25 Burst results for "Meese"

"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

Thought Row

07:41 min | Last week

"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

"They're missing out on themselves. That's absolutely right. It's one of the things I love about my work because of course everybody is different, even two people who on the face of it are doing the same job in a similar sort of organization. There's lots of nuances that mean that they're not the same. They don't do things in the same way. So no, every client is a fresh opportunity. There's always something for me to learn as well. And I never know at the start of the process exactly where it's going to lead with that person. No, I would think that. So it's certainly what keeps things completely fresh from my point of view, which is fantastic. It's a real privilege. Yeah, it's exciting. So exciting. So what led you on this career path and has it been rewarding to you consistently? It's a good question. Well, I'll try and keep the summary of how I landed on this career path as brief as I can because it does go back quite a way. So if I go back right to the very start of my career, my first job was as a personal assistant at managing director in a firm of management consultants. So that was the very start of me doing lots of written work taking notes taking minutes. Lots of keyboard skills required. So that was the very start. And I learned an awful lot doing that. I then made a move into sales, which was a real departure for me and not particularly something that's enjoyed, but it was sales within the world of print and back then it was traditional print, not digital print that hadn't even been invented when I arrived when I was in that world. But getting involved in the world of print led to me ultimately becoming a production manager in a firm of graphic designers, which was down in London. I had about 8 years living down in London. And part of my role, I promised this will make sense to you at the end. Part of my role there was to schedule all the elements of every job that went through the agency. So for instance, they created glossy brochures for people polite BMW, big names, and my job was to find the people to create those brochures. So it was a photographer. It was a copy writer. It was a printer. And in the course of me doing that, I had a particular agency that I used to source people when there weren't enough people in house. And I used to regularly speak to the lovely owner a lady called letitia who was fantastic. And when I eventually decided I wanted to move on from that role, I rang her because she was a recruitment consultant. She invited me to go into talk to her and she said, Judith, from the first air spoke to you, I thought there's somebody who should be working in recruitment. I've got a job for you. If you wanted to, she offered me a job on the spot, and I just know that it would suit you. And I thought, well, I've got nothing to lose. That does sound really exciting. I could see myself doing that. So that was the very first step into the world of recruitment. And that was back in 19 95. So working in recruitment, that eventually led to me working with senior executives. It was executive recruitment. I was trained as a headhunter. So I was going out to market and finding managing directors, CEOs, COOs, finance directors, you name it. Sourcing them for my clients as part of that process. I always would rewrite somebody's CV. If there were a great candidate, but the CV let them down, to me, it made sense for me to rewrite it because it was much easier for me to then represent them to my client rather than me just saying, trust me that they're fantastic. If I could provide a really tip top CV as well, it made that much easier. And I used to get into terrible trouble for it because the people I worked for weren't allowed to charge for that. But I would say, but did that? If that makes it easier for me to place them and then you get the fee. It just made sense to me. Right. So that was the start of me getting involved in writing CVs working with senior executives. So then when I ultimately set up my own business, which was 2005, and at the start of that, it was still in recruitment, but then gradually over a period of time, it translated into I so loved the CV writing part of that. That was the start of it evolving into the service, which I now deliver today. Wow. That is so interesting. But I have to say yes. It's so creative Judith. To take people's lives, work lives, and make it in a way that's sellable, but yet they can understand what that person has done with their life. Their work life is really so creative and so important. I suspect there's a lot of motivation involved here too. You have to my next question was going to be related to CVs that you covered that quite well. And in the process, though of telling people how they might move from one career to another career, does it require you motivating them? I mean, is it a black and white thing? They go look, I don't want to do this anymore. Could you find something else for me? Or do you have to sit there and say, hey, you know what, if you don't take a chance now you never will. To know every client is different, every client is different. And some clients come to me and they are very clear on what they want next. But they're not sure how to position themselves. So they know what they want to do, but they don't quite know how to get there. Quite a lot of clients, however, come to me, and they know they're not happy. They can't necessarily put their finger on what it is that isn't right. They want something to change. They don't want to jump from the frying pan into the fire by going somewhere else. And that's the reason that those people come to me. And then my process helps them to recognize the things that have been either troubling them or undermining them. Whatever the reason is, it starts to bring that clarity. And that simply comes from asking a lot of questions. And for me, an awful lot of listening. My clients talk an awful lot more than I do. So I listen to what they're saying and then I'm able to hone in on a particular thing and say, I notice, you know, when you were talking about this thing, you know, I noticed that your energy dropped you looked more concerned. You know, it has that been troubling you. All sorts of things come out of that process, but.

London Judith letitia CVs COOs BMW CEOs
"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

Thought Row

07:28 min | Last week

"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

"We're excited to have you as a guest. Entirely. Okay. Judith before we start our interview, we always like to ask our guests what they had for breakfast. I know it's been a little bit of a time for you because you're at the end of the day. What did you have? I can still remember. So breakfast for me is probably the most random meal that I have. I have all sorts of different things for breakfast, but today I had smashed avocado on whole meal toast with a glass of apple juice and a coffee. Oh, that sounds very nice. Avocado toast is always delicious. That's one of our favorites. And we live in an area of avocados. You wouldn't know it by the prices. That's true. That's true. So where are you talking to us from today? Exactly. Okay, so I'm in the UK. I live in a small town called long Eaton. And it's between Nottingham and Derby, which are two cities right in the middle of the UK. Oh, how nice. And specifically, I work from home, so I'm sitting in my conservatory at my desk with my piano behind me. That might be more specific than you were wanting. That was great. I have to ask you, do you play the piano then? Yes. I don't know the way discovered that about you. I do play the piano. And the cello. I completely. Yes. We'll have to talk about discuss that. Well, no, I have a question actually right now. Did you have siblings, right? Yes, okay? And then with your siblings, did you have your own little band where you would perform way actually, we did. So it was my mom who was at the heart of the music in our family. My mom incredibly musical studied music at university was a music teacher. I can not teach a church organist a violent super talented, so we all learn to play the piano from a very early age. I've got two sisters, all three of us learned to play when we were four years old, 5 years old, and then as we got a bit older, we all played various instruments. So I played the cello, my middle sister plays the flute piccolo, saxophone, you name it, far too talented for her own good. My oldest my oldest sister played the guitar, my aunt played the violin. So we did used to have a little mini orchestra in our dining room and quite often got together to play, which was fantastic. It must have been lovely at Christmas times. Oh, lovely. Absolutely lovely. And my mom being a church organist, she was the mistress as well. So we quite often have the entire choir squeeze into squeezed into our dining room singing carols or hymns or whatever else. So very lucky. What a fun household. Where did you guys grow up? We grew up actually not far from where I am now. So my whole family are Nottingham born and bred. So I live on the other side of the city now to where I grew up. But yes, not that far away. I'm going to have a question for you, but I want to make one comment about your skill as a pianist, do you perform anywhere? No I don't. I did used to, and a growing up we were in the school orchestra, my middle sister and I went to a music school on a Saturday on the part of various orchestras. And we used to perform back then, but as is quite common, I think the older you get the rest of us the rest of life gets in the way. And I just never had the time to commit. And if you're going to perform, it takes a good deal of time, keeping your skills up to that level. So I have to say, I moved away from that. My middle sister performs in lots of different ways, but I don't anymore. I just play for my own amusement. Oh, nice. That's the best. You're a transition coach and not everyone knows exactly what a transition coach does. In fact, I learned quite a bit just from going over your website and our initial chat that engine I had with you in the very, I don't know a few weeks ago. So Judith tell us exactly what a transition coach is or what they do. Well, it's not surprising that you didn't particularly know what a transition coach is and not many people do because it's what I would describe as something of a hybrid role so typically people may well have heard of a career coach. That is part of what I do, but as a transition coach, as the name somewhat implies, I help my clients transition from being in one role to another. And sometimes that's from one job to another, sometimes it can involve changing from one sector to another. And in making that change there's an awful lot that is involved. So some of my coaching work is helping my clients to understand what is the change that they want to bring. Why do they want a new role? What is it that they enjoy? What do they not enjoy? What do they believe their strengths are? What happens in awful lot is most of my clients, if not all of them have skills which they haven't recognized as being skilled or things which they've taken for granted because they've done them for years and don't necessarily realize that it's something special that they're bringing. So a lot of the transition coaching part of what I do is uncovering those skills helping them to really have the clarity of what they want next and why that is what they want. And that then becomes the foundation of how I can help them through the rest of the process that I take them through. So there's almost sometimes an element of it almost it can be counseling. When you take people through a process which is going to bring a lot of change, it can bring up all sorts of emotions and insecurities and fears and concerns and all of those things are addressed through the process. So the transition coaching piece, it's very much at the start of the process, but it is woven through the whole thing. Thank you for that. Wow. The reminds me about you playing the piano. You've transitioned from that. Well, that's a good analogy. That's a good analogy to draw. You know, that's so amazing because you have so many avenues of helping people by being a transition coach. Meaning you're not only just doing basically matching a job to something that they might find more fulfilling, but also you're helping this person transition. That's a human and identify what maybe.

Nottingham Judith UK Eaton Derby apple
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"You don't need a venture capital investor reading you million dollar check. All you need is to have clarity. And passion to create a real solution to a real problem for real people that the basis of good business when you do that thrive and that's an amazing definition and you know heard variations of that. You know from you know if you the zigzag lawyers sure all the others you know that say you know if you if you want to thrive in life help people thrive in life and xactly and when you do that. We all reap the benefits from that. You know the work that i do. You know this from the show you know. I work with organizations and individuals on burnt out prevention. Why you know it's like okay. Yeah i had own out straight but that that's not a big enough reason for me to do it. I- i- rebounded from it is a consumer is someone that's part of society wants everybody to live healthy and well lives so they can do the things they dream and want to do with when they want where they want and how they watch so they can thrive so they are living there ideal life. It's for me. It's like it's success for them and success is different for everybody. It's like what's which version of success. What what would make your life quote unquote successful all right. We'll take the necessary steps to get there in create an environment where they can because everyone can. I know a lot of people think. Oh it's not for me. I i was done in your story. You just shared is proof. You know a lot of people in through all kinds of different challenges financial setbacks. Maybe you have family members that grew up during the great recession or the excuse me the great depression and we had the great recession and all these different challenges and said you got college degree. Yeah oh my my brother. And i in my eight cousins on my mom's side you know. We're the only two that went to college in on that side of the family are late. Uncle joe is the only one that had a college degree. And i'll real tongue-in-cheek story real quick uncle. Joe is a little out there okay. Love him dearly sweet kindred soul but he made some interesting crazy choices in life not dangerous or harmful but just some really interesting choices and habits and whatnot and my brother. And i were both scared. It's like if we get a college degree. Where you to start acting like that we wanna rethink this. Just drop out right now but I love him and mess him. But again those degrees as over eighty percent of people that have degrees. They're not working in the field that their degree is in. And i loved here thoughts on that. Oh for sure. Well i mean okay. So i wrote this new book. It's called survive and thrive how to build a profitable business in any economy including this one and one of the things that i talk about in the book is that we've made this shift from the age of information to the age of insight and the real economic forum is really the first turned me onto this idea that the age of information is over. It was just kind of a crazy thing to say. It's sort of like there was a time in history. There was a stone age and then there was a bronze age. And if it's the bronze age and you still got a workshop full of tools.

Uncle joe depression Joe
"meese" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"meese" Discussed on If I Were You

"Dot com and we try. We don't have a name for the podcast. We're trying to buy a domain. I yeah and then you right. Ha ha ha. If i were you is pretty good there. You go And then i suggest that also what i would do Yup and say. I think like if i were you and then i said. Ww med. what would meese is do instead of jesus do then i said if i were you show dot com is available and i say i'd like if i were you show all right. I know he likes to look at us. Now we're really going. Well how do you wanna read your last the last thing you said to me right before i say bad attitude of course. Yeah absolute course so there you have it. That was sort of the origin of coming up with the name so as usual just like head gun you came up with it. Wow i'm good at naming things. I guess that's why you one probably the first golden. Mike was based on the fact that you came up with the name idea. And then i got my brother to make the podcast art for it. Yeah wow and i think your brother was the first person that ever made art. Looked like my face. Yeah you're at first because any any art that we did for busta. Tease for t shirts never looked like when we went to make him. Yeah that's right and it's funny. Because now in retrospect i kind of think that the original jacob. You're so as shirt did look like me at the time. I can run a hard time. Who did that illustration do you remember. I think it was trailing. Wow okay so that was. That's the preordered and we actually kept that artwork for like eight years until two weeks ago. We really like just switched it way way too long. All right i'll also want us to talk about the running bits that began with episode one episode. One had our first one origin story for a running bits. Let's take a break. We'll think some sponsors come back and answer questions. Maybe on the other side of these messages. Thank you honey for sponsoring this episode of our show. Yes thank you honey..

meese Mike jacob
"meese" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:27 min | 3 months ago

"meese" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Be a highly controversial issue Not even from people that are necessarily pro all red meat or pro carnival or anything but a lot of the time there can be a biased towards not trying to acknowledge there is any risk of meat consumption and that may not be necessarily accurate or in line with most of the data. we have. Yeah yeah and and you know when you look at these human studies. So let's let's even just kind of steal mine this for a second. i guess. All of the animal mechanistic work because people will just throw that out even if we're confining it to the human experimental research that has looked at various levels of red meese on unprocessed unprocessed various forms of iron the formation of these compounds on comparing for example white meat or fish will then we start to have a fairly consistence plausibility from those human studies that explains the epidemiological findings where we see associations with red meat but not quite meet and we see associations with red meat not fish and we seem to see somewhat of a of a threshold of risk with higher intakes for unprocessed red meat. And they're the human studies would would would very much. I mean one study for example which was looking at two hundred forty grams. A day of fresh meese read meese on processor have me's or process meets the same dose and you saw four folds increase in the formation of an nitro compounds in the unprocessed fresh red meat and you also saw a six point. Five fold increase from the process mate. So the idea that any of these potential mechanistic explanations only apply to process me may not necessarily be the case may be that the magnet choose off the endogenous tros compound formation is much greater with processed meat because of the preform nitrite levels in us but to say that potential explanations about explain process meet associations don't apply to unprocessed meat associations. I think that's largely difficult to substantiate based on human data and it would appear that certainly high levels of two bingham's research they looked at four hundred and six hundred grams a day as well. You know you see quite profound increases in the formation of these carcinogenic compounds..

meese bingham
"meese" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

04:18 min | 3 months ago

"meese" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Congress put a halt to his efforts because he was spending way too much money. Congress also would not provide funds for wagons to get the supplies from warehouses to the army. Whatever blamed could be attributed to congress though mace's leadership was not impressing anyone including meese himself in december. Seventeen seventy seven. When washington was at valley forge me submitted his letter of resignation citing poor health..

Congress mace meese army congress valley forge washington
The Miracle of the Sun

Unexplained Mysteries

01:20 min | 4 months ago

The Miracle of the Sun

"The sun was low on the horizon when physics professor gustafsson stepped outside his office in november. Two thousand two. He smiled as he felt. That chile belgian air brush past him. The sky was clear. The afternoon was perfect. He strolled through the university of leuven campus. Until he found a vantage point it was an ideal spot to watch the sunset. But that wasn't exactly what the professor had in mind for months. Meese in had been obsessed with the miracle of the sun. A spectacular event witnessed by nearly seventy thousand people on october thirteenth nineteen. Seventeen a massive crowd in the village of fatima. Portugal had watched the sun dance across the sky today. Mason wanted to see it too. He took a deep breath in steeled himself for what was coming next. After a moment of hesitation he opened his eyes wide and looked directly into the sun. He knew he was risking damage but he had to be sure of what happened that day. Five years earlier as he stared into the sun he was astonished. The crowd was right. it was some miracle.

University Of Leuven Gustafsson Meese Chile Fatima Portugal Mason
The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

People of the Pod

04:53 min | 9 months ago

The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

"A controversial curriculum for teaching ethnic studies. In california's public schools will face a final vote in march. Since the first draft of the curriculum came out in two thousand nineteen a coalition of jewish organizations including the american jewish committees. California team has worked together to fine tune the content to be more inclusive define anti semitism and avoid perpetuating the stereotypes that put jews endanger here to talk about the debate surrounding the california curriculum. And why it matters to. All of us is rabbi serena. Eisenberg director of ajc northern california serena welcomed people of the pod for having me so exactly. What is california's ethnic studies curriculum. A start back in two thousand sixteen when the california state. Legislators passed a law. Mandating that the state department of education developed a guidance document for the teachers and administrators so they could implement ethnic studies courses and schools and the reason was because in california students of color account for the majority of the population in our public schools. They speak about ninety different languages so the goal was to prepare pupils to be global citizens with an appreciation for the contributions of multiple cultures. Ajc supported that effort. We believe that k. Through twelve students across california should be able to learn the role of ethnicity race and religion in the life of all of the citizens including maybe even especially those groups have been largely left out of other textbooks and so high quality. Ethnic studies courses can help combat bigotry. He'll some of the really difficult. Racial and ethnic divisions we are facing in this country so whereas we support an inclusive and balanced approach to ethnic studies. What some might call multicultural or constructive. Ethnic studies which focuses on the contributions and challenges of a broad array of ethnic cultures. What happened with the california curriculum. Was that state. Department of education appointed a small advisory committee of teachers who are committed to something called critical ethnic studies. The critical studies association was formed in two thousand eleven with a specific goal of radical resistance. It was anti-capitalist anti-imperialist somewhat neo marxist ideology and this group was what guided the development of the very controversial first draft of the curriculum which was released in two thousand and nineteen. What was controversial about that first draft. The first problem was that it lacked balance running through the entire curriculum. The goal was promoting this narrow critical. Ethnic studies ideology the los angeles times. Editorial board wrote that the curriculum talks about critical thinking but usually offers one side and one side. Only it's more about imposing predigested political views on students than about widening their perspectives. That was the los angeles editorial board. So a second problem was that it was an inclusive. We talked about more multicultural approach which looks at the diversity of olive our california population but this curriculum actually left out a lot of groups including sikhs hindus. Korean syrians armenians jewish americans. It had a very small focus on particular groups and because of that. Ajc formed a multi-ethnic coalition with a number of other ethnic groups to ask for a more inclusive curriculum one lack balance to not inclusive. but three. and. I think what was so outrageous. It really contained a lot of offensive material. There are some examples of antisemitic material the material and even more so material that wasn't even included for example a really extensive glossary in a curriculum. That's designed to combat discrimination didn't include a definition of anti-semitism. This was released just after the shooting and powei so the jewish community was particularly eager to see that anti semitism was going to be taught about in an ethics studies curriculum for california. Was there any kind of explanation as to why anti semitism was left out of the first draft. This paradigm of critical ethnic studies sees the world through a lens of people of color and whites oppressed and oppressors and in that paradigm jews are considered to be white and of course we know jews have a complicated identity managers of color. Many jews meese rothley were middle eastern origin huge number of persian jews in california and so unfortunately the curriculum just consider jesus whites and focused only on four groups of people of color that would be african. Americans latinos native americans and asian americans.

California American Jewish Committees Rabbi Serena AJC Critical Studies Association Eisenberg Serena Department Of Education Los Angeles Editorial Board Los Angeles Times Powei Meese Rothley
What's In A Scientific Name

Your Brain on Facts

05:12 min | 1 year ago

What's In A Scientific Name

"From loon example of a trial by in Hunan China called Hans Solo to a butterfly Pea flour reminiscent of Georgia. Oh painting called Couture Couturier Turn Tia. The naming of species offers almost as much in the way of entertainment as it does scientific classification. The official rules for naming species set down by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature are surprisingly simple. The name must be spelled with the Latin alphabet and must not be overtly offensive and that's pretty much it. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Most of US know that the animals we call by single name such as a horse actually had a two part name in that case equis Columbus. In contrast to astronomical bodies like stars, Asteroids and planets which are under strict naming conventions overseen by committees, there's almost unfettered freedom it comes to zoological nomenclature. The name can even be on sense string of arbitrary letters. While there is a wealth of name fascination to report on from plants to drugs to telescopes. Ourselves today to the Animal Kingdom. For as long as we have had records and probably longer mankind has sought to classify the world around us in an effort to begin to understand it. This is called taxonomy the study of the general principles of scientific classification from the Greek words for order or arrangement and science. Three centuries before the common era aristotle grouped animals I by similarities like where they lived and then hierarchically with humans naturally at the top. Not, every animal fit well into this system though ducks posed a particular problem as they had the bothersome habit of living on water on land and spending time in the air. It would be eighteen hundred years before another natural philosopher as scientists were called, then would try their hand such as Andrei sessile, Pino Italian physician, and botanist who sorted plants by the structure of their fruits and seeds. The first scientist to use a binomial or to name system that we would recognize was Swiss botanist guest sparred Boeing. Some six thousand plants by genus and species in sixteen, twenty three. There were several inconsistent and sometimes conflicting systems of classification already in use when Carolina's wrote his. SYSTEMA naturally in seventeen, thirty five. Laying down the system we use to this day. Lena's was first taxonomic east to list humans as a primate, but he also originally classified whales as. All living things were sorted into them, Feilim class order, family, genus, and species. Many of US memorized that in middle school by way of a new monarch like King Philip came over from great Spain. Housecat for example, is kingdom and Amelia filed them cor data meaning it has spinal cord. Class Mammalia order can Adora family feel a day genus fearless and species cactus. A lion diverges at the genus Pan Terra, which awesomely means reaper of all and species. Leo. So the scientific name for Lion Is Penn Tara Leo. This system can be visualized as an enormous branching tree with its trunk, very broad and its branches increasingly specific. We. Still name some animals in accordance with their appearance with a little poetic license thrown in for good measure. The tiniest and most pastelle of the armored mammals was christened the pink fairy armadillo. A. Hand Size Lizard with a gift from a meese camouflage was given the fairly metal moniker satanic leaf tailed Gecko. It's actual religious beliefs remain a mystery. As advertised, the star nosed mole has a burst of delicate sensory tendrils on the tip of its snout. Also, sacks myuka Flores is an unappealing worm who lives off the bones of dead whales which would explain its name bone eating snot flower. A bacterium that was taken to the International Space Station, and exposed to cosmic radiation earned the Latin moniker for traveler of the void. China boasts a salamander species that can grow to a whopping one point. Eight meters were nearly six feet long. It goes by the name. Hell Bender and this reporter for one will not argue with it.

Zoological Nomenclature Penn Tara Leo United States Scientist Couture Couturier Hunan China Myuka Flores Hans Solo Animal Kingdom International Commission International Space Station Official Pan Terra Georgia Carolina Ducks China Adora Lena
"meese" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on KOMO

"Colorado trying to run back in the second half kickoff is is fielded by Joel Meese at the goal line is up only to the twenty yard line it will be a first down flows to begin the second half they won the toss prior to the first two for Washington with Oshie scored on their opening possession Colorado tied it at seven after one the only touchdown in the second quarter it is fourteen to seven it is self a quarterback for Colorado coming out of the locker room does it surprise you bought at all he's known for this kind of thing a yard line here has all the right moves it's the pitch wants to throw over the middle hitters Washington state route twenty four side numbers thirty four yards well receiver right opportunistic to to the house to school early for the colts the freshman building him Washington third interception of the season for Taylor that comes on the first play of the second half skis take it back for a touchdown the point after an away goal is good fans and even settle back into their seats after the halftime break Cefalu file comes back trying to give the Huskies or the buffaloes a boost and instead give the Huskies a boost with the pick six the other Whaley's the second half he wants to come in as a sparkle championship it's not the only one sure wonderfully freshman he's on the bench right now six interception of the season four six the other way we get a time out for just sixteen seconds into the third quarter Washington twenty one to seven will begin from its own twenty five yard line stunned perhaps the reception returned from Taylor rap on the first scrimmage play of the third quarter and I'll bring him up again I tried a new was down Colorado from about twenty five they work for the new year has shown the right going from our left right pair whites to the far side left so checks with his in around like Skelly repositioning Lindsay in the back field so just go there and Lindsay Doherty told him to go get a hand off Lindsay running right penalty marker down this let's see through for one of his better games tonight I think this one is going to come back though the twenty five miles running off tackle for twelve on first down Lindsey straight ahead hand off and he is hammered down us these big guys bring the area coming from his linebacker spot witching cringing down by dropping for a yard gate at the thirty eight yard line on second down they're gonna try to run outside Lindsay running left stacks up there as well this time it is Elijah Qualls jamming up the play and then the help comes Lindsay dropped after a gain of eighty two the one gonna be Thursday on a third down an eighth straight drop goes over the Middle East in at the far side forty thirty five thirty while in the third quarter watching the first twenty six yard line this is the first time prince championship game the quarterback has been intercepted more than once and it's happened to Cefalu file in a minute thirty two seconds of the third quarter first down dogs the twenty five Colorado leading twenty one to seven looking for more running on first down handed off to Gaskin through the Middle shoulder into attack we're crossing the twenty down to about a seventy two yard line for a pickup of eight on first down search right there that'll serve wine it's eight yards down field hello this rushing attack here tonight is one of the first half thirty eight yards between of averaging six yards a carry second down into here Washington from above seventeen Browning going right to left Gascon again takes the handoff is able to remove the on rushing linebacker pops it out to the numbers of the fires the ten for a Washington first down Addison Gillam getting upfield Gaskin miles turns it into a seven yard gain first and goal Washington at the Colorado ten miles Gaskins lateral quickness it was kind of the same runners I am there down hill you look up and it's eight dollars twenty one seven dogs first goal here at the fire house on the right at the ten yard line gasket inside handoff carrying tacklers inside the five pushing toward the goal line they finally getting out of the water wow still this is held in the fray it'll be the second goal is from just inside the two yard line on the plate he is forced to leave the field when it's just you know people wave from the there is more than just inside the two second and goal to give a shot handed off Pullman right side stopped up it's going to be here for a big loss on the play Colorado with a huge surge that that's really cool it down at the seven yard line loss of five yards as we go to the safety forced up into the middle third and goal at the seven yard line a little play action perhaps right here we'll see third and goal from the seven areas on the left she's looking for their second touchdown of the third quarter as for it stands in pros to the corner Ross trying to reach down and grab a knee high fastball couldn't hold on the route right here John cross across the formation one on one matchups runs the slant return open the ball just a little bit two hands on it sometimes leaves out for his to make some money in there slowly passing game just here tonight said they're going to have to settle for a twenty four five yard field goal attempt in Waco sharp angle left for the right footed kicker ball down kick is away Kim and puts it through is made five in a row now he settle for three two minutes three minutes and the thirty seconds or so into the third quarter Washington has put ten points on the board off to Taylor Rapp pass interceptions we take a break eleven twenty seven to go in the third it is twenty four seven Washington here in Washington I am G..

Colorado Joel Meese
What's Working Right Now

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

07:51 min | 1 year ago

What's Working Right Now

"These are some good back to ones that we and our listeners have found useful to sort of set in place to make all of this a little easier and as we were leading off the number one thing. I put something on the facebook group which you should join. Everyone is sharing really good resources and information there and I would like you to go to facebook dot com forward slash. Whatever shell cast like the page joined the group and one of the things that people are talking about the leadoff issue is the Diet thinks so I thought we would start by trying to make anxiety a little easier and I have a couple of things that are helping my anxiety amy. Hopefully you have a couple. Should I lead off with mine? Yeah tell us first of all time and I will say I feel like we're out on the leading edge a little Bit New York so I can say I feel like I've come over the anxiety. I'm flattening the anxiety curve. I think is what I'm saying like the beginning for me was three o'clock cold sweat wakeup really scared. All the time and I will say like the time has calmed me down a little bit which is hopefully helpful to someone. Who's maybe a little bit later on the curve than me but the number one thing that I have cut down on is the constant refreshing of twitter and other forms of social media and like looking at are they epidemiological charts. There is something comforting about refreshing them every six seconds but I have found just stepping away from them is the better choice. I am very behind you. I'm still nearing my peak of being single. Most well informed person about it in the Western Hemisphere. You want to know anything about anything. I definitely just checked twitter and I can tell you all about it. That's your safe-space though. Like information is your safe-space. Yeah I would gently offered to you that in the same way that I was sick to my husband. I need to check the charts because I'm in charge of this like the same way. I need to keep my eye on the ground at all time in a plane to keep the plane flying correctly. I mean I need to check the charts because somehow I'm controlling. This was my mind. I think if you can cut that cord it is probably better for your mental health. You know I haven't been like I'm sleeping fine at night. I'm sleeping like a stone. I think I'm so exhausted but during the day I am perhaps a little quick to lose my patients. I certainly feel like whenever I do. My patients it is a well earned loss of patients. It is I have held my tongue eighteen times not once more but judging from the reaction on my kids faces sometimes to them. It seems like it comes out of nowhere and I suppose that's sort of like me spilling over is probably yeah. You're running a little hot probably. That's probably yeah. It's probably where I'm expressing it instead of a three. Am So I'm going to take the no. Yeah I would generally put in your path that less of cessive checking of the curves is probably better for you. Okay you can put that down. There are some really smart people in charge of it and you obsessively checking is actually not helping in any way and might be making you more. You Know Edgy. Shall we say you know what I'm GonNa do right now with that? I'm going to take that note. Can I explain about that? Yes that's in Showbiz right. So when like the director you did a run through of act one and the directors like amy. I'm GonNa need you to start your cross to the table earlier because if you don't fluffed the pillows by the beginning of that line he doesn't have the cue to say. Why used fluffing the pillows. If I then say we have what I know but I can't do that unless he is very bad etiquette in the theater they give you a note you say okay and you take the note and you might disagree with it and you might pick it up with the director later but in the moment. You don't explain why that request of you is wrong or misplaced. Somehow you take the note. It is something I've been working on with my kids for seventeen and a half years now and it's something we can all do for one. Another right now. Take the note. It's not easy. I'm not good at it and it also always depends on your who you get it from right there. People from you can't take notes and people for Ken. I think. Opening yourself up to try to be like how can I make? This better is worthwhile. Yes other things exiled. They've been helping me. It's like the goofy breathing gifts. You know what I'm talking about. We'll just linked to UNSEE. You can see them but if you go to gifty or any gift site and you type breathing exercise. They're like visual representations of breathing in and out and I don't do great with like the lying down and the voice breathing. I don't know it bothers me My daughter finds that. Make sure she swears it makes her more nervous to listen to like meditation. Breathing tapes weirdly. I'm with her like sometimes it's like I get a wrong voice and it really agitates me but these and I have a kid who gets a little over a what do you call it. He freaks out and I have found that they work really nicely with him. They just serve. Visual representations have had a breathe for five minutes and they've been helping me a lot with my anxiousness Anne Marie who is one of our top fans on instagram and facebook. She mentioned this grounding exercise that I make sure to put up on social media this week which is like fine five things you can see find four things you can hear. Find three things you can smell you know. Find four things you can touch. Whatever it's I'm getting the specifics of it wrong. But it's basically that go through each one of your senses and do a full inventory of everything you're able to hear right now in an immediately grounds you. I've tried it works really well. That's like take the note thing for me because often these things sound so to quote a meese grandma tweet tweet demand like I really don't have time to count the things I can say. I'm way to busy keeping the world going with my mind but I think it is helpful and I always know it's helpful but in times like this I found like oh. I actually really need to spend some time. Every day not holding the scary at bay by scrolling twitter but spending some time in some sort of state of mindfulness or roundedness. And like if you know me. I can't believe my tongue didn't just fall out of my head when I said that but it's been helping me and I would highly recommend it. Revenge the upside down right now in every way I know well we are in the upside down and the other thing that is my touchstone in. This is in terms of like my problem. Which is maybe not everyone's problem with anxiety is like holding it away from me like it's too scary to think about so I let it. Just become this monster in the closet and I go about my day like say day busy. Scroll twitter read. The chart is the curve. Bending and one of the things that I work on and I work on this with my anxious. Kids is like let's name it. What's The scariest thing that will happen? And we've talked about this previously so I won't linger on put like go through it. What are we scared of? You know. There's a related article? I'M GONNA put a link on the Shenoy to this episode at what Russia PODCAST DOT COM or. They might be in your operate now. You can look child psych named Helen. Dodd what an article for the conversation about this whole moment and she points out that free play for kids. It's essential in this moment that free play without us telling them what to do that. We really should take a step back. It's not only okay mom. It is a fact. It's their work. You know little children and she made a point that I hadn't really considered. Which was that you may over here. You see your kids. Play acting this moment in ways. That may seem like something. You really need to clamp down on and that you shouldn't because she says that free play even about this moment can help kids make sense of the things they find hard to

Twitter Facebook Director New York Western Hemisphere Anne Marie Dodd Helen KEN Russia AMY Instagram
"meese" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Was Warner more wealthy parents are going to prison over the college admissions cheating scandal Gregory and Marcia abit are getting one month behind bars for pain to fix their daughters SAT and ACT scores the New York couple pleaded guilty in Boston federal court back in may on Tuesday a judge also ordered them to pay a forty five thousand dollar fine and completed two hundred and fifty hours of community service they are the six and seven parents to be sentenced in the scandal they admitted Payne confessed scam mastermind Rick singer a hundred and twenty five thousand dollars to fix the tests in an effort to get their daughter into Duke University Kevin trip K. A. B. C. news president trump is honoring Ronald Reagan's former Attorney General ed Meese today with the presidential medal of freedom I want to thank you I want to thank you for your incredible lifetime of exceptional service and of devotion to our country during a White House ceremony the president called me is an inspiration to liberty loving citizens everywhere he also praised Meese as a fighter for freedom and a champion of law and order the medal of freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor ed Meese expressed his gratitude to president Reagan and I will always be indebted to him not only for the honor he did by having me a build a hundred I need to serve under his leadership for thirty years after the Houston Rockets general manager expressed support for pro democracy protests in Hong Kong in a tweet it sparked a backlash from Beijing NBA commissioner Adam silver said he will not censor players or team owners over China or any other issue arguing that the NBA is motivated by much more than money and freedom of expression need to be protected correspondent Brian Todd says China may be at the mercy of Chinese and be a fan China still needs the NBA more than the NBA needs China and that of the Chinese government takes the step of pulling all the NBA games including the regular season games from state TV well they could have an up people on their hands from the hundreds of millions of.

Trump awards Medal of Freedom to Ed Meese

Ben Shapiro

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Trump awards Medal of Freedom to Ed Meese

"News president trump is honoring Ronald Reagan's former Attorney General ed Meese today with the presidential medal of freedom I want to thank you I want to thank you for your incredible lifetime of exceptional service and of devotion to our country during a White House ceremony the president called me is an inspiration to liberty loving citizens everywhere he also praised Meese as a fighter for freedom and a champion of law and order the medal of freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor ed Meese expressed his gratitude to president Reagan and I will always be indebted to him not only for the honor he did by having me a build a hundred I need to serve under his leadership for thirty

Donald Trump Ronald Reagan President Trump Attorney Ed Meese White House
STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:31 min | 2 years ago

STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

"Should all feel grateful towards she advanced the science related to a key appliance. You use every single day and probably take for granted the refrigerator. We're talking about. Mary Engle Pennington Mary Engle Pennington was born in eighteen seventy two in Nashville Tennessee see soon after she was born Mary's family her mother father and younger sister moved to Philadelphia to be closer to her mother's wealthy quaker relatives. Mary's parents ordered their daughters interests and hobbies as a result. Mary learned to garden with her father. At a young age she also Oh love to read and spent hours on end at her local library. It was there that she had her first break. Through all reading the book on Medical Chemistry Mary Very was studying a chapter on nitrogen and oxygen when something clicked she later told The New Yorker. I realized Liberty Hoop that although I couldn't touch taste or smell them the really existed it was a milestone. Mary was twelve years old when she had that. Aha moment and from that point on she wanted to learn everything she could about chemistry. Unfortunately the rest of society wasn't so keen on Mary's budding in curiosity at that time studying scientists considered unladylike. Mary tried to convince the head of her boarding school to allow her awesome instruction in chemistry but the headmistress refused still Mary's fascination with medical book didn't go away she went to the university -versity of Pennsylvania which was located near her house and demanded a professor there. Give her some instruction. Despite the fact that she was still only twelve years old the professor told her he would consider teaching her if she learned to read and spell the words in the book and returned when she was older though she didn't didn't return to that specific professor she did return to the University of Pennsylvania in eighteen ninety s she was the only woman in her class and studied chemistry and biology in the university town scientific school to earn a certificate of proficiency she had to settle for that instead of a Bachelor's slurs degree which was denied due to her gender nevertheless she returned and earned a PhD in the same field in eighteen ninety five the University of Pennsylvania was one of the only schools to get doctorate degrees to women at that time after graduating with her PhD. Mary created her own lab. The Philadelphia Clinical Laboratory to analyze different bacteria. She took aim at the ice cream supply she she educated farmers about safety practices while handling raw milk in order to prevent outbreaks of sickness in Nineteen Zero Five Mary Bet Harvey Wiley a famous chemist and the two began working together on cold storage and refrigeration the next year thanks in part art to Harvey Wiley the Pure Food and drug act passed which tightened regulations on food labelling and safety the government created the bureau of chemistries mysteries food research lab to help fulfill the safety requirements outlined in the law and Harvey Wanted Mary to be in charge after all she got the top top score on the exam required to enter Federal Service. Harvey was so sure that Mary was the best choice but he tried to conceal the fact that she was a woman woman. I referring to her only as Emmy Pennington on the necessary paperwork his trickery was soon discovered but harvey continued the fight by arguing that Mary couldn't be denied simply on account of gender. Mary was hired to leave the lab her work in that lab established. The foundation of today's food knowledge that keeping bacteria count low and refrigerated foods like milk eggs and cheese is instrumental to food safety. She also also developed standards for processing chickens for food led an investigation of the refrigerated boxcar and served on Herbert hoovers war food administration station during World War One in nineteen nineteen. Mary left her work for the federal government to continue research in her own lab about the safety of frozen foods foods through her later research. She discovered that freezing food was a more viable storage method than canning or smoking during her career. Mary won the Garvan Olin Medal the highest award given to women in the American Chemical Society in Nineteen twenty-three she was is recognized by the American Society of heating refrigeration and air conditioning engineers as the greatest American expert on home refrigeration. She's also also in the National Women's hall of fame throughout her career. Mary encouraged young women to participate in the sciences including her own meese who also went on to pursue a stem degree. Mary passed away in a hospital in nineteen fifty two. She was eighty years old. Today we might take Mary and go Pennington Science for granted but she helped save millions of lives by educating society about food safety

Mary Engle Pennington Mary Eng Mary Bet Harvey Wiley Professor American Chemical Society Mary Philadelphia Emmy Pennington Pennington Science Nashville Tennessee University Of Pennsylvania The New Yorker Meese Philadelphia Clinical Laborato Pennsylvania University Town Scientific Sch Garvan Olin Medal
"meese" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Think I had a moose in the summer. my dog was not. where there's a moose in your backyard right outside my back yeah. really. but I'm not scared of my dog at all is what I told the story. I was in a moose. as big as the most yes. moose is huge what's the plural moose Meese's no. listen I'm a go okay. this is a bold by the way the source said bull moose right don't use. to loose in Eurasia is an el. thank you. the north American in Eurasia it's an L. thank you no yeah yeah yes tried to tell you we're not we don't live in your. right now I'm in North America we call it a moose yeah this is north American. Alan and elle because he's from Eurasia. check the box. thanks to dragon. correct loosely Callaway I'm Dave. he's baseball coming up at twelve thirty okay away. sure classic rock because this fall starting with test on September eighteenth. performing his like modern day cowboys love song in the way it is. and get ready for the legendary.

Eurasia North America baseball Meese Callaway Alan elle
"meese" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on WDRC

"Do when you're at that point when your last hope the chords is now gone why you threaten the courts Tom is jumping joins me now who's deputy director of the Edwin Meese the third center for legal and judicial studies as senior legal fellow at the heritage foundation Mr Jinping welcome back to the program thanks for having me so you feel free to tell me that I got that all wrong if I did no I think you got it exactly right the the last has always look to the courts as sort of plan B. for getting their political agenda accomplished and that's in part because they reject the principles that went into forming the structure of our government that the distinctions that you were describing things like federal versus state legislative versus judicial branch those kinds of things that's part of the design that America's founders gave us and they they felt that those distinctions were very important the left rejects the mall the left is about power they don't care how it gets done so if it's state legislatures federal courts whatever it is they'll go where ever they can to get their agenda accomplished and that's what they're doing today see that's one and and I can I throw another element in an incident elitism I remember talking to a friend of mine I'm a pro death penalty guy and I asked him about Europe but he said well first of all be in the European Union you have to get rid of the death penalty I said I didn't know that two people in Europe support the definitely said well actually the polls show they do but the elites who run their government just tell them you folks are fools the masses are **** and so we will decide for you and I'm worried that that same kind of thing is coming here that they see they don't they don't subscribe to the notion that government derives its power from the consent of the governed and that we transmit that consent kind of slowly through representatives it's deliberately designed to be a slow system and and one that doesn't just blow in the in the wind like a weather vane but but but at the same time the people can say Hey you're my member of Congress you voted against that thing I really wanted we're throwing you out and all the members of Congress know that judges especially federal judges aren't subject to that at all in fact they're deliberately insulated from public opinion and they can act like a lease and say oh yes thirty eight state legislatures have considered and and actually thirty states had voted on gay marriage and we can't get that way so we'll go to the Supreme Court and they'll do over to fail the case that legalize gay marriage and simply impose it on you now what do you agree with that decision in particular not doesn't matter what matters is if all the states and all their legislatures had said no and then the courts say well this is the right way to go so we're going to tell you that doesn't seem like the consent of the governed anymore does it it isn't and perhaps the most important question to ask when you're trying to identify what kind of system of government you have is who is sovereign and according to the the founders of our country they used a phrase like popular sovereignty that is the people are sovereign wealth other systems of government it's the government that sovereign I one of America's founders James Wilson who was one of the very first Supreme Court justices he gave some lectures explaining our system of government and he contrasted our system of government from the system in Great Britain and he said that the differences here people are masters of the government there if the government is the master of the people that's the that's what we're talking about here either the people are sovereign or the courts are sovereign again the last bridge Jack's those principles and so where ever they want you know can go to get what they want that's exactly what they're going to do and ultimately that leads to any five members of the Supreme Court being the most powerful people in the country now let's talk about the specific threat that's been made five Democrats senators had threat have said if you don't make the decision we want against the second amendment rights of New York state residents in a gun case the first gun case in a decade we are going to retaliate against you tell tell my audience about that please well it didn't in your your listeners may remember not that not that long ago the the whole idea of court packing you know came up which is if we don't like the decisions of the courts are making well that will change the structure of the courts will will increase the number of judges on the Supreme Court so we can stack it and get what we want well this is this is another version of it there's a case before the Supreme Court involving a constitutional challenge to New York City is gun law and.

Tom deputy director Edwin Meese
"meese" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Out but it was a slip because even if that's what you get bill my technique hello age all right the film exactly he's all fame when he was a bench coach yeah that's true thank you very much all right see I got to Patrick are and have a good night all right take care ray from the bay you know it can be a good right thank you for a little local singles were announced but again in the but I learned a little well this I did not well let me the retention team Maryland I agree with you although I do seem to the change to Jane Meese selling general okay well let's see where it goes as I said you know two weeks ago and say you know the sooner the better get the best deal possible but you know they've made a little interesting the league is a is a little mish mash of teams all bunched up in the wild card so let's see it play out a little bit more all right thanks always good to hear from you member him right RAF ray from the bank he's got a bunch right yeah yeah well good because then I very good alright it away came to our we'll take a break be back with you I'm on that KPIX the sports wrap on channel five tonight so I know I'm doing that a little bit later we're going to take that that in a bit but we've got more time to take some calls a two eight came the or if you want to get in things of lighten up just a little bit but we'll get everybody on the right after this can baseball with Marty Laurie on KNBR six eighty the sports leader.

Patrick Jane Meese Marty Laurie Maryland baseball two weeks
"meese" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Guys clearing tonight, low sixty nine another chance for showers tomorrow, high eighty four seventy five Reagan national, I'm really fun. Washington's mall, may Al rose underground command post deep in the bowels of a hidden bunker, somewhere under the brick and steel of a nondescript building, we've once again made contact with our leader. Everybody, Mark Levin here. Our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. I must say all the media I do. This is where I'm the most comfortable. I really am. This is where the most comfortable radio. Man, there's so much to get to. I just figure out how to do this. I can do this. I think I can. We're going to start with Bill bar. And then I'm going to go to address an issue that I talked about some time ago. Little over a year ago. Almost a year ago to the state. That the appointment of Robert Muller was unconstitutional. Professor Calabrese of northwestern law school. Former colleague of mine when we serve attorney general Edwin Meese, he wrote a paper on this. I endorsed his position. I expanded on his position. And we're going to circle back on this. Because I think it's very important. But before we do Bill bar said something that's very, very important. And he was interviewed by Jan Crawford. She actually is a real journalist. She's at CBS, believe it or not. But let's walk through this you and I cut four go when you see some of the criticism and you've gotten quite a bit of it that you're protecting the president that you're enabling the president. What's your response to that? Well, we live in a hyper partisan age where people the longer really pay attention substance of what said, but as to who says, it, what side they're on what it's political ramifications are. Department of Justice is all about the law, and the facts and the substance, and I'm going to make the decisions based on the law on the facts and I realized that's intention with the political climate, we live in, because people are more interested in getting their way politically. So I think it just goes with the territory of being attorney general and hyper partisan period of time. All right. Great point now. Cut five go. We saw the special counsel yesterday. Makes that statement. He analyze eleven instances, where possible obstruction, and then said that he really couldn't make a decision to with that interpretation. I personally felt he could have reached this in your view. He could have reached a conclusion have reached the conclusion of the opinion says, you can indict a president Wali's office, but he could have reached a decision as to, whether it was criminal activity. But he had his reasons for not doing it which he explained and I'm not going to, you know. Argue about those reasons but when he didn't make a decision. The deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein it. I felt it was necessary for us as the heads of, of the department who reached that decision. Well, and he seemed to suggest yesterday that there was another venue for this, and that was congress. Well, I'm not sure what he was suggesting. But, you know, the department of Justice doesn't use our powers of investigating crimes as an adjunct to congress. This man is brilliant. He's right on and honestly, sounds a little like me. Last night on Hannity. I raised a question. I raised a number of questions for Muller. One of the questions I said, if he thought. The president of the United States committed a crime. He couldn't indict them. But why didn't he say, we believe the president United States committed a crime? And here's our probable cause evidence for it. But he didn't do that. In the report, nor did he do it during his standup routine yesterday morning. Let me underscore this point. I'll speak slowly..

Robert Muller president Bill bar Department of Justice rod Rosenstein Jan Crawford Mark Levin United States attorney Wali Washington Reagan Edwin Meese northwestern law school Professor Calabrese deputy attorney general CBS congress special counsel Hannity
"meese" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"My name is Marissa. And Tim Conway junior knows knee by my uncle. He's the one who drinks the Cobra, and my mom loves like, the chicken or whatever. Well, that's a lie. Identify you. Yeah. It's cool. You guys you're on your own like almost your own language. You could say. Yeah. And Bill yo- young to some kind of upset with her. You know, she kind of me some expired. I apologize. Wow. If you know unpack here Marissa's nicely. You let that talk. Talknet. Sounds like you got out of your house all show. Let's not do. All right. There's the smartest man in the room right there. Maybe it's time for the condolences. And I didn't want to send my condolences to Tim Conway junior and his family for the passing of his dad sweet. I heard about it. 'cause I was at school, and when you say testing, and so my mom technician. Like, Tim Conway in years, dad, just passed away and the soon as I got home. I was like mom we have to call. And she's like, yeah. So yeah, I've been calling. Thank you so much for for calling and also for being so patient 'cause I know it took a while to get to your call and thank you so much, and Tim we will pass along your condolences and thank you so much. Appreciate it in the best of your family. And so good to talk to you tonight. So many people have called we tried to get to everybody, and we're trying to get to these last couple of callers as well. Hi, Patti welcome to KFI. Well, Patty may have been on hold for really been on since this morning. They've been on hold. So it's conceivable that they're not. I will try one more time. Hi, patty. Yeah. I'm on. There you go. Hi, patty. Welcome to KFI. Thank you. Well, I'm calling for my brother and Sam and saying sympathy for Tim Conway junior and his dad. His dad was very funny man is being in the kills navy and and Carol Burnett, and I'm doing Tim Conway marathon dizzy right now. Oh, that's cool. Doubt about a Meese by digging movie have over two hundred movie five of them are got Tim Conway. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I guess he was a regular on that Disney movie, circuit home. Yeah. He did. He did the the the he did the the other two John not. Oh, that's right. Yeah. But I forgot what the other ones, you know, that is cool. Does it's about it's about a meal that Honey all young not the goal. Oh. Not based on a story. I don't think he'd be playing an ice cream, man. Yeah. I mean, he just had a charm to him. Thanks, patty. Appreciate your call. He did have a charm. We keep talking to it's sort of like one of those things. It's almost indescribable. You know, we talk about this charm or this merciful quality had and he he did, you know, I think you hear it as people call in and try to describe all these different characters and all these different vehicles that he was in. And he just. And then he had enduring characters, right? Like, the Mikhail's navy ensign engine Parker is it is just one of those characters. So funny. I mean, he just where he just isolates one part of his personality, and is able to be so funny and just right up in the in the face of authority, right whose captain Binghamton on Mikhail's navy. Joe flynn. Who plays sort of the heavy to him. And and of course, I mean, these we've been talking about them all night the sketches on Carol Burnett. They will live on on and on. They are transcendent year after year. They will bring people so much laughter. So it really has been such an honor to be here tonight and to to review some of these things, and we've you know, we've got a whole I wanna say file, but it's a treasure trove. Yeah, we haven't even gotten to a lot of it. Yeah. Just we can't play at all. Because then it it's it's a lot. And as you said, I made a great point excuse me. You made a good point little while ago. Talking about the fact that there is so much Tim Conway that is the physical. So part of the sketch is the setup, and he does a great of you know, I'll post it to my Twitter feed. Maybe there's a I was watching sketch earlier, we does the voice, and, but but some of it is the voice in some of it is the premise and some of it is the physical, and you just feel like it loses. Something if we try to bring too much so what we try to do is give you a little bit of across section and share our memories. And then play of course, mostly Tim talking about his dad here on the show. And it's not just going to be tonight. Because I mean, this this tribute will go on it's not just tonight. So we'll get to your tweets. We'll get to your emails. We'll get to your messages, and in some way, shape or form, Tim will either see or hear most or all of them. Exactly. Exactly. And you know, we think about. We think about zofia, and that's the grandpa the the grandkids are the ones who Tim was most concerned with today when I spoke to him. It was that that he was concerned with show. I'm sure that he'll share thoughts when he returns. And it is you know, we all have heavy hearts about this. When we've tried to be a beat when we can. And we've all had struggles with frankly tonight, but all of you who've listened and all of you who supported Tim Conway junior and by extension. Tim Conway have helped to keep us going tonight. Sharon, I know there's so many people to help put tonight show together. So we wanna thank everybody everybody else. I wanna thank everyone who's called or sent emails, and, you know, sending messages to Tim and trust me. I will make sure that he and his family see everything and hear every phone call because it really does. Tim's type of person that would write a personal. Thank you to everybody. But this is a lot. So. Thank you so much it's been received. And he will absolutely get them. When you talk about putting the show together. And we think Sharon's thinking everybody we need to. Thank sharon. Bellio. Was here. Very early today. I mean, really early to get this all together in a coordinated. So yes, Sharon, you do deserve special things you Mark. This has been an honor. It really set it. And it's true. It has been an honor. So my love to the Conway families. Thanks, and thank you all participated tonight. KFI AM six forty..

Tim Conway Patty KFI Sharon Conway Marissa Carol Burnett technician Disney navy Mikhail Twitter Meese Patti Joe flynn Sam John Mark Parker
"meese" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"That's M R RC sticker dot com. Let's see if in the call screen or not. Of course, not when he got there, Mr. producer. Matthew, Kansas City, XM satellite. Go. Mr. Mark within the great one is so great to talk to you, sir. Thank you so much taking my call. Thank you, my friend. Hey, I wanted to tell you one thing. First of all, I have three kids, and I'm not lying to you. When I tell you to number one and number two books in their library is my dog spot in proverbs for young people. So that's so wonderful. I wanna thank you for bringing that to my attention because it has it has brighten their life up they enjoyed reading because of that. So. Secondly, I wanted to let you know that I told you. I was introduced to you relatively recently two thousand eleven when I was stationed in Iraq when I was deployed, and God bless you, man. Well, thank you. I appreciate that. Thank you for your service, sir. Well, buddy of mine, and I kind of what the hell are we doing over here? Because at that time is the other commander in chief absent commander in chief. Buddy. Another. About. But then I I'll tell you why every single show that I listen to every every one of your books, I read there's a there's a defining factor that separates us from them. And that's I mean, classical liberals and constitutional conservatives and them the per-. The progressives are status, and that is intellectual honesty. After I got out I became a police officer noodle of people as a police officer. And one thing that I've noticed that all liberal progressive status have in common. Is the inability inability to be intellectually honest with themselves when presented with facts, they have to paint a picture and for the great one to come on the program and say something to the effect of you know, what this Donald Trump day. He may not be that bad. Look at the evidence. Look what he's doing. And for the great one to come on and say that is is very impressive. And it just underscores everything that you are very kind. And I wanna thank you for your service. And this is why when the Scarborough's attack me really doesn't bother me in the least. Well, you used to say this my audience live night said that they know exactly what I think. I don't hide anything. There's no hypocrisy. If I change my mind, I tell people I look at the facts, I look at the evidence, I embrace our principles. This president is the most conservative president since Ronald Reagan. There's absolutely no question about that. And I was with attorney general Meese today as we're others celebrating him and his career, and he said that to me, and I agree with them. And we know because we campaign for Reagan and we worked for Reagan, and that's the truth. And Joe Scarborough can't see it because he's so hate-filled, and he's such a psycho. That's his problem. That's. Not my problem. Absolutely. It was absolutely discussing the way. He's he just back in the corner that and and he won't give you an opportunity to fire back. That's what you know. 'cause he's gonna he's gonna just brushed you off like everybody else, you invite as a matter is no audience. He's not taking seriously exactly he's he's a circus clown. Although I don't like putting down clowns. My wife hates it. When I do that. He's a you understand do he's he's a lounge at he's he's a cheap Las Vegas lounge at all right? Matthew. Thank you for you. Don't hang up. I want to send you a signed copy of unfreedom of the press when it comes out. I want to thank you for your service. Don't hang up Sheila, a Long Island, New York, Sirius satellite. Go. Thank you very much for take my phone. Call. And thank you very much for all that you do for helping to save the country. I really mean that you. Are you working twenty hours a day that you you mentioned the other day question is how about by the way when I have a guy a veteran calls me and says thank you for your service. I have to say nobody needs to thank me for my service. I mean, I'm not put my life on the line. I'm not facing down these these these terrorists and all the rest of it. But I I pre- she ate I get the point. But I'm not even close to that category. Anyway, she'll go ahead. We we truly do how could it be possible? That after a two year investigation was conducted. And there was no mention of Hillary Clinton. And or her foundation in the report that how could that be possible? I'm a retired New York City detective, and it's very common during an investigation things pop up that you don't normally you want working for you, follow them, right? Of course, things come up that you don't you wouldn't even expect now. Did Molly online stores investigation. I don't know what he could've asked the deputy attorney general took Spanish investigation. He did that another airs. And that's why I want him to testify because the Republicans really need to grill him on this stuff. Why why did you why did you stop? Why did you not look into these other things? Well, you know, it wasn't part of my mandate. Well, why did you ask to expand your mandate? Why did you hire these people when you knew they were partisans? I mean, there's a thousand questions I have for this guy. Don't you former detective, I'm sure you do if he used the time line, it would begin with the Steele dossier that that Hillary paid for excellent point. Excellent. Well, now, we know what have begun even before that when the FBI was in planning spies. And I mean, isn't that shocking to you? I mean, I I read this stuff. I can't believe what I'm reading. I know and I. Tell you what shall I want you to go to my Facebook site or my Twitter site and tell me what you think about that selfie. Just go online and common. Oh, we're not getting home. I will go on the Facebook. I yeah. I don't take south either. And I want to see the picture, but I guess they know Republican Senator didn't mention why President Trump warranted Mullah removed. I mean, I think a majority of the public don't really know why it's because of the the the band of Democrats you make another excellent point, which is this. Why do we give them that that territory, the Democrats and say, well, maybe he should have been removed. One point attorney general bra is going to say that. But it never came to for for. Wishing it just he did make a good point though. He said look if he wanted to remove him because he thinks he was conflicted. That's not a crime. That's not obstructing. That's a great point. And it's true. Chila? I appreciate it, my friend and thank you for your work as a detective, Kim, Tampa, Florida, Sirius satellite. Go. Hi, Mr. Levin. I just think you're awesome. I can't say enough about just plug listening to you. You're just thank you. Thank you for. Thank you, helping us points a real love fest tonight. Thank you. Just the greatest I. I'm sixty one years old. My dad was in my uncle his brother were World War Two vets. And if there's any young this is to get in line if there's any young people out there that are buying the socialist sad like new clothes that are cooled wear. Whatever do your homework and any independence out there. Do your homework, and I'm telling you right now. I mean, I I just can't listen to this bull every day. I mean. It's cousin at Trump is listening. Thank you so much. God bless you. God is is keeping you protected, and you are fight fire. Gonna go down in history as the most amazing president that this country ever. And thank you so much, but do your homework. I mean. There. I just at the point we're getting so fed up. I'm with you. And I don't think these left wing Democrats understand they're playing with political fire their millions of millions of us, and we expected our vote to count. And if you try and disenfranchise us with these phony arguments, and so forth, the will be political consequences. Thank you, my friend. We'll be right back..

Ronald Reagan president Matthew Hillary Clinton attorney Facebook Sirius Donald Trump officer Joe Scarborough producer Mr. Mark Iraq Trump Kansas City FBI New York City President Trump deputy attorney general
The Dangers Of Methane

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

The Dangers Of Methane

"Here's a riddle for your dial. What do one hundred thirty six thousand cows and glacier flowing from an active ice-covered volcano have in common. They both move really slowly I was thinking about the fact that they both release about the same amount of methane per day. At least miss warm out. Scientists calculated that the salt may have cooled glacier in Iceland, which flows from the volcano Cutler releases up to forty one tonnes of methane from Meltwater a day during the summer months. That's a little too specific to make a good riddle on. But that is a surprising amount of methane for microbes to produce beneath the ice. Researchers think the volcano might be helping I the heat from the volcano might be increasing waterflow under the glacier moving the methane out faster. And Secondly, the volcano might be helping the methane stay methane usually when methane comes into contact with oxygen. It's converted to receive to buy methane consuming microbes so in Milwaukee, which has a lot of dissolved oxygen molecules comes into contact with a glacier bed. The methane the microbes produce there is converted to carbon dioxide, but when Meltwater Meese assault who glacier bed it also encounters gases from the volcano those guesses reduce the amount of oxygen in the water. So the methane remains methane as it dissolved in the water and flows out of the glacier fr. From where it can enter the atmosphere and function as a potent greenhouse gas is land in an article or full of his glacier, covered volcanoes. So it's something to keep an eye on. In the meantime, the microbes are complaining this moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don glass and Cassandra.

Meltwater Meese Meltwater Don Glass Iceland Indiana University Milwaukee Assault Forty One Tonnes
"meese" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Great architect Meese Vander. Oh, Seagram building. Yeah. It's where the four seasons used to be. Yes. That's a beautiful building. Yes. I love the secret. Really? Why why so keen on the secrets I'm a big fan of niece Vandross? Okay. Have you ever been to Chicago? A lot of the architecture and Chicago mies van okay? Is a giant in the architectural world. Anyway, the Seagram building is my favorite talk about what they're talking about with this. You know, you don't own the land beneath the Chrysler building the land you have to rent it from union. Wow. That's and last year. It was seven million. Now, it's up to thirty two million twenty eight it goes to forty one million. So that's one of the problems you face when you when you own the Chrysler building, plus all the repairs, you know, it's very costly to fix what's inside. Yeah. It's also inside the they say lot of it is falling apart inside. So renovations are going to cost a ton of money but Chrysler building I feel sorry for the Chrysler building only worth one hundred and fifty million dollars. Hey, go far seat. Now. I saw this report over the weekend. New York City is careening closer to all financial bankruptcy for the first time since bean ran the city forty years ago. All right, tax, fleece, businesses and individuals are leading the city and mass city public spending surges into the stratosphere financial analysts say Gotham is perilously close. Disaster as a one OSA wasn't a mid seventy. So it'll be like the famous post headline from Gerald Ford Ford to city drop dead. Well, that was because the city was bankrupt and it needed a bailout from the federal government and Ford said, no right now, listen this New York state and city are ranked number one in nationwide in state local tax. All right. The top one percent of New York City earners pay more than fifty percent of the city's income tax property taxes rising faster than any other revenue source. I can tell you that because my maintenance, which is my property tax. And it keeps going up and up and up congestion pricing fix all that. No, no, no de Blasios got a crisis looming. And where is he? Laugh it away too. I can fly. Oh my God. Come back. Manono? Don't come back. It's probably better that he's out of the city. We need a Republican in charge of the city. That's what we need another Rudy Giuliani to save us. All right. It's seven thirty. Let's get the news from Noam Laden. Good morning. Good morning. Michael good morning to people dead after an early morning house. Fire Suffolk County broke out about one thirty this morning, north patchy fog at a home on since street detective Lieutenant Kevin Brier says a third person who lives at the home return to the house to discover it was in flames.

New York City Chrysler Seagram Gerald Ford Ford de Blasios Meese Vander Chicago Noam Laden Vandross OSA Rudy Giuliani Gotham New York Suffolk County federal government Kevin Brier Michael
"meese" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"meese" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Two. The. Oh. Gee. Jeez. Meese? Sweat. Away. So. The over third. No.

Meese
"meese" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:36 min | 3 years ago

"meese" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Actually. I think shortly before that interview, she got an operation called deep brain stimulation where they cut a hole in her head, and then put a small electrode in her brain that is controlled by a battery pack that she wears that sounds like a low level pulse to her brain. And she's doing way better because of that. That's good. And yet, and before we started the interview, I said, hey, I'm gonna ask some personal questions to you. And you said, oh, that's alright. She's she's an open book your. Yeah. She's she's an open lady people who don't know her. My mom's great. She's like a really warm loving person. And she worked in hospice when we were growing up, and I think like because of that she everyday would have, you know, difficult conversations about death in about illness with lots of people so growing up death was never like a taboo subject. This was never a taboo subject. So like, she's just this open warm loving person. You're fortunate to have that in. Yeah. It is a taboo subject for most people totally tell me a little bit about how the idea to make this record came up. Well, so my wife's my father-in-law. My wife's father. He also has Parkinson's disease of he's he's older in attendance sort of later stages. And then my mom was diagnosed, and it kinda just seemed like pretty insane to everyone in the family that we had these two very close family members both suffering from this degenerative illness. And it was just something that was kind of like Omni president omnipresent for so many years and. I think the way that it came up with just sort of Meese struggling to find a way to like deal with it in a healthy way. Rather than either bottle it up or just talk about it with my wife. I was able to like actually have a very direct conversation with my mother, and yeah, I wanted to do that. And I think the other thing is like. You know, when you go to visit your parents, you you like my parents live close. So that you only have a couple of hours at a time, and you wanna come in guns blazing just being like, so tell me about your Parkinson's disease. So this was sort of a way for me to explicitly go in and talk with her and say like I wanna talk with you about these things I have these questions, and we're just gonna talk about this. And I think because that was the premise of the conversation it kind of gave us permission to really sort of open up about it. I wish she about it. How was she knowing that you'd be recording? This maybe doing something with it. She was great. I mean to my mom's credit, she's never been one to shy away from tough conversation ever. And when I proposed the idea to her especially her knowing that he was going to be part of a record that was going to get released. She didn't hesitate. She was really great. What were you hoping to get it? Think I was hoping to get. A deeper understanding of what she was going through. And. You know, it's tough when somebody you know, is going through a difficult illness because you see the way they handle that illness, and obviously that's a very personal thing for them. But you also can't help but think to yourself certain things you would do differently. And I mean, obviously, no one wants to be told what to do especially by their son. So I think this was a opportunity for me to ask her what she's going through to like for her to tell me how she's how her view of herself has changed through the lens of this illness. But then also for me to say like you've been doing this in this in this. And I found this very difficult for these reasons can you talk to me about that. And I think that was one of the big things that I was hoping to get from it is just like answers. But also be in a situation where there was like very open dialogue without feeling constrained. It's one thing to have those conversations though. It's another thing too. I would put this like listen back to it. You know, having having it first of all is hard enough. But then you have to listen back to where countless countless countless times. And I think what was really interesting listening back to it was like listening back was the good part. When I listen to these interviews, I think so much of the time like it was a dialogue rather than just a street interview. So I was jumping in and saying like, why are you doing these things I think this is so crazy like how can you think about yourself in this way? When really you're like this, and then that happened and then listening back forced me to not insert myself into the conversation anymore. I was able to just listen to her answers and sit with them in digest them. And I think in general I can learn to shut up a lot more than I did. We all can we all can do that for. Yeah. But then sitting with her answers, I think that gave me a lot of clarity and peace to where like just recognizing. I'm never going to change her nothing. I can do can change. Illness or change the way she decides to handle her illness. And I think sitting with her answers her gave me a bit of permission to just say, okay? I've heard what she has to say. And I'm cool with that. Because that's her journey. And then I'm just sort of be there for her and love her, and yeah, I just understood what she was going through a lot more. Let's let's take a listen to a little bit more. Some..

Illness Parkinson Meese Omni president
Melissa Seaman- Following the Universe with Strategy

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

13:46 min | 3 years ago

Melissa Seaman- Following the Universe with Strategy

"Coming up today on the nice guys on business. I think that we all have genius at flows through us when we're when we're open and we're ready and we're staying in that flow state. Surely the can't be serious. They are, but don't call them Shirley. Meet an education on how to grow your business. The nice guys are here to help learn about great customer service networking and how just being nice can help you prosper. Now here all your host, Doug Sandler and Strickland Bonner. We're going to take a little bit of a walk on the woo side today. That's actually how I started my intro for you, and I'm like exactly, but I'm okay with starting a little bit on the Woodside see guy community. Melissa semen was interested me about a year ago and let me say this. She's fucking legit. Okay. I know. I know. I know. I know. I know we have some nonbelievers in our community, and I would have to say that. So recently I was probably I was probably one of them, but and then I realized the universe works in some serious fucked up mysterious ways and Melissa's gonna share at just spent about five minutes talking to her about all of the of the mysterious ways. The universe actually comes collectively to you, and I know you're going to get into his also some Melissa's about to share with our funky bands, the ways in which those ways those mysterious ways can actually come to life. But everything about Wu is what Melissa, at least in the beginning. I thought she was not. I mean, reading your bio and then getting to be a friend of hers and then getting understand it a little bit. She's af Stanford educated lawyer, business strategist, and. Leaders leader and dumb. She's gonna, discuss this thing called your soul gift. And again, if there's anybody out there, I want you just that does not believe or even if you do believe, just fuck you for just one second. Okay. Just to sit back for just a minute, just roll down your window of skepticism, just enough so that these next fifteen twenty minutes that than I are gonna talk will allow some bit of of of, I guess, knowledge let it bake in for just a moment. I'm gonna talk about Melissa's going to talk about what a soul gift is what your soul gift is, what your genius is. Stay tuned. She's here. She's gotta get forty at the end of his episode. Also what that was like. One of the most fucked up enter introductions, but you know, Melissa, you're so much more worthy of that. I could hit stop right now and do it all over again, but I don't think we want to. I think we should just roll or anything yet channelling baby channel. Okay. Well, let's start there because actually that was my first question I had written down is like, what am I gonna talk to Melissa about? I know I've had you on our Biswas podcast or we have had some conversations and I took your your soul gift challenge and we're gonna share with people how they can do that too, but what is challenging channeling? What a challenging, what is channeling? Can we start there to begin with challenging about are challenging right now? You know. I like you say, I'm an ex lawyer write a recovering lawyer, and I work with a lot of professionals late. I work with Silicon Valley executives. They work with company founders and and so for me like the whole woo thing at first when I got going with the wou I was now is not so much for it. But where I'm at now is we can put the stuff to work for us and it can support the bottom line. It can make stuff clearer. So the big challenge, I would say with channeling as people think it's something weird truth is the most brilliant company founders innovators, high end professional people that I work with, they are following their gut. They are getting into their flow state. They are following, you know, that sort of mysterious intelligence that moves through them without thinking too hard. Yeah. I look at the that voice that inner. The voice, and I just say, how can it not be? How could that not be something like channeling? If it's not if we don't call it channeling on our side, if we call it our inner genius, if we call it that gut instinct, we call them in that inside voice that whatever it is that you call it nice guy community. You can call channeling. You can call it your inner voice, whatever the fuck you call it, it just know that it's it's not just a blank stare stare staring at you. This is actually an energy force it's coming through you. Well, yeah, I only have to convince anybody anything because I just ask a couple questions like, you know, have you had that moment where you're standing in the shower and you finally unwind, and then suddenly that problem you've been noodling on for days the answer just downloads like, ooh, where the heck did that come from? And it might be an answer that you wouldn't have even thought of. It might be an idea that when people say, how'd you get that idea? You shrug and think, I don't think it is my idea. I don't know where it came from and I would say, well, that's that. That's what I'm pointing to is the fact that we're all. These, you know, on a good day, I think we're kind of empty hoses that we allow something really great to come

Melissa Melissa Seoul Meese Center Melissa Zemun Austin Texas Steve O'brien Steven Brian Executive WU Regina DAN Two Minutes Four Years