33 Burst results for "Meese"

What Is Populism?

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 1 d ago

What Is Populism?

"So what is populism Were the revolutionary supporters of populism Doesn't mean we the people Doesn't mean the majority How do we know what the majority want By voting for candidates or against candidates Well that's every two years What if our views change in the meantime And who is it that determine But the majority wants Who is it that determines What's populist In terms of policy The working people the middle class they say Marx used to talk about classes but as I told you before van meese's pointed out or mes He never defined it In a redefined What do we mean by this The march has always talked about the people The revolutions are always for the people People like Joe Biden always talk about democracy and the people What do they mean by the people and democracy The way our constant solution is set up with divided powers three branches really a fourth the bureaucracy as well How do we know What the people want and how do we execute an institute the people's will

Van Meese Marx Joe Biden
"meese" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:22 min | 1 d ago

"meese" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Were the revolutionary supporters of populism? Doesn't mean we the people? Doesn't mean the majority? How do we know what the majority want? By voting for candidates or against candidates? Well, that's every two years. What if our views change in the meantime? And who is it that determine? But the majority wants. Who is it that determines? What's populist? In terms of policy. The working people the middle class they say. Marx used to talk about classes, but as I told you before, van meese's pointed out or mes. He never defined it. In a redefined. What do we mean by this? The march has always talked about the people. The revolutions are always for the people. People like Joe Biden always talk about democracy and the people. What do they mean by the people and democracy? The way our constant solution is set up with divided powers, three branches, really a fourth, the bureaucracy as well. How do we know? What the people want and how do we execute an institute, the people's will. It's a little more complicated, isn't it, America? When we talk about unalienable rights, does it matter what the majority thinks? Does it matter what's populist or not? Due to unalienable rights, given to us by God. There's nothing to do with populism. Does it? What is capitalism? At bottom, what is capitalism? Capitalism is your freedom. To use your intellectual and physical labor. To use your brain power or your labor power. To make something to create something to produce something to acquire something. If that is taken away or it is in a significant way interfered with, by the government, then you're no longer free. You only have so much time on this earth, right? And you spend a lot of it at work, don't you? Well, that's why you work. To acquire things, whether it's food and a home, whether it's heat, or air conditioning, or whether it's great wealth, whatever it is it is. So what's populism? Well, the government should be used to help working people. Working people, yes, working people. Everybody thinks they're working person. Don't they? Except those who are on the doll and they could care less. But all the people who work, if you don't earn a lot of money, that doesn't mean you're not a working person. If you're working, if you aren't a modicum of money, that doesn't mean you're not a working person, you're working. If you make enormous sums of money, that doesn't mean you're not a working person, you're still working. So what's a working person? And what do we mean by middle class? Now, the government sets it up very neatly. In order to turn one group against another by grouping us, but what's this middle class stuff that comes straight from Marx? Although he doesn't define it. And he was challenged often, by the way. And he was caught because he says, well, there's subclasses. But he would never define it. So it is a mirage, isn't it? Set up for tax purposes set up for political purposes to turn one American against another. Hatred is a very powerful force. Jealousy is a very powerful force. It's also a distraction. It's intended to create resentment. So what is populism? What populism is the opposite of corporatism? And it sounds to me that populism is about government. Government. Now what is conservatism? I wrote a whole book on it. It's called liberty and tyranny. Conservatism is not merely an economic model. It's a way of living. Populism is not a way of living. Populism can't even be defined in any coherent or illogical way. And one populist won't agree with another popularist and when I hear Josh hawley talk about it or others who attempt to write about it, but not particularly intelligent or substitute of about what they're writing. It just sounds like a soft socialism to me. Programs to help the middle class

van meese Marx Joe Biden America Josh hawley
The Impact of Reagan Conservatives

Mark Levin

01:34 min | Last month

The Impact of Reagan Conservatives

"But this has always been the approach Of Reagan conservatives traditional Conservatives again do not confuse people who sit at think tanks and spit out white papers Or write columns to The Wall Street Journal of national review With movement conservatism look at what the court's done What do you think Sam Alito came from Came from the Reagan administration What do you think Scalia came from before he passed from the Reagan administration Where did Robert bork come from the Reagan administration It was the Reagan administration that started the whole judicial pushback against the activism that had taken place in the 60s the 70s and into the 80s Led by Ed meese the attorney general So don't burn the bridges down Rachel The things we can do and we should do We should learn from the successes But I think most of the complaint here while people are trying to be very philosophical about it isn't about philosophy And it isn't about even politics It's about getting strong patriots in the right position so they'll get something done

Reagan Administration Sam Alito Reagan Robert Bork The Wall Street Journal Ed Meese Scalia Rachel Patriots
The Infamous Lost Suitcases of Lawrence Walsh

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 4 months ago

The Infamous Lost Suitcases of Lawrence Walsh

"And I was handling the representation of then the former attorney general Edward meese the iron countryman And as I was doing my research and over the transom came information That the independent counsel at that time Lawrence Walsh who was a real hateful in my view diabolical individual since deceased That he violated the espionage act Among other laws Here's a man who took the most secret classified information involving a foreign country As well as grand jury information put it in two suitcases mister producer As he was flying from Washington D.C. to the West Coast to question then president Reagan Checked those two suitcases as luggage And when he landed at LAX guess what The two suitcases never came out They came out on the carousel that goes round and round in your waiting They waited and they waited and nothing happened It was all secret and under the radar The FBI went on a secret mission for two weeks to find those documents You know where they found them mister producer They never did

Edward Meese Lawrence Walsh Washington D.C. President Reagan West Coast FBI
NY Times' Jeremy Peters Is Back for Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 4 months ago

NY Times' Jeremy Peters Is Back for Mark Levin

"And apparently there's a photo of Donald Trump and me at a Medal of Freedom event For former attorney general Edwin meese And under the photo the statement is the radio host Mark Levin with Donald J Trump at a White House ceremony in 2019 mister Levin is scoffed at the notion that mister Trump has tried to overturn the election Now mister Levin has stopped at the notion that mister Trump led an insurrection Our created a crime Right so after the January 6 committee's final summer hearing last week talk on the sets of CNN and MSNBC turned to an intriguing of familiar possibility About what might result from the panel's finding I think he means findings The case for a criminal prosecution of former president Donald J Trump many pundits said was not only justified but seemed more than likely given the evidence of his inaction as rioters sacked the capital That's because as he points out he's a contributor to MS LSD and that's the world they live in There's many pundits who say no But none of them recited of course If that felt like deja vu more productions of mister Trump's looming downfall the response to the hearings from the pro Trump platforms Felt like something new reflecting the lengths to which his praetorian guard isn't that funny how he steals that phrase from me mister

Mister Trump Mister Levin Donald J Trump Edwin Meese Mark Levin Donald Trump White House Msnbc CNN
"meese" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"meese" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Air is stuffy here, the cod's tightly packed the posters on the wall urge recent arrivals to tell investigators what they know, but just a few have come forward to talk. More than 4 million Ukrainian refugees have crossed the Polish border since the Russian invasion of their country, only 1000 have given testimony so far, according to Poland's prosecutor, not a single rape survivor has come forward. Doctor Raphael kusak has treated some of the Ukrainian survivors in his Warsaw clinic, he says it takes time to heal the body and the mind. I'm almost sure even if this war ends tomorrow. And all trials will start in a year. I don't think they will be volunteers. I want to talk about it. We will have to wait long, long time. So history will judge. History has some lessons for Ukraine. In the waning days of World War II, historians say Russian troops, the Red Army, raped more than 2 million German women. Bridget meese kept her wartime memory secret for decades, she is now 92 years old. I don't believe it myself, but somehow I got here. And I just go on as I can. She was 15 in those little chaotic days of the war, as allied armies swept across a defeated Germany. If you asked me where I was when the war stopped, I was there where nobody wanted to be. Under the Russians. Why do you think nobody wanted to be? I mean, we had done such absolutely cruel things. To the Russians that cruelty was repaid, she believes mass rapes were revenge, taken out on the bodies of German women. The Russian army to do what they wanted to do the Germans. Did you see them do whatever they wanted to the Germans when the Russians came? Well, of course, I was also once violated. She didn't talk about her assault at the time, for years mass rapes were an open secret in Germany, a few reported it fewer still wanted to know about it. In Russia, the topic remains toxic to this day, publicly called a western myth. Nice, only published her first an account two years ago in a German magazine. My summer of 1945. And I just wrote it down. You know the rape was part of it. I wasn't ashamed. It was done to me. Luckily only once, and as it seemed part of the whole story, I was telling the generation who knows the whole story is dwindling. Were your children shocked to know my daughter was shocked and I told her listen it didn't really mean very much at the time because it was happening all over the place. But I mean she insists that I was traumatized so that I think it. Here

Raphael kusak Warsaw clinic Bridget meese Red Army Poland Ukraine Germany Russian army German magazine Russia
The Disloyal Culture of the Republican Party

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 5 months ago

The Disloyal Culture of the Republican Party

"But it's the culture of the Republican Party I want to address this evening What is the culture I have never seen so many disloyal people in any organization Corporate labor clubs associations what have you The Republican Party is filled With so many So many disloyal individuals it's unbelievable They write these books if you're having served close to the president of the United States in this case I'll say Donald Trump They leak they they and grand eyes themselves enrich themselves they want to be celebrated by the people who have attacked their boss and the bosses have administration or the boss's office or what have you And there's so many examples I don't have enough time to cite them all And it's an amazing thing I watch this having served 8 years in the Reagan administration Several years his chief of staff to attorney general meese As deputy solicitor the interior department as associate director of presidential personnel as principal deputy assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education I never leaked against any of my bosses I never wrote essays or books anonymously or with my name against any of them

Republican Party Donald Trump Attorney General Meese United States Reagan Administration Interior Department
The Criminalization of Policy Differences With Paul Kengor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:01 min | 6 months ago

The Criminalization of Policy Differences With Paul Kengor

"Paul, as somebody born here, did you ever expect to see a political adversary of an administration who hasn't killed anybody, is not a drug lord, be handcuffed at Reagan airport and put in leg irons to be physically transported by the federal agents to hinckley's cell in the bowels of the FBI. Did you did you think that was ever possible? Yeah, it's really shocking, isn't it? And Hank Lee sell right about the time that hinckley has been released recently released. It was unconditional release. Here we are 41 years after he shot Ronald Reagan. And what bothers me too is, in fact, taking this back to, well, again, the Reagan years, it was with the Iran contra hearings, trying to think who used this term at the time. It might have been Ed meese, who talked about the criminalization of policy differences. Yes. And this is something that the liberals have been doing. And in fact, here, it grows city college just this past week. We had one of our fellows in the institute for faith and freedom, Jay cost. And I know you've read Jake costs, he writes for RealClearPolitics, Washington examiner, national review. He's an expert on James Madison. And he was talking about Madison and the art of compromise. And how politics people make fun of politics being all about compromise, but really that's kind of a virtue of politics in a democracy is that you do have compromise. So parties learn how to compromise and their differences. In fact, Ronald Reagan in 1981, August 13th, 1981, got his enormous federal income tax passed with tip O'Neill and the Democrats overwhelmingly controlling the House of Representatives. The Washington Post called it the most remarkable example of bipartisan cooperation in politics in generations.

Reagan Airport Hinckley Hank Lee Ed Meese Institute For Faith And Freedo Ronald Reagan FBI Paul Reagan Iran James Madison Jake JAY Madison Washington Neill House Of Representatives The Washington Post
Dinesh Reflects on His Time as an Intern for Ronald Reagan

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Dinesh Reflects on His Time as an Intern for Ronald Reagan

"It's time for our next question. Listen. Hey mister de Souza, my question is, what was it like being an intern for Reagan? And what special memories do you have of him? So in the Reagan White House, I was actually very lucky to at a young age coming as a domestic policy analyst. So I wasn't really an intern and I only say this because of course interns have no access to the president. You have to be on staff and you have to be at least at the middle level. I wasn't at the top level. And so my direct interactions with Reagan were modest. Only a few times did I get to stand in the back of the room along with other staffers. We had our notepads in those days. And the senior staff was right around the table. People like Pat Buchanan or Ed meese, and later the chief of staff was Howard baker. And the senior staff would interact with Reagan, but the rest of us got to stand in the back of the room and observe and take notes and then afterward offer comment to our own teams. In my case, the domestic policy team. So it was a thrill for me because I was in my mid 20s. I think I was I joined the Reagan White House in 1987. So this was in the latter part, the second term of Reagan, of course, during the first time oregano and I was in college. But and I had this big fallacious office in the old executive office building. I mean, an absolutely giant office with a bar and but the real power, by the way, is not in the old executive office building. It's in the west wing, where the office is a much smaller, but you're literally with an earshot of the president. So you have more direct access to him that

Reagan Mister De Souza Ed Meese White House Howard Baker Pat Buchanan
Best of Mark Levin: A Letter to Rep. Kevin McCarthy to Remove Rep. Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Best of Mark Levin: A Letter to Rep. Kevin McCarthy to Remove Rep. Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger

"Now I want to read you something a letter to Kevin McCarthy From a number of very important conservatives and conservatives in some cases that run conservative organizations In the letter is signed by among others former attorney general led meese In a variety of others cancun former attorney general of Virginia Tony Perkins president of family research counsel Brent bozell the media research center and I could go on and on and on These are very very important people Been around a little while you know And here's the letter that they sent to Kevin McCarthy The underside conservatives asked that the House Republican conference act immediately to remove to remove Both representative lives Cheney and representative adding king singer from the Republican conference due to their egregious actions As part of the House of Representatives January 6th select committee Sure I wear this committee as no formal representation from Republicans Both representatives chaney and king singers serve at the request of the House speaker Nancy Pelosi As part of Pelosi's team representatives chaney and king singer have deliberately sought to undermine the privacy and due process of their fellow Republicans And those of private citizens within properly issued subpoenas and other investigatory tactics designed not to pursue any valid legislative end But merely to exploit for the sake of political harassment and demagoguery The actions of representatives training and king singer on behalf of House Democrats have given supposedly bipartisan justification to an overtly partisan political

Kevin Mccarthy Meese Brent Bozell Tony Perkins Media Research Center Chaney King Singer Virginia Cheney House House Of Representatives Nancy Pelosi Pelosi King House Democrats
"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

Thought Row

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

"They're missing out on themselves. That's absolutely right. It's one of the things I love about my work because of course everybody is different, even two people who on the face of it are doing the same job in a similar sort of organization. There's lots of nuances that mean that they're not the same. They don't do things in the same way. So no, every client is a fresh opportunity. There's always something for me to learn as well. And I never know at the start of the process exactly where it's going to lead with that person. No, I would think that. So it's certainly what keeps things completely fresh from my point of view, which is fantastic. It's a real privilege. Yeah, it's exciting. So exciting. So what led you on this career path and has it been rewarding to you consistently? It's a good question. Well, I'll try and keep the summary of how I landed on this career path as brief as I can because it does go back quite a way. So if I go back right to the very start of my career, my first job was as a personal assistant at managing director in a firm of management consultants. So that was the very start of me doing lots of written work taking notes taking minutes. Lots of keyboard skills required. So that was the very start. And I learned an awful lot doing that. I then made a move into sales, which was a real departure for me and not particularly something that's enjoyed, but it was sales within the world of print and back then it was traditional print, not digital print that hadn't even been invented when I arrived when I was in that world. But getting involved in the world of print led to me ultimately becoming a production manager in a firm of graphic designers, which was down in London. I had about 8 years living down in London. And part of my role, I promised this will make sense to you at the end. Part of my role there was to schedule all the elements of every job that went through the agency. So for instance, they created glossy brochures for people polite BMW, big names, and my job was to find the people to create those brochures. So it was a photographer. It was a copy writer. It was a printer. And in the course of me doing that, I had a particular agency that I used to source people when there weren't enough people in house. And I used to regularly speak to the lovely owner a lady called letitia who was fantastic. And when I eventually decided I wanted to move on from that role, I rang her because she was a recruitment consultant. She invited me to go into talk to her and she said, Judith, from the first air spoke to you, I thought there's somebody who should be working in recruitment. I've got a job for you. If you wanted to, she offered me a job on the spot, and I just know that it would suit you. And I thought, well, I've got nothing to lose. That does sound really exciting. I could see myself doing that. So that was the very first step into the world of recruitment. And that was back in 19 95. So working in recruitment, that eventually led to me working with senior executives. It was executive recruitment. I was trained as a headhunter. So I was going out to market and finding managing directors, CEOs, COOs, finance directors, you name it. Sourcing them for my clients as part of that process. I always would rewrite somebody's CV. If there were a great candidate, but the CV let them down, to me, it made sense for me to rewrite it because it was much easier for me to then represent them to my client rather than me just saying, trust me that they're fantastic. If I could provide a really tip top CV as well, it made that much easier. And I used to get into terrible trouble for it because the people I worked for weren't allowed to charge for that. But I would say, but did that? If that makes it easier for me to place them and then you get the fee. It just made sense to me. Right. So that was the start of me getting involved in writing CVs working with senior executives. So then when I ultimately set up my own business, which was 2005, and at the start of that, it was still in recruitment, but then gradually over a period of time, it translated into I so loved the CV writing part of that. That was the start of it evolving into the service, which I now deliver today. Wow. That is so interesting. But I have to say yes. It's so creative Judith. To take people's lives, work lives, and make it in a way that's sellable, but yet they can understand what that person has done with their life. Their work life is really so creative and so important. I suspect there's a lot of motivation involved here too. You have to my next question was going to be related to CVs that you covered that quite well. And in the process, though of telling people how they might move from one career to another career, does it require you motivating them? I mean, is it a black and white thing? They go look, I don't want to do this anymore. Could you find something else for me? Or do you have to sit there and say, hey, you know what, if you don't take a chance now you never will. To know every client is different, every client is different. And some clients come to me and they are very clear on what they want next. But they're not sure how to position themselves. So they know what they want to do, but they don't quite know how to get there. Quite a lot of clients, however, come to me, and they know they're not happy. They can't necessarily put their finger on what it is that isn't right. They want something to change. They don't want to jump from the frying pan into the fire by going somewhere else. And that's the reason that those people come to me. And then my process helps them to recognize the things that have been either troubling them or undermining them. Whatever the reason is, it starts to bring that clarity. And that simply comes from asking a lot of questions. And for me, an awful lot of listening. My clients talk an awful lot more than I do. So I listen to what they're saying and then I'm able to hone in on a particular thing and say, I notice, you know, when you were talking about this thing, you know, I noticed that your energy dropped you looked more concerned. You know, it has that been troubling you. All sorts of things come out of that process, but.

London Judith letitia CVs COOs BMW CEOs
"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

Thought Row

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Thought Row

"We're excited to have you as a guest. Entirely. Okay. Judith before we start our interview, we always like to ask our guests what they had for breakfast. I know it's been a little bit of a time for you because you're at the end of the day. What did you have? I can still remember. So breakfast for me is probably the most random meal that I have. I have all sorts of different things for breakfast, but today I had smashed avocado on whole meal toast with a glass of apple juice and a coffee. Oh, that sounds very nice. Avocado toast is always delicious. That's one of our favorites. And we live in an area of avocados. You wouldn't know it by the prices. That's true. That's true. So where are you talking to us from today? Exactly. Okay, so I'm in the UK. I live in a small town called long Eaton. And it's between Nottingham and Derby, which are two cities right in the middle of the UK. Oh, how nice. And specifically, I work from home, so I'm sitting in my conservatory at my desk with my piano behind me. That might be more specific than you were wanting. That was great. I have to ask you, do you play the piano then? Yes. I don't know the way discovered that about you. I do play the piano. And the cello. I completely. Yes. We'll have to talk about discuss that. Well, no, I have a question actually right now. Did you have siblings, right? Yes, okay? And then with your siblings, did you have your own little band where you would perform way actually, we did. So it was my mom who was at the heart of the music in our family. My mom incredibly musical studied music at university was a music teacher. I can not teach a church organist a violent super talented, so we all learn to play the piano from a very early age. I've got two sisters, all three of us learned to play when we were four years old, 5 years old, and then as we got a bit older, we all played various instruments. So I played the cello, my middle sister plays the flute piccolo, saxophone, you name it, far too talented for her own good. My oldest my oldest sister played the guitar, my aunt played the violin. So we did used to have a little mini orchestra in our dining room and quite often got together to play, which was fantastic. It must have been lovely at Christmas times. Oh, lovely. Absolutely lovely. And my mom being a church organist, she was the mistress as well. So we quite often have the entire choir squeeze into squeezed into our dining room singing carols or hymns or whatever else. So very lucky. What a fun household. Where did you guys grow up? We grew up actually not far from where I am now. So my whole family are Nottingham born and bred. So I live on the other side of the city now to where I grew up. But yes, not that far away. I'm going to have a question for you, but I want to make one comment about your skill as a pianist, do you perform anywhere? No I don't. I did used to, and a growing up we were in the school orchestra, my middle sister and I went to a music school on a Saturday on the part of various orchestras. And we used to perform back then, but as is quite common, I think the older you get the rest of us the rest of life gets in the way. And I just never had the time to commit. And if you're going to perform, it takes a good deal of time, keeping your skills up to that level. So I have to say, I moved away from that. My middle sister performs in lots of different ways, but I don't anymore. I just play for my own amusement. Oh, nice. That's the best. You're a transition coach and not everyone knows exactly what a transition coach does. In fact, I learned quite a bit just from going over your website and our initial chat that engine I had with you in the very, I don't know a few weeks ago. So Judith tell us exactly what a transition coach is or what they do. Well, it's not surprising that you didn't particularly know what a transition coach is and not many people do because it's what I would describe as something of a hybrid role so typically people may well have heard of a career coach. That is part of what I do, but as a transition coach, as the name somewhat implies, I help my clients transition from being in one role to another. And sometimes that's from one job to another, sometimes it can involve changing from one sector to another. And in making that change there's an awful lot that is involved. So some of my coaching work is helping my clients to understand what is the change that they want to bring. Why do they want a new role? What is it that they enjoy? What do they not enjoy? What do they believe their strengths are? What happens in awful lot is most of my clients, if not all of them have skills which they haven't recognized as being skilled or things which they've taken for granted because they've done them for years and don't necessarily realize that it's something special that they're bringing. So a lot of the transition coaching part of what I do is uncovering those skills helping them to really have the clarity of what they want next and why that is what they want. And that then becomes the foundation of how I can help them through the rest of the process that I take them through. So there's almost sometimes an element of it almost it can be counseling. When you take people through a process which is going to bring a lot of change, it can bring up all sorts of emotions and insecurities and fears and concerns and all of those things are addressed through the process. So the transition coaching piece, it's very much at the start of the process, but it is woven through the whole thing. Thank you for that. Wow. The reminds me about you playing the piano. You've transitioned from that. Well, that's a good analogy. That's a good analogy to draw. You know, that's so amazing because you have so many avenues of helping people by being a transition coach. Meaning you're not only just doing basically matching a job to something that they might find more fulfilling, but also you're helping this person transition. That's a human and identify what maybe.

Nottingham Judith UK Eaton Derby apple
"meese" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on TNCnow

"Really or going. Because he know by experience nor now by you'll seniors final Now your noise you need. Stash is offered innovate thirty by though if combined with a slow woman alphabet into which are just luggage. Excellent the whole lot seems britain at all of them up at will let me now. Dubai only thought of anymore fee beneath the Even a mentor. because he's watching women and those nevada getting by the support second of us using using often approach dos and adopt me anna. Losing anyway Bug song behind them businessman. Dial assembly behalf mentors elegant among of feet nevada up up with yuba Adorn an implementer. Niece open that ethically line is doing said that in hundreds of the lobi nine. Any new are less teaching snow in eastern long but earn visa school. Those at over our main for was the cosa at it window. They've got the is the center of every being so we are. We are less now guy neo an epithelial our lawn in you. Finally not in key astonishing on the value of a young invented an one hour every day. Now i i know that we have very face or some like that if you could share the vis through in any last words are message for our viewers meese meet yes Thank you thank you so much charm for having me. Thank you the new channel. It's reading pleasure to be here. Speaking a lot of our listeners. Our our viewers the your followers mechanical especially the charm. A love you own message. Everybody so at the foggy always hear eat meant that we have to be grateful with what you have in be contended that ended up by be grateful to what you have in beacon vending. I strongly agree. I strongly agree that we have to be grateful to what we have because we are in a borrowed time. What do i mean by that. We are not gonna tear earth davao on our lives to be wayne snap of guides fingers so we are in a borrowed time so we have to live our life to the fullest again. Be grateful oil. We have the attitude of gratitude. Gallon thankful comedy. Gato adult make by media coming in. Great booby glumly neon. You have to be great for On bended on that matter. 'save yes you have to be good than than on material things probably better. Let's not be connected domestic being counted on what you have but not be contented on what you can give so. I think the Abou we're because i have i am in a michelin tire. I am in a mission helping many people so e-content bark Said who less sky. You have the blessed people but you have we the outbreak Doesn't necessarily mean money the by a mortgage with your wisdom your help. That could be a great blessing many by security on ina message gopher those dreamers opportunity seekers looking for your whole knowledge again. Do anything that you want. You just have to remember that there will be times along your bath that you will see No annual having a hard time at cherish if that will be part of your sweet story and of course not doesn't matter how or where you on voidable is to start say at the end of the day. You are way ahead Those people who don't even try who don't even are so i am now you don't be contented to what you can give led by laminating. Im send helium orlando. Are you part of the solution in this funding. Nick are are you part of the problem. So i hope all of us are choosing to be a part of the solution now back so move now the by in weekend succeed together as one gandhi the volume government alum kandari. Doing their very best. But we also have the are very big eighty survived. This is because we can. We can come out alive in this crisis Blank with a guy is left. Your dreams date light Daniel beacon dead you justifying your situation. Donald who did exhausting frightened because our in our comfort zone. So i'm going to get off from their movement by a goiter. The bursts on that goal is not for your says you leave were on their Especially for your family. So you long vegas on which everybody my name again is. Mitch eland bow in really hoping and praying for you that you can let your dreams flight godless. While over again. I value. But i will give you a chance to plan your business or would you like to invite them ever Invitation to them and also by the way by died after those people accurate and want to try and really went on for your whole on land will be business jazz missing Alcohol adversity just. Don't hesitate to ask me help you educate you. We could mentor you and everything that you want to learn idei missile t think. Thank the plug. Yes yes please go your instagram accounts. Everybody anti at That's m. i c. H. e. c. o. y. That's my instagram account. They will begin. Finally i also have my own youtube channel. So it's been very very new will be supporting the as of course it's under many msci length also our presentations in discussions about our us on a business is kinda happening every single night so you can just see message as and just take a look at one hurt. Though by at the end of the ongoing moist. Learn something in this. Danny because if you learn something new in this fund that mix having any landau. You're missing not so thank you so much. Everybody.

Dial assembly nevada meese Dubai davao anna britain kandari Daniel beacon wayne Mitch eland orlando Nick Donald vegas youtube Danny landau
"meese" Discussed on Mala Wielka Firma

Mala Wielka Firma

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Mala Wielka Firma

"Dish. Meow in shape divided the new york. Show 'cause i walked each other moslem yet the quad near meow. She kw become If he's not logan the chicago bull. Shit bob boys poop recipes Ninety new jam who haji go Usher not to talk to them. The soviets suburban atlanta not all israeli. Peru's nash shed yet. Spot-on for blogger shabyah. Jj perspective thought social renewal. There's your social bravo are actually foia millennia. Foyer not again the patsy that they are the country's puts your schmooze nikki blow actually Autumn them will Vm officials all's also with Go to raise your class yet. Becky go absolute attack to the terrorist. Murder is doug ignazio. Oliva told us cover demonize you probably delays To g zulu gape obata. The chargers saturday die eucalyptus is done in a few salvatore taught to go navy is not being shows to goto. Vhs zia To remove maher is little bit muslim of fiscal. the glacier them no oshawa thome slalom bats. Cooper don't Thermodynamics provide the hosoi properly spicy Benchtop as paseo Passed as i'm Insert moist Engaged Trash not only the maslova. Steamy swims battle. Ten nano couple fought. Clutter ball what. Would i resist finding gypsy of needs to get upset so on police minister konitz stick proactive tutor. The bearish extra hold on. Just wishy tour if they my body exit we honest meeting meese glass to me on of polack measure now show me and soviet that is leah some tobin the neons voiced He said he's That goes Tiny issue at Sports nausea to you Vince about Is apple still army. The go-to Poma.

shabyah doug ignazio logan Peru Oliva atlanta nikki chicago Becky new york zia chargers maher konitz stick navy Cooper meese tobin leah nausea
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"If you'll be paying attention to you. I mean it's it's mind boggling. I mean there are people who are paid ten thousand dollars to post a picture of himself on instagram wearing a specific pair of shoes because their attention brokers not because their business moguls or because they have some kind of patents on something. It's because they have people's attention and so that's what's gonna make the difference in the coming economy is if you have people's attention energy willing to own that keep that by becoming curator love the analogy of the curators and and you know you see people wearing different kinds of things and monetize ing you know the use of brand in a way to To basically highlight another brand. And it's it's interesting to watch the dynamics of all of this and you know real quick before we wrap up. The bookstore analogy and in canada The main bookstores indigo or chapters and in their store in most stores are usually two levels. And i would say about fifty percent of the door or the store is actual books. The rest of it is you know. Notebooks in paper and household type items coffee you know type of accessories and all of that so they they're not just a bookstore. They got all kinds of things but one of the things as far as books are concerned is their ceo. A her name is heather so in the main entrance of their store. They have this. Big banner is heather's picks and it's a series of ten maybe twenty books in all the books they have that are her picks and they're usually discounted a little bit And there are a lot of people that will go month after month in by what. How their recommence. Because they know who she is and the the other sand recommended. It's at barnes and noble. Should it if they haven't. I haven't been in being in a while but no but here's the thing the difference because barnstable has something like that. But the barnes and noble thing is like it's like barnes and nobles favorites who's barnes and noble person. We know that when we we automatically assume he's he's barnes and noble like it'll say recommended reads and we're like oh so these are the ones that you want us to buy to make you a bunch of money. Going to say something i love the brilliance of that where it says heather's banks because all of a sudden it's like whether or not you know the ceo of the bookstore chain. She's real human being and you connect that with the name and in. She's front and center and she does a lot of different things so people that are familiar with the chain. Know who she is. And it makes such a big difference and she's thriving and people that go in that store thrive because they they know what it takes for them to be able to thrive so john of loved this conversation. Congratulations again on the book. So where can you find out more about you. In the saas marketing go to survive and thrive dot com. This is brandon. Book just came out and you know it's already been number one bestseller direct marketing marketing for small business..

heather barnes barnstable canada john brandon
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"The quality of the material is the difference in access. It's that it's that it gives the consumers control. Say you know what you get to choose when you engage with what content And so that's a shift. That's another example of the shift from the age of information to the age of insight. So what think. What do you think snacks. What do you think the next shift is In business. I mean obviously insight is going to be the big thing but where where some industries you think and this big question but let me narrow down What do you think what industries do you think are going to be able to thrive In the shift to an insight type of world and are there any of the think might have some challenges at least in the short term. Sure so the first thing i will say is that the age of it said is just beginning. So it'll take decades really for us to move into this era and so the first thing that happens is right away. People's the demand for curator's has already has already risen more than the supply in other words. People are looking for you. Someone out there to be their go to guru on one hundred subjects about their life. I mean that's a. That's a characteristic of the age of inside is that i don't wanna read twenty articles about twenty different types of dress shirts that i should wear. I want one person. I trust on instagram or in an email newsletter to tell me what three shirts i should buy right now and that's true in almost every industry and every decision. You know that like we're all looking for like that person. Tell us okay. What's the one thing. I should do to lose weight. Or what's the one thing. I should do to run faster. If that's important to you right. The only things that are important to you that you actually wanna to root for but you know you want someone that you trust to tell you. You know how to prepare your meals or how to take care of your spouse or your children and so there's all this demand religious pick a targeted group of people who have real problems. They care about that. He'd solutions for at become the provider to them. And so i think that's i think that's just beginning and that'll be a shift. That will take a long time to really continue to max out. This is a big bluish over here. So that's exciting. The second thing i would say is that what the shift to the Age of insight also simultaneously and related is another shift to what some economists call the attention economy. Now there's a economist wanna nobel prize for coming up with the terminology and I don't remember his name. Tom ahead but he's wonderful but the attention economy is just this horrible thing that if you ever took econ one if you've ever even heard of economics or finance you've probably heard of supply and demand right. There's two things. Markets are made up of supply and demand if there's a and it's supply demand connect. That's the price. But i was asking a friend of mine. Yesterday he owns a coffee roasting company. As i said. How much coffee could you roast this year. He said We think. I mean i guess okay i think the most we could make is about one hundred twenty thousand pounds.

Tom
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Or your tax filings. You're never going to switch off of quickbooks. It doesn't matter someone comes along and they're like my software is like a little bit cooler. And you say i don't care. I have years of history books. I never moving that sticky growth into because of that quickbooks all kinds of money on you know on inbound and outbound sales reps to sell their product and they can spend huge money to sponsor big conferences. And just get their brand in front of you because they don't want you second up. Even though it's a low conversion rate you are there for life so then the other two growth models. I three by the way work come from i mean. I haven't been on them but they're originally. I learned about them. I into lean startup by eric. Ries but then i added two more That i think are different. One of them surgeon optimization which are seo which is sort of like referral viral marketing but it's sorry viral marketing. But it's more like robot referrals you know you've got google is telling someone about your business where we want to become. Basically wikipedia of your industry and the fifth is affiliate growth which is kind of like paid growth except for it affiliate growth. You only pay people for a commission if they drive results..

Ries eric google
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"You don't need a venture capital investor reading you million dollar check. All you need is to have clarity. And passion to create a real solution to a real problem for real people that the basis of good business when you do that thrive and that's an amazing definition and you know heard variations of that. You know from you know if you the zigzag lawyers sure all the others you know that say you know if you if you want to thrive in life help people thrive in life and xactly and when you do that. We all reap the benefits from that. You know the work that i do. You know this from the show you know. I work with organizations and individuals on burnt out prevention. Why you know it's like okay. Yeah i had own out straight but that that's not a big enough reason for me to do it. I- i- rebounded from it is a consumer is someone that's part of society wants everybody to live healthy and well lives so they can do the things they dream and want to do with when they want where they want and how they watch so they can thrive so they are living there ideal life. It's for me. It's like it's success for them and success is different for everybody. It's like what's which version of success. What what would make your life quote unquote successful all right. We'll take the necessary steps to get there in create an environment where they can because everyone can. I know a lot of people think. Oh it's not for me. I i was done in your story. You just shared is proof. You know a lot of people in through all kinds of different challenges financial setbacks. Maybe you have family members that grew up during the great recession or the excuse me the great depression and we had the great recession and all these different challenges and said you got college degree. Yeah oh my my brother. And i in my eight cousins on my mom's side you know. We're the only two that went to college in on that side of the family are late. Uncle joe is the only one that had a college degree. And i'll real tongue-in-cheek story real quick uncle. Joe is a little out there okay. Love him dearly sweet kindred soul but he made some interesting crazy choices in life not dangerous or harmful but just some really interesting choices and habits and whatnot and my brother. And i were both scared. It's like if we get a college degree. Where you to start acting like that we wanna rethink this. Just drop out right now but I love him and mess him. But again those degrees as over eighty percent of people that have degrees. They're not working in the field that their degree is in. And i loved here thoughts on that. Oh for sure. Well i mean okay. So i wrote this new book. It's called survive and thrive how to build a profitable business in any economy including this one and one of the things that i talk about in the book is that we've made this shift from the age of information to the age of insight and the real economic forum is really the first turned me onto this idea that the age of information is over. It was just kind of a crazy thing to say. It's sort of like there was a time in history. There was a stone age and then there was a bronze age. And if it's the bronze age and you still got a workshop full of tools.

Uncle joe depression Joe
"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome back. I've got john sunshine. John how are you doing. Well how are you. I am awesome really looking forward to this conversation. I was on your show not too long ago. So thank you again for having me as a guest and really wanted to get you on because she doing some amazing things so wants to share a little bit about you and the work that you're doing well first of all. Thank you for being a guest on the tricycle. Podcast end for Stated nixon there and burrito checkouts that we can have this conversation as well Second of all of you know who am i. What do i do That is the ultimate question. isn't it. we're all struggling with that but I'm a traditionally trained economist. Turned entrepreneur turned serial entrepreneur. But not like fruit loops like multiple businesses like different kinds of cereal. So that's kind of like that's my background. I have i have a software company in a co working space company and education company. And everything i do comes back to the core of my heart which is to. I'm on a mission to eradicate generational poverty by helping entrepreneurs create thriving businesses. And i come from a family. You know where you know. Sort of several generations of bad financial decisions That i was born in two. And i was then cast as the golden boy to go change our families trajectory and go off to this place called college where you get a piece of paper. The magic the changes your life and i got a couple of pieces of paper from college. Actually that say that. I know some things And it didn't really change my life dramatically. I hate to say and this is true for a lot of people in my generation. Is that The outlay disappointed by academia as a path to really opening up new doors in my career. And so i kind of. I just went back to the drawing board knows. Exactly why are we doing this. Why are we spending tens of thousands of dollars that we don't have to go to classes. We don't enjoy to learn subjects. We don't care about to get jobs we don't like this is like a bad deal so as i started going back to and i did work for an economics research lab in college outside of college and so as i went back to that and just looking at my experience there with economics degree are realized that we weren't really talking enough about the everyday entrepreneur. So i just kind of. I just began to this exploration of what. It means to be an entrepreneur. I really just fell in love with entrepreneurship As a path to eradicating generational poverty. If you want to start a business and you want to be wildly successful you want to start a thriving. Business that fuels your life. Make the world a better place. You don't need a college degree. You don't need ten thousand dollars in the bank. You don't need ten thousand friends..

john sunshine nixon John
"meese" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"That is largely premised on an embrace of socialism that is fixated on a green new deal that will drive up costs in the country and arm. Poor people it makes rich white woke people feel good about themselves but it crowds out of the marketplace and drives up the cost of black hispanic voters the fact of the matter. is you. Raise the cost gas in this country to discourage people from buying fossil fuel burning vehicles and to go with electric. You're actually raising costs on the working class. And the poor. Many of whom were black and hispanic. You raise the costs of travel. You're raising their costs. You raise the cost of food. You raise their costs. I played for you the clip the other week of june sacchi and the council of economic advisers guy. Talking about how food costs have gone up in particular meet. Costs have gone up. Who's actually kind of funny. I got an email from a guy who was blassie. Meese his i work at publix and and it's the vegetable and fruit costs. That have gone up. It's not the not the beat costs that have gone up. You idiot like all. I'm doing is telling you what they said you double down. All i did was play the clip but their clippers beef pork poultry. Costs are going up. That's typical also going down. Brian will discuss the details of the data namely that beef pork and poultry are the real drivers of increased at grocery store bills and then brian goes on to say that vegetable and produce costs are going down. It's not a coincidence..

sacchi blassie council of economic advisers Meese publix Brian brian
"meese" Discussed on AoS Coach

AoS Coach

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on AoS Coach

"That's where a unit like that comes really into hand. Maybe just before move on. Jeff has made a really good question. I kind of skipped over like why it was good. Is there anything in particular that you relax about. The contorted appear to me by the way. Yeah jeff for sure. The main thing is If you go to the artifacts of the Of this legion legion of the first princeton. Broken bellcore book. There's the fourfold blade this artifact select one of the models me weapons and you get fives and sixes or three mortal wounds automatically and the contorted epa thome has nine also make itself re-rolling wants to hit so it's quite strong. It also has to up ignoring mortal wounds save and mortal wounds at long range. Right now are everywhere. It's a double caster that we roles casting so you're guaranteed to cast your portal or life swarm without any can avoid meese costing if you roll has double ones but the most important thing about that unit is for pace of play and and what i mean by. That is contorted has a very bad. Save your opponents. Maybe misunderstand what you're what you can do with it. And if you charged into combat alongside another something you can activate the ability at the start of the combat phase. You roll one dice and if you roll a four up the unit cannot attack until the contorted attacks which will allow you the den to attack with save bellcore and the contorted into the same unit. And this can give you the potential you know of the d. three mortal wounds plus combat damage at negative to rand which both units have so. That's what we're looking for with that model. Yes he could really reduce the amount of attacks going into your contorted. Pita me by choosing another unit going into that unit and then hopefully you've done enough damage that the threat is significantly reduced compared to some sue. I mean it's going to control to have you that. They need to choose different models. Some other bigger threats by. Yes you this very interesting play with that model slashes attractive. It's if people wanna go near the costing you abilities quite good too and they win it. It went up over. I think what forty five points with the points changes in three point note with all of it was one of the ones that went up quite high. That beautiful thing is is you. Can you can tap into all of the demon stuffing nergal slash. Corn ends inch. Get the best of both bowl and as the matter adapts. And let's say on cars get changed and you know the change for the worse you can move on. May be blood. Lead has become really good in the metaph. Some reason fully. I'm sure a lot of colin plays a hyping finger crossing..

bellcore meese princeton Jeff epa jeff colin
"meese" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on If I Were You

"Dot com and we try. We don't have a name for the podcast. We're trying to buy a domain. I yeah and then you right. Ha ha ha. If i were you is pretty good there. You go And then i suggest that also what i would do Yup and say. I think like if i were you and then i said. Ww med. what would meese is do instead of jesus do then i said if i were you show dot com is available and i say i'd like if i were you show all right. I know he likes to look at us. Now we're really going. Well how do you wanna read your last the last thing you said to me right before i say bad attitude of course. Yeah absolute course so there you have it. That was sort of the origin of coming up with the name so as usual just like head gun you came up with it. Wow i'm good at naming things. I guess that's why you one probably the first golden. Mike was based on the fact that you came up with the name idea. And then i got my brother to make the podcast art for it. Yeah wow and i think your brother was the first person that ever made art. Looked like my face. Yeah you're at first because any any art that we did for busta. Tease for t shirts never looked like when we went to make him. Yeah that's right and it's funny. Because now in retrospect i kind of think that the original jacob. You're so as shirt did look like me at the time. I can run a hard time. Who did that illustration do you remember. I think it was trailing. Wow okay so that was. That's the preordered and we actually kept that artwork for like eight years until two weeks ago. We really like just switched it way way too long. All right i'll also want us to talk about the running bits that began with episode one episode. One had our first one origin story for a running bits. Let's take a break. We'll think some sponsors come back and answer questions. Maybe on the other side of these messages. Thank you honey for sponsoring this episode of our show. Yes thank you honey..

meese Mike jacob
"meese" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Be a highly controversial issue Not even from people that are necessarily pro all red meat or pro carnival or anything but a lot of the time there can be a biased towards not trying to acknowledge there is any risk of meat consumption and that may not be necessarily accurate or in line with most of the data. we have. Yeah yeah and and you know when you look at these human studies. So let's let's even just kind of steal mine this for a second. i guess. All of the animal mechanistic work because people will just throw that out even if we're confining it to the human experimental research that has looked at various levels of red meese on unprocessed unprocessed various forms of iron the formation of these compounds on comparing for example white meat or fish will then we start to have a fairly consistence plausibility from those human studies that explains the epidemiological findings where we see associations with red meat but not quite meet and we see associations with red meat not fish and we seem to see somewhat of a of a threshold of risk with higher intakes for unprocessed red meat. And they're the human studies would would would very much. I mean one study for example which was looking at two hundred forty grams. A day of fresh meese read meese on processor have me's or process meets the same dose and you saw four folds increase in the formation of an nitro compounds in the unprocessed fresh red meat and you also saw a six point. Five fold increase from the process mate. So the idea that any of these potential mechanistic explanations only apply to process me may not necessarily be the case may be that the magnet choose off the endogenous tros compound formation is much greater with processed meat because of the preform nitrite levels in us but to say that potential explanations about explain process meet associations don't apply to unprocessed meat associations. I think that's largely difficult to substantiate based on human data and it would appear that certainly high levels of two bingham's research they looked at four hundred and six hundred grams a day as well. You know you see quite profound increases in the formation of these carcinogenic compounds..

meese bingham
"meese" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Congress put a halt to his efforts because he was spending way too much money. Congress also would not provide funds for wagons to get the supplies from warehouses to the army. Whatever blamed could be attributed to congress though mace's leadership was not impressing anyone including meese himself in december. Seventeen seventy seven. When washington was at valley forge me submitted his letter of resignation citing poor health..

Congress mace meese army congress valley forge washington
"meese" Discussed on Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"meese" Discussed on Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

"Me because able are inherently corrupt and like not inherently. I don't think people are inherently corrupt. I actually don't feel that way. I think that our culture trains us to be individualistic and to take selfish opportune when we see them really exacerbates the tendency in both in all of us But in some people especially. But i think the thing about ni- experiences being with these kinds of small-scale projects is that like you know if you do have a small scale project and someone invests funny. They only took five hundred bucks. If you have a project of the level of the federal government is someone embezzles money. They can take much more than an lake. I think that kind of scale idea is kind of what. I'm sort of working with in my poetry in my work. In general just like trying to bring baugh. Direct relationship is one of the things in in doing like grocery distribution projects. Stink things like that. That i encountered was just experienced meeting all the people who lived in my neighborhood because we were going round and making sure that people knew we were operating delivery service. We actually met many of the people in our neighborhood. And we like you know. Wore masks stood outside and had a brief chat with them. And i think the reason people are able to be as selfish as as opportunistic as they are are is often because they don't see the value of the people around them the animals around then the the resources of the environment around them. And when you don't have a personal connection is very easy to league take advantage when you do have a personal connection often. That can be away to isn't just like doing something harmlessly neighbor down the street Yeah i think there is definitely something about that. But that is also a how nepotism takes place right because we see exactly how our actions affect our immediate surroundings. Unusually that immediate surroundings are close friends or family and so the we are looking out mostly for the people we know rather than people we don't know so it always becomes a lake us centers or meese center. You know you know what i'm saying. So the person centered and however early large their social surrounding their social community is so. It's a little bit of a conundrum because for certain things. Larger governmental powers work really well lake lake roads. For instance building highway at highway system railway system distribution for vaccines for instance. Yes it needs local coordination as well because the local people will know the best way the local environment works. And so you need to have this coordination between both and in terms of corruption. I've also seen more community oriented cultures people acting in corrupt self serving manners because of corruption within society makes them feel like okay. I need to watch out for myself. They've been trained by that corruption. To say i need to watch for myself because nobody the government is not going to take care of me if somebody violates the law and hurts me i have no protections so i need to be the biggest influencer in this particular area. I need to grab power. I need to have enough power. So that i could be the one that nobody can hurt. So there's that incentive as well so that's why part of the problem with cutting huge holes in social safety nets is that it incentivizes this selfish behavior because we realize that we cannot fight corruption as just everyday people on the street. We need to grab as much power as possible as much. Wealth as possible as protection scheme is totally. Think i think you mentioning to interesting slip. boasted nepotism east analyst self-centeredness pace. I stink like require. a certain. Like interpretation like is me who is my community that like weaken also challenge really interesting ways. Like i don't know i mentioned earlier on a started to be really interested in like microbiology. And one of the things. That's been really fascinating someone who's like a practical virologist i e of city makes for mutations at call is that like me is actually not just like the one human organism whose like mouse is making restatement. Me is like a human being all of the bacteria all fun. between my toes in other crevices like all of the organisms that like make by digestive enzymes and so like even then like when we introduced that perspective. Like i don't know. I really think that. Like introducing a lover like all horns of nature is a really big solution to a lot of our social problems because like when we appreciate. The nature lives inside of us. I think that the accuse like such a perspective of like oh me is not a singular entity actually a plural entity there's like millions of organisms inside of like quote unquote. Then like when you rod in that. Al blake. If i think about like just my partner now thinking about like a million organisms and then like when you think about like the community that you live in. I don't know lake another thing that people often say like well. I don't live around any immigrants. Or i don't live around any people. I don't live around any black people. A this probably not true actually wick. If you had a more expansive notion of what your community was dot would not be the case for example where i live in the pacific northwest often. People say they live in communities that don't have indigenous apl but that's not true. It's just that they've never gone to the reservation. That's like fifteen minutes outside of tower. Were they've never liked interacted. With some of the urban people. Many people are indigenous in like those kinds of things kind of show that lake. We are around each other. We are like interacting with one another and like seeing difference. But i i just wanna try and open people's eyes to that difference now they're are already like participating in their already. In relationship with people unlike beings that are so different from the lake. thing on an opportunity rather than a scary thing in something that people should see as like. I need to clamp down on like protecting themselves rather than opening themselves up like always lake cultural micro biological invasions. That are actually good for us. Yeah i i agree with you. In terms of the definition of the self and the definition of who we consider 'skin and family and and kindreds has a huge affect on how we interact with the surrounding world and how inclusive we can be how receptive we are towards other people at the same time if you'll like we are each other's choir and.

meese center baugh federal government Al blake wick pacific northwest
The Miracle of the Sun

Unexplained Mysteries

01:20 min | 1 year ago

The Miracle of the Sun

"The sun was low on the horizon when physics professor gustafsson stepped outside his office in november. Two thousand two. He smiled as he felt. That chile belgian air brush past him. The sky was clear. The afternoon was perfect. He strolled through the university of leuven campus. Until he found a vantage point it was an ideal spot to watch the sunset. But that wasn't exactly what the professor had in mind for months. Meese in had been obsessed with the miracle of the sun. A spectacular event witnessed by nearly seventy thousand people on october thirteenth nineteen. Seventeen a massive crowd in the village of fatima. Portugal had watched the sun dance across the sky today. Mason wanted to see it too. He took a deep breath in steeled himself for what was coming next. After a moment of hesitation he opened his eyes wide and looked directly into the sun. He knew he was risking damage but he had to be sure of what happened that day. Five years earlier as he stared into the sun he was astonished. The crowd was right. it was some miracle.

University Of Leuven Gustafsson Meese Chile Fatima Portugal Mason
The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

People of the Pod

04:53 min | 1 year ago

The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

"A controversial curriculum for teaching ethnic studies. In california's public schools will face a final vote in march. Since the first draft of the curriculum came out in two thousand nineteen a coalition of jewish organizations including the american jewish committees. California team has worked together to fine tune the content to be more inclusive define anti semitism and avoid perpetuating the stereotypes that put jews endanger here to talk about the debate surrounding the california curriculum. And why it matters to. All of us is rabbi serena. Eisenberg director of ajc northern california serena welcomed people of the pod for having me so exactly. What is california's ethnic studies curriculum. A start back in two thousand sixteen when the california state. Legislators passed a law. Mandating that the state department of education developed a guidance document for the teachers and administrators so they could implement ethnic studies courses and schools and the reason was because in california students of color account for the majority of the population in our public schools. They speak about ninety different languages so the goal was to prepare pupils to be global citizens with an appreciation for the contributions of multiple cultures. Ajc supported that effort. We believe that k. Through twelve students across california should be able to learn the role of ethnicity race and religion in the life of all of the citizens including maybe even especially those groups have been largely left out of other textbooks and so high quality. Ethnic studies courses can help combat bigotry. He'll some of the really difficult. Racial and ethnic divisions we are facing in this country so whereas we support an inclusive and balanced approach to ethnic studies. What some might call multicultural or constructive. Ethnic studies which focuses on the contributions and challenges of a broad array of ethnic cultures. What happened with the california curriculum. Was that state. Department of education appointed a small advisory committee of teachers who are committed to something called critical ethnic studies. The critical studies association was formed in two thousand eleven with a specific goal of radical resistance. It was anti-capitalist anti-imperialist somewhat neo marxist ideology and this group was what guided the development of the very controversial first draft of the curriculum which was released in two thousand and nineteen. What was controversial about that first draft. The first problem was that it lacked balance running through the entire curriculum. The goal was promoting this narrow critical. Ethnic studies ideology the los angeles times. Editorial board wrote that the curriculum talks about critical thinking but usually offers one side and one side. Only it's more about imposing predigested political views on students than about widening their perspectives. That was the los angeles editorial board. So a second problem was that it was an inclusive. We talked about more multicultural approach which looks at the diversity of olive our california population but this curriculum actually left out a lot of groups including sikhs hindus. Korean syrians armenians jewish americans. It had a very small focus on particular groups and because of that. Ajc formed a multi-ethnic coalition with a number of other ethnic groups to ask for a more inclusive curriculum one lack balance to not inclusive. but three. and. I think what was so outrageous. It really contained a lot of offensive material. There are some examples of antisemitic material the material and even more so material that wasn't even included for example a really extensive glossary in a curriculum. That's designed to combat discrimination didn't include a definition of anti-semitism. This was released just after the shooting and powei so the jewish community was particularly eager to see that anti semitism was going to be taught about in an ethics studies curriculum for california. Was there any kind of explanation as to why anti semitism was left out of the first draft. This paradigm of critical ethnic studies sees the world through a lens of people of color and whites oppressed and oppressors and in that paradigm jews are considered to be white and of course we know jews have a complicated identity managers of color. Many jews meese rothley were middle eastern origin huge number of persian jews in california and so unfortunately the curriculum just consider jesus whites and focused only on four groups of people of color that would be african. Americans latinos native americans and asian americans.

California American Jewish Committees Rabbi Serena AJC Critical Studies Association Eisenberg Serena Department Of Education Los Angeles Editorial Board Los Angeles Times Powei Meese Rothley
What's In A Scientific Name

Your Brain on Facts

05:12 min | 2 years ago

What's In A Scientific Name

"From loon example of a trial by in Hunan China called Hans Solo to a butterfly Pea flour reminiscent of Georgia. Oh painting called Couture Couturier Turn Tia. The naming of species offers almost as much in the way of entertainment as it does scientific classification. The official rules for naming species set down by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature are surprisingly simple. The name must be spelled with the Latin alphabet and must not be overtly offensive and that's pretty much it. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Most of US know that the animals we call by single name such as a horse actually had a two part name in that case equis Columbus. In contrast to astronomical bodies like stars, Asteroids and planets which are under strict naming conventions overseen by committees, there's almost unfettered freedom it comes to zoological nomenclature. The name can even be on sense string of arbitrary letters. While there is a wealth of name fascination to report on from plants to drugs to telescopes. Ourselves today to the Animal Kingdom. For as long as we have had records and probably longer mankind has sought to classify the world around us in an effort to begin to understand it. This is called taxonomy the study of the general principles of scientific classification from the Greek words for order or arrangement and science. Three centuries before the common era aristotle grouped animals I by similarities like where they lived and then hierarchically with humans naturally at the top. Not, every animal fit well into this system though ducks posed a particular problem as they had the bothersome habit of living on water on land and spending time in the air. It would be eighteen hundred years before another natural philosopher as scientists were called, then would try their hand such as Andrei sessile, Pino Italian physician, and botanist who sorted plants by the structure of their fruits and seeds. The first scientist to use a binomial or to name system that we would recognize was Swiss botanist guest sparred Boeing. Some six thousand plants by genus and species in sixteen, twenty three. There were several inconsistent and sometimes conflicting systems of classification already in use when Carolina's wrote his. SYSTEMA naturally in seventeen, thirty five. Laying down the system we use to this day. Lena's was first taxonomic east to list humans as a primate, but he also originally classified whales as. All living things were sorted into them, Feilim class order, family, genus, and species. Many of US memorized that in middle school by way of a new monarch like King Philip came over from great Spain. Housecat for example, is kingdom and Amelia filed them cor data meaning it has spinal cord. Class Mammalia order can Adora family feel a day genus fearless and species cactus. A lion diverges at the genus Pan Terra, which awesomely means reaper of all and species. Leo. So the scientific name for Lion Is Penn Tara Leo. This system can be visualized as an enormous branching tree with its trunk, very broad and its branches increasingly specific. We. Still name some animals in accordance with their appearance with a little poetic license thrown in for good measure. The tiniest and most pastelle of the armored mammals was christened the pink fairy armadillo. A. Hand Size Lizard with a gift from a meese camouflage was given the fairly metal moniker satanic leaf tailed Gecko. It's actual religious beliefs remain a mystery. As advertised, the star nosed mole has a burst of delicate sensory tendrils on the tip of its snout. Also, sacks myuka Flores is an unappealing worm who lives off the bones of dead whales which would explain its name bone eating snot flower. A bacterium that was taken to the International Space Station, and exposed to cosmic radiation earned the Latin moniker for traveler of the void. China boasts a salamander species that can grow to a whopping one point. Eight meters were nearly six feet long. It goes by the name. Hell Bender and this reporter for one will not argue with it.

Zoological Nomenclature Penn Tara Leo United States Scientist Couture Couturier Hunan China Myuka Flores Hans Solo Animal Kingdom International Commission International Space Station Official Pan Terra Georgia Carolina Ducks China Adora Lena
What's Working Right Now

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

07:51 min | 2 years ago

What's Working Right Now

"These are some good back to ones that we and our listeners have found useful to sort of set in place to make all of this a little easier and as we were leading off the number one thing. I put something on the facebook group which you should join. Everyone is sharing really good resources and information there and I would like you to go to facebook dot com forward slash. Whatever shell cast like the page joined the group and one of the things that people are talking about the leadoff issue is the Diet thinks so I thought we would start by trying to make anxiety a little easier and I have a couple of things that are helping my anxiety amy. Hopefully you have a couple. Should I lead off with mine? Yeah tell us first of all time and I will say I feel like we're out on the leading edge a little Bit New York so I can say I feel like I've come over the anxiety. I'm flattening the anxiety curve. I think is what I'm saying like the beginning for me was three o'clock cold sweat wakeup really scared. All the time and I will say like the time has calmed me down a little bit which is hopefully helpful to someone. Who's maybe a little bit later on the curve than me but the number one thing that I have cut down on is the constant refreshing of twitter and other forms of social media and like looking at are they epidemiological charts. There is something comforting about refreshing them every six seconds but I have found just stepping away from them is the better choice. I am very behind you. I'm still nearing my peak of being single. Most well informed person about it in the Western Hemisphere. You want to know anything about anything. I definitely just checked twitter and I can tell you all about it. That's your safe-space though. Like information is your safe-space. Yeah I would gently offered to you that in the same way that I was sick to my husband. I need to check the charts because I'm in charge of this like the same way. I need to keep my eye on the ground at all time in a plane to keep the plane flying correctly. I mean I need to check the charts because somehow I'm controlling. This was my mind. I think if you can cut that cord it is probably better for your mental health. You know I haven't been like I'm sleeping fine at night. I'm sleeping like a stone. I think I'm so exhausted but during the day I am perhaps a little quick to lose my patients. I certainly feel like whenever I do. My patients it is a well earned loss of patients. It is I have held my tongue eighteen times not once more but judging from the reaction on my kids faces sometimes to them. It seems like it comes out of nowhere and I suppose that's sort of like me spilling over is probably yeah. You're running a little hot probably. That's probably yeah. It's probably where I'm expressing it instead of a three. Am So I'm going to take the no. Yeah I would generally put in your path that less of cessive checking of the curves is probably better for you. Okay you can put that down. There are some really smart people in charge of it and you obsessively checking is actually not helping in any way and might be making you more. You Know Edgy. Shall we say you know what I'm GonNa do right now with that? I'm going to take that note. Can I explain about that? Yes that's in Showbiz right. So when like the director you did a run through of act one and the directors like amy. I'm GonNa need you to start your cross to the table earlier because if you don't fluffed the pillows by the beginning of that line he doesn't have the cue to say. Why used fluffing the pillows. If I then say we have what I know but I can't do that unless he is very bad etiquette in the theater they give you a note you say okay and you take the note and you might disagree with it and you might pick it up with the director later but in the moment. You don't explain why that request of you is wrong or misplaced. Somehow you take the note. It is something I've been working on with my kids for seventeen and a half years now and it's something we can all do for one. Another right now. Take the note. It's not easy. I'm not good at it and it also always depends on your who you get it from right there. People from you can't take notes and people for Ken. I think. Opening yourself up to try to be like how can I make? This better is worthwhile. Yes other things exiled. They've been helping me. It's like the goofy breathing gifts. You know what I'm talking about. We'll just linked to UNSEE. You can see them but if you go to gifty or any gift site and you type breathing exercise. They're like visual representations of breathing in and out and I don't do great with like the lying down and the voice breathing. I don't know it bothers me My daughter finds that. Make sure she swears it makes her more nervous to listen to like meditation. Breathing tapes weirdly. I'm with her like sometimes it's like I get a wrong voice and it really agitates me but these and I have a kid who gets a little over a what do you call it. He freaks out and I have found that they work really nicely with him. They just serve. Visual representations have had a breathe for five minutes and they've been helping me a lot with my anxiousness Anne Marie who is one of our top fans on instagram and facebook. She mentioned this grounding exercise that I make sure to put up on social media this week which is like fine five things you can see find four things you can hear. Find three things you can smell you know. Find four things you can touch. Whatever it's I'm getting the specifics of it wrong. But it's basically that go through each one of your senses and do a full inventory of everything you're able to hear right now in an immediately grounds you. I've tried it works really well. That's like take the note thing for me because often these things sound so to quote a meese grandma tweet tweet demand like I really don't have time to count the things I can say. I'm way to busy keeping the world going with my mind but I think it is helpful and I always know it's helpful but in times like this I found like oh. I actually really need to spend some time. Every day not holding the scary at bay by scrolling twitter but spending some time in some sort of state of mindfulness or roundedness. And like if you know me. I can't believe my tongue didn't just fall out of my head when I said that but it's been helping me and I would highly recommend it. Revenge the upside down right now in every way I know well we are in the upside down and the other thing that is my touchstone in. This is in terms of like my problem. Which is maybe not everyone's problem with anxiety is like holding it away from me like it's too scary to think about so I let it. Just become this monster in the closet and I go about my day like say day busy. Scroll twitter read. The chart is the curve. Bending and one of the things that I work on and I work on this with my anxious. Kids is like let's name it. What's The scariest thing that will happen? And we've talked about this previously so I won't linger on put like go through it. What are we scared of? You know. There's a related article? I'M GONNA put a link on the Shenoy to this episode at what Russia PODCAST DOT COM or. They might be in your operate now. You can look child psych named Helen. Dodd what an article for the conversation about this whole moment and she points out that free play for kids. It's essential in this moment that free play without us telling them what to do that. We really should take a step back. It's not only okay mom. It is a fact. It's their work. You know little children and she made a point that I hadn't really considered. Which was that you may over here. You see your kids. Play acting this moment in ways. That may seem like something. You really need to clamp down on and that you shouldn't because she says that free play even about this moment can help kids make sense of the things they find hard to

Twitter Facebook Director New York Western Hemisphere Anne Marie Dodd Helen KEN Russia AMY Instagram
Trump awards Medal of Freedom to Ed Meese

Ben Shapiro

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Trump awards Medal of Freedom to Ed Meese

"News president trump is honoring Ronald Reagan's former Attorney General ed Meese today with the presidential medal of freedom I want to thank you I want to thank you for your incredible lifetime of exceptional service and of devotion to our country during a White House ceremony the president called me is an inspiration to liberty loving citizens everywhere he also praised Meese as a fighter for freedom and a champion of law and order the medal of freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor ed Meese expressed his gratitude to president Reagan and I will always be indebted to him not only for the honor he did by having me a build a hundred I need to serve under his leadership for thirty

Donald Trump Ronald Reagan President Trump Attorney Ed Meese White House
STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:31 min | 3 years ago

STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

"Should all feel grateful towards she advanced the science related to a key appliance. You use every single day and probably take for granted the refrigerator. We're talking about. Mary Engle Pennington Mary Engle Pennington was born in eighteen seventy two in Nashville Tennessee see soon after she was born Mary's family her mother father and younger sister moved to Philadelphia to be closer to her mother's wealthy quaker relatives. Mary's parents ordered their daughters interests and hobbies as a result. Mary learned to garden with her father. At a young age she also Oh love to read and spent hours on end at her local library. It was there that she had her first break. Through all reading the book on Medical Chemistry Mary Very was studying a chapter on nitrogen and oxygen when something clicked she later told The New Yorker. I realized Liberty Hoop that although I couldn't touch taste or smell them the really existed it was a milestone. Mary was twelve years old when she had that. Aha moment and from that point on she wanted to learn everything she could about chemistry. Unfortunately the rest of society wasn't so keen on Mary's budding in curiosity at that time studying scientists considered unladylike. Mary tried to convince the head of her boarding school to allow her awesome instruction in chemistry but the headmistress refused still Mary's fascination with medical book didn't go away she went to the university -versity of Pennsylvania which was located near her house and demanded a professor there. Give her some instruction. Despite the fact that she was still only twelve years old the professor told her he would consider teaching her if she learned to read and spell the words in the book and returned when she was older though she didn't didn't return to that specific professor she did return to the University of Pennsylvania in eighteen ninety s she was the only woman in her class and studied chemistry and biology in the university town scientific school to earn a certificate of proficiency she had to settle for that instead of a Bachelor's slurs degree which was denied due to her gender nevertheless she returned and earned a PhD in the same field in eighteen ninety five the University of Pennsylvania was one of the only schools to get doctorate degrees to women at that time after graduating with her PhD. Mary created her own lab. The Philadelphia Clinical Laboratory to analyze different bacteria. She took aim at the ice cream supply she she educated farmers about safety practices while handling raw milk in order to prevent outbreaks of sickness in Nineteen Zero Five Mary Bet Harvey Wiley a famous chemist and the two began working together on cold storage and refrigeration the next year thanks in part art to Harvey Wiley the Pure Food and drug act passed which tightened regulations on food labelling and safety the government created the bureau of chemistries mysteries food research lab to help fulfill the safety requirements outlined in the law and Harvey Wanted Mary to be in charge after all she got the top top score on the exam required to enter Federal Service. Harvey was so sure that Mary was the best choice but he tried to conceal the fact that she was a woman woman. I referring to her only as Emmy Pennington on the necessary paperwork his trickery was soon discovered but harvey continued the fight by arguing that Mary couldn't be denied simply on account of gender. Mary was hired to leave the lab her work in that lab established. The foundation of today's food knowledge that keeping bacteria count low and refrigerated foods like milk eggs and cheese is instrumental to food safety. She also also developed standards for processing chickens for food led an investigation of the refrigerated boxcar and served on Herbert hoovers war food administration station during World War One in nineteen nineteen. Mary left her work for the federal government to continue research in her own lab about the safety of frozen foods foods through her later research. She discovered that freezing food was a more viable storage method than canning or smoking during her career. Mary won the Garvan Olin Medal the highest award given to women in the American Chemical Society in Nineteen twenty-three she was is recognized by the American Society of heating refrigeration and air conditioning engineers as the greatest American expert on home refrigeration. She's also also in the National Women's hall of fame throughout her career. Mary encouraged young women to participate in the sciences including her own meese who also went on to pursue a stem degree. Mary passed away in a hospital in nineteen fifty two. She was eighty years old. Today we might take Mary and go Pennington Science for granted but she helped save millions of lives by educating society about food safety

Mary Engle Pennington Mary Eng Mary Bet Harvey Wiley Professor American Chemical Society Mary Philadelphia Emmy Pennington Pennington Science Nashville Tennessee University Of Pennsylvania The New Yorker Meese Philadelphia Clinical Laborato Pennsylvania University Town Scientific Sch Garvan Olin Medal
The Dangers Of Methane

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 4 years ago

The Dangers Of Methane

"Here's a riddle for your dial. What do one hundred thirty six thousand cows and glacier flowing from an active ice-covered volcano have in common. They both move really slowly I was thinking about the fact that they both release about the same amount of methane per day. At least miss warm out. Scientists calculated that the salt may have cooled glacier in Iceland, which flows from the volcano Cutler releases up to forty one tonnes of methane from Meltwater a day during the summer months. That's a little too specific to make a good riddle on. But that is a surprising amount of methane for microbes to produce beneath the ice. Researchers think the volcano might be helping I the heat from the volcano might be increasing waterflow under the glacier moving the methane out faster. And Secondly, the volcano might be helping the methane stay methane usually when methane comes into contact with oxygen. It's converted to receive to buy methane consuming microbes so in Milwaukee, which has a lot of dissolved oxygen molecules comes into contact with a glacier bed. The methane the microbes produce there is converted to carbon dioxide, but when Meltwater Meese assault who glacier bed it also encounters gases from the volcano those guesses reduce the amount of oxygen in the water. So the methane remains methane as it dissolved in the water and flows out of the glacier fr. From where it can enter the atmosphere and function as a potent greenhouse gas is land in an article or full of his glacier, covered volcanoes. So it's something to keep an eye on. In the meantime, the microbes are complaining this moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don glass and Cassandra.

Meltwater Meese Meltwater Don Glass Iceland Indiana University Milwaukee Assault Forty One Tonnes
Melissa Seaman- Following the Universe with Strategy

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

13:46 min | 4 years ago

Melissa Seaman- Following the Universe with Strategy

"Coming up today on the nice guys on business. I think that we all have genius at flows through us when we're when we're open and we're ready and we're staying in that flow state. Surely the can't be serious. They are, but don't call them Shirley. Meet an education on how to grow your business. The nice guys are here to help learn about great customer service networking and how just being nice can help you prosper. Now here all your host, Doug Sandler and Strickland Bonner. We're going to take a little bit of a walk on the woo side today. That's actually how I started my intro for you, and I'm like exactly, but I'm okay with starting a little bit on the Woodside see guy community. Melissa semen was interested me about a year ago and let me say this. She's fucking legit. Okay. I know. I know. I know. I know. I know we have some nonbelievers in our community, and I would have to say that. So recently I was probably I was probably one of them, but and then I realized the universe works in some serious fucked up mysterious ways and Melissa's gonna share at just spent about five minutes talking to her about all of the of the mysterious ways. The universe actually comes collectively to you, and I know you're going to get into his also some Melissa's about to share with our funky bands, the ways in which those ways those mysterious ways can actually come to life. But everything about Wu is what Melissa, at least in the beginning. I thought she was not. I mean, reading your bio and then getting to be a friend of hers and then getting understand it a little bit. She's af Stanford educated lawyer, business strategist, and. Leaders leader and dumb. She's gonna, discuss this thing called your soul gift. And again, if there's anybody out there, I want you just that does not believe or even if you do believe, just fuck you for just one second. Okay. Just to sit back for just a minute, just roll down your window of skepticism, just enough so that these next fifteen twenty minutes that than I are gonna talk will allow some bit of of of, I guess, knowledge let it bake in for just a moment. I'm gonna talk about Melissa's going to talk about what a soul gift is what your soul gift is, what your genius is. Stay tuned. She's here. She's gotta get forty at the end of his episode. Also what that was like. One of the most fucked up enter introductions, but you know, Melissa, you're so much more worthy of that. I could hit stop right now and do it all over again, but I don't think we want to. I think we should just roll or anything yet channelling baby channel. Okay. Well, let's start there because actually that was my first question I had written down is like, what am I gonna talk to Melissa about? I know I've had you on our Biswas podcast or we have had some conversations and I took your your soul gift challenge and we're gonna share with people how they can do that too, but what is challenging channeling? What a challenging, what is channeling? Can we start there to begin with challenging about are challenging right now? You know. I like you say, I'm an ex lawyer write a recovering lawyer, and I work with a lot of professionals late. I work with Silicon Valley executives. They work with company founders and and so for me like the whole woo thing at first when I got going with the wou I was now is not so much for it. But where I'm at now is we can put the stuff to work for us and it can support the bottom line. It can make stuff clearer. So the big challenge, I would say with channeling as people think it's something weird truth is the most brilliant company founders innovators, high end professional people that I work with, they are following their gut. They are getting into their flow state. They are following, you know, that sort of mysterious intelligence that moves through them without thinking too hard. Yeah. I look at the that voice that inner. The voice, and I just say, how can it not be? How could that not be something like channeling? If it's not if we don't call it channeling on our side, if we call it our inner genius, if we call it that gut instinct, we call them in that inside voice that whatever it is that you call it nice guy community. You can call channeling. You can call it your inner voice, whatever the fuck you call it, it just know that it's it's not just a blank stare stare staring at you. This is actually an energy force it's coming through you. Well, yeah, I only have to convince anybody anything because I just ask a couple questions like, you know, have you had that moment where you're standing in the shower and you finally unwind, and then suddenly that problem you've been noodling on for days the answer just downloads like, ooh, where the heck did that come from? And it might be an answer that you wouldn't have even thought of. It might be an idea that when people say, how'd you get that idea? You shrug and think, I don't think it is my idea. I don't know where it came from and I would say, well, that's that. That's what I'm pointing to is the fact that we're all. These, you know, on a good day, I think we're kind of empty hoses that we allow something really great to come

Melissa Melissa Seoul Meese Center Melissa Zemun Austin Texas Steve O'brien Steven Brian Executive WU Regina DAN Two Minutes Four Years