35 Burst results for "Meena"

Ramstein Air Base in Germany Becomes a Refuge for Afghans

Here & Now

01:50 min | Last week

Ramstein Air Base in Germany Becomes a Refuge for Afghans

"There is still a significant number of people in afghanistan who are still trying to leave the country after the us pull out and for afghans who have already left some are in limbo at the us. Air base in ramstein germany. Waiting to fly here to the united states. Npr's rob schmitz reports this hanger. Which can snugly fit. Some of the largest planes in the world was not meant to house people that it is. Today it's nine story. Tall ceiling looms above a series of rectangular enclosures constructed of ten foot tall wire fencing separating groups of afghans dressed in colorful robes tunics. Were allowed to leave these massive cages when it is time for their flight to america a woman in a black hejab cradles her newborn wrapped tightly in a linen cloth on hangers cold floor. The infants name is mustafa. His short life has been hectic two weeks ago. He was born in a village outside. Kabul the next day is family whisked him to the frenzy gates of the kabul airport where they slept outside for four days packed among throngs of others desperate to flee the taliban when he was five days old little mustafa was rushed through the gates and carried onto an aircraft ending. Up here at ramstein air bags now. He's waiting for a flight that in a few hours. We'll take him to his new home. America i plan to build a life for my son and his siblings. In america says mustafa's mother walk. Meena will only gives her first name for fear of reprisals by the taliban on family back home my husband worked with the afghan army and we were in too much dangerous day in afghanistan. There are nearly fifteen thousand others here left for the same

Ramstein Rob Schmitz United States Mustafa Kabul Airport Afghanistan NPR Germany Ramstein Air Kabul Taliban Meena Afghan Army
Johnny Depp Says Hollywood Is Boycotting Him

Fred + Angi On Demand

00:55 sec | Last month

Johnny Depp Says Hollywood Is Boycotting Him

"So johnny depp. Said he's being boycotted by hollywood as his latest film. Meena motto has yet to score a us release in a recent interview. He called his fall from hollywood's good graces and absurdity of media mathematics. That's a fancy way to say that. I've run doesn't like him right now if you forgot about his acts Amber heard she did accuse him of domestic violence last year he lost a libel case against a british tabloid rich referred to him as a wife feeder. That's a direct quote The court ruled that the content of the article was substantially true and the judge found that twelve of the fourteen alleged incidents of domestic violence had occurred. Mg mgm then reportedly switch the us release date of minimata from february of twenty twenty one to now it's tv. A and johnny depp ex Accident his lead role in the fantastic beats franchise Talking is hard day So

Meena Motto Hollywood Johnny Depp Amber United States MGM
Juventus Win the Coppa Italia

ESPN FC

02:02 min | 4 months ago

Juventus Win the Coppa Italia

"We have to start with the big mid week game and that was the co by final between giampiero gasperini atlanta and unplayable pillows advantis now meena. You haven't really been good this season at all. We've been wondering where is the team that we've seen when nine consecutive scotty the team that even if they play terribly they'd always find a way to win and i couldn't help a thing and we were on the commentary for this game on. Espn two that the second half. Especially i thought you event this may be wasn't the better side in the first half. I thought that they gave away more chances. To what the lanta. Maybe they got a bit lucky but in the second half this was vintage. Event is great pressing creating chances the intensity that we normally we're used to seeing from them and then in the final whistle pandemonium under appeal of felt like there was a champion champion trophy victory all the players celebrating together. It was almost like they let off all the frustration from this season. Yeah i accidentally thank you hit the nail on the head. It really was the way that they celebrated was a little bit like finding it was almost like they had recovered their identity. They had remember who they were. they were the event. is that we. We've known all this time now. It's interesting because there were movements of you and twenty twenty that i did see on dan dreyer. That was some great wins. Perhaps not always fantastic to watch. But i always knew how to control the game. A little bit better. There was a win against barcelona. There was strong winds. That i thought to myself. I can actually see what pillows doing here. There is a developing pattern of play. There is some interesting Bullpen using my voice had an issue with the fact that they always post to defeat rather than into space. They don't seem to understand chemistry just quite yet so it slows down there passing game and makes it a little bit harder to create chances at times. Looks a little bit slow but having said all of that this is event is they're always strong in defence confident capable of managing the game

Giampiero Gasperini Advantis Meena Scotty Dan Dreyer Espn Atlanta Barcelona
"meena" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:00 min | 4 months ago

"meena" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Meena at 10. Alexis, who lives in Oakland, comes to us from the Atlantic, where he was a staff writer. For the next month. You'll continue to hear guest hosts like me until Alexis begins on air in late June. Now on to today's show. Earlier this week, The journal Nature Medicine published results of a study using the psychedelic drug MDM, a known on the party scene as Ecstasy to treat post traumatic stress disorder. Among research participants who received the drug along with counseling 67% felt so much better, they no longer qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD. The study adds to a small but growing body of scientific literature, exploring the use of psychedelics like MD Emma LSD and psilocybin as therapy for a range of mental health conditions, including depression, eating disorders and end of life anxiety. Bill now working its way through the California Legislature aims to build on this momentum. It would allow doctors to prescribe psychedelics for therapeutic use, and it would decriminalize Thies drugs for personal use. People previously convicted of possession could see their records expunged. We're going to discuss the pros and cons of relaxing prohibitions around psychedelics. Joining us this morning is state Senator Scott Wiener. He represents San Francisco and authored the bill. SB 5 19. Welcome, Senator Weiner. Thanks for having me. We're glad to have you. We also have Juliana Mercer, a Marine Corps veteran who used psychedelic therapy to overcome her trauma from her time serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Juliana welcome. Thank you. It's great to be here. We also have two doctors joining us. Dr Robert Grant, professor of medicine at UC San Francisco. He's been elite academic voice on decriminalization and psychedelic therapy. More broadly. Good morning, Dr Grant. Good morning to you, and Dr Jeffrey Lieberman, former president of the American Psychiatric Association and chair of the department of Psychiatry at Columbia University. Hello, Dr Lieberman. We have you there, Dr Lieberman. I'm here. I'm here. I'm glad to be with you and sorry, wonderful, wonderful. We're happy to have you two. We're also going to be joined later this hour by Larry Morris. He's a legislative director for California's District Attorneys Association. But first I'd like to start our conversation off with Giuliana Giuliana. You graduated military boot camp one week before September 11th 2001. And you were in the Marines for 16 years and served two tours of duty one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. When did you first discover psychedelics? And what kind of relief were you looking for? Um, gosh, it's it's only been about four years. Uh, that I first discovered Psychedelics was an accident. Recreational E, but the very first time that I experienced it. I felt this sense of relief and relief and this connection back to My authentic self that I had lost a while ago and I didn't realize that I had lost her. But that Yeah. Interaction with these psychedelics helped me to recognize that there was something going on. There was something wrong and that there was a solution. If you feel comfortable if you feel comfortable talking about it, What was it about your military experience that led you to look for this relief in psychedelics? Uh, on here between Iraq and Afghanistan, where I saw the traumas of war. Um, in between those two deployments. I spent five years working with our wounded in San Diego at the Naval Hospital, and I did everything that was non medical, so helping them in a holistic way to get back. Into their lives with their injuries. And those five years I saw the direct result of war. I got to see not just the physical trauma, but the mental trauma, and I did my job every day and You did it happily because I was helping my brothers and sisters. But that, uh, every day dealing with that and seeing that firsthand seeing that the trauma that not only to the service members but to their families and to their friends and losing quite a few fellow Marines, another veterans to suicide Between two war deployments really took a toll on me, and I didn't realize that they had taken a toll on me because I was doing my job every day. And that was I had toc suck it up, do my job and do it well, because I was taking care of my brothers and sisters. And a few years after exiting the service and continuing to work with nonprofits that help veterans I felt this just this lost. Of this is lost, and I had a loss of purpose. Even though I was doing purposeful work at a loss of who Ju Liana was and who my authentic self was and when I first interaction with these medicines really opened up. The acknowledgment that I had suffered a lot of loss. And there was a lot of grief in there and it started to help me unpack all of the grief that I had taken and put inside and put away on. But I don't revisit it because I was so busy doing my job and taking care of my brains. Yeah. Um, So eventually you found a group called the Heroic Hearts Project, and they specialize in Iowa ska therapy with military veterans. Can you describe what an Iowa ska session looks like, like set the scene for us. Where? Where do you go? Who's there? How long does it last? Sure I went Tomo Costa Rica. I went to Seoul. Tara hits the retreat center. That heroic hearts project helped me and six other veterans get to Um, you who we were there for 10 days on. We had four sessions with Iowa ska. And these are thieves. Their sessions where you drink the medicine, which is a route that sound in the Amazon and you administered by a The shaman and you go into the sessions with intentions of white want to accomplish and what you want to open up..

Larry Morris Juliana Mercer Oakland Alexis San Diego Juliana Ju Liana Giuliana Giuliana Iraq five years 16 years Afghanistan Meena 10 days Grant 67% Lieberman American Psychiatric Associati late June Seoul
Fanny Durack: The First Female Olympian To Take Home Gold

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:59 min | 4 months ago

Fanny Durack: The First Female Olympian To Take Home Gold

"Francis durack better known as fanny was born on october. Twenty seventh eighteen eighty nine in sydney australia. She was the third daughter and sixth child in a big irish family. Her father thomas drac managed pub in town while her mother. Mary took care of fanny and her siblings. Fanny was not a natural swimmer. Her when she was nine years old fannies family went on vacation in the beachside town of coochie australia. While in the ocean. Fanny found herself fighting against the waves and struggling to get comfortable in the water instead of retreating and fear or discomfort vani made it her mission to teach yourself how to swim and she did that. Fannie trained in and mastered the breaststroke at the time that was the only style of swimming that had a championship for women when she was seventeen years old. She won her first state title as her abilities progressed. Fanny learned the trojan stroke and the australian crawl with these three styles. In her skill set she dominated the australian swimming seen her main. Competition was me no wiley. Nina beat fanny a few different events including the one hundred yard breaststroke at the australian swimming championships at rose. Bay as the nineteen twelve. Stockholm olympic games approached. There was discussion. About whether fanny and meena should attend the new south wales ladies amateur. Swimming association had a rule that forbade women to compete in arenas where men were present. The association believed it was immodest for a woman to be so scantily clad and the presence of men but fanny and meena's widespread success created enough public pressure. The association overturned the rule. Getting to the games was another hurdle. These were the first olympic games where women were allowed to compete in swimming.

Fanny Francis Durack Thomas Drac Coochie Australia Swimming Vani Sydney Fannie Australia Mary Swimming Association Meena Wiley Nina Olympic Games Stockholm South Wales
Cavani Disallowed Goal vs Tottenham

ESPN FC

01:01 min | 5 months ago

Cavani Disallowed Goal vs Tottenham

"Kick things off by welcome into the show. Don't actress anne anne frank leboeuf. We're wondering where to start today. And then stephen nicholson's in and goes against pretty much. Everybody said on yesterday's show and he said it was the right decision to disallow cavani. Go in the spurs yesterday. The floor is yours. Stevie as much as beautiful between paul byrne cavani truth is if a player strikes another player in the face. a scenario makovsky. No question is using these right arm to defend off these opposition. Which is fine if he sees them in the army. Catch him in the shoulder. These are all things that we all accept because as a contact sport. However you're allowed regardless of whether you mean meena on. Aw you're not allowed to catch it opponent in the face and mccormick catch them in the face and nobody has said he didn't catch him in the face but why is everybody saying. It's not a foul.

Anne Anne Frank Leboeuf Stephen Nicholson Cavani Paul Byrne Cavani Makovsky Spurs Stevie Meena Army Mccormick
An Encyclopedia of Betrayal

Latino Rebels Radio

03:39 min | 6 months ago

An Encyclopedia of Betrayal

"Let's go don't know. Smu joe. Chris gregory debate e Doris is a little dino would only own alpha nine son if that won't be down though on a backup it again. Mce bill is when bela vicar. Betas in that it had done in order to make your own goal pessoa mesa copper double room. They're hanging on yet. He sloppily meta in my hangul. Vn element is when people if folder they offer sina but put the rico so significant will be neutral mass basil money left for non michael montero on say look ego getting kinda hinted comforting for monta delegates. When i got paid that is history. He lancia program are illegal. Carol gobierno parapet. Cdl moving into independent developer. Tha rico alwyn off the super meter mowing until they susan issues increasing quinta for him blow bully aca paraiso paul simply actively on their own and pottery regain los achieve asleep state but obama valencia. Dutton the quaranta extending stellar search. Inte- local really sacred della policy. Gareth three oh amass this cintos in quinta mill personas etc extensive. Expedient this nasty ass. He sees me christly. Gullo mutual diem boy yet. Betas is photographer. Espn comments local mental red zone. Havoc dallas Don catala gutless feed us again and killer the you and commissioner you then you. I had to gasoline hinton. Alessia really. he's to sweat on compiler official policy local collaborative chairman. John zarrella policier. Meena not naughty. I'm in the locker. Peter informacion e compelling whose propia chievo sober independent teeth does less achieve narrative Dante christly your him for him. Most ulta milan synthesis anti-seizure aura. Numale say so. Check your aura. Bonsor alumna she took over our. I read that he can for more focused as implicit. And like i say those amelia where we started super the solar outerwear informa- in fire and people the saw from us young complimentary announced via area. It's analysis knock gassing get blue blue santaniello free anti if the program affoil another loss masic stencils that he got a healer through stephanie. Then says you've ottawa. Kabo put su propia galeano. You've got chris when undergoes masterly left. Ama- it Kenya cpr angeles owners. Al assad but alycia forming donald price. Yoenis then throw if amelia's in cameos if they thirty other bahia lands. Yes that myth. Eli concern secretary. Kenya copying borough pius variables got bet the ad or said that at the

Smu Joe Chris Gregory Michael Montero Carol Gobierno Tha Rico Alwyn Aca Paraiso Paul Obama Valencia Quinta Mill Gullo Don Catala Doris Alessia John Zarrella Peter Informacion Rico Dante Christly Dutton Bonsor Alumna Gareth Susan
Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | 7 months ago

Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

Curatorial Research Center Gosper Twitter Sophie Balancer Meena Costco Sophie Cornwall Archipelago England Iowa Large International Museum Docker Newseum Association UK
The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 7 months ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
The Blockchain Adoption Tipping Point with Evan Shapiro from O(1) Labs

Bitcoin Radio

03:06 min | 8 months ago

The Blockchain Adoption Tipping Point with Evan Shapiro from O(1) Labs

"So it's actually interesting to get your personal take on this. Because i think it's a little more unique than what we traditionally seen the crypto world. And what i mean by that. Is you know. Things like the bitcoin blockchain or even even enterprise blockchain. You know a lot of feel like a lot of people talk about How the longest chain guarantees things like security and also reliability right bitcoin longest chain keeping blockchain's large. I would say a lot of people. That's why bitcoin right layer one doesn't scale well. So what why do you think you like. I'm trying to ask you you know. Why do you think blockchain should blockchain should be smaller in size. Is it for because you believe in it will improve the usability or is it because you believe that maybe multiple could have access to her. I don't wanna go to bitcoin. But i'll go to bitcoin. Basically you know not. everyone can mind. Bitcoin right very computational expensive many that wasn't what it was built for in the beginning but that is the case not so maybe couple of your thoughts their alleged thing i you have unique. Take on this chart on. I think what was really interested in the space. And where i started kind coming into it was i think that crypto currencies real strength is that like it's something that kind of levels the playing ill in everyone could get access to it in everyone can use it and this list for development is that we can have this cryptocurrency that has a very small blockchain that everyone can connect to everyone can use on. It doesn't have the traditional hurdles of very large ever go blockchain and this is intimately connected Stuff we were just talking about. Because i think the layer to step is trying to patch the existing tech to to work on even though it has like this big launching problem. Aware is with me now. We need a whole layer one to solve directly. Yes so can you get into more about how things are going with with meena and where have you seen the most growth. You know it can be. It can be by usage but kind of by sector like what people are using it for or can also be geographically. Because i've seen that. Certain tokens depending on their nature Actually the geographic. The geography is really important. I mean you know. A lot of these protocols are open source decentralize but depending on where you are it can limit your your access and Yeah basically what what you might what you might use this for. Maybe some third world countries. They don't they can't really afford to use bitcoin are they. Don't really care to right. They just need something. Better actually usable. So yeah that's kind of a question like we have. The answer is related to geography The big

Meena
Mina Kimes Explains Why SheIs More Excited for This Weekend Than the Super Bowl

ESPN Daily

05:19 min | 8 months ago

Mina Kimes Explains Why SheIs More Excited for This Weekend Than the Super Bowl

"Meena. Hello pablo hello is an nfl analyst for espn and the host of the meantime show featuring lenny so i need to know where you are on the football excitement alerts scale right now because i for a true tape grinder like yourself conference championship. Sunday is in some ways. Maybe even better than the super bowl if the football excitement scale as you call. It was one through ten conference championships. Sunday's about fifteen for me. There's know maybe about whether or not it's more exciting than the super bowl. Pablo it absolutely is. This is my favorite sunday of the year and in part because by the time we get to the super bowl we've talked about same matchups over and over and it's usually like. How many times can we say what you guys rush brady with four. You know before and of course always been in the super bowl the last decade or so. That's a phrase. I've said a lot inventive. You say that. I was going to say you're the person i i would really make that a me. I mean it's true but it's also more fun when you get to talk about other things and this particular set of games. It's really the best possible combination of teams in my opinion. There's a reason why the lions in vegas are very close because it actually looks like a pretty well matched pair of games. I wanna start with buccaneers packers. Meena because this was not a close game when these two teams played back. In october roggio touchdown tampa bay fire the cannons the bucks and thirty seven rogers was abysmal. In that game through zero touchdowns he threw two. picks completed. Completed doesn't half passes in tampa bay when they played each other. The first time and tampa bay destroyed perhaps not coincidentally green bay. Thirty eight to ten. So how did that blowout happened. Well this is. It was such a strange game. Pablo because aaron rodgers has had this incredible season which. I'm sure we'll talk about this. Is the one real blemish on his staff third drops better pass picked off the other side. By two thousand fifteen touchdown touchdown booker. He stunk i. There's no really nice way to put it. Now he stunk in part because the offensive line in green bay which has been spectacular. One of the best football year got beat up. Front rodgers was sacked six times pressured twenty one times. I mean no most of the time this series look cool as a cucumber back there but this was not the case and as mentioned had these very surprising interceptions coming from him. I think he finished the game with a passer rating of like thirty five. Okay so really. It was all about the buccaneers. Pass rush beating green bay upfront and aaron rodgers being uncomfortable as a result and that was also reflected in the running game. aaron jones had just ten carries. He averaged like one point. Five yards per rush again. Very dissimilar from the rest of the season. But you saw what could or should i. If in the eyes of tampa bay be the formula for beating green bay which is if you can stop the running game and keep the packers from executing their play action passing attack which flows from that and get them into third down and get pressure on rogers and obvious passing situations. That's your best chance of beating now. All those things i just said barry. Few teams in the nfl been able to do that but tampa was able to do that the last time. These two teams that so many things obviously have changed since then as you alluded to. That was back in week. Six when that game happened. So in what you've seen since then who's been better this year. Aaron rodgers tom brady. Aaron rodgers is undeniably. Been the better quarterback this year and he is my pick by the way for. Mvp it's between him. And patrick mahomes. It's close but rodgers is that an unreal season. I mean just statistically he's been first and qbr brady was tenth. He ranks third in yards per temporary. He was eleventh forty eight touchdowns brady at forty. He only through five pigs brady threw twelve. You get the idea. So while tom brady is the most complex quarterback of all time i believe. Aaron rodgers is the most talented. Patrick mahomes is kind of them. A run for that. And when these two goats meat i don't know where goat's meat in a field a meadow anyway to meet makes me sort of hungary. Honestly that phrase oud took it there. I guess goats will be hurting in green bay this weekend but the goat whose homefield it is home meadow. It is has been the better one this weekend. That's metaphor really. Just got out of control.

Super Bowl Tampa Bay Pablo Hello Green Bay Aaron Rodgers Football Pablo Roggio Buccaneers Meena Front Rodgers Lenny Packers NFL Espn Rogers Lions Aaron Jones
Mina Kimes Explains Why SheIs More Excited for This Weekend Than the Super Bowl

ESPN Daily

05:19 min | 8 months ago

Mina Kimes Explains Why SheIs More Excited for This Weekend Than the Super Bowl

"Meena. Hello pablo hello is an nfl analyst for espn and the host of the meantime show featuring lenny so i need to know where you are on the football excitement alerts scale right now because i for a true tape grinder like yourself conference championship. Sunday is in some ways. Maybe even better than the super bowl if the football excitement scale as you call. It was one through ten conference championships. Sunday's about fifteen for me. There's know maybe about whether or not it's more exciting than the super bowl. Pablo it absolutely is. This is my favorite sunday of the year and in part because by the time we get to the super bowl we've talked about same matchups over and over and it's usually like. How many times can we say what you guys rush brady with four. You know before and of course always been in the super bowl the last decade or so. That's a phrase. I've said a lot inventive. You say that. I was going to say you're the person i i would really make that a me. I mean it's true but it's also more fun when you get to talk about other things and this particular set of games. It's really the best possible combination of teams in my opinion. There's a reason why the lions in vegas are very close because it actually looks like a pretty well matched pair of games. I wanna start with buccaneers packers. Meena because this was not a close game when these two teams played back. In october roggio touchdown tampa bay fire the cannons the bucks and thirty seven rogers was abysmal. In that game through zero touchdowns he threw two. picks completed. Completed doesn't half passes in tampa bay when they played each other. The first time and tampa bay destroyed perhaps not coincidentally green bay. Thirty eight to ten. So how did that blowout happened. Well this is. It was such a strange game. Pablo because aaron rodgers has had this incredible season which. I'm sure we'll talk about this. Is the one real blemish on his staff third drops better pass picked off the other side. By two thousand fifteen touchdown touchdown booker. He stunk i. There's no really nice way to put it. Now he stunk in part because the offensive line in green bay which has been spectacular. One of the best football year got beat up. Front rodgers was sacked six times pressured twenty one times. I mean no most of the time this series look cool as a cucumber back there but this was not the case and as mentioned had these very surprising interceptions coming from him. I think he finished the game with a passer rating of like thirty five. Okay so really. It was all about the buccaneers. Pass rush beating green bay upfront and aaron rodgers being uncomfortable as a result and that was also reflected in the running game. aaron jones had just ten carries. He averaged like one point. Five yards per rush again. Very dissimilar from the rest of the season. But you saw what could or should i. If in the eyes of tampa bay be the formula for beating green bay which is if you can stop the running game and keep the packers from executing their play action passing attack which flows from that and get them into third down and get pressure on rogers and obvious passing situations. That's your best chance of beating now. All those things i just said barry. Few teams in the nfl been able to do that but tampa was able to do that the last time. These two teams that so many things obviously have changed since then as you alluded to. That was back in week. Six when that game happened. So in what you've seen since then who's been better this year. Aaron rodgers tom brady. Aaron rodgers is undeniably. Been the better quarterback this year and he is my pick by the way for. Mvp it's between him. And patrick mahomes. It's close but rodgers is that an unreal season. I mean just statistically he's been first and qbr brady was tenth. He ranks third in yards per temporary. He was eleventh forty eight touchdowns brady at forty. He only through five pigs brady threw twelve. You get the idea. So while tom brady is the most complex quarterback of all time i believe. Aaron rodgers is the most talented. Patrick mahomes is kind of them. A run for that. And when these two goats meat i don't know where goat's meat in a field a meadow anyway to meet makes me sort of hungary. Honestly that phrase oud took it there. I guess goats will be hurting in green bay this weekend but the goat whose homefield it is home meadow. It is has been the better one this weekend. That's metaphor really. Just got out of control.

Super Bowl Tampa Bay Pablo Hello Green Bay Aaron Rodgers Football Pablo Roggio Buccaneers Meena Front Rodgers Lenny Packers NFL Espn Rogers Lions Aaron Jones
Mets fire GM over explicit texts sent to female reporter

The Dan Patrick Show

01:17 min | 8 months ago

Mets fire GM over explicit texts sent to female reporter

"Fired their GM Jared Porter. It was not part of some housecleaning that Cohen started when he bought that team. Porter was actually part of the new regime. He was supposed to be a part of the solution, not the problem. No, he was not fired because he had not been active enough in free agency or the trade market. In fact, he was killing it there. No, he got broken off because he was too active on his cell phone. Not too active in a click bait, sort of way or addicted to instagram sort of way, but believe this dude could not put that phone down for any reason. How active how active you ask? Well, let me read the first sentence of report from Meena Times and Jeff Passan. The drop last night. Here is how the peace opens and I quote New York Mets general manager Jared Porter sent explicit Unsolicited text and images to a female reporter in 2016, culminating with a picture of an erect naked Penis, according to a copy of the text history obtained by ESPN and quote Damn there. You have it right in your face in my face. That sums it all up right there. Now

Jared Porter Cohen Meena Times Porter GM Jeff Passan New York Mets Espn
Boston doctor calls for more self-administered COVID-19 tests to stop the spread

VB in the Middle

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Boston doctor calls for more self-administered COVID-19 tests to stop the spread

"Women's Hospital is published a study calling for a new testing approach to stop the spread of covert 19 self administered home tests. In his study, published in the journal Science, Dr Michael Meena argues the allure test or a similar rapid test should be mass produced and sent out to all Americans. Something like twice a week. Stuff that we could Place into people. Tomes are called the rapid Auntie Gin test. They've been mired in a lot of controversy. But if your goal is to detect people who are currently infection and at risk to infect other people, these tests are very accurate. I don't have to. State

Women's Hospital Dr Michael Meena
"meena" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Your way. No. This, Meena Then get in the skin and make a landing. These guys just don't know. Lalla. Don't don't Don't. Wait. Okay. I see the more I see you're single. But you must see Wei..

Meena
"meena" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

"A children's book, but it's a message for adults absolutely and I think importantly, when we talk about representation, it's about seeing two black children to black girls as leaders. You know there's the ones leading the way they have the idea that was very intentional and I think elevating those voices looking. At them as leaders I think not he's born for all children, eat right? Not just my daughters to see themselves as it's just as rob's more Morton, for White, you know children for boys to see that. But to your point, it's not just about Bam it's also about community and the fact that they leaned on our community that they were thinking about their community knows about doing something for their community and through their community and so as he said, I mean, that's a huge message ride known can do everything but everyone can do. Something, you're part anything do something on no matter how small and so there's that but it's also about you know when each of us do that when we come together and we're all doing something, we're all doing whatever our unique thing is in our own community in our own backyard and our own corners of the world that that's when real changes possible that's when movements happen, and so doing it through the Lens of children feeling so small and perhaps insignificant of building area in an apartment courtyard. The point as you said is like. Adults take away and frankly the big secret of my book is that since starting on I've done lots of talks and things like that I sort of have this stump speech in political terms that I've done literally align in my you know how I talk about this is no. One can do everything that everyone is on big. So I have already been saying this to adult. Three years and night is stuck in a kids book. You know by we all I continued how those conversations I think especially in the trump era just feels overwhelming feels very big in terms of what we are up against and number one that is their goal you overwhelm us and to make us feel hopeless and helpless and I think it's about not productive right? Like put one foot in front of the other and just chip away find whatever issue it. Is that really matters to you or that you think you can make a really unique impact on whether it's because of your personal experience or subject matter expertise whatever it may be like just go do that thing whatever way works for you I think that's great and I think that's a wonderful. Not Don I. Just WanNa ask one last thing which is, are there any books that you have read recently or you'd love that you would wanNA recommend to our listeners? Gosh one that has become really popular but I, want to put a plug in for it for particular reason his herald of by. Matthew, Cherry. It came out I guess a couple years ago, and he of course has gone on to win an Oscar for the short film reason I wanNA mention not is not only again on the topic of representation and why it was just an incredibly important book for my daughter's right around loving their hair and the process of doing their hair and all that. But I think that that there's another one called bedtime. Bonnet by a friend of Mine Nancy ride I think when white parents macy those books on bookshelves in bookstores and say, oh, that's lovely. Ride in not so great that black children black roles have representation but like that's not for me because my kids don't have here like that I would actually argue that it's very important for your children and white children to read those books to it's about celebrating differences in in recognizing. Outside of your own and cultures and experiences that are different from your own and I joke with both Nancy and Matthew that I've like I've had interesting conversations with adults about how lake they learned late in life, it's not cool to like go up to a person in touch their hair for example it how maybe if we read books like that virtual rain, really on beacon start to talk about that in a way that it's Not. Until you're an adult that you're learning those things rioted Mike, you know will loss as you use the books as a tool but then there's a way to also translate them into sort of universal general concepts. Ryden, in the hair touching thing obviously is about boundaries and consent in all other important right? Exactly. The curiosity is great celebrating of different all that stuff like just kind of working through that and using books like. That to do. So what I want to say too is that as much as I looked at my book and my wanting to do it is mission driven in wanting to help diversify children's literature and you know seeing kids like my daughter's on the pages of books also. So proud to be a part of sort of I. Don't know if it's right to call it like this new generation ride of authors of Color of. illustrators of color who violate still under represented, but we've made so much progress just in the last I would say through three years riot in folks like Matthew who came before me ride in really the way a lot of what you're seeing. So I guess that's the thing like I could go on and on right there. Thanks frankly to people waking up to the moment were in around protests and inclusion in Equity Racial Justice and There's just so many resources in now literally that people were circulating just months ago. So I think that's generally what we try to emphasize in our household. Of course there are also you know the amazing classics and other you know conic kids book others like, Mac, Arnett who I adore It's amazing We love his books. He's local author I call him local. He's like freaking famous and amazing but like we love it, he lives in Oakland. But Anyway, I just think that again it's about being. And showing your kids like a lot of stuff and you know be intentional around these longer term lessons than values that weren't WanNa be teaching our kids around dislike interacting with other people rioted having compassion and empathy and curiosity and celebrating others I. think that's Great. It was such a delight to speak to you. Thank you so much for doing this. Thank you everyone. Please check out phenomenal women, dot US and Kamla and my as big idea for your children or any children in your life anywhere books are sold, but now is the time to support local independent bookstores. Yes thank you for saying that we did a huge continue to campaign where we partnered with dozens of local bookstores across the country to encourage folks to support them. We actually launch that campaign in January before the pandemic kit, and obviously since then it has become even more so could not emphasize that enough support local bookstore is a few goto nominal girl dot com we have a list of local bookstore is we have a list of black on bookstores please shot local. Thank you so much. Thank you. Sarah. Thank you for having me. We'll be right back with Karen Russell. Sleep donation is a novella set in a familiar world where a large part of its citizens are suffering from insomnia. Set against a backdrop of a national pandemic of sorts. The story confronts themes of human motivation, greed empathy, and how we as a society survive and attempt to come through on the other side of shared trauma. Here's my zoom chat, with.

Matthew Karen Russell rob Oscar insomnia Don I. White Ryden Sarah Mike Nancy Kamla Morton Oakland Mac Cherry Arnett
"meena" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

"Books discuss what's happening in the world the books GonNa turn things over to Sarah Jane's Daily, a supervising producer late night who's literature expertise is invaluable for myself and for our show, take it away Sarah. Hi everyone and welcome back to late night let. I'm Sarah Staley a supervising producer here at late night with Seth Meyers. This month we're speaking to incredible brilliant women, both of whom have published books during this very strange, very surreal year. My first chat is with Meena Harris an entrepreneur lawyer founder of the Phenomenal Women Action Campaign and author of the Empowering Children's Book Kamla and my as big idea. I also talked to the exceptional novelist and Pulitzer Prize for fiction finalist, Karen Russell whose novella sleep donation will be published this month. Kamla and Maya's big idea is a children's book that Meena Harris wrote about her mother Maya Harris and her aunt Kamala Harris. In part to inspire young readers and their parents to learn about the importance of community. But also to show her own daughters that young black girls can lead and can be represented on the pages of children's literature. And one of my favorite moments you'll hear one of his daughters who came in to check on her mom during our call. Now, here's my zoom chat with Meena Harris. Meena welcome to late night. Let's. Join this is Sarah Things we're having me I am so thrilled to have you here and I noticed that you're wearing a phenomenal woman sweatshirt and I'm so bummed out because I ordered one and I was hoping it'd be here in time. I wish I had known I would have liked rushed to you I can't wait to mine. So he think it makes sense for us to start by talking about the phenomenal women action campaign which those that don't know as you're socially conscious brand if that's a good way to put it. Yeah. You launched it a few years ago. Is it true this? Right around the two thousand seventeen women's march on Washington. That's right. So the concept was around that time and I think if I'm. Remembering. Correctly, the march was in January Sadat's we sort of tested out had out a handful of shorts in some them off with friends of mine I sadly couldn't make it because I had a newborn but I wanted to be a part of it in some way, and then we formally launched the campaign which was really just a one month fundraising campaign. That's what it was supposed to be to begin with for women's history month we launched on International Women's Day on March twenty seventeen. There's such a focus on women, of course, during the election in big question are are women GonNa, break the glass ceiling, and sadly we did not in not moment but I remember you know the headlines The commentators. The next day were saying are women show up or women GonNa fight back or women going to do something and I was just sort of like my eyes a little bit like, yeah of course we are right were phenomenal. We're strong and I. Woke up feeling disillusioned in many ways in which defeated but also woke up feeling the next morning after election night we were literally in New York at Center. It was a real to experience there and you know I felt we have lost but we were not defeated and I still feeling very resilient and ready to fight, and in fact, the first thing I did was not a t shirt I started a pantsuit drives i. don't know if you remember nation. Riot the Genesis pan-asian all these women coming together basically like coordinating wearing pants suits on election day and I had gotten my pant suit got a brand new democratic blue pants. I was walking down the street to our drive senior in thinking. Wow, like what of religion? I. Have this panel and also just kind of like cleansing myself of everything from that night and I thought well, Hey, there's basically a group of four million women who ostensibly have like pantsuits maybe we do. Something good with that right in donate pants, aides to women need. So that was really the very first thing I did literally the next day and you know that it continued and it was sort of what other small things that I could do I. Think I really derived inspiration from that on the woman the by Angela has always been huge inspiration me. Maya. Angelou. Herself is known as a vote in author think by most people, but she was also a fearless though rights activists. I really wanted to honor that history and then also bring it into that hurt moment of also celebrating what we were seeing all around us and it was just a little small thing and at the time that I made them for the women's March I I even did not have a plan to like do anything with it. Right I. I didn't even have the idea at that time to do a fundraising campaign. So the month of marches last one month and then now. Here I am almost four years later still talking about it, which is Kinda wild. I think it's great. I mean it's grown into this powerful brand, which is doing I think what you intended it to do and like you mentioned uplifting and empowering women. There's also this charitable component which has allowed you to highlight specific causes, which I'd love for you to just speak about in terms of was that something you knew from the beginning, you wanted to be a primary part of phenomenal. Yes. I mean as I said, the sort of formal launch of this was was a fundraising campaign to raise money for women's organizations who are on the ground doing the work and one thing that I think was unique about our approach, which was again from day one was that we didn't want to just raise awareness and donate money to one organization. We launched I believe with four or five ride. In the idea there was thinking about you know the concept of intersection there lots of different issues that affect women and want to draw attention not only. To those issues, but also the organizations that were doing the work. So the ended up having actual partnerships to those organizations, we launched a campaign with the organizations as our partners and that commitment both to raising awareness around issues that uniquely indistinctly impact unrepresented communities as well as our partnership model and working very closely with advocacy organizations continues. Today we've expanded beyond the original nominal woman message and organizations that sort of focused more specifically on on women's issues. By last I hate that word. Sorry I, need to say that when it's like all issues are women's issues. But you know what I'm saying. You know expanding to other communities right. So we just have so many different initiatives now on it's been incredible not only for us to continue deepening our understanding and engagement with those issues in the organizations that are doing the work but also or getting to share that with others and most importantly you know our model is is making it accessible right so that every day ordinary folks can engage with stuff and you know that we have a hook that were sort of getting them to engage in a way that they. May Not otherwise and not wait you. It's about taking sometimes what are very complex policy issues sometimes, very serious zad issues such as pay equity things that are not to be celebrated, but rather you know raise awareness around but the way that we approach doing it through celebration of those communities through lifting up those communities. So our first campaigned for Blackman's equal pay we said black women are phenomenal. Black women are phenomenally black near the cornerstones of our community. They are the backbone of the democratic. Party they're incredibly powerful like. Pay Them what they are owed right inspire related products and being able to take those sorts of issues in do it in a way that's really about community in community pride positively in celebration in ultimately lifting us up. I think he has done a fantastic job and this is a very female centric brand. It seems only natural because you come from such a powerful female family, just a brief history for anybody that doesn't know your grandmother was a world renowned scientists and civil rights activists your mother's a lawyer public policy advocate worked at a few campaign adviser for Hillary Clinton. And your aunt is obviously Kamala Harris who happens to be the Democratic nominee for vice president I know all of these women contributed who you've become. But can you talk about now how you look at your upbringing perhaps differently than you use you either because of this political situation because of this brand that you're behind or.

Phenomenal Women Action Campai Meena Harris Kamala Harris Sarah International Women supervising producer Maya Harris Pulitzer Prize Sarah Staley Sarah Jane Seth Meyers Karen Russell Kamla Washington founder Hillary Clinton Maya Angelou
Episode 19: Youth Ministry 101 Clip

Youth Ministry Maverick: Mold-Breaking NextGen Investment

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Episode 19: Youth Ministry 101 Clip

"Look. You don't have to get overwhelmed in it just take a breath and look at it and say, how can we reach out? How do we connect kids into the life of the Church? What is the door to get them out in the community into the church, and then how do we help them grow up? and. Then not just stick man. That's you mentioned the sitting at the bottom there of that thing and just saying, well, we're all about evangelism and bottom left Corner Meena discipleship were in were in this holy huddle hand look at what Jesus did. He did not leave his guys in a holy huddle he sent out he said look for this to stick in you. That's what I think he was doing for Jesus to say the teaching my teaching is going to be solidified and you win you go. Tell that story to others? You know you had Andrew on here a couple of weeks ago when you tell that story to others, it not only affects them but cements it with you

Corner Meena Andrew
Brad Pitt's New Boo

Nightly Pop

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Brad Pitt's New Boo

"Hi guys tonight, burning questions did a-rod pays off Jaylo before the Super Bowl. Towel annoyed Lena that rod supposedly dating off. Could you marry into this family? Let's get started. Welcome to. We miss you guys. Hi, Nina High Hunter. Lo. Look. Very, stealth Meena for a second I was just. Doing the show today and then I realized bright you couldn't even see me right to him. Oh Yeah. Yeah. WanNa tone. Funny to to show that. SETINA. Tone that. John told. US All right. We all know A. Rod, a super supportive of Jay Lau, but his strategy to get Jennifer ready for her big super bowl performances. Kind of backfired. They were on Barstool sports the Corp and revealed Alex's mistake. We went to the gym that morning and I was driving her and she was talking to me I was ignoring her I was like I'm not getting the way of anything is your day. I'm focused. We'll talk Monday and she. Talked to me. Like. Zone I'm just like I'm trying not to get away. Okay annoying or sweet. Well, I think like in situations like this like this is how I feel like whenever I would get into an argument with like a boyfriend they would let me let you cool off I want you to go off and then I'll come back and I hate that I hate the cooling off period like a mad. That's when I want you to come and try to make it better. I don't want to come in and talk to don't go silent for a day like so she probably wanted him to be comforting and be they're supportive not to. Give her the silent treatment. That's the opposite of ones, right? Right. I know it's already it's already clear that you and I are perfect mattress for each other. But this proves that even more because I hate the silent treatment both ways given it and I hate getting in fact, if someone's mad at me, I literally need to solve the situation or at least absolve myself from guilt immediately, and then let's go about our day I hate the silent treatment. I hate it too. But to be fair to be for I, don't think he was trying to give her the silent treatment i. do understand what he was saying like look it was a very big day for her. She had a lot of things to. And he didn't really want to be in the way and wanted to give her her space to be in zone but I think what you know. Right exactly getting into that and then. They think that it's the same thing like he he attacks at how he would attack. Going to play for a big game but I, feel like you know she's a performer. So it's different, right? It's also he could have. Just, not been there at all. That's why becomes more distracting if somebody's trying to go out of their way to ignore you when that's not something that you guys talked about. So next next super. Woke me. Yeah. Next time this ask a woman what she needs and then got how that. You'll know. Tonight's other big story off. You're not gonNA believe Brad Pitt has been spotted with model i. don't even know how we have put this together but. Standby while butcher her name except I won't. It's Nicole. petrosky. But. You're. Spinning. It's Petrosky. Okra. Right. Thank you. She's twenty seven. And he's fifty six okay. Reports claims. She's his new girlfriend and they're saying at his sixty seven million dollar state in the south of France. Remember France. Love it. Do we like Brad with a model? Yeah I like the the thing that I find funny is he's been hanging out with Leila Lot and you know that those conversations Leo the whole time was like I'm telling you. Go for someone in her twenties. It's great like he's sold Brad on this because I don't feel like he would have done. It had Leo not Ben I'd not been doing claymation they're doing in his garage every single night. Also. He's never done this before rarely he's always dated actresses that have been sort of like within his like on the same level and who have been relatively close in age. So the fact that he he'd Busta Leo I lay. On disappointed in Brad. Brad is like more of a deeper actor like not very surface or materialistic like you know he's always been kind of associated with being a humanitarian. So I expected a little different move from him. You know what I mean I expected him to show up with the woman who might be a host of a late night show you know possibly a black woman. You know possibly you know someone on the show nightly. That's what I was hoping

Brad Pitt Alex Busta Leo Nicole. Petrosky Nina High Hunter Lena Meena Brad Barstool Sports France A. Rod John Jay Lau Jennifer Leila Lot
"meena" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"This at home. Big boy's neighborhood way. No, this Meena getting scared. London. Stop being like this. Just don't don't Don't You know when we might see OK, connecting more stuff. I'll see you tomorrow, okay? You don't know that we got there. Fudges on G. I'm into bloody bottle is on any honey ranks, McGee. I remember, you know, calling loudly enough, honey. My buddy got me a date a buddy ideas? I will be if I got up on Arlene. Almost right away my queen, But I got no, not eat. I don't do the struggle. I didn't forget. I had added a medic in B. Tell me now because I got big money. You heard that young to serve? Great girlfriend, Amy. Some peace headache. Get embarrassed. We came upon dirty money. I give it over. You run a gang? I just gotta know.

McGee Meena London B. Tell Amy
NBA Restart: Which Teams Have the Advantage?

ESPN Daily

02:20 min | 1 year ago

NBA Restart: Which Teams Have the Advantage?

"Jackie is good to hear your. Voice. Meena, are you today you trust me on around worn. Almost stalker it. I'm almost over. It's okay. You beat me many times at this point. EILLY. You're the Lakers and suns. Jackie macmullan is a senior writer for ESPN and frequent around the horn panelists where she has earned two hundred and forty four wins compared to my own forty. She also happens to cover the NBA for nearly forty years. Speaking of the Lakers and suns, the NBA returns, tomorrow night, and amidst all of the craziness in major, League Baseball, the NBA, but seems to be mostly working, but the league is not without some coronavirus related drama. Thanks to one Lou Williams who's sanctioned trip outside of the NBA's clean site included an unsanctioned visit to a certain establishment. Can you explain for everyone? What happened? Well Lou, Williams left the bubble for a funeral for a very close family friend in Atlanta. And he has said many times. It's documented on social media that his favorite place to go eat the magic. Or another left to forgive me I'm not someone that goes interest clubs often or ever if I'm truthful although I did go once to the Butterfly Lounge against my will in Washington DC. But that's a whole nother story that we don't have time for. So. Lou will claims said he went there to have the wings which are named after him. There's some lemon pepper wings named after him and that he went there simply to eat and then he was on his way with his mass and so on and so forth. And Meena by the way I believe him I. Don't think he went to see your stripper. You probably was hungry. But my goodness. What was he doing there? What he did after the family gathering is the center of an NBA security discussion. A rapper who was at the club took pictures of him and tagged him in the photo used the poster child of what not to do. The sample out of what glue will be. It it it. BOGGLES my mind. You. Just clearly did not think this through.

Lou Williams NBA Jackie Macmullan Lakers Meena Suns Butterfly Lounge Espn Washington Dc Baseball Atlanta Writer
MLB Marlins Coronavirus Outbreak, Plus Dodgers v. Astros Rivalry

ESPN Daily

03:36 min | 1 year ago

MLB Marlins Coronavirus Outbreak, Plus Dodgers v. Astros Rivalry

"Alden how you doing? I don't know what I am right now. You and a lot of folks in and around Major League, baseball because while last week the League got off to a mostly successful start minus von Soto test. The last forty eight hours have been difficult. Things have been chaotic. And you and I are talking right now on Monday afternoon and we know that eleven Miami. marlins players in two coaches have tested positive for coronavirus. I mobile postponed the MARLINS oils game as well as the Yankees. Phillies game that was slated for today because the phillies played Miami over the weekend in were potentially exposed. Alden, the League's owners meeting today to discuss the outbreak. What came out of that? Woman. I tell you the big thing that didn't come out of that. In that is that there were no serious discussions yet about the possibility of cancelling this season, which was obviously the question that came up on everybody's minds when they see sort of an outbreak like this, take place. What happened with the Marlins in Philadelphia was just a reminder of how fragile this season is. It's a reminder of the fact that Major League. Baseball is trying to stay to season in the middle of an escalating public health crisis in a country that obviously hasn't been able to corral the corona virus. Any little one thing can send this season spiraling. But the one thing Meena you kept hearing when baseball got back, and the positive cases were lower than people anticipated, and there started to be a little bit of optimism about a spots. Chances of actually making this happen for one thing you can make being reminded of was at once. The season began layers were going to start travel. They were GONNA go on the airport. Security you're going to get on planes? They were GONNA. Stay on, hold stay in hotels and the complications of actually making this work. We're going to be incredibly more difficult than it was. When those guys were just in their own home, cities were already seen that be really difficult, and it is only the first four days of the season. There's a lot that starring about this including number of tests, but especially jarring is the revelation that the marlins players after learning about the positive tests decided in a group chat apparently. To play. They let the phillies now. And then the phillies also decided to play, and apparently that was sufficient. Does that surprise you? I think what's interesting about. This isn't like the sensibilities of Clare's or sort of the tenants that players hold onto. Don't necessarily apply situations like it's what I mean by. That is that athletes always operate under this mantra of suck it up? Play through injury clay. Hart show up every day. Do the best that you can do and when you're talking about a public health crisis when you're talking about the coronavirus pandemic in a situation where this virus spreads so easily. Those sensibilities don't apply here. They've been operating under a similar mindset like this their entire lives. It's what sort of made them great in their at their sport, which is just. Suck it up and play in. Get on with it, and that's why it can't be their decision. Major League Baseball at the very least, and at most a third party is going to have to intervene in this in these matters, because if not. This is going to continue despite a web, this season is going to be compromised and even worse. The pandemic in this country is going to get even worse.

Major League Phillies Baseball Marlins Alden Yankees Miami Miami. Meena Clare Philadelphia Hart
"meena" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Worth it and you're supporting someone I love. Colo- from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia. Will Manica. Today's leading lady is one of the most acclaimed decorated actors in Bollywood history known to audiences as the tragedy queen. She's been described by critics as a historically incomparable actress, though her own life often mirror at the tragedies. She played out on screen. She managed to make more than ninety films her short lifetime, leaving an indelible mark on Indian film. Please welcome Meena Kumari. Module, Bano was born on August. First Nineteen, thirty three in Bombay India to Father Ali UK's a Sunni Muslim from a province in what's now Pakistan and mother Ekvall Begum Bengali Christian convert to Islam. Both parents were struggling actors in Bollywood. Ali Played. harmonium worked as a music teacher and composed music for films to help the family get by. Shebeens acting career began at just six years old when she landed a role in the nineteen, thirty eight VJ bought film. Leather face. Though? She later said that she had no interest in acting. Mahjoubi noted that she was proud of being the breadwinner for her family at such a young age, and was contented to continue working at her father's behest from nineteen, thirty, nine to nineteen, forty two. She acted in seven films. It was on the set of one of these films in nineteen forty that she took the name Baby Meena when Meena was just fourteen years old. She started her first adult role as the heroine and the film botched shown cockle, which featured a number of major bollywood stars of the era. She received significant, critical and popular praise for her breakout performance. It was around this time that she started going by the name Meena Kumari. Meena worked on a series of box office hits from nineteen, forty, six to nineteen, fifty two. Including a number of big films in the mythology and fantasy genre. While on the set of the film Tamasha, in Nineteen, Fifty One Legendary Bollywood actor Shoka Kumar introduced Meena Director and screenwriter come all I'm wro he. Amro He subsequently offered me the starring role in his next film, and she accepted, but it was not to be just a couple of weeks after signing onto the new movie me was in a serious car crash while on her way back to Bombay, an ended up spending four months recovering in the hospital. I'm wro. He began visiting me at the hospital nearly every day. And when he couldn't come in person, it would communicate through letters. I'm wro, he and Meena, who was only nineteen at the time fell in love. And after Meena was released from the hospital, the two decided to get married. There were just a couple problems I'm wro. He already had a wife and children and Meena knew her father wouldn't approve their union. The two ended up marrying and secret, but after only a few months, the media found out and broke the news. Meena's father demanded an immediate divorce as expected but Meena who is still living in her parents home at the time refused. That same year Nina officially became one of the most famous and in demand actors in Bollywood after starring in the film by Jubara. This is the first film that really allowed me not to show her star power and significantly increased her value at the box office. Meena received her first film fare award for her work. On the film, the volley would equivalent of an Oscar. The following year I'm Roe v asked me not to star in his next film, but Meena's father wouldn't let her work with the man who was technically her husband. Instead Meena's father told her to take a role in a different film, but she only lasted five days onset before instigating a fight with the director and leaving. The following day. She told her father that she was heading to Bombay to star in unreleased film instead her father told her that if she left, she would no longer be welcome to live in his home. He kept to his word, refusing to open the door for me. Know when she returned from shooting. With little choice Meena moved into. I'm rohe's house in Bombay according to Vinod Meta's biography of Meena. Amro, he became a very oppressive. Even abusive husband wants the to began living officially as a married couple, he imposed strict rules on who was allowed to have in her dressing room. Onset regularly sent his personal assistant to spy on her instead a nightly curfew for her, and was constantly upset at being upstaged by her greater stardom. There have also been accusations of physical abuse. At the same time me, no was funding her husband's effort more lavish productions out of pocket, and she was trying to convince him to have a child with her, but she refused. Suffice it to say the marriage was extremely rocky. In the late nineteen fifties and early nineteen sixties Nina began starring in films that more closely mirrored her own life. She was particularly drawn to dramas that featured women leads exhibiting great. Strengthen the phase of tragedy. As a result, she became known as the Tragedy Queen of Indian cinema. The films during this period showed off Menas incredible range and brought her significant critical acclaim. In, nineteen, sixty three, Meena made history when she was nominated for an award in all three of the best actress categories at the film fare awards on March Fifth Nineteen Sixty four, while on the set of a new film me not slapped across the face by her husband's personal assistant, after Meena invited a famous male lyricist into her makeup room. Enraged at this latest indignity forced upon her by her husband Meena. Told I'm row. He that she wouldn't be returning to his house ever again. The to remain separated for the rest of their lives. Following the separation Meena suffered from severe depression and began drinking heavily. Though she continued acting in major productions and received significant acclaim for her work throughout the nineteen sixties, her drinking worsened considerably over time in nineteen, sixty eight, Meena was diagnosed with psoriasis deliver, and subsequently travelled to London and Switzerland for advanced treatment. After returning to India in late nineteen, sixty eight. She resumed work contrary to her doctor's orders. By nineteen seventy-two Menas, health was deteriorating rapidly. But she was determined to finish one last film a movie. She and her strange. Started all the way back in nineteen fifty four called PA- Kiza. The movie premiered February Third Nineteen Seventy two and became the most famous and most highly acclaimed film of means career. Just three weeks after the release. Meena was admitted to a nursing home. She died on March thirty, first, one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, two. She was just thirty eight years old. For her half, Meena requested the following lines, she ended life with a broken fiddle with broken song with a broken heart, but not a single regret. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another leading lady. Special thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator was Kaplan. Talk to you tomorrow. I wanted to tell you about another show. I think you might like. The American girls podcast reviews the series you loved book by. Join Alison, Horrex and Mary Mahoney as they explore the wild world of American girl fandom. In each episode Allison Mary dive into an American girl book from there, and perhaps your childhood, using their knowledge is professional historians and.

Baby Meena Meena Kumari Bombay Bollywood Father Ali UK Jenny Kaplan Meena Director Amro Nina Bano Wonder Media Network personal assistant Ekvall Begum Bengali Christian Shoka Kumar cockle Shebeens Mahjoubi Onset India Oscar
California settles lawsuits over deadly 'Ghost Ship' fire for $32.7 million

Morning Edition

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

California settles lawsuits over deadly 'Ghost Ship' fire for $32.7 million

"Of Oakland, California says it's agreed to a settlement of nearly $33 million in connection with lawsuits filed over a deadly 2016 fire. 36 people died in the fire at an illegally converted warehouse of the ghost ship. The lawsuits were filed by the families of 32 of the victims of fire swept through that warehouse in December of that year during a music party. The primary leaseholder Derek al Meena is facing a retrial in October on charges of criminal

Derek Al Meena Oakland California
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"To watch her and to support her, and I know that she will continue I'm giving you like the most? No, I know I. Love on Anti. I love it. So well well. Neri to watch you and to be able to sit here and have this incredible conversation. Thank you so much for taking the time I know. You've had a very busy weeks and Yeah, thank you so much. We'll superfine super finite. The remind myself you know we're all would doesn't solve the ritual stock, but in my most exhausted moments when I don't WanNa, see anybody or talked to anyone exists WanNa like. Paul and by lay down for two months, these moments of having conversations with awesome extraordinary people like you are like. They released me up. And just you know it's wonderful to be able to maintain that connection and to be able to. Talk to the folks I. Always remind myself like that felt really good. You know like that's something you should remind yourself as we're all still by navigating August. While wild newfangled world. Such a great reminder that means so much coming from you, thanks. Thank you, thanks again for all of your support of phenomenal and Elsa, and always is your dream my God of course. I just feel so reinvigorated after talking to her, she's so inspiring and I know. She said the same speaking with us. I know that's why we do this podcast. In the first place, there's so much I learned from her candice. What stands out to you just that? She grew up having a dialogue about activism from a very young age and I. You know in adulthood. I'm realizing how I'm kind of just catching up to. You know being involved with the community what it means to be an activist. I also just loved how she. Didn't really have a definition for what an activist was. And just you know related to it from her own personal experiences I thought was really powerful. I love how she? Admitted that it took thirty five years for her to finally take that risk and her advice to all of us. You know, do it when you can like. She encourages us to do it sooner than that, but if you aren't up for it, do it when you can. And that's enough and taking that risk is enough, and she acknowledges how. Privileged, she is and how she can use that privilege for others and I. Am just so inspired by her I just I I knew we were going to love this conversation, but men is. She pretty phenomenal. Yeah. A to what you're saying. I mean we've got you know. I know I say this on this podcast. We've got teenagers in the House and that is something that comes up for oldest ally. You know. She's going to be a senior in high school. She's talking about college. And you know and trying to figure out what the rest of her life is going to look like, and I constantly telling her like hey. I'm in my thirties and I'm still figuring it out, and it takes a while I thought I had figured out just like how we start this podcast every week. And it's okay to admit you don't and and so so wonderful. That Nina was able to share her experiences where Know, we're even though she had it figured out. She's still left room for for growth and room for creativity and room for re passions, and and how many of those revolved around helping her community, and I think that's something that we are you know witnessing right now is just the importance of. Getting out there and being a part of your community paying attention to what's going on. In your community, right and Kansas you and I have this conversation with each other privately as well how we want to raise our daughters a certain way, and have these conversations with them and I'm so excited for unions book to arrive because I can start that conversation with poppy and continue to have an open dialogue about it and so grateful that means created that opportunity for me. And I wouldn't have known those statistics. I wouldn't have known to research those statistics before this week. which is you know feels very embarrassing and shameful to admit, but I feel like it's important to admit and acknowledge that you know I. I saw myself in books. You know and so I think it's really. It this was such an important dialogue to have him so appreciative that Meena was willing to share. In her experiences with us our listeners because it definitely makes me view. you know going to the library completely different going to the bookstore completely different where I shop for books, completely different, and most importantly you know. The difference of like joining the PTA to help bake sales, and like participating in the PTA to actually make sure that your kids can go into their school library and see themselves in the books that live there. Right it's truly. Inspiring again he was so inspired i. can you tell so annoying like a broken record over here I'm we hope you guys enjoyed this episode? As much as we.

Paul Neri Nina Meena Elsa Kansas poppy
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"But course the teacher wasn't fired for actually organizing are black lives matter. They were instead fired for like being tardy. Right There's there's a bunch of people commenting on the threat like Oh. Did you really look into this? It's the you know there may be something else going on. It's like. have. You ever heard of retaliation. Right like this and how this stuff usually plays out. So anyway I think that's another way to about like keeping your eyes open and not A. Assuming that the person who has been? Victimized repressed by you know powerful people. is the one that is like doing wrong or or rather that Initi-. Have done wrong and and admiring faction for being tardy. Is that really what's motivating them to fire her and is not a valid basis virus writing this I don't want to compare the two issues, but this is exactly what we're seeing with black man getting shot by the police. Right in this idea that they have to be you know these examples of good people right? There's so much emphasis with Christian Cooper in Central Art Was it the? Ride that he went to Harvard and he's good looking and I mean stuff is lovely, but even if he wasn't even if he had done something by you, don't you don't deserve to get killed by police same thing you know Chris Cooper on. He was harassed by this woman but George Lloyd Riot. He. Supposedly it was around a forgery claim at a convenience store. Even if he had you know done. That is not a reason is a should I'd be a death sentence. So. I hope I think making another point, which is, we have to apply this thinking in his analysis to all of these issues right when we talk about this being systemic and systemic oppression in when people are talking about abolishing this be systems, they apply to all of them right. This operates in many of the same way across these different systems Some of them just have more drastic outcomes. We're talking about prisons and police. It's you know. It's daft. It is depriving someone of freedom, but this happens in lots of other places as well and it's it's just as hershiser and something that we all need to pay attention to and apply you know with the term like he thought energy. Keep that same energy right all of these different. Issues and keep We're GONNA. Take a quick break. We'll be right back.

Christian Cooper Chris Cooper forgery Initi George Lloyd Harvard
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Her decades and generations, and we're finally see not progress in that, likewise for folks who are new to it, it takes a lot of times really engage in meaningful way, and it's probably not GonNa happen in a week. By watching the videos, and so that's what I mean to about. The least you can do is show up consistently and really care about this stuff to commit to educating yourself in a deep meaningful way without means like set a google, alert or right to to or defunding police, and you can read up on all of the right. Pieces that are being written about this right now. There's easy things that we can literally be doing from our living rooms that. In the end, I think are are much more meaningful impactful ways of engaging speaking of twitter. We want to discuss something you posted. I was looking at your twitter this morning and about twenty hours ago. You'd said that a California teach you teacher who? I guess a teaching California was apparently fired for wearing one of your phenomenally black T. shirts. and she was told that it was the same as wearing a Maga hat. What it's you put it out there on the. Internet! You said I want to help her fight this. Please DM me if you can help, I mean this is insane, because being black and proud isn't a political stance What's going on with all this right now? Yeah, so I'm getting as much information as I can from her right now from what I side. That's a huge caveat, which is that were still doing exactly what happened and what her you know. rights and claims might be what I do know is that it is a public school. It is in Bakersfield, California, which.

twitter California Bakersfield google
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Work is huge. There's another Fun story I have grounds co working? In down in La for the day and I ran into someone. From the organization families belong together, which is another one of our partners. It does a on the border. We were even like working together I just ran into her nose lovely and we were sitting there working extra each other and somebody at the table next to as answer the phone and it was this woman, and she started talking about I'm going to get the backpacks collect them and they were gonNA. GonNa. Get on the bus and then we're GONNA get the shoes and Blah Blah Blah and we looked at each other and the other woman in her life, she she's clearly doing work at the border. Like how do we not know her right? Like who is this person? I wonder what organizations us with NC Hangup, and I'm like I'm sorry to be awkward, but I couldn't help but overhear your conversation. Like who are you? What organization are you with? And she's like armed screenwriter like I'm just a mom in regular percent in. Clubbing backpacks. Shoes to donate. Relief packages to the border and like this is amazing right and she literally was like I'm I'm just ordinary I'm a screenwriter I work in Hollywood when you're talking about those like wow. So, I don't know there's just so many stories like that across so many different issues and I think it's really about like picking one leaning all the way into it right showing up doing it consistent reading becoming a subject matter expert on that issue, the very least you can do is just like learned the issue inside and out understand what the policy agenda is. What people are with the with the actual activists, right or like fighting or We're seeing that right now. Right with criminal justice reform in and having conversations around deep on the police, which I know may make.

La Hollywood
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Not sort of the immediate thing that I thought you pay attention to, but what? I started to realize in talking to other folks Gina reactions that many ways. Like it could be more needed in this moment right and it feels like it might the moment, and now it's. It's what we're seeing. Right? Use Your Voice. We got do anything in that. Each of us can do something and when we do when all of us you know, take that step number. How small when it adds up to thousands of people are millions of people. Protesting it's pretty impactful, right? It's a big. It's a big impact. Is that what how you grew up where you go? Did you grow up as an activist surrounded by activists I? Mean obviously I know your mother and your aunt. Lawyers, and you know we know them today, but if this was as prevalent when you were a kid as well absolutely, although it's funny to hear you use the term, activists and somebody just asked me about this as well and I was thinking back to my childhood, and not we didn't use the word activists I think it was really in many ways were dislike what you do right and there wasn't a title in rather the titles and the people that I saw up to who were talked about in terms of you know what they were doing. Real lawyers, right? There are lawyers were academics they were. Elected officials local elected officials, and so those are the people that I revered, and you know Camo actually talked about this all the time that know her up in the sixties. Those were the heroes. who were really a part of a movement? And that's still the case back right? It's it's academics. It's poets artists so I didn't have that language around being activist, but it was something that every single bag right? My Grandmother Mom hot, and I remembered a very unique situation, whereas like just these three powerful incredible, when any were doing awesome stuff in the world, but my grandmother in particular was the one who. Really emphasized that not only can I do anything, but it's my responsibility, and it's my duty right The the I think it's proper to whom much is given much required bright any ounce of privilege that I had whether it was education, or access to some institutional system that others did. It was my responsibility to figure out how to bring them along. It was my responsibility to fight for them to represent them. Them in those rooms and figure out on a you know, dismantle those you know power structures that were I leading folks out, and I know that sounds like lofty right and the whole message about we can do anything, but that's the point right in my my work in intact I'm sitting in a room and I'm the only woman or I'm the only person of color not room like I'm representing everyone Brian to. figure out how I can be a my own change agent to make sure that I'm not the only not real next time. So, it was really about you know less about through the status entitled, but really about duty and responsibility, and it was just around me constantly. Not only you know hearing the stories of my mother in this rights movement in my mom and aunt as kids in the work that they were doing which part with the book is about? But even when I was younger, my my whole sort of extended family. In in the United States was all these folks that were in the civil. Rights Movement with my grandmother. All My aunties and uncles, right, so it was sort of just this kind of constant conversation and you know real value system that I was. Exposed to very early on. That's incredible I. Love How it's not. Didn't even need a word for it. You just There was not a choice you just did it. totally that's amazing We Really WanNa talk to you about. The the lack of representation of color in literature and I know that's I heard you discuss. That's why you wanted to write this book I wanNA. Make sure I get the statistics right. Because for our listeners they are staggering. When you hear them, read aloud fifty percent of lead characters in children's books. Children's books are white. twenty-seven percent are animals with human characteristics, ten percent, black, seven percent Asian, five percent, Latin, Nex and one percent native American. What has your experience been like raising your daughters and shopping for books for them and trying to find something that they can relate to given those numbers? Yeah, all, add a number I think it may be pulled from the same. Place at the University of Wisconsin in two thousand, eighteen to research and release data that said in two thousand eighteen, there were more children's books that had animals as main characters than black lat next Asia and indigenous characters combined. Combined. and I think it's something like fifty percent of all children's books. Were I believe white male characters, so we have? This was only two years ago and I wanna I make the point that we have made incredible progress. I'm I'm Super Owl. To be a part of this, you know new wave, a diversity championing diversity in kids lead along with folks like Matthew Cherry. Who wrote hair live or you know? The products flew by Mohammad. I don't need I. Don't need to run down the list. There's lots of list circulating right now. Because he finally paying attention what was interesting like all of us were talking about this long before folks were being attention right, and now they are, but you know the answer your question. It's one of the reasons. I wrote the book which is becoming a new mom. My now older daughter, who just turned four yesterday. Happy. Birthday to you. Say extra literally. Day God, it's like it's like having another grown adult my house at this point like she's so like old and my God, it's so much. But you know when she was when I was a new mom and I was. You know we were looking for children's books to read her. Of course we are reading the classics you know. The Night Moon, and where the wild things are brown bear, and you know all the titles and. They're great. They're really wonderful pieces of art and children's literature, but at a certain point I'm like where are the women? Where are the black girls that look like my daughter, right? Where's the brown skin and the curly hair and we would start like you know coloring..

Gina United States Mohammad University of Wisconsin Brian Matthew Cherry Asia
"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Law School and has hell bent on empowering future generations of women to make their mark including her two lovely daughters, and you know what guys we actually talked with her for. Basically almost over an hour, so we don't want to waste your time. We want to jump right into this conversation. Without further ADO. Here is the phenomenal. Meena Harris. CIA. And you guys. We're here with Meena. Harris Meena. We are so excited to have you. and we owe you a huge congratulations on your new book Carmela It's came out June second, and it's already. It immediately sold out everywhere right? It did yeah when you were like. You Owe me congratulations I was. Just. Nonstop. I'm probably the I kind of white break. I've gotten in the last two weeks. Yeah came out almost two weeks ago on June second, and it was just wild. I'm a first time author her never. Authors we like calling myself at his crazy by getting to see people finally hold the bug and read the book and hear their reactions to. It was just one of the most special things in the world, so I'm still on a high. That's great i. feel it's only now just being restocked and I both ordered it, and it's on its way, but it's not here yet because it's sold out so quickly. You don't get that immediate gratification totally not yet, but it's coming It's based on a true story, and it's about your mom and aunt. Will you share with us since we don't have the book yet? What the premise? Yes, so it's about two sisters named Kamla and Maya based on the childhood of my mom by Harrison. Aren't Kamala Harris as you said and it's about two sisters who see a problem in their community. They see issue and they decide that they want to solve it, and they want to figure out how to make positive change in their community. And their communities is literally their backyard. Something that I talked about a lot with my women's brand that just starts somewhere starts, and we're small right, and so this is such a great example of it's an apartment complex courtyard I. don't WanNa way too much especially since your books are coming soon, but It's.

Carmela It Harris Meena Kamala Harris Meena Harris CIA Kamla Maya Harrison
"meena" Discussed on TheAbbie

TheAbbie

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on TheAbbie

"BE NINETY. GonNa cut back on my back. I think he got a leading off Had the bully push. You didn't get the Mugunga did he? Yeah he Dominic I don ninety go. I'm I'm I'm Paul..

"meena" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"meena" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The Guardian Hello and welcome to the Guardian books. PODCAST with me. Richard Lee Claire Armistead. This week we welcome Ben Lerner. Who talks to the Guardians Lindsay Irvine about masculinity and forging fiction from his own life and Meena candice? Sammy joins us in the studio to discuss us. How auto fiction is haunted by the realities of Gender Ben? Lerner had already brought out three well received collections of poetry when he published leaving their torch station in two thousand eleven. This first novel chartered the Wanderings of Adam Gordon. An American poet Adrift in Madrid. Who hopes around the Produ- parties? He's with young Maddalena struggles with the idea of poetry and takes a bunch of drugs. Readers were enchanted by his subtlety on language and Americans abroad even even as they were thrilled by the correspondences between the life stories of learner and his awkward narrator his second novel Teno four was was the story of an unnamed writer like Learner Teaching in New York who had published a book to great acclaim. Now he returns with the Topeka School. ooh which finds Adam that the air quotes there in the final year of university. We're in Kansas. As the author was himself in the late nineteen nineties. He's an atom. You guessed it. Like learner is a debating champion. The novel is in part a meditation on the intellectual traditions that have fueled bullying and fake news in the American public life and when Learner came to the studio he began by reading a section where Adams Parents Jane Jonathan. Who are both psychiatrists? Listen listen to a judge pulling apart their sons debating performance. Yes you're winning these rounds easily. Evanson said to Adam with an intensity I thought might have been for our benefit. But you're winning them in the wrong way. This was two days later. We were in another empty classroom after the afternoons competition had concluded you're giving in fast and fluent speeches from left on the spectrum and you're going to easily carry judges who share that organization Liberal cosmopolitans judges from San Francisco in New York of which there are plenty. My is meant Jonathan's maybe I was being paranoid but I have expected Evanson to come right out and say the Jews but imagine you're running for president and now you're in a swing state. You're an hour or two outside of Pittsburgh and while you need to be intelligent. You need to be winning hearts as much as minds. What what you have in your favor is Kansas? You have midland American English. I went quick swerves into the folksy. You can put lipstick on a pig but it's still a pig that kind kind of thing I want you saying. Right after some hyper eloquent riff about Yeltsin breaking a promise now in Kansas. We call that a lie after you go off about a treaty regulating drilling in the Arctic now in Kansas. We wouldn't shake on that. I don't care if they're not real sayings just deliver them like they're tried and true say they tried and true. Say Ain't if you want. You can go a grammatical so long as they know. It's a choice that it's in quotes interrupt your high brow fluency with Bland Dan Soundbites of regional decency after recovering from those Jabs Lindsay. Irvine asked Lerner why he wanted to use his own experiences. A champion debater to make a state of the nation novel. Will I mean I wanted to write a family. Saga story about a family's prehistory that could also to a certain degree be a prehistory of the trump era And to think about how one families reckoning with certain questions of patterns and yeah and and prehistory both known repressed could also be brought into relation with this larger set of social issues and forces. So I think a novel feels writable to me when I have something that. That's on the micro level. That feels like it might also have implications broader social implications. Yeah the central character right to his Adam Gordon. There he appears alongside his his mother and father. Joe Jane and Jonathan and he's somebody you have written about before the Dod I S. Noble. He was a somewhat shift scratcher student in Spain and but as seem here he's kind of he's a thirty something something of a prodigy preparing to leave high school. What what led you there? Yeah I mean. There's a way in which they're come to Adams in this novel there's the atom who's in the class of nineteen ninety seven the graduating high school class in Topeka the adolescent Adam. And then there's kind of the subtler implied older Adam who's in writing this book from the Brooklyn of the present where he's become a father and it's to a certain degree about the older Adam Trying to remember the the experience of the younger atom but also too often remember it from the vantage of his parents. Anka's now is apparent himself as much access To his into his parents as he does to the the perspective of the adolescent version of himself so I wanted to be before and after the other atoms and they doubted voices. Kind kind of flicker. In and out of the the narrative threads than censoring different voices appeared in a context. Where sort of expect one to carry on? That's right because for me. The the drama of the book is the older Adams effort to imagine these other minds advantages. Like it's not a book where I like you. You know the goal is to just perfectly omniscient Lee being able to inhabit other consciousness is it's more about the dramatization of the struggle to imagine other minds and also to encounter the limits of that process of imagination. Like Adam doesn't doesn't even have full access to the younger version of himself but he wants to be able to imagine The kind of people around him and to think about how the voices that surrounded him when he was young were you know were or have shaped him and the president it is. He a figure you. You think you're going to carry on returning to become a kind of intellectual version of rabbit. Yeah I mean I don't I don't seem to ever really be able to predict what I'm GonNa Right next but I kind of doubt it because I feel like this is a trilogy. which is you know? This book is the prehistory of the other. Two books I keep thinking of it as the unconscious of the other two books and a certain way and I think I always needed to write a Topeka novel like of this kind of formative childhood experience and I feel like I've written both the third term of the trilogy and it's also the prequel the other two books so it feels like a closed circle so I don't have a sense of whether or not he's he's he's an Avatar whatever deploy fiction again but if I've learned anything from writing these novels it's that I'm not really in control. You made your name as as a poet and and also as a a novelist with more or less avant-garde experimental writing and compared to them. This this novel looks really quite conventional final does it feel like that. That's a con storytelling style. That you've you've arrived at naturally and that will you'll continue with. Well it's weird 'cause I I mean I totally totally know what you mean and it is the it's the most conventional novel that I've written in the sense that it's intergenerational it's has multiple temple centers and multiple voices. It has a little bit less maybe about Kind of art and poetry whereas the other novels were to a certain extent kind of vehicles for literary and art criticism among many other things but they're also ways in which I feel. This novel is the strangest novel I've written to. I mean in part because has it that issue of of of where there are tears in the voices. And you know you're you'll read a section that's very much Kind of somewhat somewhat conventional effort to write in the voice of an other. But then there's a kind of glitch in the voice that reveals it to be the work of the older Adam trying to imagine or channel his mother's foist or whatever so there's a sense in which I feel like I did work within a framework of conventions of of comparative conventionally but often because it gave me something to kind of strategically he generally disrupt And there are other voices. Don't trump kind of best point. Yeah I mean the book is kind of about the genealogy of the voice. That's that's writing it in a voice is a corporate Fang. Voices made up of many voices. It's always a tissue of contradictions. I wanted the novel. To come dramatize that as opposed is to present you know a social perfectly formed interior voices that are separate from the other Influences of the world. So I don't know I don't know what what a be able to do next or or the degree to which it'll be conventional or unconventional. But I think that whenever you're working in a sean right or a set of conventions. The great gift of having conventions is that they give you things to strategically mess up. You know for year matic affect an awful lot of the the details of this are drawn from what the the facts we know about your life. Why did that make sense says a as a as a way to write about modern America? Yeah it's a good question. I mean a couple of things like one is I mean for. This book is kind of third term in a trilogy. I kind of wanted to write like I said like the prehistory of the other books and kind of complicate this Adam Gordon figure by kind of describing some of the formative experiences of of his life in a way that would kind of change the valence of the other novels. I mean the couple. Oh things like one is the the theme you know of. The theme of this novel is very much about Prehistory the and the way that you have to work with the kind of family mythologies stories and experiences that you inherit and the way that you know you try to find freedom to break certain patterns and in other ways you try to honor certain patterns or legacies and it seemed to me that working with some of kind of autobiographical material but shaping taping it would be the way to most intensely dramatized that series of the Matt Concerns. You know The other thing is that I got really interested trysted in this biographical thing about the place. I grew up which was to peak Kansas which went on the one hand. Was this Very Red State with a very masculine EST culture. Where you really weren't supposed to talk about your feelings like if you're a guy and you were talking you needed to be talking trash but on the other hand there was this thing called the men Iger Foundation this huge huge international psychiatric clinic which brought people like my parents and people from all over the world and that was an institution that ran on talk? You know it was all about expression and talk talk therapy. and which is because Adam kind of grows up it seems in a little island of of More or less Bohemian liberality. That's right except not totally desperate to pass as a real man in the masculine est culture outside of the household so I got interested in the way there could be I could depict this childhood torn porn between these two very different relationships to masculinity into speech I mean the only thing I'd.

Adam Gordon Kansas Jane Jonathan Ben Lerner Richard Lee Claire Armistead Lindsay Irvine New York president Sammy Madrid Meena candice Spain Topeka School. Maddalena Evanson Arctic Teno Pittsburgh Dan Soundbites
"meena" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"meena" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"And the answer was another podcast. It's called bootleg with Meena kind and her I get her. I guess that was making fun of Dominique and her, although wasn't to her. She didn't hear me make fun of it yesterday. I'm like, usually on the second show, it's when the guest is the local chef on the first show. People trying to come out of the box, strong with a big celebrity. Dominique was like, no, no, I show bootleg is with the chef on day one. You know, you try to come first show, Tom Cruise. Second show local chef from down the street, doing a daily television shows hard, but no, she's coming out of the box with Dominic Foxworth. Once the most interesting thing you guys discuss on that. I mean, what's the most interesting thing? So I, what I thought was interesting. I don't know if Dominique agrees was we both ended up not citing which Cruden on the Khalil Mack trade. But I think being a little bit more skeptical that it's been a huge success for Chicago than most people would think. Especially given how good clear MAC is obviously just been a world's destroyer, but from a team building perspective, Mitch, Trubisky, as I mentioned earlier, doesn't look very good and they just invested all of their money in a defensive star, right? So they're sort of betting that they can take advantage of Mitch, trubisky's rookie contract with him, but there might not be anything to take advantage of their. And I was kinda surprised at Dominic and I both came out on that side. I mean, that's a win now trade and they don't have a win now quarterback and on the other side for Gruden their time to load up and make a run was when they had a rookie quarterback under a rookie deal, and a rookie are under a rookie deal. That was their win now window that Wendover hose. So it's reasonable to think now it's time to rebuild, but that's not the thing that out though is most most interesting. The most interesting thing or while on your show was Urals. Hold on a second. Hold on a second. We've got breaking NFL news. Eric Reid is now signed with Carolina Panthers. I'll try and get your your reactions in real time. Wow. Can we got that? Can we put that on the capsule and send it to you as PM dominance? Real real reaction that when I asked him for analysis a interrupted him, we'll talking about urinals and his real analysis. A sound you say real react in Dominique's. Right? I'm out of here. Xiaomi way, though it's it's encouraging, but there is another person who potentially should get a job, but that is, I mean, that's shocking, encouraging greedy, black man, Eric, gotten back from the league who it to capture, Nick. Let's celebrate that. This blackballing appears to be over. You got us, hey, got ten acres. Don't try to go get all forty all at once. It should be noted that doesn't jeopardize his collusion suit because for collusion to occur, it's not that every team in the NFL has to be in cahoots. You only need to prove that either the league in one team or two teams. So even though the Panthers are obviously no longer in quote, unquote, cahoots potentially could still proceed with that in that particular area of the country to it's particularly shocking thing, but you need a good safety needed. Good safety, I guess. But the Dan, you remember I was in studio when the David Tepper took over and you and I talked about how he was kind of a different sort of guy. I don't know if you've seen his quotes on copper, Nick, and all of this. He is clearly not of the same ilk, I think is a lot of the owners. So what's the team in the league Meena that people are sleeping on the team that you believe is actually pretty good and nobody's talking about them as being pretty good? Well, I first of all, I'd like to just the patriots are still good..

Dominique Carolina Panthers Eric Reid Dominic Foxworth Meena NFL Nick David Tepper Tom Cruise Trubisky Mitch Gruden Chicago Khalil Mack Cruden Dan ten acres
"meena" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"meena" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We asked poets a selective favorite poem for the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we invite them to read a poll of their own appeared in the magazine. My guest today is Meena Alexander the author of over a dozen books. Oppo Trie fiction nonfiction and criticism the recipient of a distinguished achievement award in literature from the South Asian Lewis OC as well as of a pen open book award she teaches at hundred college and the graduate center. Cuny? Welcome to the show me. So the poem. You've chosen a read is one we published pretty recently Adana by Gerald stern. What drew to this particular poem as you're proving the archives? Kevin it actually sort of took my breath away. Because of the extraordinary voice that he has in the poem and the way the whole thing flows in kind of unspools that's verb that he used as you know, almost like a theater, so there's this miniature cedar of the sorrow and of desire and of this early life. I guess we all have that as points in some measure the pull to an earlier life, which is ours, but not ours anymore. And then, of course, the way memory works. The other thing I wanted to mention was just the way the breath works in this poem. I mean, we normally think of points, you know, in different ways, different points, do it. But coupled together stitch together on this certain kinds of poetry particularly contemporary poetry now where you actually see the stitching, but with with this poem, it's the foist in. It's the breath which perfectly. Suits, two things. I think one is the image of music trope of music that is there because music of all the arts is the one that exists in time. It doesn't really have a special form. I mean, it comes out of instruments where it's the voice or instrument, but it doesn't it's not like sculpture or visual art, painting or even appointment a piece of paper so exists in time and by the same token vanishes. And of course, the figure the Adonis is somebody who makes music was a composer. And we don't know if it's for real or not. That's wonderful. Why don't we listen to it? Now, here's Meena Alexander reading Donna by Gerald stern. Donus? I forgave him that debt of having to explain where he came from who is angry father and his loving mother were or are relieved him from any excuse and Sut dozens and dozens of years ago at the counter of sex Broadway and a hundred third he on the other side his sleeves rolled up. His hands is arms in steaming water washing. Tissues and frying, pans and talking music, his dream of studying Chouli are the tiny practice room, a rich lady from the upper east or Upper West side paid for listening all ofter noon to him playing the small though his law dramatic gestures his hair wild, his hands and fingers amazing. Classic polish..

Cuny Meena Alexander Gerald stern Adana Upper West Kevin Donna
"meena" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"meena" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"I think particularly in an era when ego is so flagrantly on display at when narcissism is so extravagantly expressed it's good to remember that there are these depths that complicate our self presentation what crews dozen this book it sounds like is not just critique or attack for aids ideas but also serve goes after him on a human level and your review you say here we have freud the liar cheat incestuous child molester woman a hater moneyworship or chronic plagiarise are and all around nasty nut job it's pretty relentless cruise spends an inordinate amount of time on going over the story of freud's probable affair with his sisterinlaw meena i'm this is something that has now been public knowledge for decades that this probably occurred but there's something oddly prudish and inconsistent about what he does with this for one thing in one of the i think incorrect aspects of this book is cruises suggestion that freud was a true misogynist a deep misogynist in many many ways in which what freud did in terms of recognising female desires equal in significance to mailed is that i for example were were liberating for women but on the one hand he suggests that freud was constantly hostile to women and then he also says that in this affair in fact meena became a kind of emu's and influenced freud theoretically at many different stages in his own development and so i don't know why her status as a female means less than that of other women crews also says that the ways in which freud attacked the repressive morality of his age which was really a problem an and one thing that i write about is that the book makes it sound a bit as though human understanding of sexuality and of the essential universality desire was just growing enlarging just fine before freud came along and sort of made us all subject to his own strange obsessions this wasn't the case and you don't have to read very far in early 20th century literature lawyer 19th century literature to understand the the crippling effects of the social morris of the time.

freud meena one hand