for example. I would love more money, but I'd have to work more hours. I would love more money, but my responsibilities don't allow me to you know, I I would like more money, but I have so many bills, you know, pay attention to that. And that is what will be pointing, you know, we'll be focusing on to help you create a healthy relationship with money. So when you create a healthier relationship with money, it's not that you're creating a healthy relationship with the physical aspect. Of it. You are creating a better mental space about money and everything associated with money. So I'm all about the mind the mind is powerful. And so when you have a positive mental relationship with money when you feel okay when you spend money when you feel like you have enough, and you spend money, or when you feel like you're investing years in yourself, and he spent money those positive feelings are a mental state that you have and. Because it is a mental state. You have the power to take control of that and create the relationship and the money that you kind of want to come into your life. But like everything else it all starts in the mind in this part. I'm going to go into the five most common beliefs about money that stop people from making more money or feeling abundance and had improved those beliefs that that you one you can have a different relationship with money, and to that you can start a manifest in the kind of money that you want and abundant the feeling of abundance that you want and for each one I'm going into how to break that belief down. And then what kind of new beliefs you want, Chris if you guys want to give some examples of positive beliefs that you have about the specific statements that I'm to go into, you know, it's your mind. What helps you is what you got to think about? So the first belief and that is. Asaf limiting beliefs that holds people from having a better relationship with money and getting more money into their life. Is that abundance is a limited resource. Who believes that money is a limited research that there's only so much to go around. They are, you know, circumstances on life will have some people believe it, you know, including me in Kumi because I grew up with with the idea that you have to work, really hard. And once you can't work, really hard. You have to rely on other people to give you money to me that told me that there's only a small amount of areas that I can get money that money is a limited resource. But here's what I might ask when it comes to that belief. Is this true is money really a limited resource. What facts are what things can disapprove it. So for example, money is a limited resource is that really true because I see people all. The time making more money. I see people all the time. Losing money losing their whole business losing what their life savings, but then getting back again, you know, you see millionaires billionaires money is literally all around you. It cannot it cannot disappear mealy because money is something that is always around us again money is that mental belief that mental feeling mental belief, and the feeling of abundance, and the feeling of abundance is a feeling there is no it's not limited. So because money is an energy because the energy that were striving for is abundance. Where can you see abundance around you? I mean, a lot of examples that I can give our when I go out, and I'm able to see people buying stuff. You know, I go out, and and I get up, for example, even a Bill. A Bill tells me that I have the abundance. To be able to have this resource. So instead of money being limited resource. A good example is money is all around me whenever I pay my Bill money is there is there. So I was able to pay for it. So money is a limited resource. Versus money is always created every single day. Money is limited for money is limited to I am abundance abundance. Cannot be limited. Because I am abundance. Money is not limited to resource because we're always creating we're always creating the the exchange of something for something else. We're always creating new ideas were always are able to make that exchange. So there's some ways you can you can really change that belief the second self-limiting belief about money. Money is the root of all evil or it selfish to want a lot of money so inherently those statements are saying that money equals evil, and who would want evil. And that's contradictory to society that we see every day and for myself to to to be to see money as evil. So that means inherently we are fearing money, and when you fear money, you have this a fear relationship. And what happens when it's a fear relationship, you're afraid of that thing. So because you're frayed of it subconsciously your mind is trying to avoid it as much as possible. And so then it goes back to a full full circle. I want money, but I I have this mental belief that money or this. This thing that's been ingrained in my mind, this belief it's been agreement that money is evil than we feel bad about wanting money. So is it true is money really the root of all evil is it selfish. What more money or are people who use money for evil evil? I don't think ever I don't think anybody's inhering evil, but if someone's using the money money within tension of doing causing harm that negatively that is that's only showing what's the word. I'm looking for. It's only magnifying that person's belief that person's energy so money is a magnifying. That's might be a good good thing to new affirmation to safer that is a money as a magnified. Because I'm a good person. Because I have good intentions. I am able money loves me. You know, because I have good intentions. I'm able to use money for good intentions to better the world or to improve it or it's not selfish to a lot of money. Because if I have a lot of Miami able to put more into myself, I'm able to give more to my family able to create more, and you really like constantly say, those those affirmations because you're literally building a lot, you know, redirecting and changing a lot of relief that not only you or your family believe, but also society as a whole, it's a societal thing a lot of these. And that's like you're working against a lot of not against you're working to retrain a lot of things that we've been taught as society. So instead of money's not all evil, or it's offered to have a lot of money. Let's go ahead as as a collective start saying that money is positive experience that. That me having more money means I'm able to do more good. Star. I say I love money. I used to feel bad about it. Because I mom, but has helped me understand that it's not evil or bad. It's not selfish. I'm not selfish for wanting it now. Nope. Unless remove selfish as a bad thing to I have I have something against the word selfish being used to hold people back. Because if we're selfish that means, we are focusing on ourselves and ally a lot a lot lot of good can come from building yourself up to that your overall to build others up. There is a power that comes with feeling that abundance feeling people feel that abundance feeling people feel it when you feel it. So it's like now only now only in a cash, y so if you have more money able to give more money, but if you feel more abundant you're able to spread more abundance and really Kerr raise the vibrations. So the third self limiting belief that one I know I had to go through. I'm brother reminded me of this a few weeks ago, but it's the either or mentality. So you can either be rich or happy or you can either be rich or healthy? You can't have both because we'll. Go to why. But yeah. So this either or so it goes back into psychology. There's this thing called the either or mentality. So it's either can have this or that. There is no balancer is no in between. So the either rich or happy and rich or healthy statement. So when you have an either or it means that you have a relationship it's in in ba- imbalanced. So this shows you that there is an imbalance that you have when it comes to money, you believe that you either have to have really bad health and have a lot of money or be really unhappy and have a lot of money or you can either be really poor and healthy or be really poor in happy. So this either or release stops people because if they have this mentality of like, what's the point? What's the point of having more money? What's the point of working, really hard? If I'm not going to be if I'm gonna be unhappy. And I'm I'm gonna get divorced eventually, or I'm a, you know, give my body so sick, what's the point of making money? So here's the point it. It's it's in my reality. It's a truth that the more money you have if you're a positive person you're gonna do positive from the healthier. You're going to be because you're going to invest more in yourself, your invest more in your health, your invest more on your body. You're gonna invest more you mental health, you're gonna invest more in your, you know, in your family's health, and when your family's health, your your family's happy when you have a lot of a lot of money to give you experiences any have enough money to take care of your all your medical needs, ger, rich, happy and healthy. I you. Have the ability to be rich happy and healthy. Those are all possible for you actually with balance, you balanced, your health, you balance, your abundance, and you balance your happiness that is alignment so money allows you to be in alignment, if you allow it to again, it's all about the power that you give to that money mindset to that mindset. But up star the money can't buy. Yeah. Would actually here's here's a joke. That always comes up, you can either be crying in broke down nineteen ninety some Jeddah or you can be crying in a Mercedes Benz, which don't do have. And always like once when somebody said that I was like that makes sense. I'd rather be crying in a fucking like BMW or some shit. I'm not into cars, but that was the reference they made. So I was like, okay. I'll go for it. All right. So let's see the one-two-three fourth. The fourth statement that the self-limiting money minds statement that holds some people back for making more money is you have to work really hard to become wealthy. You have to put on a lot of sweat, a lot of tears a lot of hours a lot of English, you have to hustle, hustle, hustle hustle. It's the hustle mentality. That's exhausting so many. Any people, you know, this hustle mentality. Says that you have to put in a certain amount of energy to get out a certain amount of money. This is a huge dynamic that is changing. And I notice it so much in the life coaching health coaching industry, and there's a huge shift going from this masculine energy, this hustle, hustle, hustle hustle. Masculine energy equals money or moving into this flow alignment, you know, do do a feels Ray. And then you make more money both work guys. So going back to the supplement statement of you have to work really hard to become wealthy. So you do have to put in some physical work because manifestation with idea of you're able to create things, you know, by thinking of them is. Is there are two aspects that come into the stairs, the spiritual aspect the art of manifestation, the logic and the doing of manifestation, and so my belief is there has to be a balance with work and flow to be able to bring in the energy that you want in your life because make it like what you want. If you want to believe that going with the flow all the time and feeling what I feel and taking action based on my fields going to be the best results. Guess what? It's going to give you the best results. If you say that you have to re really hard you have to print certain hours, you have to dedicate those power hours you have to go to these networking events. You have to stress you have to like stay up all night to be successful. If you don't do those things guess what you'll become successful. If you believe that. That's what it takes. Again. It's all about us all about the belief. So what are what are we is that can disprove it? Like like, I said, you can say I me going with the flow and feeling and being more. Are connected with my intuition will help me bring him more money because the better I feel the more money comes into my life one mantra that I have my phone is the more fun. I have the more money I make because if you guys have been watching me for a while or know watching my journey last year, I really really Burt myself out because I had this hustle, hustle, hustle hustle mentality. I literally had this app where I tracked my hours how much I worked. And so I was so always focused on those numbers. And when it came to the actual point where I would expect unsually increase, my income or not I didn't because I self sabotage because I was bird out fifth an last belief self-limiting money, mindset belief that you can use work to redirect is money is not that important. It's only money or I'm not good with money. So both have the idea that one you're not prior to it. Prioritizing money or giving money that tension it needs because if it is an energy, it will stagnate if you don't give it enough attention enough lov enough growth kinda like plants money is one of those things one of those energies that if you don't care about if you don't prioritize, and you just let sit in the back burner or you're Scherzer, we're I'm gonna you're not gonna take care of it. Then it will come back. It'll be a be negative stagnant. Energy that will reflect in your reality, a belief that can change that is if you are someone who makes who has a job and has money, or if you are in any way, anyway, spend money money's important to you. Money's a part of life a good way to. So this is not a mantra. This is not a belief in miniature with your eyes, but are really good way to give your money attention and give it priority is to have. Medicated rituals Everson like or routines. Whatever you wanna call it where you look at what you have look at your money just glimpse at how many money how much money you have all your accounts how much inequality cards. How many how much is your account there? Don't be afraid to give money. Attention. Don't be afraid to give it attention. Don't be afraid to actually care about. It. Don't be afraid to prioritize it don't be afraid to create a budget. Don't be afraid to invest a solo another thing don't be afraid to invest and money gives you in this physical reality. The things that you wanna see in your life like one way manifestation happen. Which is a big way that we sometimes don't really give value to is us buying things. Because that is one form that manifests what you want, for example. I want to go on a cruise. I wanna go to Asia at I'm going go to Tokyo. Oh, those are. I know Tokyo, the nature, but you know, what I mean specifically and ways to get there. There are so many ways to get there. You know, so many ways like I could win a trip win ago way someone can gift it to me. But one way that I know, and then I can actually do myself right now is pay money in exchange for those trips. So that's why it's really important. And I really really encourage you guys to a look at your money have a better relationship with your Bunny's spend time looking at your Cowan spend time, you know, thinking, positively about money spent time being grateful for money, really really create this really solid energy about money in your life. So those are the five south beliefs that hold most people back. I know there could have been so many I could've gone on. But there's five and then some way to to to redirect them. Yeah. So that was the money minds the episode. Thank you guys so much for sticking with me. Now, I want you guys to really start practicing. These beliefs a start to create a routine or ritual around your money, a think positive things about money whenever you pay your Bill whenever you pay your rent. I personally looked at them as gratitude. So I would say thank you. And whenever I have a Bill do I put on my calendar as gratitude, it's always gratitude, I'd never write the word Bill. Hi. So let's talk about really quickly about the giveaway. So the giveaway is going to be going until four twenty two thousand nineteen we're going to have there are nine winners. I just announced the first winter. So it's going to be eight more winners everyone's day. I'm going to pick a winner, and you can only win once. But when you enter one time, you get the chance to win every single week, and there's going to be nine winners while eight winners now after this episode. So there are two ways to enter the giveaway. The first way is on I tunes. You would rate in your view this the happy abundant heaviest pod. Cast you'll screen shot the review and the Email too happy rich hippy at t mill dot com. The second way to enter this giveaway is on Instagram. Your cow must be public, and you're going to write a review a news feed post Natta story posted news feed posts about the podcast. You're going to tag me at happy rich hippy and the hashtag happy abundant hippies. And that's it. So you either review an I tunes or Instagram. And if you do win the winner will get sage as well Sal night, as well as many packet gratitude journals so these pocket journals are fantastic for one manifesting into creating like a attitude of gratitude, creating really restoring mindset additive for gratitude is like being super duper grateful for everything all the time. But basically, you just write the date inside of when you start in just list out gratitude ever. Every single day. Dedicate a few minutes Selestat our gratitude, and I like the pocket journals because they fit in your pocket in your wallet and your purse bag looking ten anywhere, which makes it easy that if you have a positive grateful thought, you can just jot it down or a good practice is if you had a negative thought and you wants to practice redirecting it you can just right on that journal. So really, great mindset training to leak out really awesome stuff. So the sage itself is really good for helping remove negative energy and clear that your air, the satellite. Crystal is for cleansing your space cleansing your crystals. And like I said the mini gratitude journal is that you can carry it everywhere and build a habit of positive being positive being grateful and having a supportive supportive minds. They guy so much for joining me and have yourself a wonderful wonderful Wednesday. Thank you for joining today as always it's earned to have you please leave a review and let me know what's been your biggest takeaway from this episode as left to provide you with valuable content that creates a change within. And the only way I could do that. As if I hear from you. I'm grateful to be a part of your journey. Thank you. I appreciate you.

Money Bill Kerr Representative Tokyo Hannah vezzano Meese Geary BMW Crystal Britney Jeddah partner Asaf Chris Miami Asia Ray
Reflecting on the Year Gone

The Nordic Mum

16:32 min | 10 months ago

Reflecting on the Year Gone

"Hi there I'm Susanna too. Naughty I expo block the minimalistic in natural way embracing the Scandinavian lean. Avian Way less is more approach in life. I talked to nude woman about their journeys and how they live their live with the new lifestyle wherever they are a happy healthy living to Scandinavia way. This is the Nordic Mom. Did you know that I have recorded this episode quite a few times before and the reason is that my poor laptop her suffered water damage. My son poured water order on it managed to save the interviews. That I've done two separate hard drive but some of the other episodes I have do get. Yeah I have to Redo them. And then while I was redoing them I also kind of had a moment of thinking that what I want to do next year you was in. I'm already thinking what I'm going to podcast. And if you know me if you'd be following the social media like instagram the Nordic like mom you would know that my younger one is five. He's actually five at starting school next year and school gear hearing Australia's beginning the end of January. So they're breaking up in the school holidays. Just when these editors coming out and then they go back in January so my youngest. This one is starting school and I made the decision that doing school holidays. I won't be doing any podcasting. I just want to spend time with my kids with my son son with my young particular before he starts to school and because he is different to my old woman who is really really you know like extroverted really confident young chap and he had no issues going to school when my younger one is more. He's more introverted his more. Oh quieter and I'm just want to be there for him so I've decided that we're not comeback meteorology February. I will only to every other the week episodes every other week rather than every week and I might come and do special bonus episodes on those weeks off but I won't be doing doing scheduled episodes until every other week I also would do more themed episode. So let's say. I have three episodes about Scandinavian design or have something ending cinnamon architectural traveling in the Scandinavian countries in new countries. So I have that kind of episodes planning but hey now is Christmas. We should be enjoying and celebrating. I hoping joining celebrity like the way. And there's an episode about it that you can go and have a look that this episode. What was it? Actually I don't know I'm kind of like scattering my brain. It's episode road a seventy. Maybe it wasn't even seventy near episode seventy four and there's episode thirty thirty seven where I talk about my Christmas a year before as well if you're interested but if it's seventy four dig. What's service surprising celebrated Nudie Christmas now? No New Year's coming newest solution goals last year. I did a big episode about goals this year because of the damage recording so my husband's laptop so we are not going to do goals but I just want to reflect to own my podcasting and what is means to me. Beginning of the year I was doing we clones and then when I went to holidays July I decided not to put vetoes. Walla gone yesterday. Didn't make any sense and now that I'm going a holiday again I'm not gonna put those episodes but this eighty four episodes that a lot and there's lots of gold nuggets could stare which you know if you haven't go unchecked him out about new living this candidate way of less is more in life and I will be promoting those on my socials while I'm you know having holiday but here go and check them out but reflection I would go back to episode fifty two where I kind of redefined sport. Guess what I wanted to achieve and what I WANNA do is talk about Scandinavia woman about their journeys their lives and about a happy healthy limits Scandinavian way. And that's what episode fifty was about. It was redefining. All of this. All of what you've been in listening and I'm so grateful for all my listeners. All those little messages. You have sent to me where it's twitter whether it's Instagram facebook wherever you are and I know there's lots of you in the US so happy holidays because there and a lot of you who in Europe in UK and Finland and Germany and ARC flash. Lots of places so. I'm grateful for every single person who has learned to deport hord guests. And if you have time please go and give us a reviewing items because that means that more people will be seeing and listening this podcast. Also listening I think that's the best thing you can do any but it's minus someone else's to keep them review give them a little moral boost and tell them. Yeah I like like what are you doing. I like what you say and I'm here. I'm listening reflection on going back this year. Two dozen nineteen gone is also that I had a product business which I closed and wrapping selling process of selling and that was kind of flying experiments. That wasn't even experiment was a business but then I find that I fell in love with it because my son John who started school the year before needed me more and this year. I just knew that I could not I could not split myself on pieces emptying and Tiffen bases at different times and I wanted to be there for my My son so that's my my learning. Is that priorities. And I think this is a good learn to anybody when you are looking. You know the year gone. What have I learned from? This is that you need to get your parties right so busy life is busy. And there's lots of things can distract us from what we doing our day to day living. I sometimes we. We don't see the bigger picture. We are just tunnel vision of what we doing. So get your priorities right from the beginning. What Mothers Hugh Your Time with your family and your friends and with your kids and time that you spend you know investing on you like listening podcasts or reading books so those should be be you know in your priority and that those kind of morals and I do believe in reflecting back on what you you know changes and it's coming in and what we're doing is like we also going to renovate our house next year so recording podcast will be interesting experiment so are being living in this house? Adult two years we are this lovely beachside placed here south coast of New South Wales in Australia. And it's beautiful. I can see the see when recording this for you guys but we've been living here for two years and when we bought it we newbie. Were GonNa be renovating though we just having it around. So now we have finally getting around to it and yet the renovation is gonNA take a while but it's going GonNa be nicer deliver in and hopefully my recording office will stay as nice and tight as it is now but but but that means that you know we won't be going a holiday as as we were perhaps hoping that we would this coming year and also because we had that Nazis holiday this yes yeah we were a month in Europe. We were in London Scotland and Finland and seeing friends and family and it was awesome. It was so long overdue holiday. Ed was lovely to see my great grandmother who turned ninety and my mother who turns seventy and my uncle who was sixty. It was my my husband's parents fifty wedding. Anniversaries wells was a lot of celebrations and lots of good things and just reconnecting and realizing that even though you live far away from your home country you are truly a fiend inside out and that was my maybe reflection number two that I'm still that same person internally when when I left Finland nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine. That is a long time ago. I still value those finish values equality and education and how you can have a good life with a little bit less the things and materials little bit less planning and just leaving the moment and it was nice to kind of reconnect. That side of left my myself with the culture and nature in Finland and that was that was also share. Those moments with my kids kids and my husband was just priceless. What else could I reflect on this year? So there's two through there but I think the third thing is also that you can't please everybody. There's a saying that you should not try to be everything to everybody but try to be something to somebody and I think that is so oh well said and if you are in a cross roads situation where you have to make the decision and go for that job or am I going to continue in this way in in my life it is so meaningful to say that. Yeah actually you know you should be true to yourself and what you want to do where where you want to go in life and be that something to somebody not just tried to please everybody around you try to please yourself first and be happy be with yourself be content who you are and what you want to achieve in life flirting that has been learning for being. Is that a particular podcast because we try to cover different aspect in our PODCASTING and it depends. What you need is an? I didn't realized what my niece was until episode fifty where I decided. It's just a Scandinavian. I was trying to do different things. Because that's what I thought people wanted to hear and the people that's why I thought people were connecting with me and they were resonating all these Scandinavia. South was actually what people wanted to hear here so that was kind of watershed moment to me to realize that just to be you know something to somebody is actually enough and I think the fourth thing is I started investing on myself. I did a podcast. Mastermind with delays colony Mo.. Who Oh has a rat cast on board? Yes in school she also has to the podcast. One is called Carlos Office and the second one is called Rock your mic right. So if your podcast go and check that one out and we'd talk with her she She kind of you know has being able to push my boundaries. Bush mean a direction that you need to kind of push your boundaries launches be stalemate and stay where you are but try something we knew if it doesn't work you try something different and lots of broadcasts. We doubt ourselves we come across like all happy and Chatty and getting getting everything done but in the mind we might be thinking like. Oh that doesn't sound right and that's You know have to Redo this so putting those doubts out of my mind and opening myself off for unity's and just realizing it's enough of what I do this. I don't need to leave the bar any higher because I'm okay. I'm comfortable comfortable. What I'm doing? I'm I'm where I want to be and where it is. Port guessing journey is going to take me. I don't know yet but I'm looking forward to you know continue. I sharing the Scandinavian living and the new decline of style with you guys and that's been great discovery. avary I would say and I was just before this board gossip is it. I was just sharing my thoughts carly about that watershed moment where I was listening. PODCAST and I just realized. Wow this is just amazing. This is just where where I need to be. I'm just exactly who I am And where I'm going with. This journey is mystery but yeah life is a journey as the whole but sport guessing journey. We shall see where it goes next next now. I do want to touch upon social media because when you are promoting podcasting social media is a big part and and if you are anybody you will be facebook. You'll be social media for sheer. Because you're listening podcast. You'll be listening. Meanwhile you are walking the dog or cooking the dinner you Wafi Walk you listen to me when you are picking up the kids from school or having that long drive through the granny grandparents house wherever you're listening. I'm I'm grateful that you have decided to choose me as your companion for the journey just realizing the podcasts are consumed in different way and some people do each other. Just WanNA listen to podcasts. Data won't sign up your newsletter or they don't want to you go and check your website and read the blockbuster people just want to listen to you. Other people just want to read about it you so social media. It's been one of those things that are typing really concentrate on twitter. So if you're there you find me. A new mom poured casts doubt to t in the end. And that's where upping hanging out most of my time nowadays and doing this holidays. I'm just going to take a little bit detox and I will be there but I won't be Responding and being a S. present because I think we all need to break and all means everybody just putting the phone away beneath the laptop away and just leaving the moment and that's what new decline is about leaving the moment in joined a moment and just being there for your family and friends which brings me to the point one that I already mentioned reflections since priorities in life. So that's my priorities. That's my reflection for this year. I hope you have enjoyed this episode piece Compaq Doc middle of February. If you haven't already go and check my previous episodes and please go on give us a review in eighteen. Sort of more ears can listen to the new style of living the Scandinavian happy healthy living and I shall see the other side. I will hear you any other side or you hear me and any other side in the middle of fishery where we have new episodes of out. Happy healthy living to Scandinavian way until stay save. Enjoy your Christmas your New Year and eat lots rest lots reflect alive rejuvenate yourself and just just chill allowed and be happy. And that's what I'm going to do now so thank you. Thank you again for listening me really enjoyed having you you a spot of this eighty episode of the Naughty Glenn Podcast by for now. Thank you so much for listening meese assigned assigned to notify now go and check off the Nordic Mom dot com for third resources and reading and this episode show notes and the block post you can also sign sign up for my Phoenix. Dessert Recipe Book for free at the website. Tough to get you again next week for another episode of the Nordic Mom.

Finland Scandinavia Australia twitter Europe Nordic Susanna Tiffen Compaq Scandinavia Walla Phoenix John US meese Ed South Wales
80: Muse

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 1 year ago

80: Muse

"U s poet laureate, Tracy k Smith, and this is the slowdown. What's your stance on strangers? Do you speak in passing or give them their space? Are you the person in seat five who strikes up a conversation with five a or do you leave them to their pseudo? Cou I ask because I'm torn I'm fascinated by the way, strangers move through the world what they seem to advertise about themselves or channel without realizing it. For a long time. I accepted the common city wisdom of not looking strangers in the eye. But finally, well, I couldn't help it. I wanted to meet their is with a look that silently said, I see you there. And by the way, you're fabulous in their way. Everyone is fabulous. Once when I was twenty six and decked out in a fur jacket and cowboy hat that I bought that very evening at a thrift store, an older woman looked me up and down and said simply oh angel. I claimed it as a blessing today's poem muse by Loretta Collins clo- ball of San Juan Puerto Rico is a celebration of strangers. I like that it acknowledges the ways we sometimes invent our own back stories for the people we only know from a distance. Since and I love how beautifully at honors the supreme mystery privacy and profound complexity in everyone. Muse by Loretta Collins Clova. She always walks at the threshold of shadows under the awnings of the locked car. Lot through floodlights of the warm on you meant past clanking pool tables of confetti, drink confetti and the unlit storefront of Iglesia Cielo they forego late under rain through night into day in the heat. She walks by L quirk bell. They believe near both on Agha's and kiosk owes of plus mecca though, treading through demolished ruins of Roxy hotel, which wants kept a carousel pony at its doorway white hair warned to her shoulders a grim schoolgirl face and a decade in the same clothes and embroidered vest, and Jean skirt street, dingy pockets filled. Like, the children who pack pockets with rice for pigeons in the plus they Adamus or like, my father who plugged his pockets with nuts. When myself starved mother, no longer, eight meals this woman, fills up her pockets with numbs the last morsel of pencils as she walks. She writes, a note book always in hand untie me say the tennis shoes dangling over high wire 's feed them out NoMura in Meese by this utters aborted up Bank. It's your unlucky day cries a lotto ticket booth. She walks, and she writes, always I wanted to know what station she was tuned to what she was observing which frequencies of dawn and casualties of dusk memories of family, lost chance, happenings or. Fashions filled her book one day in out by sale. I almost collided with her. She held her notebook open like a preacher holds a bible, and I saw the pages many times and in many styles. I had imagined her handwriting constricted cursive shaky print or slanting. Loops the pages were shiny slick with lead written on over and over again until letters merged into a solid C of pencil gloss. Not one word decipher -able. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation.

Loretta Collins Clova Meese Loretta Collins San Juan Puerto Rico Tracy k Smith Iglesia Cielo congress Agha NoMura tennis Jean one day