18 Burst results for "Meena Kim"

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pray all in for Meena Kim today and you can hear that re broadcast tonight at 10. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm also Chang Thunder, sleet, single digit temperatures in Texas record setting deep freezes. Much of the country is witnessing some bizarre and historic winter weather. But why Well, it has to do in part with something called the polar vortex, a mass of cold air spinning over the Arctic and up into the stratosphere. It strengthens in the fall and normally stay stable over the North Pole, keeping cold air penned in over the Arctic. Dr Michael Ventress and meteorological scientists that IBM explains it like this. The polar vortex want to sit over North pole. It's it feels like it's comfortable there that's equal to bear. However, it can make weather very interesting when the polar vortex up in this treasure gets destructive, he says. That's what happened last month when temperatures at high altitudes above the North Pole spiked. Interests and other meteorologists were fascinated by that unusually intense, sudden, stratospheric warming event as it's called, and by what might happen as cold air got pushed south into North America and Europe by an erratic jet stream we can actually see Locking or high pressure setting up over the North pole essentially anomalous warmth over the Arctic region. And that's because all the Arctic air's getting squeezed out of the North Pole, and it's getting pushed down into the mid latitudes will relive..

Meena Kim North America Texas IBM today Europe North Pole NPR last month Arctic tonight at Michael Ventress North pole Chang Thunder single digit 10
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And this is a party that because of its association with with racial resentment, and now, racial violence is isolating itself from too many of those people it can't survive on a national level without without real. Change. So, Professor, but we just got about a minute before you take the next race. I'll give you 30. Seconds here. Okay, well, let's remember there are some issues that are very compelling to Republicans. Anti tax Antiabortion anti regulation draw many of them in for their votes. Whatever the racism is, and there are Tax bracket finance Republicans who are not racist. I'm happy to admit that so they have a lot of issues on their side. It's just that they had a monster of the top of the ticket. And that's why they're in the problem. They're they're in right now. We come back. We're gonna talk about the problem that has put the entire country in the entire democracy in what might happen to that democracy in the coming days and years, so Professor Blight and Stephen Henderson. Standby. We'll be right back. This is on point. Stay with us at nine o'clock tonight for the Friday news round up on NPR's one A. And then a 10 on the statewide forum with Meena Kim. First we will listen back.

Professor Blight Professor NPR Meena Kim Stephen Henderson
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sleep works. Thanks again, Joe. Coming up Forum nine o'clock. Michael Krasny leads at nine from 9 to 10. Then it's Meena Kim during the first hour of former discussion of how the presidency might be reform when President Trump leaves office with law professors Bob Bauer and Jack Goldsmith. Their new book is called after Trump reconstructing the president. See Meena Kim looks back at the year in pandemic parenting from wrestling with remote learning to scrambling to find child care, and we would like to hear from you as well. What were your parenting winds or parenting flops in 2020 Be a part of our to our program on KQED on the year Thanks to your support. It's forum 9 to 11 today. Look for sunny skies later after areas of some frost and fog Bay area highs close to 60, the same four Sacramento today in the Valley. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Leila Fadel in Culver City, California and I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D C and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. Good morning, So will struggling Americans get $600 or $2000 in relief checks? The House passed a bill yesterday for $2000 payments, a demand that President Trump made last week as he held up the relief package that bill now heads to the Senate. And while the House back to Trump's higher direct payments, they voted to reject his veto of a huge defense policy bill. Senate will start the same process today and that sets the stage for a possible first for the president, his first and only veto override of his presidency. NPR White House correspondent Franco Ordonez is with us to talk through all of this. Right. Good morning. Good morning, David. Well, let's let's start with these higher direct payments. I mean, this is something president Trump wanted changed in the cove. It Relief package on bit. Sounds like House Democrats said Okay, let's let's try and act on that. We like this idea. Yeah, It's one of the reasons Trump blasted the spending package before ultimately signing it. On Sunday. He you know he came out against the payments, which are up to $600 per person provided they qualify, but he wanted them boosted to $2000. Democrats were quick to take trump up on that house leaders actually tried to pass it last week by unanimous consent that failed, But they came back last night to hold a roll call vote, and it passed with two thirds support and more than 40. Republicans voted for it. Interesting. So so a bunch of Republicans released a number in the house. What does that mean that it has prospects in the Senate to be passes? Well, not necessarily, You know. Senate Republican leaders opposed higher checks when negotiating the deal. So it's really thought that it won't go any further. But you know that's uncertain. You know, the pressure is really on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell right after the House vote, Senator Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader, He said he would push to pass it so this is going to be politically tricky for many Republicans. And I'll just note that were President elect Biden stands on all this. He did say yesterday that he supports the $2000 payments. Okay, so we're watching that we're also watching what happened with this Defense Bill House lawmakers voted to override trumps Vito was expected, but but this is significant, right? Absolutely. You know, this is the Defense Authorization Act, which is passed with bipartisan support for 60 straight years. It sets the spending for military and includes provisions like true praises and benefits. Trump had issues with it because one he wanted it to end legal protections for social media companies. He also opposed the bills calling for the renaming of military facilities named after Confederate figures. Trump did indeed veto the bill. But Congress kind of had this planned out, and they set up these end of the year sessions to try to override him. OK, so what's gonna happen with that in the Senate? Well. The Senate is controlled by Republicans, and, but it's considered likely members will also override the veto as well. Senator Jim in off in Oklahoma Republican and a Trump ally, said he's confident and override would work. I mean, frankly, there is no question the Senate has the votes to do so. But Republicans have proven over and over again that they don't like to go against Trump. And this would be a rebuke. If if Republicans split from him, it would actually be the first congressional override of a president Trump Vito Justice. The presidency is winding down. Well, let me ask you about the incoming President, President elect Joe Biden. He slammed President Trump and his administration yesterday for for obstructing the transition to power. Yes, he did He, you know. He spoke to reporters and publicly after meeting with his national security and foreign policy advisers, he talked about his goals. But he also criticized the Trump administration for holding critical information back from his own team. We've encountered road walks from the political leadership at the Department of Defense and the Office of Management and Budget Right now, we just aren't getting all the information that we need. The ongoing I'm going in from the outgoing administration in key national security areas. It's nothing short in my view of irresponsibility, you know, and this is not the first time that bind has made such accusations against the Trump administration. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez forces. Morning, Franco. Thank you, as always. Hey, David. Thank you. As always. It's been an honor working with you. And let's likewise thank you. As President Trump's time in office draws to a close, his administration has accelerated the pace of federal executions. Some Democrats want to see the incoming Biden administration takes steps to end the practice altogether. But that's not something a president can do alone. NPR's Juana Summers reports. Earlier this year, The Trump Administration ended a stretch of nearly two decades without any federal executions. The Justice Department has announced that it will resume the federal death penalty this two black men Brandon Menard announcement. Bourgeois were executed in the last two days lethal injection last night. It was the first execution in 130 years at a federal prison during a presidential lame duck period. Some of those executions have been scheduled for the administration's final days before President Trump, who is a strong supporter of capital punishment, is replaced by President elect Biden, who opposes it. There have never been so many executions scheduled for so late in a presidency during any transition period in the entire history of the United States. That was Robert Dunham, the executive director of the nonpartisan Death Penalty Information Center. He says that the U. S government has not had multiple federal executions during the presidential transition since the late 18 hundreds. Former Attorney General William Barr, who recently left the Justice Department has said that the government is carrying out justice for quote staggeringly brutal murders. Critics of President Trump have denounced the decision to resume executions during an election year as politically motivated an opponent of capital punishment or focused on what biting conduced when he takes office. He says he opposes the death penalty. So we want him to use this clemency, power and in this cruelty once and for all that's representative elect Cory Bush of Missouri. Democrat who will take office next week..

President Trump president Trump Vito Justice Joe Biden Senate Trump NPR David Greene White House correspondent Franco Ordonez Justice Department NPR News Michael Krasny Meena Kim Bill House President Senate Majority fog Bay KQED
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To for my Mariana Pray all in for Meena Kim, and we're talking with Marcus Samuelsson, chef television personality and author about his new cookbook, The rise black cooks and the soul of American food. He's also got a lot of restaurants, which include restroom Red Rooster, with locations and Harlem, Miami and London as well as genius supper club. He hosts no passport required on PBS and has served as a judge on food network's chopped and a B. C's the taste and we're also welcoming you our listeners to join us. You can call us at 8667336786 or email your questions to form at KQED. Got or g'kar. So Marcus Amos and I didn't want to ask you about the backlash you received for recipe you created for the book that was inspired by Haitian soup Shamu when it was included in Bon Appetit magazine. Some found your interpretation of the dish to be offensive because suits you move has such a deep And powerful cultural history tied to Haitian independence. And I know you've apologized for that. And what did you take away from the feedback you received in that whole conversation? Took away that first of all, I'm great school that people are opinionated and guiding and You can have the best intent in the world, but you can still make mistakes. And in the book, you know we're giving a lot of context and it went from The book to magazine, too. Social media. That context was taken away. And, uh, you know, that's something that I am. I learned and I think it's important to acknowledge when we when I was wrong and my team was wrong, and we made a mistake, But our intention was always the highlights and broadcast and I have Lot off Asian friends that guided me through this regular there with one of them. I spoke to chef of that patient Association of Chefs in Haiti. Uh, A lot of Asian countries are not in the food world, but they're very passionate about food, and I'm learning. I'm gonna go to Haiti and cook as well. So I think it's very like I take. I'm being Ethiopian. If somebody would misrepresent beneath your condition would be the same thing. So I I appreciate where I can learn something you have to own you mistake. Um, I fell in love with Haitian food from my friend, Mark artists and then actually, one of the episodes of no passport required. We focused on sooty morning. It's history, So I thought that done a lot of work on that had a lot of Knowledge and this was something that I've got. This is such an incredible story so again. I own my mistakes. Sound mistake that we did as a collective. Uh and that It's been great to speak to so many from the community and understand what we did want. And I don't want to The comments on Twitter in response to your apology, said in part, this dish is a Haitian independence symbol and his link to freedom from slavery. Do not alter it. Um, when it comes to cooking and creating recipes, kind of zoo model of it are there should there be some sacred cows that are left alone? Even in this age of fusion food? What would be your thoughts on that? I think that the You know, the The the word you inspired by which we used in the book. Um Is that there tonight? So much of the food that we do as chefs is inspired by. I have no pretense to know another culture's dish to make it except like and I think that Food has a lot of culture meaning, you know, my wife comes from a region where we will be Tatar in a very specific way. If you would Not do it that way. It couldn't be called that dish. So I fully understand And there was something that I've apologized for, and I don't want it to stop. Cree Ah City off. That's how we discovered right and Think context is everything is like how do you set it up? I'll just set a dish up. We clearly made a mistake on that this time and that's something I get once again on the in. Apologetic for and I am most glad that there is. That's the beauty of America. You have a pushing forward. Yeah. Checks and balances. And that means Greater dialogue like that. It was important missing foot. I'm sure it won't be the last time. We have some comments coming in a listener writes Thank you for mentioning Rodney Scott. I saw him featured on chef's table on Netflix and was blown away by his story. My husband wants to travel to South Carolina just to eat his food when the pandemic is over. How did you decide which stories you put in your book must have been hard to narrow it down. You know, Rodney Story was not hard to narrow down because I adore Rodney and yes, going to South Carolina and eat at his restaurant, and it's worth it. So it's gonna be amazing clip. But The rice is not a list. There's so many incredible chefs and people that I know that are not in the book. That could have easily. Would fit the narrative, but It was important to have a broad book showing Africa that we do a chef Mike don't showing. You know, this is not just a big city book. Showing stories that are in smaller cities and showing diversity that it's not just yet. So me. It was very important to have a broader book and show that Wherever you are. You conspire to be part of this, Whether you are consumer, whether your reader whether you are a chef for food writer, so that was the most important thing. Chill type first. What story? There many black voices Well, let's go to a collar. We have dominate Krenn in San Francisco. You're on form. Hi. I just want to. I just want to say hello. And, you know, principle that appreciate your show. Hey, Mark, use what's going on? Well and I'm good, And I just want to say that, you know, I think it's important to support any ship, but especially black ships. You know, I've seen a lot of friends. Um, that I that I know, through the years through all over the world and thank you so much for shooting a line on this because she's much needed And also you I just want I just wanted to say thank you to you, You know, Two years ago, Three years ago, Dominic came to Harlem to cook with us in Harlem, and she didn't amazing dinner. And it's something that my chefs, my cooks Still talk about and you always share your talent and also congratulations to you, too. Your memoir, which is absolutely amazing, and you inspire so many Just around the world with your story. So thank you for everything that you do them. Yeah, but thank you so much for for what you doing Also you you quite inspiring, So I just want to say hello and congratulations. I'll go with you. And thank you for being on the show. Thank you for giving him a voice because you're amazing and And I've seen this world needs more of you out there. And I think the idea is also to understand. You know that food is, um Um VQ to communicate to others are story and where we come from, and the voice off. Those black ships are so so important to understand, stand what the world is about. You know, And I think it's done. You know, It's been time for a long time. And I'm just so glad that it's happening. So thank you. And can we cook again together? Yes. Come on, come up with the very next time, okay? All right. Well, thank you. And to love you guys. Thank you. Thank you. Oh, yeah, Nice. Glad we can orchestrate a mini reunion on forums air. We have a listener who asked. What do you think of efforts such as yelp putting black owned business labels or lists? Do you think that makes a difference Is that the best way to market black chefs and restaurants? I think it's you know, during this time black businesses Was all business but black business, particularly Need all the help it can get, because the access to generational wealth and their access to Um Structural..

Harlem Haiti South Carolina Marcus Samuelsson Association of Chefs Marcus Amos KQED Meena Kim Twitter Rodney Story Netflix Rodney Scott Miami Africa yelp writer America London
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coming up at nine on KQED join us for form with Michael Krasny and Meena Kim during the nine o'clock hour of form a discussion with the leaders of some Bay Area arts organizations. About how they've adapted during the pandemic and what's ahead for arts. We'll talk quarantine culture around 10 with Meena Kim and writer Alex Giang of New York magazine and also during the 10 o'clock hour, we'll check in with Los Angeles Times reporter Ron Lynn. About how hospitals in Southern California are coping with the latest surgeon. Coronavirus cases all informed today. Meena Kim Michael Krasny, your hosts on KQED Public radio. Join us from 9 to 11 this morning. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. We've called back a doctor who has now been on the job for 272 consecutive days. Dr Joseph Tone, chief of critical care of Houston's United Memorial Medical Center, is on the line. His work puts him at the center of managing Coronavirus cases. I've been sleeping no more than two hours per night. I signed more. Let certificates last week that in my entire life almost all put together that was July. When we spoke, his case numbers were rising in Houston. We spoke again when the national death toll past 200,000 people in September, I'm leaving another million. I mean, I'm going and going and going on also the sense that if I don't do what I'm doing right now. Nobody else is going to buy. Last month, Dr Veron's hospital was accepting covert patients from hard hit El Paso, which is hundreds of miles west of Houston. You have no idea how crazy things out. I mean, it's it's beyond ridiculous. The number of patients have increased. The severity of illness has increased. I truly believe that the next six weeks are gonna be probably the darkest weeks that Houston has have. We need people to You just keep on fighting. You know, I I know it's tiring. I mean, I'm exhausted. You can imagine. I mean, it's It is very tough. All right now we're in the middle of those six tough weeks, and we've called Dr Verrone again. Welcome back to the program, sir. Thank you for having me. So we're in this week when the death toll past 300,000. It's a week when vaccines were spreading. How is your case load this holiday season? Unfortunately, we have as I predicted, you know exponentially. We having increasing there is no day when I get at least capitals and new patients critically ill. Getting admitted to my colleague unit and you said, critically ill half a dozen patients per day day after day after day. How's the staff holding up? Well, you know, just as before. I mean, they're they're stress there, exhaustive. I have nurses that in the middle of the day we step crying, just crying because you know, the lowest human was they see patients die or, you know they have a lot of work on one patient, and then suddenly when they're finally done with that patient You hear that? They have three more patients waiting for for them coming from the emergency room or coming from a transfer from like you correctly, so that they're you know, from a passel from all any other place that we're helping out. We've heard from some hospitals across the country that they may be. They don't exactly turn people away. But it's slow to admit people. There are delays in care, Maybe other people who need treatment for other things there. Are turned away problems, at least at the edges of not more. Are you able to care for everyone who shows up needing care? We do, but we do have, like all of the husbands from time to time. We have the lace. Sometimes I would stuff it's so stretched that sometimes a patient may have toe wait in the emergency department. For the video of ours instead of rapidly going to the governor unit. What have you thought about his news has spread of the vaccine. The first vaccine inoculation is going out. Well, you know, the one thing that is important that people need to understand is that the vaccine is not the answer. Okay? Not the answer. At the present time on the fact that we're vaccinating people right now. It's not gonna make Any difference in what happens to the number of admissions that we're getting over the next few weeks. So, yes, it is important to vaccinate. However, it's not going to fix the problem in the next few weeks. Remember, we have Christmas coming up. I mean, I am now seeing the effects off What happened in Thanksgiving. I'm getting all those of missions from succeeding. We're gonna have the same after Christmas because people are not understanding. People don't understand that having a virtual Christmas if what we need to do this year instead of, you know, ending up in our intensive care units, and I even want to say it could be worse after Christmas, right? Because this is an exponential spread, and if we had more people sick over Thanksgiving, that's even more people who might be exposed if people get together again at Christmas time. Absolutely without question about it any him? People are dropping their gaffe. My primary concern is like a game. They think they vaccine is going to fix it, and he's gonna fix it fast. No, the vaccine will work. But it's gonna take time is gonna be month and more months and probably been years before everybody gets vaccinated, and then we will have control over this pandemic. Dr Anthony Fauci said yesterday on the program that maybe caseloads will start to go down significantly when half the population is vaccinated, which is something that is a good number of months away..

Houston Meena Kim Michael Krasny Meena Kim KQED Michael Krasny NPR News Dr Anthony Fauci Steve Inskeep Southern California Rachel Martin Ron Lynn Los Angeles Times Dr Verrone Dr Joseph Tone Bay Area arts New York magazine Alex Giang
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Valley after some areas of fog, mostly sunny as well. High's 58 to 64 on KQED at nine after morning edition Join US for Forum With Michael Krasny and Meena Kim will hear about a state audit that found California's unemployment development Department put claim it's at risk of identity theft. At 10, Meena Kim talks to science writer at Young about how hospitals are preparing for a covert 19 search and what frontline workers face says the pandemic gets worse. Meena Kim. Michael Krasny, your hosts be a part of our Monday morning program. It's forum 9 to 11. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Greene. It has taken just six days, six days for the United States to add a million new covert cases. We've moved past the 12 million mark in documented infections in this country, and that is before Thanksgiving. Healthcare workers across the country are holding their breath now knowing that surges we have seen following other holidays have been really bad. There is reason for optimism with new medications and vaccines. But it will be many months before all Americans could be vaccinated. Let's talk this through with NPR's Allison. Aubrey. Alison. Good morning to you. Good morning, David. This is I mean, this is a really frightening surgeon. And it sounds like it's just getting worse. Yeah, you know, as we head into this holiday week, it's Graham. I mean, we're averaging 170,000 new cases a day. It's a 60% increased just from two weeks ago. If you look at the map, David, it's all orange and red. In so many parts of the country deaths are averaging about 1200 per day and rising. That's nearly a person dying from Cove in every minute. I spoke to former CDC director Tom Frieden about this surge. It's shocking. We're losing the equivalent of a 9 11 attack every three days in the U. S. And what frankly scares me is that Thanksgiving could become the Super Bowl of super spreading events. You know, it just doesn't take much, David. All you need is one asymptomatic person in your gathering to start a round of infections. The CDC now says Most coronavirus cases are in fact spread by people without any symptoms, and we know how easily the virus spreads within households. We also know how much Thanksgiving means to all of us. I think we all want to be with their families. So badly thing CDC telling us just don't travel. I mean, do you think Americans air are listening? Despite how much they just want to see their loved ones? Yeah, I think many people are rethinking their plans David, especially the travel part. But a survey out from the University of Michigan this morning finds that one in three people polled say the benefits of gathering with family. For the holidays are worth the risk of spreading or getting the virus. I should point out. The survey came out last week or actually was completed last week before being released this morning, and this is before the CDC advisory. But it does show the temptation and the desire you 0.0.2. People want to see family. I certainly want to, too, but is Tom Frieden says, better to have a zoom Thanksgiving than an ICU Christmas? Yeah, It's not the same when we could show each other the turkeys over Zoom. I mean, like some way toe show each other love. Well, I want to ask you about hospitals. I mean, they're not more than 83,000 people hospitalized with covert 19. What does that number mean? How much pressure hospitals around the country feeling right now, you know, around the country hospitals are filling up David, and this is taking a toll on frontline health care workers. I spent much of this weekend. I think the doctor is talking to nurses and some of hard hit areas and they are exhausted. They're just fried. David. I spoke to Alison Wines. She's a nurse practitioner. At the University of Iowa hospitals. They have three times the number of covert patients they did two weeks ago. As part of their search plan. They've had to reschedule, postpone non essential surgeries and procedures because they're at capacity. Last week, they had to convert more beds into ICU beds because the demand is growing so fast. We filled those extra beds within 24 hours, and the anxiety has not stopped. I'm still a little bit nauseous today thinking about you know what if the next That event isn't enough, And what if we have to keep going? You know, Keep in mind David. Covert patients require a lot of resource is before Covad. The average ICUs Day was about four days of her hospital. But Covic patients in the ICU for weeks, and if they're on mechanical ventilation, dozens of staff could be involved in their care. Also, given the risks and the need to minimize time and patient's rooms, it's harder to his one There's told me deliver compassionate care. I just think about these health care workers too. I mean, you and I talked about maybe figure out ways to mark Thanksgiving. Like with a zoom Thanksgiving. Healthcare workers can't even think about that. I mean, they just must be working around the clock right now. You know they have long, grueling shifts. That is, one nurse told me we eat like snakes. We eat a meal and one bite. There isn't time to sit down and eat a meal during shift. On top of his health care workers were like the rest of his David. They're trying to manage home life, You know, maybe kids, not in school or the needs of aging parents. Issues of isolation, Loneliness stress, Alison wines, says it is simply exhausting. I have had moments where I have thought I can't do this anymore, and it's not that I don't want to keep doing it. But I just don't know how much longer I can function as a human under these conditions, and given the numbers right now rising cases her hospital has likely not seen the worst of it. Well, that voice just stays with me. I mean, just just on the verge of breaking. I mean, that has to hit you hard. You must be hearing this so much from people in the middle of this. You know, these conversations with health care workers really brought me to tears. Alison Wines told me that after a shift at work if she drives home, and she's these people gathered in a bar or at a restaurant or just people not being masked in public, it's just incredibly frustrating. It's a punch in the gut. It feels disrespectful, and we all have rules in society that we follow that make us good citizens and make us live in a civilized society in right now taking care of each other by falling public health mandates are recommendations is part of that. You know, we all get it that Americans value freedom. But she says with that freedom comes responsibilities, too. And right now that means wearing a mask and following all of the other recommendations. Well, that I mean recommendations, and we're seeing more more restrictions now from from some states, curfews and restrictions on business is, um, Is there evidence that this is going to help stem? Let's look at what's happening in England and in other parts of Europe, they've had nationwide restrictions in place for weeks. They've closed. Many nonessential businesses and cases in England have been declining in recent days. Here's Tom Frieden again. We do see case is beginning to come down in the United Kingdom over the past week or so, And that's almost certainly the result of the kind of restrictions you're seeing. Interestingly, they named leave schools open and prioritize closing other parts of society. So this is something we'll hear more about in the coming weeks. NPR's Allison Aubrey, Alison. Thank you. Thank you, David. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Procter and Gamble, maker of Metamucil Fiber Gummies made with a blend of prebiotic plant based fibers that provide 5 G of fiber in each serving, designed to be taken every day more at Metamucil dot com. When President elect Biden takes office at noon on January 20th. He.

David Greene Alison Wines CDC Tom Frieden David Allison Aubrey Meena Kim NPR Michael Krasny NPR News Steve Inskeep United States California England University of Iowa hospitals asymptomatic University of Michigan
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At the Altamont Pass is slow, but it looks like the crash near Grant Line is over to the shoulder. Joe McConnell for KQED Traffic support comes to you from European Sleep works. Breezy. A chance of morning rain rain likely also this afternoon in the Bay Area and also in the Sacramento Valley High's upper fifties to the upper sixties today windy of times in parts of the Sacramento Valley with rain. Eyes 58 to 68 form coming up a nine on KQED with Michael Krasny and Meena Kim during the nine o'clock hour discussion about a rise in drug overdose deaths in San Francisco and also a look at how the pandemic is complicating efforts to get people the treatment they need. And his California rolls back re openings amid a spike in Corona virus cases. There has been some good news on the vaccine front will find out the next steps for vaccines in progress, those topics and others with Meena Kim and Michael Krasny, starting at nine. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Let's take the temperature so to speak of the effort to distribute a vaccine to companies have now announced they have Corona virus vaccines shown to be 90% effective or more. One of them comes from Fizer and one comes from Moderna. Immediately after the news of Madonna's vaccine broke on Monday, the company gave a presentation to the people who would have to distribute such vaccines. Both of them have to be kept frozen, which means you cannot just ship and store them like other products. Ah, lot of lives rest on how that particular detail is addressed. So NPR's Selena Simmons, Duffin has been looking into it. Good morning. Money, Steve. Why did the vaccines need to be kept frozen? Well, both of these vaccine candidates are what are what's called Messenger RNA vaccines and M Arnie is very unstable. So to help explain what that means. Here's an analogy. Think of the vaccine like a melty chocolate bar. To stabilize the vaccines. These drug companies used modified building blocks or nuclear sides, which would kind of be like changing the chocolate recipes. So it's less melty. I'm not my father holds fingers quite as much. Okay, Go on. Go on. Right. So then they coated it with something something called lipid nano particles. Margaret Lee, you explain this to me. She's a vaccine research researcher who chairs the board of the International Society for Vaccines. That formulation helps protect the RNA. It's kind of like putting your chocolate inside a candy coating. And you haven't Eminem so the chocolate doesn't melt. So then the freezing is also done to protect the Arnie and make the vaccine more stable. It's the same concept is freezing food so it doesn't spoil. Although.

Michael Krasny NPR News Steve Inskeep M Arnie Meena Kim International Society for Vacc Margaret Lee Altamont Pass Joe McConnell KQED Sacramento Valley High drug overdose Bay Area Sacramento Valley Grant Line NPR California Eminem Rachel Martin
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On this Wednesday morning comes from San Matteo Credit Union. For him on the way at nine. Michael Krasny, your host for the first hour from 9 to 10. Michael talks with the authors of a new book called The Upswing About what History can teach us about how the United States could repair social and shared national identity. Meena Kim takes over forum at 10 with a statewide broadcast from 10 to 11. Meena talks to experts about how election polling actually works and how they've changed since 2016 all on form today, 9 to 11 Very Nice day in Northern California, not as windy at all Hi's mid sixties, lower eighties in the Bay Area today. Look for mostly sunny skies in the Sacramento Valley. Sacramento's high Today 78 degrees. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D C and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. Here in the U. S. We're seeing one of the worst outbreaks of the Corona virus yet. We're going to zoom in this morning on Illinois, one of the states seeing a spike in cases in a moment we'll hear from the state's health director, but first to a debate over how to respond to this In some parts of Illinois. Local leaders are not backing guidelines from state health officials. Justine Hermann from member station W. L. L reports In Winnebago County at the north end of the state Public Health Administrator Sandra Martell has been threatened with lawsuits from bar owners who want to continue to offer indoor service in violation of the governor's orders for that region. At a press conference this week, she pleaded with businesses to spare her agency from spending precious resource is trying to police the contentious mandate. Our team spends more time having to do this. And I really think that we would want to be spending. Our public health resource is on. Sandra Martel faces a dilemma. She can order a bar closed, for example. But if law enforcement doesn't back her up, nothing more will happen. And the local sheriff and local politicians have publicly encouraged businesses to defy the state's orders. Meanwhile, covert cases, hospitalizations and deaths continue to rise. 200 miles south in Champagne County. Public health Administrator Julie Prides experience is night and day. This job is tough enough in doing it in champagne where I have a ton of support. I can't imagine doing it where you're fighting against here. People in your community. It's horrible and we're losing public health people all over the country. Pride says early preventive steps in coordination with other local entities saved lives and champagne. The University of Illinois campus runs a massive Corona virus testing program mandatory for all students and employees. And at the start of the semester, campus area bars and restaurants willingly shut down indoor dining for weeks going beyond the states mandate at the time. The death rate in Champagne County is now less than a quarter of Winnebagos. In Illinois, Like everywhere else, Public health guidance has become a political target part of the culture war that makes the job of public health officials much more difficult. And, according to the latest numbers could put more people at risk for NPR news. I'm Christine Herman. And we have the director of public health for the state of Illinois on the line with us this morning, Dr Eng Hotsy Zeke, Doctor, Thanks for being here. Pleasure to be with him. Thank you for having me just listening to that story there. I wonder I want to pose the question to you. I mean, how much harder is your job if you have, local authorities say, encouraging people to defy state orders. No, it's quite a struggle. We want to focus our energy on educating the public and getting the right data to them. But instead we're now Dividing our efforts on two fronts, trying to combat peoples who are actively working against what will come to keep our community safe. It's a continuous struggle. I know you've been pleading with people to wear masks. Which, of course, is a plea that we have heard from public health officials for months Now, are people listening to you? People are people are definitely listening. I would say probably more than half the state is listening and and implementing, but Because of how the mask wearing work. You really need universal adoption, and so we need more and more people to hear and understand and buy into this really important mitigation. Measure and we're not there yet. Unfortunately, the mixed messaging has not helped public health caused at all and the desire, but the desire by people to believe in things which are comforting But not true is incredibly strong right now. What are you talking about? When you say people are believing things that they're comforting, but not necessarily true. Well, people are happy to believe that you don't have to change anything that you're doing. You can go backto life. You were living it pre Cove it. You don't have toe Limits your gatherings. You don't have to wear a mask. You don't have to keep all this distance that that you know, everybody would love to be in the pre covert world were not there and so thinking that you can eyes really counter to the progress that we're trying to make. You have said that this is personal for you. I understand if you've lost them relatives yourself to covet. No, I can't imagine that There are many people who haven't been touched by this. I've been fortunate in my nuclear family not have lost anyone. But definitely if you extend out to the extended family way have had sickness and death..

Illinois Champagne County NPR News Michael Krasny Meena Kim Administrator United States Sacramento Valley San Matteo Credit Union director Sacramento University of Illinois Bay Area Sandra Martel Rachel Martin Winnebago County David Greene Northern California Los Angeles
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes from European sleep Works on Lady Later this morning Forum from 9 to 11 with me. Kim and Michael Krasny, Michael's guest at nine in San Jose Mayor Sam Accardo talking aboutthe city's latest efforts to suppress Corona virus, tackle homelessness and rebuild the local economy. Then at 9 30, a discussion about a new report that found California prison officials have frequently failed to enforce mask requirements for prison staff and inmates to stop the spread of Corona virus. What That means for people living and working in prisons and Meena Kim attend talks with sociologists, Zeynep to fetch E aboutthe rising cases across the country prospects for getting the pandemic under control. And feelings of what is called pandemic fatigue. All ahead on forum. We hope you'll listen and participate the two way program from 9 to 11 this morning. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D C and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. A cove it storm is on the rise. That grim new warning comes from the governor of Illinois. Texas is another place suffering. With many new cases, Residents of El Paso have been asked to stay home for two weeks to prevent cases from overwhelming hospitals there. We're going to take a closer look this morning at Wisconsin, Rural parts of that state are being hit very hard. Theresa Weiler is a nurse. She supervises the covert unit at Marshfield Medical Center in central Wisconsin. We're busy. It's almost a rotating door. Here. We Either send somebody home or they leave. And then we get somebody else in a bed right away it Sze truly day by day in the pandemic, providing patients with 24 hour care means serving their emotional needs to because their families can't be with them. The patients are scared they are alone to to visit her restrictions. We try to be their family. We tried to be their friend. We try to be their nurse. The feeling of isolation is even worse for patients in rural Wisconsin patients who often have.

Wisconsin Meena Kim Theresa Weiler Michael Krasny Mayor Sam Accardo Lady Later El Paso NPR News California Rachel Martin Zeynep San Jose David Greene Illinois Texas Los Angeles Sze Marshfield Medical Center Washington
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Parking lot, and it's all jammed up to the base of the incline section. The metering lights have not actually been turned on yet. Joe McConnell for cake. Thank you. Choe. Traffic support this morning comes from San Matteo Credit Union Later this morning. It's forum with Michael Krasny and Meena Kim, at nine form discusses a proposal in Oakland that would set health and safety standards for homeless encampments while also clearing them for areas near schools, businesses, residences and parks. The Oakland City Council is set to vote on the plan today and attend with me to Cam Forum takes a look at efforts to turn out Asian American voters. They're the fastest growing voting block in the country, according to Pew Research. But outreach to Asian American voters remains low more on this and other topics today. Two hours of Forum Meena Kim Michael Krasny, join us after morning edition from 9 to 11 here on Kiki Dee. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Justus. This country is moving into a colder season. Corona virus cases are rising new cases are up 30% from two weeks ago. States mainly in the Midwest and Great Plains, posted new daily records last week. Dr. Brad Burmeister is one of those dealing with that He's an emergency physician of Belen Hospital in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Our hospital is very full right now, with a lot of Corona virus cases. Looking back a few months ago, we thought we were really busy then and it's just crazy. How many Multiple times more busy. We are now the concerning thing is the trends that we're seeing are positivity rate continues to be very high greater than 20% In North Dakota. We reached Renee Mock, the public health director in Bismarck, burly here in the Bismarck area. We had over the weekend. Just one bed available for I see you. And so if you had a severe illness that required more critical care likely you may have to be transported to another area of the state. Some have gone even outside state lines to be able to get hospital care that they have needed. So that's the backdrop is we bring in the doctor who was overseeing the search for a vaccine here in the United States? Dr. Francis Collins is director of the National Institutes of Health. Dr Collins. Welcome to program. Thank you. Good morning, Steve. I want people to know that you said about a month ago that you had three vaccines that had made it to phase three testing meaning really widespread testing tens of thousands of people taking them. In areas where they would be exposed to Corona virus. How would you describe the status of the search for a vaccine as of today? I think it continues to be absolutely breathtaking. The pace that has been achieved here recognizing that most vaccine development in the past has been a matter of multiple years, four years, six years, sometimes 10 years. The fact that we knew about this virus and its particular genome sequence in January, and we now have four phase three trials in the United States that have gotten launched. Two of which are very close to completing their enrollment of 30,000 or more participants each. It's pretty amazing that that's been accomplished. But before anybody starts to worry, I also want to reassure everybody. We're not doing this by cutting corners. Thes will be vaccines that air tested with the most rigorous standards for safety and efficacy. If we get to the point by sometime, maybe the end of this year where one or more of those is judged to be safe and effective, it will be because it's safe and effective. And you said if we get to that point, so you see the end of the year is within the realm of possibility. But not anything we should plan on. Again. This is a really tough scientific challenge. We're doing everything possible to try to develop and test the vaccines in the most rigorous way. But you'll never know anybody who's worked on vaccines before will tell you the things that happen it by the way, two of these Trials are currently on hold because of a concern about a possible safety issue. People should be reassured by that, that that means we're really looking at the safety issues with great scrutiny. But that does say that those two trials are of somewhat uncertain status. And we'll have to see what happens in the coming days about reactivating those if they're judged to be safe after all, so, yeah, many uncertainties here, But I am guardedly optimistic, as I think are most of the experts who are watching over this, including Dr Valachi who I talk to every day about this because he works for me that we will have by the end of the year. One or more of these that will pass this very high standard of safety and efficacy. Probably not in the next couple of weeks that we would assume right. I would think it's very unlikely given the timetables and the standards that have to be followed that you will hear about an emergency use authorization before late November at the earliest. Okay, that's useful to know, of course, since Election Day is two weeks away, and there had been much talk about some kind of vaccine announcement before the election. You're giving us the facts here and telling us that the time table is a little bit longer than that. I want people to know that you're part of the Corona virus task force that has been advising the White House advising the president. From our perspective, as laymen looking from the outside the task force is much less public than it was less visible than it, Wass. Ah, and there's more prominence for a new member, Dr Scott Atlas, who's not an infectious disease expert. What is your impression? Is the president still listening to experts who know what they're talking about. The past force continues to meet.

United States Steve Inskeep director Dr. Francis Collins Meena Kim Michael Krasny Michael Krasny president Joe McConnell San Matteo Credit Union Oakland Choe NPR News Pew Research Dr Scott Atlas Justus Midwest Meena Kim Dr Valachi Oakland City Council North Dakota
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Skies today low sixties. To the low eighties inland. Cooler temperatures tomorrow. This is Fara. My Meena Kim, a pole last month of Latino voters found only 40% said they had been contacted by a presidential campaign. Political parties often fail to engage Latino voters. Effectively, even though they have the numbers to sway crucial swing states in the presidential election, as well as tight local races. We look at efforts this year to increase turnout in the Latin next community and Their political power. And joining me is Maria Teresa Kumar. She's president of Voto Latino Acidic Engagement organization. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. I had to say that I'm excited with Kate. Because I am from Sanoma. I grew up with you. Also. This is a treat. Oh, that's so great. Well, we're so glad to have you on and you know, I know. Voter Latino has just been so active in registering voters and trying to play a key role in increasing civic engagement among Latinos, and I'm wondering, you know, with the final weeks of the campaign now. Where? Where are you focused? What's the plan? Yes. Ah Tau win focus, but there's no plan B so I will share with you. Our goal was to register half a million voters in time for the November 3rd election Yesterday, we surpassed that goal. We have officially registered 520,000 registered voters in six battleground states. Arizona. Texas, Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Nevada. We also did some work in Georgia and North Carolina. And now what? We're pivoting where we will probably in the cycle registry 600,000 again in these key states. But what is also exciting is that you mentioned on at the top of the show that the majority of Latinos did not get contacted. Even if they're registered voters. They're what we call low propensity voters. And this is where The ability to change how they contact voters. Because 60% of Latinos are under the age of 33 40% of Latinos are under the age of 33 that are eligible to vote that are registered. And if you'd only register if you only contact the person that has a history of voting. By default. You're never going to contact to the majority of Latinos because we're so young in one in one scenario, and in the other For the first time you have one out of 10. Voters are going to be naturalized citizens. So even under that scenario, so well, But I think I were pleased to announce that we are going to run a really aggressive campaign in the six states where we will be contacting. In addition to the 600,000 folks that we've registered, we're gonna contact an additional 3.2 million low propensity voters in the state. It's we have. We have been fortunate enough that we have raised the funding out from low low dollar donors and individual donors to rent such an aggressive campaign. But it really people really have to imagine reimagined how they cultivate Latinos moving forward because for the very first time we're going to be the second largest group of Americans that can cast a ballot. And half of our community is still unregistered. So what have you found? Does work because I know that there have been added challenges, especially this time around, of course with the pandemic. So this is where are the way we do? Our work is counterintuitive to the norm. Norm is site based voter registration on that is talking to people you know, at the local Wal Mart in that sort of stuff from our inception, But the Latino has been a digital organization where digital natives talking Tio roughly those 16 million people that turned that are in the United States. Our target audience are young people. We reached roughly 15 million people a month during this election, and our job is to mobilize them to give you an idea. We came into the pandemic having registered 80,000 folks, and we digitally targeted them right around the George Float program beside death of George Floyd because we knew that the protests were being conducted by a lot of Latinos. Two. We have a great affinity for what is happening in the African American community, because, sadly, we're not so far behind. Doing those digital conversations and digital marketing. You know, I always say what you know way happen to register voters. But we're really in the business of marketing democracy, good and enfranchisement. By doing that. We registered over 100,000 folks in the month of June alone because we connected protest voting and of the people we registered. 80% of them were under 33. 75% of them were women. And that is because we know that young Latinos in particular have an outsized role in their families and I can influence by just latticed their immediate friends, but they will also influence their families on so our job, Walter Latinos to continue closing that voter registration gap. If we had, if you know if you were to look at the only real ways that we can bring in more people into the electorate, it's really two pools People. It is young voters. For the first time we're going to 12 million more young voters than baby boomers in our nation's history. Two thirds of them are young people of color and who a quarter of them happen to be Latino. And so when we look at that, with what the opportunities are, I think that I'm tired of nail biter elections. We actually know that we have a whole constituency at their young voters that I don't have to remind them or convince them that climate change is really I just need to get them to register to vote so that the person and change the policies that they already deeply believe in you. How would you characterize the level of enthusiasm around this year's election? We've been seeing polls you know, over several months showing it kind of varied and that even enthusiasm for the candidates was a little depressed from 2016. Do you find the enthusiasm high among young voters? And do you think it's different, depending on age? One. It's different, depending on age is also dependent on region where where the community really is. I will tell you one of the things that we're seeing. For example, everybody talks about Florida. Florida is gonna be really hard. I think, because there's so many different generations and so many different constituencies among the Latino community there, But if you look at Texas in Arizona and North Carolina, Georgia, Pennsylvania, there is something different happening there. In Arizona. You have a whole population that aged in becoming registered voters after Jan Brewer and and Arpaio targeted their their flood ones, their parents in themselves and they are fierce. They are organizing. They're mobilizing. They're running for office, and they are changing the electoral map. Texas is where I should, with her up in in cinema and I was in college when people's and rose to power, and the best kept secret was that California stopped being a swing state because myself and millions of people like me convinced our families to come naturalized citizens and to register and vote and California became a decidedly blue state. We are on the eve of seeing the exact same thing happened in Texas in Texas, Texas is responsible in home to 25% of all eligible Latino youth voters. 2.5 million. And under there, as they were our aging into this voting population. They don't only have trump that gives them incredible anxiety, but they also have. And George Abbott, who site The most dangerous voter and exhibited immigration laws on the box. It's called s before and s before allows an official In power to ask a minor if they are American citizens. Imagine having an eight year old or nine year old and having your child being subjected to their citizenship. It is something that is happening in Texas. That is why one of the reasons that this aging and you know better work. It's interesting in a better war, Obama lost Texas by 16 points. Hillary lost by nine points, but our work lost by two points He lost by 212,000 registered voters both let you know the cycle.

Texas Voto Latino Acidic Engagement Florida Walter Latinos Arizona North Carolina Maria Teresa Kumar Meena Kim Sanoma president Georgia United States Obama George Float Kate George Floyd George Abbott
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is not a major factor. Joe McConnell for City State owned VD for Forum from 9 to 11, with Michael Krasny and Meena Kim during the nine o'clock hour forum talks with the climate scientist Daniel Swain. About the link between climate change and wild fires. A study released this year found that the number of autumn days with extreme fire weather has more than doubled since the 19 seventies and a 10 a wide swath of stressors the corona virus pandemic. Economic recession. Wildfires of coming election remote learning And racism to name a few are putting a major strain on people's mental health at 10 with Meena Kim Forum has a discussion with experts about how to cope with the current surge of troubles many are experiencing. Join us today from 9 to 11 the morning fog, Smokey and hazy the rest of today. The spare the air alert in effect through Wednesday for the VE area. High temperatures today will range from the sixties. To the low nineties inland. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. The devastation in California from deadly wildfires is historic. So far this year, thousands of wildfires have devoured More than a million and a half acres, an area more than three times larger than Los Angeles where I am the LMU Lightning complex fire is now the second largest in the state's history. And the Flames did not spare Andy pissed in his home. He's a 23 year veteran with the South San Francisco Fire Department. He spent decades saving other people's homes, Pestana Lost everything as he put it last Wednesday, his farm his home many of his animals, but he and his wife are safe. And he and his wife, Sarah Hawkins, joined me on the line from Winter's California about an hour northeast of San Francisco. Thank you both for taking some time for us. I can't imagine what you've been through. Thank you for having us. Oh, Andy, I want to start with you. I mean, as I said, you've been a firefighter for 23 years. Your own property now hard hit by this fire. Just talk to me about this fire of you ever battled anything like it? I have not. And not many people that couldn't say that they've battled in fires have been in fires or experience fires. Of such size and magnitude. And at the speed that this moved seemed unprecedented. Well, yeah, I mean, talk to aunty at home asleep in off duty. When when it came to a property. I mean, can you take me to the moment when you I realize that that it was this out of control. We actually received multiple phone calls back to back from our neighbor and they lost everything also, but they called us woke us up and said, Hey, We've been given notification from their son who is a local firefighter, that it's bad. Get up. I went outside and did a quick assessment of what I could see. And I could see The ridge line two behind US. All a glow and we're talking miles and miles of Miles from my right to my left. As I looked out the pact or I hurried in and woke up, Sarah, we quickly got trust through a few things and bangs. Made sure we had identification with us on a little bit of money and made sure that cars were pointed out. I then went out to kind of assess what was going on. Based on my training and years of service, saying What am I seeing on DH? I've never seen a fire front of that size coming towards office. We've had fires back there in the past. Then it seemed like everything changed. The winds picked up It turned 90 degrees on us. Instead of coming out of the west. It came out of the north. And Sarah had joined me to kind of just see what was going on, and by that time we turned around and realize there was a flaming front coming behind us from our north and it was going to flank our exit. We ran for the cars, and we got out of there with flames close enough that I had to get in on the passenger side of the truck instead of the driver's side because it was It was too much fire on that side of the car to get in, and we Got out and it just came so quick. Well. I'm so Believe that you two are safe. Sarah, what was going through your mind? I mean, did you feel like you were going to get out of there somehow? Well, I was pure adrenaline when we had gone out Tio Assess where the flames were coming from where the fire was coming, And all of a sudden, just hear this roar from the north. It was kind of shocking that it was coming so fast and that the flames were as high as they were. They should not have been that high on and it was like we got to go and I ran in the house and grabbed the dog and Just I had to literally throw her into the car because she was so panicked at the flames and just Get out. Have you been able to assess what you've lost and what condition the properties in We've lost everything but our barn. All of our farming equipment. Our greenhouse the house. The house is just A six inch layer of crumbled drive all and shattered tile. And we lost. All of our junior does that we were retaining and the's the goats you're talking about. I mean, your your prize breeders should say. Sir. What did those goats mean to you? You know, I've worked really hard on My breeding program, and every year we have babies and a bottle feed all of them so that they'll be friendly and I know all of them. I know all of their names I delivered All of them there. It's It's not just a place. Obviously, Sarah, this is your livelihood and your business. And already we were in a pandemic in a faltering economy. I mean, have you even begun to think about how you move forward and what's next now? Just barely. You spend an hour two. Just looking through,.

Sarah Hawkins Flames California Meena Kim Forum Andy Los Angeles San Francisco Joe McConnell US NPR News VE Steve Inskeep Michael Krasny City State Daniel Swain scientist Pestana
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Prey lll in for Meena Kim. Why comedy and why? Now? That's the question that media and social change scholar Katie born Chatu poses at the outset of her book, a comedian and an activist walk into a bar the serious role of comedy and social justice. In it. She and co author Lauren Feldman explore how comedy by laying their issues like racism, sexism and inequality can help us work toward bridging divides and achieving social change. We'll talk to her and comedian again. Far sod about how comedy helps us make sense of a world turned chaotic by the pandemic and a deeply divisive government and we want to hear from you which comedians do you turn to these days? And why email us at form at dot org's That's all next after this news. Live from NPR NEWS. I'm no RAHM Senator Elizabeth Warren confirms the Postal Service's inspector general is conducting an audit into recent changes in U. S. P s operations. Massachusetts Democrat was among legislators who had called for an investigation into actions by Postmaster General Lewis to joy. He's reassigned 23 postal executives and banned overtime to cut costs. Warren says the changes have slowed mail service and may be an attempt to undermine the processing of mail in ballots this election. Corona virus Pandemic relief bill stalled in Congress includes money for the Postal Service, Republican Senator Susan Collins told W G. M E. The USPS must be provided with the money it needs. There's no doubt that the Postal Service has long term Financial challenges and those who need to be dealt with. But now it's not the time to be cutting back services. President Trump said Friday he would support money for the Postal Service if he gets other items that he wants in the pandemic relief bill. Nearly 150,000 homes and businesses in Iowa are still without.

Postal Service Senator Elizabeth Warren Lauren Feldman President Trump Postmaster General Lewis Meena Kim Senator Susan Collins NPR NEWS Katie Chatu Massachusetts Congress Iowa W G. M
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning. Looking ahead to nine with forum on the 9 to 11 with Michael Krasny, first up. Michael discusses an ordinance approved this week by the Marin County Board of Supervisors that allows for penalties to businesses and individuals who don't comply with Corona virus. Health orders. At 10 with Meena Kim on the statewide broadcast of forum more than 80% of California kids or in districts that governor Newsome says must use remote on ly learning when school's return, and that's prompted some parents to search for tutors or teachers to come to their homes. Sometimes in pandemic pods with several families to oversee distance. Learning more about it on forum with mean akin to ours today, Michael and Mina 9 to 11. On member supported Kiwi de public radio. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. More federal agents in more American cities, President Trump has announced he is expanding a plan to fight violent crime. Yesterday, he said he's sending federal agents and money to Chicago, Illinois. Albuquerque, New Mexico and Kansas City, Missouri, with more cities to come. It's all part of a program that has been dubbed Operation Legend. This started up in Kansas City after a four year old boy named of Legend. Tell a Pharaoh was killed and then protests followed. We're going to hear from Kansas City's mayor in a moment, but first, let's look at Chicago. The president has long targeted the city for not doing enough to stop violent crime. This bloodshed must end this bloodshed will end NPR's share. Corley is with us now, with more on this announcement from Chicago. Hi, Cheryl. Hi. Explain what you have been able to learn about the program. Well, as you said it started in in Kansas City because of the death of the four year old boy in the rise in crime there of shootings and And this expansion is going to send about 200 agents from the FBI, homeland Security and other agencies to Chicago and more than 30 to Albuquerque. The cities will also receive is you mentioned grants that will be used to hire more police. President. Trump says he had to take this step now because he had no choice and he talked about mayors that he called extremists on the push by activist and others to defund the police, he says that's caused the shocking explosion of violence. And he often criticized the Chicago and he pointed to Chicago as an example during this announcement, as well. Perhaps no citizens have suffered more from the menace a violent crime. And the wonderful people of Chicago City. I know very well, you know, Overall crime is actually down in Chicago as it is in much of the country, But murders and shootings have been a big problem in certain neighborhoods here. As in other urban areas of the country. So does this have nothing to do with what we saw in Portland, Oregon, where these federal agents, often with no identification were arresting protesters and Taking them off in unmarked cars. I mean, is just this completely separate program. Well, Attorney General William Barr says yes, he says, and that these folks will be engaged in classic crime fighting, he says. For years, there have been federal task force working with local law enforcement and, ah, the that these are tactical teams that were sent to Portland to protect federal buildings. These are street agents there, investigators who will be working to solve murders and to take down the violent Gangs until not about protest, he says, but about fighting crime, not Chicago's mayor, saying about this now Well, she and the president have often been engaged in a war of words. But she seems guardedly open. Here's what she had to say if those agents are here to actually work in partnership. I support of gun violence and violent cases plugging into existing infrastructure of federal agents not trying to play police in our streets, then that's something different, and that man value I guess we don't have any timeline, Cheryl. Not yet. Not yet. All right. NPR's Cheryl Corley from Chicago. We appreciate Cheryl. Thanks. You're welcome. Okay, so that's the situation in Chicago. Let's focus now on what's been happening in Kansas City, Missouri, and we're going to talk about this with the mayor of Kansas City. Quinton Lucas. Mr. Mayor. Thanks for being here. Good morning and good to be with you. So it's my understanding. Federal agents are already in your city. They were deployed a few weeks ago. Can you explain why and what their mandate is? Well, there is some confusion actually. Yesterday, the attorney general reported that 200 arrests have been made in Kansas and seasons deployment of this program. I believe they backtracked a few hours later on DH reduce that number down to one. It is a program right now, where much like mayor like would have noted. We in Kansas City certainly welcome cooperation and solving some of the the awful Gun crimes, particularly murders against young people in Kansas City. That's what the investigations you're supposed to be that of the U. S attorney has sort of time to me is occurring and what this is not supposed to be is the operation we've seen in Portland, where yanking protestors off the streets where we have law enforcement, federal law enforcement that are supplanting our local agents. That said, Given this administration background, the involvement of Homeland Security and yesterday's announcement we remain concerned and certainly vigilant on the fact that we don't want some broader mission creep other broad based policing activities. So to be clear. Did you request this support? On this. I did not directly request the support is usually the way that it works is that the way we would have a much longer conversation about the operation? What it all looks like, And in this situation, I believe that it was granted based upon the conversations of the Police department. I know the U. S attorney's office does talk to my office. But I would have liked to know more about what the operation looks large. Were you even given a heads up that it was gonna happen? I learned about Operation legend from actually someone on Twitter who have notified me that it was occurring. And then I looked at the White House press briefing that it announced that it was already in the works. So let's go back to what you said that the attorney general claimed that that these forces or investigators, rather had made 200 arrests, you say that's not even close to being accurate..

Chicago Kansas City Cheryl Corley president President Trump Chicago City Portland Michael Krasny attorney NPR Albuquerque NPR News Missouri homeland Security Police department Meena Kim Mr. Mayor California Attorney General William Barr governor Newsome
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The immediate Bay Region pretty routine just little so that the Bay Bridge bunched up at the base of the Incline Highway 37 westbound of the Marilyn Bridges slow all the Mon pass Usual jam. Joe McConnell Fork Stay tuned to K Q B for forum with Meena Kim and Michael Krasny today, Michael at nine, discussing the destruction of evidence in a Leo police shooting that has spurred calls for a federal investigation. At 9 34 and looks at the future of Caltrain is, officials warned of a possible shutdown is reported. The light rail system is facing dire financial straits after a 98% drop in ridership and a dispute over a key future funding source. And Meena Kim, your host for for, um, a 10 political scientist, Jacob Hacker and Paul Pearson joined the program. They were going to discuss the Republican Party strategy for acquiring populace voters through fearmongering and race baiting. They're new book is called. Let them eat Tweets. Howthe right rules in an age of extreme inequality. Two hours of Forum our statewide broadcast of forum from 10 to 11 and it all begins at nine with Michael Krasny and Meena Kim on This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David Green. Good morning for weeks now wearing a mask has been politicized here in the United States. But that may be changing. President Trump tweeted out a photo of himself wearing a mask and calling it patriotic yesterday afternoon. 25 states. Plus the District of Columbia now have masked mandates, and many retail stores are requiring them. In a moment, we're gonna ask Dr Anthony Fauci, what we conducive to turn the tide on the pandemic here in the United States, But first NPR's global health correspondent Nurit Eisenman, Reports on the science of masks. For months, scientists have been poring over data from across the globe, China, Japan, Germany, the US to compare what's happened in places where most people use masks versus places where most do not. Ali Mark. Dad is on a research team that's trying to make sense of all thes studies. He's with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. You take every study that has been published on the protective effect ofthe Mass, and then you re analyze all the data, and they came up with a bottom line estimate. If 95% of people where cotton masks when they're interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect. 30% fewer people. In fact, says Mokdad, the mass could be even more powerful because that's assuming everyone is just wearing cloth masks, not surgical mask, sir. In 95 which are even more effective, then marked it and his colleagues ran a simulation based on the pandemics current trajectory through the U. S. They forecast that by November 1st About 85,000 more people will die from covert 19. But if 95% of Americans start wearing cloth masks, we find that 40,000 off these mortalities could be avoided between now and November 1st, and there's more based on the U. S experienced this past spring. McDade's team have come up with an estimate for how bad it would need to get for US officials to return to full on lock down. Texas is just a month away. But if everyone there started wearing masks right now, they just might avoid it as she's job of Harvard largely agrees, But we have never tried to use masses are primary strategy when outbreaks are thiss bath, But I do believe that if we want to avoid a complete lock down, we gotta at least give it a shot. Job who directs the university's Global Health Institute, help to build a tool for counties and states to determine when the virus is spreading fast enough that the only way to get a handle on it is to revert to stay at home mode. And yet, he says, If you look at the hottest of the hot spots in America, the Arizona Texas, Florida, South Carolina, I think there may be a window. Of course, this would require a major change in Americans behavior. Some estimates suggest only 40% currently wear masks nationwide. Natalie Dean, a biostatistician at University of Florida, says This is one of many reasons she's wary of focusing too heavily on masks. It's the idea that if we just did this one thing perfectly that we would be fine, but I think the real solution is going to be doing a lot of things. Okay, nor eat. Eisenman NPR news. So how can public health officials gained the trust of Americans who are skeptical of interventions like masks to fight the Corona virus effectively? Dr Anthony Fauci is on the line. Now He's the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the age and a member of President Trump's Corona Virus Task force. Dr Fauci. Thanks for being on the program again. Good to be with you, Rachel. Why has it been so hard to convince Americans to wear masks? You know that That's difficult, really, to give a single explanation there is, you know, a bit of pushback on authority, the American spirit of not wanting to be told what to do, but I think it is. We've heard from the segment that you just played. The data and the evidence that this can be very helpful as part of a multifaceted way to get these cases down and to diminish the transmissibility. An acquisition is very clear, so we just have to try to get a crisp, clear message. Of people that this is an important tool in our armamentarium. We can actually turn things around. And as one of your guests just mentioned on the clip. It isn't the only thing but it is an important component. There's physical distancing. There's things like closing bars like not doing things as much inside like diminishing the number of people in an indoor restaurant going out to us more than endures. All of that, together with the mask will be the important thing that turned this around. You said there needs to be a crystallized, clear, concise message of. But, you know, the administration has given mixed messages about masks for many months now. Is it time for a federal mask mandate? Well, I'm not sure a mandate. I think of federal from the top signal that this is important, so I was very pleased to see the president wearing a mask and tweeting. About Mass. The vice president does that consistently. So I think we've turned the corner on the road of a consistent message. The problem with mandates, then you've gotta enforce them, and then you get into the problem. I have trust in the American people that if we put a strong emphasis on the importance of wearing masks that we will come around and do that, and get that percentage up above. A relatively low percentage of people that are using that I want to continue on this theme of trust. Actually daily White House Corona virus briefings are scheduled to start again as early as today. Is that going to help rebuild or build for the first time public trust in the federal government's management of the pandemic? Well, I hope so. I mean, certainly it has the potential to do that. If we during those conferences come out and have consistent, clear, non contradictory messages. I believe it would be very helpful. And getting people on the track of knowing the direction that we need to go to get this pandemic under control. So what's going to be different this time? Because, as you know, in the past, President Trump used those briefings. To propagate misleading or outright false information. Well, you know, I'm just I'm hopeful item. I'm an optimist, fundamentally racial. I think if we do this, and we do it right. It will be very informative for the American public, and I hope that that's what we see as we move forward with the decision has been made. I believe it was announced yesterday that they will resume. Let's just see how it goes. I'm hopeful that it will that the value added, or will you be there? You know, I can't guarantee that. I mean, that's up to the White House. I would imagine that I would be at least in on some of them. But we have not heard anything definitive yet. I mean, if they want me there Be more than happy to be there. And if they if not, that's okay too. As long as we get the message across I want to ask you about something. NPR's reporting that last week, the White House instructed hospitals to stop reporting data about the Corona virus cases they were seeing into the CDC system. That they had been using and two instead send that data directly to the Department of Health and Human Services. More than 100 public health organizations have now signed a letter to the task force that you sit on Saying that reporting change threatens the country's response to covert 19. What's your response? You know, I don't.

President Trump president United States Dr Anthony Fauci Meena Kim Michael Krasny NPR News Rachel Martin Department of Health and Human National Institute of Allergy Republican Party University of Washington's Ins Joe McConnell District of Columbia Bay Region White House White House Corona Texas Jacob Hacker
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Michael Krasny. And I want to let you know about some big changes coming to forum and lady starting this week. Every week day I will be hosting at 9 a.m. including Friday's Meena Kim will be hosting a 10 AM What won't be changing is the deep critical conversations about our life and our world. I'll continue to bring you those discussions with authors newsmakers and Mohr and so will mean that starting this week at 9 a.m. And thank you for listening on forum with Michael at nine. Michael takes your questions about the latest round of shutdown rules his guest at 9 30 Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna. At 10 with Meena Kim and his latest article, the Atlantic Science Journalist Head, Young says diminishing resource is strained international relations and demoralized experts have America on its heels. Conversation. A 10 with Meena Kim, Michael and Mina on forum to ours today, give it a listen 9 to 11. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Noelle King. Good morning, we are about to reach 3.5 1,000,000 cases of Cove in 19 in the U. S. That's according to a database at Johns Hopkins Hospitals in Texas, Florida and Arizona are filling up. The key to stopping the virus is rapid, widespread testing. We know that by testing hasn't kept up in some states, including Arizona, now a hot spot adult ICU beds. There are at 90% capacity. So state health officials say they're setting up testing sites that will be able to test 5000 people a day. They're promising people will get their results in 48 hours. When Raymond Embry heard this. He was very surprised he runs one of Arizona's biggest testing sites. The clinic has been giving free tests of thousands of people in Mesa outside of Phoenix, and he told me there's been very little support from the state since his clinic started doing tests in March and honestly enrages me to see You know that, essentially with the snap of a finger there, Arizona Department of Health Services governor do Si's office and FEMA are just able to immediately acquire the supplies, materials and lab capacity to open two sites starting on Friday that are going to be able to accommodate 5000 patients per day with a reported turnaround time of 24 to 48 hours. Now. That's not to say that their community doesn't desperately needed testing. They absolutely do. But where, where all of those materials coming from because I've been told absolutely unequivocally that there is no additional personal protective equipment or supplies available at the state or county level. So where Where is that coming from? Embry is the business manager of Embry Women's Health. It was an obstetrics and gynecology clinic in March, though it pivoted to covert testing. When the seriousness of the virus became too hard to ignore. In May, they took part in something the state was doing called testing blitz. Saturday's the idea was to get as many people tested at once as possible. With all four of those Saturdays combined. We tested over 4000 people that we had a very small percentage of positive cases, Embry said. Less than 50 of those tests came back positive. But then everything changed. What happened in early June? Is that in a single night of testing 200 people we had more people come back positive and that single night's worth of testing than we did with all four of those Saturdays combined. May I ask what went through your head when you saw that happen? I'm not going to travel in July. Sorry that no, I mean, obviously, I was horrified. But before that, I thought our covert 19 testing operation was we put out of business and that would have been at the thing. This probably wouldn't be the first time that a business closure would have been a good thing because that means that we were no longer needed. And when I saw that it really It was, Oh my God. Nobody's prepared for this. There's no way that we're going to stop testing for covert 19. There's no way that drive through pharmacies. They're going to be enough to be able to test like we're going to need to and You know, we need to take immediate action to figure out where we can start testing people in mass. It does sound like your staff must be exhausted. Yes. They definitely are exhausted. And every time I go to the site, you know, and I'm looking to their faces. I mean, they the only reason they're there, I think is because they really want to help the community and help stop the spread of the virus. But You know, I really do wonder how you know how they're doing it. I mean, it's a 159 118 degrees outside or probably feels like it. And you know, on a black top parking surface. It definitely does not make things any easier. You've ever heard The rumors about where you can crack an egg on a parking lot in Arizona and watch it, Fry. That's essentially what our employees and our providers air working on on a daily basis. Have you been getting any help from from government from state officials? For the most part. No, we have not received any any local county state or federal support other than the Arizona National Guard. And the Arizona National Guard has been a fantastic partner. You know, they're Soldiers are out there on a daily basis is well right alongside our providers in our administrative staff, however, other than theirs on a national guard, we have received no support whatsoever. Let me ask you about something that we've been hearing about from across the country, and it sounds like some places they're doing better than others delays in results from the tests. It sounds like you have mechanized this in a way to a point where it is fairly easy to get people tested quickly are the lab results then turned around quickly. How long do people have to wait to get results back? Unfortunately, no. The lab results are not turned around quickly. That is definitely, you know, one of the things that keeps me up at night. You know, sometimes I ask myself and way ask each other. What is the point of testing people If it takes 5 to 7 business days for results to come back, especially for a symptomatic individuals. You know, nobody is just sitting at home. So how many other people have they interacted with And now they found out that their positive and that actually brings up another part of our operation, which is there's not enough swabs and vials. I think I had a mini anxiety attack last night because you know, on Monday, we exceeded 4000 patients being tested in a single day. Yet I only have enough inventory coming in of swabs and vials for 2000 patients on a daily basis, and thankfully, we've had our.

Raymond Embry Arizona Michael Krasny Meena Kim Arizona National Guard Congressman Ro Khanna NPR News Arizona Department of Health S Steve Inskeep Mohr Atlantic Science Johns Hopkins Hospitals America Young FEMA Noelle King Texas Si business manager Mesa
"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"meena kim" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This house. To maintain the commitment to know. To leave European Union with the deal. The European Union won't it will take to ensure that this house can support a deal. But when pressed her what concessions she'd seek may only referenced earlier ideas, the U is already rejected. Meanwhile, a spokesman for European Council. President Donald tusk said the withdrawal is not open for renegotiation. But the the EU would consider a quote reason request to delay Brexit. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London. You're listening to NPR news from news. Good morning. I'm Brian watt. South bay congressman Roe Conn is expected to introduce a War Powers resolution today related to Yemen, civil war similar legislation was blocked last month by the Republican led house. Meena Kim reports in December the Senate passed a resolution to end US support for the Saudi led coalition in Yemen over civilian deaths and the killing of journalist Jamal kashogi. But the house did not allow a vote on it now with the house in Democrats hands congressman Roque. Kana and others are confident the resolution will clear both chambers. If it does it would Mark the first time congress has backed the withdrawal of US forces from a military conflict under the War Powers Act, which limits the president's ability to commit troops without congressional approval. The Trump administration has said the move would undermine the US relationship with Saudi Arabia and national security. I'm Mina Kim. K Q E D news. San Francisco supervisors plan to consider barring city departments from using facial recognition technology. That's among several provisions of an ordinance introduced yesterday by supervisor Aaron Peskine and concerns not only come from civil liberties groups, but they actually come from the tech industry that facial recognition technology, which has the biases of the people who have developed it disproportionately miss identifies people of color and women the Bill would require departments. Get supervisor approval. Before investing in new surveillance technology. It's similar to regulations already in place in Oakland and Santa Clara county, I'm Brian watt. Khaki weedy news support for NPR. This morning comes from creative planning and independent wealth management firm whose advisors are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more at creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined and by the listeners of cake. On this Wednesday morning. We have a sprinkling of problems on.

US congressman Roe Conn European Union Brian watt NPR President Donald tusk Yemen supervisor congressman Roque European Council Mina Kim Meena Kim Frank Langfitt Santa Clara county San Francisco Kana congress
US payrolls surge in February but wage growth elusive

02:14 min | 4 years ago

US payrolls surge in February but wage growth elusive

"I'm side is and i'm a long haul this week on kqed's the duelists will feature a theatrical alternative to march madness and a fochi from vermont that alongside an artist thoughtfully taking on human trafficking though shows and more on the dualist our guy very best in arts and the bay area this friday in every friday morning at 620 to an eightwicket kqed's morning and this is michael krasny here's what's coming up later today on form with meena kim uc berkeley professor and former secretary of labor robert rice will join us in a studio to talk about his new book the common good we shouldn't be swayed by the myth having nutro free market we must make the market work for us join us for forum nine to eleven right here on kqed public radio mostly cloudy today with temperatures in the '60s and a ten percent chance of showers tonight live from npr news in washington i'm louise schiavone after more than a year of hot rhetoric at name calling between their two nations north korea's kim jong own and president trump are preparing to meet in person the development caught people by surprise around the world and at home former us ambassador to the un bill richardson said frankly when i heard the news i was speech was flabbergasted it keeps streamling risky for president trump but i commend him he spoke to abc news richardson has traveled to north korea several times the us stipulates this is a meeting not a negotiation the labor department releases the government's latest monthly employment reports at this hour and pr zyuganov gucci has more analysts expect the job market to show continued strength they project about two hundred thousand new jobs which could lower the unemployment rate further but last month's report also showed a big spike in wage growth assign that employers are facing higher workforce costs that stoked fears that costs would increase across the board pushing inflation higher and prompting the federal reserve to raise interest rates sooner that spurred a global stock selloff however most analysts are not projecting wages to show similar wage growth for february.

Kim Jong ABC United States NPR Kqed North Korea Bill Richardson President Trump Vermont Louise Schiavone Washington Robert Rice Secretary Professor Michael Krasny Ten Percent