34 Burst results for "Medieval Times"

The Thousand-Year Rose

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

The Thousand-Year Rose

"So. This is almost smack dab in the center of germany which means it's smack dab in the center of continental europe and in medieval times. It was an important spot for the bronze industry they exported works all over but the thing that really put it on the map the rose as with any good myth. There are a few different versions of this origin story. But here's a popular. Take on it back in the eight hundred. There's a guy named charlemagne charles. The great he was one of those old school emperors ruled over huge parts of europe and he was also one of those emperors who took his christianity very seriously. You don't have to know who the saxons are. But when charlemagne conquered them he decreed that the either had to become christians or be put to death his son and heir was called louis the pious and in the year eight fifteen louis was enjoying himself on a hunt in central germany. When he got pretty badly lost louis was trying to find his bearings when he happened upon a wild rose bush that was blooming right through the snow. We couldn't believe his eyes and his crew caught up with him. He told them he wanted to build a cathedral. They're dedicated to the virgin mary. In according to legend he was actually carrying. Some of mary's remains with him in the rose is very important and the story of the foundation of sign in combination with a reliquary with relics of the virgin. Mary and so. It was told that the virgin mary and is. We'll protect this place. That's kouadio director of the cathedral's museum when she says reliquary. She means the spot within the cathedral where mary's remains are held that and the rose turned hildesheim into a pretty big deal pretty quickly.

Charlemagne Charles Continental Europe Louis Germany Europe Bush Kouadio Cathedral's Museum Mary
Easter Bunny (MM #3665)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Easter Bunny (MM #3665)

"The with kevin mason. We've got a little rabbit. Living our backyard recently hate to go back and start cutting the grass and trimming down there clover that they enjoy so much but of course today is eastern. That's the day four well in theory. The easter bunny often wondered why is a bunny rabbit associated with easter. I figured for sure. It was something silly but i went back and started doing some research and found out. It actually has some christian or jen's it's all associated with rabbits and fertility and the virgin. Mary and as time went on the fertility of rabbits and the fertility of spring got associated with the virgin. Mary and then the germans came in and they associated the easter bunny with the season. It's fascinating reading. I was rather shocked. This goes back to medieval times. I would've never thought. I thought it was something silly. And something dumb that was created by some retailer back in the nineteen twenties or thirties. But no german. Protestants brought it to america in the eighteen. Hundreds and guess what. There is some association with lord jesus and the easter bunny go figure.

Kevin Mason Mary JEN America Lord Jesus
Easter Bunny (MM #3665)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Easter Bunny (MM #3665)

"The with kevin mason. We've got a little rabbit. Living our backyard recently hate to go back and start cutting the grass and trimming down there clover that they enjoy so much but of course today is eastern. That's the day four well in theory. The easter bunny often wondered why is a bunny rabbit associated with easter. I figured for sure. It was something silly but i went back and started doing some research and found out. It actually has some christian or jen's it's all associated with rabbits and fertility and the virgin. Mary and as time went on the fertility of rabbits and the fertility of spring got associated with the virgin. Mary and then the germans came in and they associated the easter bunny with the season. It's fascinating reading. I was rather shocked. This goes back to medieval times. I would've never thought. I thought it was something silly. And something dumb that was created by some retailer back in the nineteen twenties or thirties. But no german. Protestants brought it to america in the eighteen. Hundreds and guess what. There is some association with lord jesus and the easter bunny go figure.

Kevin Mason Mary JEN America Lord Jesus
Expats in Italy

Travel with Rick Steves

03:47 min | 4 months ago

Expats in Italy

"Let's start the hour with a look at the other side of the coin has a couple of americans explain how they reinvented themselves when they moved to italy. Have you ever liked what you saw in italy so much that you dreamed of actually moving there. I have to admit i've been tempted myself. We're joined now on travel. With rick steves by two people who gave into that temptation and now they're living their dreams and rod left her job and twenty fourteen and moved to cnn and long so for him. To medallion settled down within near sorrento above the coffee. Coast anna an and join us now to tell us their story. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so anna. How did you end up in sienna. I studied italian in college. Fell love with it. Decided to move to italy after college. Move to to rin then ended up doing graduate work in manchester became professor and then realized that i needed to get to sienna because i did my thesis on saint catherine of sienna and every summer i went every summer. Got harder to come back to the states. So i eventually just decided to move there. And that was a few years ago and You must like it. Because you're still there i do. I love it by the way big industrial city in the north. No nonsense fantastic city. Though the best food real interim people think about that but you ended up in sort of the fairytale medieval tower not an end lung. What's your story. I changed my major twice in university and so decided to take months break to go to italy to try to learn the language. Because i'd been there on vacation before and then after six months decided to stay in ended up marrying an italian and been thirty eight years living in sorrento thirty eight years in beautiful lemon cellos cream. Lemon cellos with those nothing. Better i can't think of a more dolce rental so now you've been there thirty eight years in a small town a small community in community above surrender. You always the foreigner You don't look italian. I'm a foreigner. I definitely have strange ways the way i do things It's foreign but i've been absorbed into the community. They think of me as a local. Because i've withstood thirty eight and you respect the do respect them and there's a lot of my friends that were foreigners that have left sense and they get no respect. I can respect accepted in the community. Are you taken seriously at community meetings or parent teacher meetings. Whatever you might be into you sit there at the table and and you're part of the community and they'll ask me about my opinion about local ideas and things and i'm raising family in the community as well so it touches my life. Now anna i always think of who settled in. Europe is experts. Yes but you're also just flat out. Immigrants immigrants exactly it which my friends in santa always remind me of ohio the immigrants. What's the difference between an ex pattern and immigrant. Well if we're going to be blunt the color of your skin. Isn't that something. I know in italy relationships seem to be really important to get things done personally and in your in your work life. Talk about the importance of relationships. In italy the hugely important and i think that had i not found myself in a contrada in sienna. I don't think i would have stayed because it's so important to be a part of a community. And i am the american in the she wolf so you really identify with the she wolf district. Yes loo- i know that because you guys won the palio two times in one year. Yes we did. And cnn has this passion for the neighborhood. yes. I mean famously. With these contrada. Yes and think that. Cnn is very much a walled city in in both senses of the word because it has the walls that are still there from medieval times. But there's this wall mentality as well where it's hard to enter and to become a part of the community. So i feel very lucky that i found myself in the contrada and they accepted me eventually but like and said it took awhile. Oh she's still coming back so she is she

Italy Coast Anna Sienna Sorrento Rick Steves Saint Catherine Anna CNN ROD Manchester Santa Ohio Europe
Dual Sleep And Why It's Good For You

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

04:21 min | 7 months ago

Dual Sleep And Why It's Good For You

"Already instead of start things off we have follow up something that we said we would get back to you last time which I feel like every time we do that we We don't always get back to it, but we're getting back to it. So yeah, emily had asked us about her shift work weight loss intermittent fasting 's like crazy sleep schedule where she would sleep from ten PM to two. AM Do a paper out from two to four am and then sleep from four to seven am. which was very crazy sleep schedule. We talked about the like fascinating. was. It made Victorian people I think in general just being like the I've just read articles that indicated. That's how they live like medieval times or I don't know that was the natural way to be yes. They would like go to sleep and then like wake up and then go to sleep. So I asked the residence sleep expert Dr Cur- personally who I've had on the melon avalon biohacking podcast linked to that in the show notes the I asked him about it and obviously knew everything about it. He said it was called dual sleep and it occurred roughly twenty two longitudinal above or below the equator and it was because nights were ten to twelve hours at night. And the people would sleep into have the night and they would like wake up in the middle to do activities and hang out while the kids were still asleep. So that's different than like today where we're always sleeping, you know we're lucky for sleeping eight hours and the reason I'm bringing this up is because I think we were contemplating that really oh so maybe this is like a good thing. It's not an ideal situation that situation would be if you were sleeping like if it was like a twelve hour night and you're waking up in the middle so. I think our originally answer still stands about that schedule because they slept from dark too dark, right? That was the difference those people were sleeping from dark too dark and that was too much sleep. Yeah. Probably today would wake up in the middle and then had their second half of the that makes sense but you know what my body is still tuned. To that I swear I could live that way because as soon as it starts to get dark I wanna go to bed I don't care if that's nine thirty at night or five thirty at night. If it's dark I WANNA get into bed I probably should start just doing that. Go to bed wake up in the middle of the night get up. To do some stuff, go back to bed I bet I think that might be my natural. Goes might be my natural way of being I might. Sylvia. Wake in that time when you wake up because you go to bed so like when does it get dark? You would go to bed at like. Five o'clock if it's the wintertime. Okay. See Sleep from like five to like eleven. Oh, and then you wake up and then we could hang out. And then had my second night's sleep and we could both back to same. I swear I would probably feel great doing that we could do the podcast in. I'd have to have an earlier window I'd have to shift it. So, yeah. Coming from Jen's by phase sleep. In my normal sleep and my normally. That's so funny. The APP asleep is huge. I will do a quick plug for Dr Percy's sleep remedy. have an unflavored version of it that is fast friendly, and basically has all of the substrates that your brain naturally needs to fall asleep. So it's not like a pharmaceutical doesn't knock you out or you know affect your sleep quality just makes your brain naturally fall asleep. So being you can get it for ten percent off at sleep remedy dot com slash Melanie Avalon, and the version of it that I have is a capsule. It's a capsule. They have drinks as well. So you can get it for ten percent off at Melanie avalon dot com slash sleep remedy with the coupon, Melanie Avalon and the they do have the drinks while they're coming out with a kids formulation soon so That's pretty exciting but YEP sleep sleep is super important. I feel like I keep reading everywhere that. Out of everything honestly diet lifestyle exercise sleep asleep is lake probably the most important I mean it's hard to say once more important than the other but sleep is so k. like fasting is good for us because it's healing sleep is where are our brains are healing? Right? Not Sleeping it's like eating all the time. As far as like the effects it has yeah

Dr Cur Melanie Avalon JEN Emily Dr Percy Sylvia
Modest Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

Classics for Kids

05:18 min | 7 months ago

Modest Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

"I'm Naomi Lewin welcome to classics for kids. Viktor Hartmann was a nineteenth century, Russian artist and architect and a good friend of composer mode as his ski. When Hartman died suddenly at the age of thirty nine was dark ski was devastated. Hartman's friends organized a memorial exhibit of his work, and then resort ski created his own tribute to Hartman a piano piece that portrayed ten artworks from the show called pictures at an exhibition. Quite, a few people have made orchestra versions of pictures at an exhibition. The best known one is by Maurice, Richard. Pictures at an exhibition starts off with that promenade which pops up several more times. Zarzusky meant it as strolling music to lead you through the gallery from one picture to the next. The first picture in Zork Skis Exhibition is a gnome actually it's a sketch for a nutcracker shaped like gnome sort of a Goblin who lives under the earth. then. The promenade leads to a painting of a very old castle from medieval times with a troubadour traveling singer outside it in reveals orchestration the saxophone is the instrument that plays the part of the troubadour. From there we promenade onto a picture of a nanny taking care of some kids playing in the twee gardens in Paris. Doesn't it sound like they're teasing each other and? Yeah Yeah. No promenade before the next picture, which is of a wagon with huge wheels the kind of wagon that was pulled by oxen. The title of the picture is bid low, which is Polish for Oscar. After the last of the promenades we come to the ballet of the unhatched chicks. Victor Hartman's designed for some ballet costumes in his sketch to people where egg outfits with bird head helmets but I think the music sounds more like they're running around like chickens with their heads cut off. Next to that picture repair of Pencil sketches of a rich man and a poor man, the rich one sounds pretty snooty. Roll. Along. In the poor man sounds like he's crying. Back to France for the next. Women Gossiping in the marketplace in the town of Moses. Then a couple of very creepy scenes I some catacombs, underground tombs full of old bones. It almost sounds like they're about to get up and walk around to the promenade tune doesn't it? The next bit creepy nece is a sketch for clock based on an old Russian fairy tale about a witch named Baba Yoga who supposedly lives in a scary hut that's perched on fouls or chickens legs. The very last picture in the exhibition is the designed Viktor. Hartmann entered in a competition to build a gate that would be the grand entrance to the city, of Kiev. If, the great gate of Kiev theme reminds you of the promenade. Now, you know where that strolling music was edited all along.

Victor Hartman Viktor Hartmann Zork Skis Exhibition Naomi Lewin Kiev Paris Maurice Oscar Zarzusky Baba Yoga Moses France Earth.
Fall Guys Season 2 Travels Back to Medieval Times

Kinda Funny Games Daily

06:04 min | 8 months ago

Fall Guys Season 2 Travels Back to Medieval Times

"One blessing guess what fog is season two arrives next week. This is Steve Watts over at gamespot fog is ultimate knockouts season to show off recently, and now we know when to expect to begin the studios announced that fog is season to start Thursday dunk tober eight. In the meantime, you can score some extra points developer media tonic announced that I'm sorry the news and ask the news at a tweet which tied the upcoming season to Halloween with mention of curse. The theme of the season isn't explicitly around this week holiday though as previously announced, it is themed around epic quests that means a giant castle setting and costumes like a dragon. Knight. Viking wizard in which costumes. The tweet also announced that a season draws to a close. You can claim double fame points rack up those extra points while you can before the next season starts next week. Blessing. Greg where are you at with fog is? I haven't picked up all guys in a while and I think I've been kind of going back and forth on this since I think the release of all guys I went from being I think before the game came out after I had done the Beta test being like. All right. Yeah. This seems like going to be fun for a few weeks but then. You know I don't I don't know what the longevity of this game game is then getting into that launch week of everybody playing it and it being extremely and he being like all right. Maybe this thing does have legs. Maybe this thing will be a thing that lasts forever and now I'm Kinda back in the place of I don't be personally not going to speak for the entire used because I know a lot of people are still playing fog is having a lot of fun of course but. I think when you compare it to something like A. Something like a fortnight, which is very unfair comparison because fortnight is like a once in a lifetime kind of thing for a game to blow up in that way. But you compare it also to something like animal crossing and other Games that have been blowing up over the years I feel like the conversation has ramped down on fog is in a way that. Crossing. You believe. I'm. Harvest my pumpkin not that I was doing right before we went live just got to talk you breaking with longevity bumpkins are whistles pumpkin. Them Right now, I need to water them that they've been playing with yesterday I was checking on my crop today I. got them all over the island I like talking about longevity right like I think. Fall Guy is a game back I think can have that but I think it is going to be more of a challenge for this game compared to other games of the like because I feel like with animal crossing, there's kind of a built in. Loop there as far as people coming back, people having people putting in like an hour a day or how long play animal crossing in a day like you know having seasonable events or those monthly events that bring people back insistently same fortnight for Ni- I think just has the the like the budget behind it and just the the manpower behind it to have that consistent. How consistent updates people continuously being back to it whereas fog is if you like doesn't naturally lend itself to that in the same way that said, this season to update seems very exciting I think. I. Might booted it up in, check it out for this. I Know Greg How do you? How do you react to this somebody? Who is in love with Halloween? It doesn't do much for me because they're not all in on it. That was my thing when it was at. Jeff's one night. One night only right. One night stand opening night life when they were like, Hey, here's fall guy season two and it's like all right and it was like it's nice and shit like Oh. Like Edison I don't care about medieval stuff. That's not really my jam I wish it was like we're doing a which I noticed doesn't make sense. Does it make a Lotta sense because Caesar? So long? Hey, we're doing a Halloween thing. They didn't they do I mean they are but they're not. Like it's very fascinating. The fog I story because I think in this quarantine in this year, we've talked so much about. These breakout successes and you look at something like animal crossing that yes. came out and was such a juggernaut right and then has waned obviously, but it's still part of were. So playing against part of these updates that are dropping that people are excited for doing things with I look I did a google trends search over here hold on and I know there's probably a cooler way to do it but I'm just GonNa, show it to you this by like this is just fog is right there. You see the graph obviously from the spike. In August when it launches and then steadily taking out taking not taking down not I mean what's unexpected I would say about that right is are the highs the graph gets to in terms of fog because fog is for a second there dominated the conversation and was all anyone could talk about which is great. Obviously but it's that thing of I remember when you when we talked about fortnight when we used to talk about pub G. When we talked about animal crossing, it was this conversation of all right. But how much longer can this go? What are what are the legs on this in you know look at? Yeah by comparison is interesting right in this one that's animal crossing and you see animal crossing obviously being hired as it's this crazy Nintendo game took over the world then dropping down but then fog is superseding but them being relatively tied right now as they go off and this is just google trends. So this isn't like by any stretch of the imagination actual like. Polling and science or anything like that but it's an interesting thing that. Animal crossing hasn't had this giant peak that has just gone down from where it seems like fog is especially when we look back in a few months, it's GonNa be longer and I, wonder how much of that is? Fog is is video games in general have a game play loop and they are the same thing over and over again right? Like I loved playing fog is that those two weeks we are really playing fog is a lot but the more I played at the less I was like God play more I got to play more like. Want One more game. But it wasn't like I wake up the next morning I want to go back to that where I feel like animal crossing. You know there's a big update coming or you're doing something over time because that's how animal crossing building, right like I planned to these pumpkins nominee checking on him every day I can harvest them and do it all over again whereas fog is even having the season pass and stuff like I wanted the hot dog hot I mentioned that was a cool. That's all I want on this past like I don't WanNa keep going I think fortnight you look at that, right? Really, the game has changed I. Mean invented. I shouldn't say that but changed the way we think of micro transactions and battle passes and how they're going to incentivize you to turn

Google Steve Watts Developer Greg Gamespot NI Caesar Jeff
Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

Toby and Chilli

02:31 min | 10 months ago

Italian Wine Windows Open During Pandemic, Bringing Back Bubonic Plague Tradition

"Say that Fast is a prologue. We can learn a lot from the way we used to do things back in the day, even back in medieval times, Toby and chilly in the morning, 97.1 Washington Here's what Here's What we mean. Wine windows were a thing in Italy back in the day in the Tuscan region Now you went to Italy for a wedding a couple of years ago. Do you remember seeing these wine windows on buildings? Yes, we took a tour of the walled city of Sienna, right, And that was one of the things that the Tour guide first pointed out to us as we were walking down. Stan medieval streets because this city is like a city frozen in time within its city walls. I mean, it's exactly the way it was during the time of the bubonic plague, I believe right, and so they have these little cutouts in houses. We're like, what are those, and she's like, Well, that is where you would knock and the residents would serve the wine. That was a thing. Wine was a universal human rights in Italy back in the day when they were trying to get through that playing well. Now these wine windows air, actually making a comeback. A lot of restaurants and bars are using them again because of Corona virus, and it's a great way to Show up with an empty bottle. Have someone's hand pop out of the wine window and Philip your bottle with Savino. They're also doing gelato this way and coffee this way, and the pictures are fantastic. I wish we had some around here. We do need to get some around here. So how can we make this a thing? Say in Potomac or Great falls, or perhaps maybe out in Lorton? How could we make this a thing? Now? What could argue Toby that in medieval times they were the ones who originated the drive thru because it is like a medieval drive thru window except you're walking by. I just love the fact that back in medieval times to get through a plague. Everybody came together and served wine to anyone who needed it. All you had to do was knock. See even back then fermented grape juice helped people get through a pandemic, just like it is right now. And so if there's anybody who's had any feelings of guilt, because maybe they've over, indulged a bit too much while in the middle of a zoom meeting, and maybe they've had friends call you out on your consumption of said wine remind them that generations ago in the Tuscan region of Italy People used wine to get through these unprecedented times. A past is indeed a prologue

Italy Toby Fast Sienna Philip Great Falls Savino Potomac Lorton
Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:57 min | 11 months ago

Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

"Welcome to amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Devon and Cornwall. I'd like to welcome to the show. Ryan Duffield from Devon who has come to talk to us about the city of Plymouth in southern England and also the surrounding area, including Devon and Cornwall. Ryan welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me Howie. Good well, you know and it's funny because we just talked about the English coast, but we've moved a little further to the West and talk. Talk about a different region of the coast than we did on the show recently when we talked about Suffolk and the the downs. Why should someone go to Plymouth Plymouth? Actually it's a fantastic city. It's a city that goes amazing maritime history and tradition that dates right back to the medieval times, but actress quite often overloaded when people think of cities in England. They think oh of Lunden Bama again. Manchester Liverpool perhaps. I think Plymouth is just as much. Interest is end if those cities, but it's just north of us so much, and I think particular twenty American. Listeners interested is also the city where the pilgrim father set sail on the mayflower. Sixteen twenty associated with the traditional thanksgiving. S Pre interesting point. Is also surrounded by beautiful coastline. It's right on the border of the county's of Devon and Cornwall these are two of the most popular tourist destinations in the UK down in the South West of England, said Scott lost offer. Willing we're looking for dividend cornwall if we go down to the English map and you go far bottom left. That's where we are, and if you go further bottom further left from there, you end up in the ocean. So we're. Right on the south coast of Devon Oklahoma so are literally facing out to the Atlantic okay well and facing out towards the south. Yes, excellent well, what? Are. You GonNa. Recommend Fourth Festival is obviously starting in the city centre, so the city is actually pretty much based around the coast and its large harbours, so I would say starting day Sutton Haba, which is the main harbor in the city and that so where the city spreads out from I'm from around the. You've all sorts of things to say side. You've got things like the mayflower steps. Steps, which is where there's the pilgrim fathers actually set sail from and this museum dedicated to that you've also got what's the Barbican? which is this old coupled street state specs, medieval periods, which is full of these is correct, slim pubs and bars, restaurants shops things like that, and it's one of the few passes cities. The city was actually bombed June. Sacramento War by the Nazis and the. The city was destroyed, and this is one of the well preserved areas of that city out, also recommend site just basically following the coastline of the city's known as Britain's Ocean City for good reason, because it will revolve around that and overlooking the area. What looks like is huge, fool trust, but what actually is actively operating? Royal Marines and Royal Navy base. That's right in the heart of. Of the city and they still have people that you can save people, training and things, and they actually do tours of that interestingly and I'm not sure how many military basis you can know many Abitur tour during the middle of the day. You can't do that well and it seems like one of the reasons they do that, too. Is You mentioned? This is not a new military base. Quite historical, so this is where the ships sailed out to fight the Spanish Armada for absolutely, and the city is very synonymous with Francis Drake. Who is the man who led the defeating of the Spanish the? He was from Plymouth. Things like the main shopping center in the city named optimus could drake circus, and you'll find lots of other places around the city named after him. You also have along. Along the Bob sell them this coupled medieval street. You have the Plymouth Gin distillery, which is actually the oldest gin distillery in the country, and of course you can go in then you can have tools that you can find out how the GIN is made. You can find out the botanic WHO's they use? Jin's at the end of that. So if you're GIN, Fan Pathak place to go we'll. Get into more detail on all these things. So in terms of the BARBICAN. For instance you mentioned the Plymouth Gin distillery. There are different pubs and things. Do you have a favorite pub? Is there someplace that we ought to check out? There is a place I feel bad commending it, but there's a web spins now Weber spins is a national chain across the country. If you live in the UK, you know about web of Spain's. They've actually got really nice bar that down on the Babacan. Babacan, which is right by the Plymouth Gin Distiller Selfish Nickel Jin from that, but they've got huge selection of our genes of a drinks there, but all the buildings there because they're all medieval style buildings that is then become ingrained within the actual itself garnered sovereignty. Highly recommend that this is places down the thyroid record. Think of any off the top of my head. Okay mix over a new kind of places and very traditional old pubs as well which great.

Plymouth Plymouth Gin Cornwall Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Gin Distiller Devon England Ryan Duffield Ocean City Chris Christensen Devon Oklahoma Howie Royal Navy Babacan Francis Drake Sutton Haba Manchester
Crystal King tells us about one of history’s best-selling cookbooks

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Crystal King tells us about one of history’s best-selling cookbooks

"You've just written. A book called the chefs secret about the first celebrity chef tyler male Skopje. Who who was Skopje? Skopje was a man who worked for several different cardinals and popes during the renaissance and he found fame because he wrote pretty much. What was really the essential first cookbook that modern people in kitchens and homes could look at and use as a cookbook as we understand it today and it has over a thousand recipes in it and it was published in fifteen seventy and it was one of the best selling cookbooks for the next two centuries. I wish I'd write a book. That was the best rate for the next. Two centuries won't be around Let's get to the food spices This medieval Europe spices were in vogue at the time. So what kind of spices would they use a kitchen like this? So interestingly enough sugar is the biggest thing that was involved in not necessarily on the spice side of things but over nine hundred of the recipes in the cookbook actually have sugar in them and they would put sugar on everything. Like fried eggs has orange juice and sugar on them. Did you try that? I did not try that odd. I The that is the thing I think that is the most striking of the foods at this time is that the flavor combinations are very strange to us. You describe one feast slices Parmesan Olives from Tivoli assaulted. Buffalo Tongue. Served with lemon soup of cheese and egg yolks so some of the ingredients are common. The sauce is a sauce of ground. Almonds currants hard boiled eggs chicken livers. So you're right. They they had a very different Palate than we do. They would create pies for example that would have layers of cheese and then cinnamon and then cavs eyeballs and then Just you just layer all of these strange ingredients together. They really had cavs eyeballs. Oh they used every part of the animal and In certain regions that would have been a delicacy. Actually how do you research the Sixteenth Century? What are the kinds of records? The records of what people bought for the kitchens the the market lists. What other kinds of materials? Could you get hold up to do the research? Yeah a lot of Italian history is still an Italian so a lot of what I researched was actually in the original Italian. But there's a lot of really interesting information we have They took big inventories of their kitchens of the food and the wine that went through the house and so we can see a lot from that also. There was letters that were left behind. One thing that I find really fascinating is that the the gifted food regularly Isabela de Este would send a cabbage to her brother with a recipe on how to make it for example. Not Not a very close loved brother. Yes apparently average but they cultivated. They looked at growing food and fruits and vegetables as a hobby. A pastime that they were passionate about and this was a time of exploration in the area food and so you would send food and sausages and cheeses from one place to another on a regular basis pounds and pounds of fish. Sometimes we're giving gifts Christina's you mentioned those all the time. Are they similar to what we think of? Crisanto is today in. What is a Christodoulos? Start with her pie and yes. They're very similar. Skopje has recipes for simple single cross pies as well as pies that. Have beautiful elaborate tops? Very elaborate pies in these banquets could actually have live animals in them that you would cut open and they birds would fly out for example sometimes pies medieval times. You wouldn't eat the crust because the crossed wouldn't have been palatable flower water right. It was just to hold the food and cook the food differently. Whereas in this period of time you're starting to see flaky crusts and this is where you start to see. Pumpkin and Apple Pie and quince pies and peach and Cherry and pies's we know them today. I have a little experience going back into the nineteenth century American cookbooks and it's sort of hard to translate recipes from that period to the modern times because the ingredients were different right. I mean sugar is not the same kind of sugar. We have today for example. Did you try to cook some of those Skopje recipes? And if so. Did you have problems of translating them? The recipes in Skopje. Cookbook are actually pretty straightforward I found that the majority of the ingredients could be easily sourced at least on the Internet. So did you end up with any recipes in your repertoire. Or these were all speech should stay in the sixteenth century. Oh No these recipes start to become you can see where the foundation of Italian food comes today. there's a. Pumpkin cheesecake pie across data. That I would definitely make again in super easy to make. It's something extremely delicious. Pumpkin cheesecake came from the sixteenth century sixties. No it's not actually when you read the recipe you start to make it. It's got a cream cheese which I interpreted as cream cheese It was probably something not quite the same but similar in texture record of cheese. It has The spices that we're very familiar with mostly cinnamon. The pumpkin could very well have been pumpkin from the new world at that period of time or at least a squash and it's like a Pumpkin cheesecake pie but not as fluffy as we would have in our pies today but delicious. So you get a sense you know. We always think now the twenty first century so modern people were so old fashioned hundreds of years ago but five hundred years ago if you read this book and they were quite modern. So do you get a sense that the food world has really moved on and gotten better or it's just different. I think or what's worse. Maybe it's a little bit of both. I think it's worse in some ways in the sense that we look at regional cooking and and organic cooking as a trend in some ways whereas that's what you did and Skopje took great care in the cookbook to explain the foods from different regions and he had great respect for foods in different places. He was very obsessed with seasonal ingredients and was interested in bringing in flavours from different areas whereas an Italian cooking today. Everything is very very regional if you go to Rome. You're not necessarily going to get the same food that you're going to get in Bologna or in Venice so I think that there's there was a shift in Italian cooking very definitely but I think that he he started us all out and it's different but we can learn a lot. I think by looking back at him. Chris. Thank you very much The chef secret the story of Bartolomeo Skopje. Part fiction and part history. Thank you thank

Skopje Bartolomeo Skopje Cavs Europe Cardinals Isabela De Este Rome Buffalo Tongue Bologna Apple Crisanto Christina Chris Venice
"medieval times" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"medieval times" Discussed on FoodStuff

"And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes. Thank you And because we ended on just a little bit of like a weird down note before the AD break there. I just wanted to share with you to more positive tidbits about medieval times as I. There is a museum of Torture in the lobby that you can go check out before your dinner because that's good family fund for everybody. Yeah I'm I know I'm using my sarcastic voice when I say that but I kind of genuinely mean it like weird got soul that I am. I right That's A and B any would you would you relate for once more as you did during the break The phone number that you can use to dial medieval times. Well that number would be one eight we joust. We doused.

museum of Torture
Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

60-Second Science

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

"Is scientific American sixty second science. I'm Suzanne barred some fifty six hundred years ago. People in the Egyptian city of here canopus did something. That's still a very popular activity today. They brewed and drank beer. We know this because archeologists examining the area near the ruins of a cemetery for the elite discovered a structure containing five ceramic. That's that would have been heated from below residues in the vats confirmed that they had once made beer and made that if these five vests were operated the same meantime three hundred twenty five liters produced which is equal to six hundred fifty cans of Budweiser Texas Tech University. Microbiologist Momento al-Massari. He says this ancient beer would've tasted very different from what are modern. Pellets are used to the Egyptian beer makers did use malted wheat and barley in the brewing in process but no one had mastered carbonation yet so the resulting grew was a flat. UNFILTERED malt beverage with a low alcohol content Elmasri colleagues recently sampled thick dark deposits from the herrick novelist fats. The chemical analysis confirmed that they were indeed the product of beer making being and not some other fermented food the tests also revealed other ingredients ancient Egyptians putting their beer the researchers found a high concentration of the amino acid pro lean which is abundant in dates and some other fruits. This result suggests that this could have been used or incorporated in the beer for flavor and maybe to add some sweet notes hops which act as both a flavoring and preservative weren't added to beer until medieval times. They use it hawks who was unknown to they need conditions conditions and we think that the US as it to preserve their beer the residues were indeed high in phosphorous acid a product of barley grains added during the fermentation process process. Phosphoric acid is often used today to prolong the shelf. Life of alcoholic beverages phosphoric acid via barley would have made it possible to mass-produce ask produce beer store it for extended periods and even transport it all consistent with the important role beer played in ancient Egyptian society it not only provided hydration and nutrition but was also part of religious rituals among the elite. The study is in the Journal scientific reports studying ancient beer. It has allowed Elmasri to reflect on the intersection of science and history. I teach a microbiology lab. We grew beer in the lab and the students see the whole permutation mediation process and thinking how engines were able to do a similar thing thousands of years ago. It's a very

Momento Al-Massari Elmasri Budweiser Texas Tech Universit Suzanne United States Journal Scientific Three Hundred Twenty Five Lite Fifty Six Hundred Years Sixty Second
Michael Brown's father demands case re-opening 5 years after fatal shooting

Mason & Ireland

03:31 min | 1 year ago

Michael Brown's father demands case re-opening 5 years after fatal shooting

"You missed out a medieval times john. I was the night before bowling right and then you were the night after medieval times and what i hear you made the apps you're like who is it lauren hill that does concerts and shows up an hour and a half late and sings for ten thousand leaves that was you i was there on time then i was like kaiser soza and you're gone which isn't a bad move but they did get one very good picture of you in a what looks depite dr yeah medieval garb and they actually gave me a mace <hes> so venice mason amazed by the way big question today. Is this straight edge mace or or is this venice mace girl in the straight edge. The guy in the back is yelling. Venice mace which basically is is whether or not mason shows up stoned but i think you had to drive straight edge medicines straight edge mace someday. I'll do a show where orig- venice mace and everybody will invite be invited to see exactly how stupid i am actually make the show better yeah hey so. Are you gonna watch the ram game tomorrow night yeah. I'm gonna watch what are you watching for. The rams are are not gonna play any of the starter correct so what your but your big ram fan yep like. I said i watch most of the charger game last night. Actually the chargers looked okay. They lost but they played a lot of backups so the rams are gonna play nothing but back right. What are you watching four. What are you interested in well number. One is <hes> darryl henderson the running back out of memphis who's going to get <hes> reps tomorrow night and who i think because gonna figure into the offense this year in a little background on him. He averaged almost seven yards of touch right at memphis and he's the person i've heard him. Most compared to is darren sprains. He's a very fast third down back who can both run and catch yeah so i wanna see what he looks like because i think with the rams a ah given how todd girlies knee is sort of a question mark. I like malcolm brown. A lot and i want to see what darrell henderson's got in the secondary. I'm looking for taylor rap wrap. Who i think is gonna play tomorrow night. Taylor app is a safety who is gonna be eric. Wells backed up and it's going to see i think significant time this year so i wanna see taylor rap out of washington and then i wanna see actually i'm kind of curious. See blake bortles yeah. I wonder how much he's going to play but that is an upgrade jeered garbage upgrade. Your golf for a young guy has not missed much time once he was given that starting job. I don't think he's mr mr start yet and the amount of time sean manion played as goths backup or very limited but blake bortles is a series blake bortles a former top five picking the n._f._l. Ralph experience right and so i think by the way who's the third string quarterback brandon allen so he's gonna play tonight yeah tomorrow night but i'm expecting to see bortles last year. Manion played a lot it preseason and <music>. I'm expecting to see bortles so bortles henderson. Who is the texas am receiver lesser. Josh miranda reynolds he could play you know a lot of people think that josh josh reynolds is is going to be an impact either share. They've got really four receivers to go to they've got robber woods and obviously brandin cooks and cooper cup and josh reynolds is going to be a guy who figures into the offense.

Blake Bortles Josh Josh Reynolds Rams Mason Darryl Henderson Venice Kaiser Soza Sean Manion Josh Miranda Memphis Chargers Darrell Henderson Malcolm Brown Texas Darren Brandon Allen Wells Ralph Todd Washington
Economy Of Thrones

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Economy Of Thrones

"Moot. Happy Monday Cardiff. Hi stacey. So as you know, yesterday was big. It was the finale of a television show that everyone in the country has been watching for years. Everyone of thrones. Yes. Everyone, but minus one person, the only person in America who does not watch game of thrones. Well, here's the thing. If you'll game of thrones is this whole world? And this is where I'm hoping to sell you on this economics all its own. Okay. I'm more interested than only you. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey management. And I'm Garcia today on the show economy of thrones Cardiff give you a basic working knowledge of game of thrones so that you can at least function, impolite society, and I don't want you to worry because I'm gonna give you a little bit of economics to help the entertainment go down walked out of this room. If I ends. Economic. I had you economics. Excellent. Support for this podcast. In the following message come from Jimmy Nye, the regulated exchange making it easy to add bitcoin, and other crypto currencies to your portfolio. Protecting your investments with oversight and state of the art cybersecurity open a free account at Jim ni- dot com slash indicator. Support also comes from Google from Connecticut's, California, from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. I wanted a little help with the economics of game of thrones. So I turned to this man limestone, he has a population economist and he got a little bit obsessed and started writing a lot about the economics inside this world. What we see is a world that is in sort of a late medieval stage of development, late medieval economics Carter, forget everything, you know, about derivatives and monetary policy. We are getting basic and I have five indicators for you. Today about the economics of game of thrones five indicators show of never seen. Well, the first indicator the army's, I mean, even though you haven't seen it, you certainly know that armies are a big feature of game of thrones fighting dragons fire-breathing. Yes. Epic battles between these giant armies these armies. They're sailing over oceans. They're marching over great distances. And lemon says economically speaking that actually does not fly because he says, moving armies around was just a logistical nightmare. It was like moving a city around, and he said you needed, like a ton of time between battles to just regroup and make new weapons. And he said all the speeding from one battle to another which happens and game of thrones. It's just not realistic. But never happen. Real questions. Are you going to feed everybody? Right. This was one of the reasons why the Mongols were able to steamroll through Europe so quickly. Is that the Mongols or horse nomads, who would go for months at a time surviving on, like the milk from the mayor's in their heard right? This army could. Actually feed itself to great extent. And so these European armies would would March out and it'd be like, you know, fifteen thousand guys on one side, fifteen thousand guys on the other, except on the on the European side on their Christian side. You've got, like, really like five thousand guys, ten thousand people kinda support staff in on the Mongol side, you just have like fifteen thousand trained horse archers who can survive off of, like horse milk. That makes perfect sense. Yeah. I mean big army got a feed. It got clothe it. But of course, as you mentioned, the battles, and game of thrones were not just about the army's. They were also about the fire breathing dragons, and that is our indicator number two dragons. So the dragons and game of thrones is, basically like a weapons technology. And he said, this happened a lot in medieval times, this new weapon would be developed and this weapon would give a huge advantage to one side for a while. And then everyone else would have to scramble to find a way to deal with this new weapon so you see, well, literally arms race between the quality of weapons in the quality of armor. So in the early medieval period, you've got guys in like chain chain chain, mail. Yeah. Things like that. And then what happens is the crossbow comes along. Listen, seventy. I mean you really need heavier armor, plate mail. Yeah, wait a minute. Isn't this some kind of dragons rights violation here? Why? Because. The dragons were referring to the dragons as weapons, but aren't they autonomous beings themselves capable of deciding what to do? Like are they just being wielded by one side versus the other or they like horses basically? So, you know, there's this woman denarius targe Aryan mother of dragons walking naked out of burning buildings. No, she does. So, well anyway, so she's there basically a weapon that she can use. But a lot of the other armies start developing weapons to deal with the dragons, and in fact, one guy, develops this aero- gun to shoot down the dragons, and they do actually shoot down and kill a dragon. Oh, it's kind of like if you develop a new aircraft. That's really great technology than the other side develops like an anti-aircraft gun exactly shoot. It down. Okay. Exactly. That is exactly what happened. That's the arms race. Of course, though, in game of thrones of fighting is not just about weapons. And armies it is also about defenses, namely walls. So this is indicator number three walls, while cities castles, there's also this giant. Wall that stands between civilization and these wildland where the army of killers. Ambi- is led by the scary night, king and Lyman says the wall thing is right on. But here's the other thing all the walls and game of thrones spoiler alert, they all get breached Limon's. That's actually also pretty realistic. But he said, nonetheless walls were still a really good medieval investment, if your city you're not thinking how resistant army fifteen thousand determined enemies. You can't your goal is just to make yourself look like enough of a pain in the butt that when a rating party comes through, just be like look, you could take six days to besiege us in look for the week spot in our wall, or you can just go onto the next village that doesn't have a wall. But then as everybody gets walls. Somebody's not enough to have walls. You gotta have a

Army Google Stacey America Limon Jimmy Nye Jim Ni Europe Garcia Cardiff Carter Ambi Lyman Connecticut Minnesota Mississippi California Milk Six Days
Medieval Dancing Plagues

Curiosity Daily

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Medieval Dancing Plagues

"If you think it's hard trying to figure out the his. Three of the human species than buckle up. Because in medieval times history, presented the mystery of the dancing plague where people literally danced themselves to death. Yes. I said danced like tap dancer. Swing dance. Here's a went down, and what the modern medical community think caused it. This all happened in Strasbourg, which is in France these days, but back then it was still part of the holy Roman empire on a hot July day in fifteen eighteen a woman named it fro to Fe stepped into the street and started dancing like a lot. According to records, she danced without rest for between four and six days. We're talking no stopping to eat sleep or even take off her shoes. And people had started to join in by the end of the week. There were thirty four dancers and within a month. The crowd grew to around four hundred because of the summer heat up to fifteen people per day or dying from exhaustion, according to some sources word spread and esteemed physique. Try to figure out what was going on supernatural causes like demonic possession were certainly on the table. I mean, it was the medieval times after all. But the wisdom of the time settled on the medical explanation. The dancers had a case of hot blood and needed to dance it out are you laughing over there. A demonic possession taught blood. So to help these people out there were suffering from the hut. Blood case, a stage was set and musicians were brought in to give the dance or something to groove to. And it was at absolute disaster. These measures only seem to encourage the dancing, and it caused the numbers to swell again. Finally, the plague past almost as mysteriously as it arrived after about three months of nonstop bogeying. So what happened today doctors think it was a kind of culture influence stress induced psychosis, it's well documented that certain psychological maladies only arise in certain cultural contexts, and this type of compulsive dancing was probably an example of just such a thing. And we're not above that type of thing. Now, these days we have psychosis such as Perez syndrome, which only affects Japanese tourists in Paris. It just goes to show how much of an effect your cultural surroundings have on your mind body. Hey, Cody, I'm going to have to call in sick tomorrow. Why I got a real bad case? Do you? Do you have a fever and the only prescription?

Strasbourg France Fever Cody FE Perez Paris Three Months Six Days
"medieval times" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Slate's Working

"I enjoy that. I definitely got choked up my last show as Princess Catalina was a role I played for many years, and it was of course, bittersweet to let her go but super excited now to be to the Queen. It's good to be Queen. So we're gonna get into the intricacies of how you play the Queen and what that actually takes. But. I kind of want to step back. You're an actress. That's correct. Is this your only job or do other acting jobs or houses into your career? This is my main gig my main ongoing gig. But the beauty of our show schedules that it fluctuates flexible, we have a rotating cast. So for those of us who are working actors and gives us the opportunity to pursue other opportunities and performing other venues as well as performing this magnificent show. That's our steady piece of work, and and it's wonderful to work with other people who are also in the business were always bouncing ideas off of one another were really supportive cast, which is one of the things I've loved most about entering the the medieval time showcases that were really supportive network for one another cool. So what other kind of acting jobs do as well as this done a lot of theater a lot of Steph, New York off Broadway. I've done a lot of regional theatre film. Tv I work consistently with another theater New Jersey where I also work as a teaching artist as well, which helps pay the bills in between every. As well. So this is like the steady job steady your study. But then you've also got off Broadway stuff and all that which I mean that is hard to make a living off of it's not an easy business. And I love the art steady thing on the side. It's a blessing really is I've been so grateful to be a part of this company, and how long have you been doing medieval times for I'll it's been about seven years. Now, how did you get into acting to be? I went to see a chorus line with my parents weighed in the TK T S line. And I was five and my mother saw the billboard. And it has these lovely people with the gold, flashy costumes, and we went to see it for those people who know the show, there is one particular number. That's not exactly the most family friendly. It has certain jargon. It that's not necessarily appropriate to a five year old. Talking about that number. My father literally looked over. It was like this was a really great show choice Barbara nicely done. But I didn't know anything like what I thought they had, you know, flashy costumes their dancing grape. You're learning early learning. I mean, if you're gonna learn about the theater too young into the deep do about the the metaphors of the show, it does kind of or you for life in the theater of rejection and auditions, but I I went to see that show with my parents before that been in my church choir by church musicals. I grew up with a musical family. But I took one look at that. And I leaned over to my mother, and I was like that is what I want to do what I grow up, and she was like, okay. I was like no I was like these people get to do what they love for a living. I was like that's what I'm gonna do. I'm like I wanted to be an actor measure that is really funny that the show that is about. Crushing profession conveyed glutton for punishment say. Okay. So you saw course tribe, and you knew that that was well, I've never I never looked back. I mean, it's been hard lots of ebbs and flows and peaks and valleys, but I've been very blessed to be able to work in a lot of great venues have a lot of great opportunities. It's been amazing. You're like theater from school. Did you did you study in college? Did I went to Montclair state? I'm a.

Princess Catalina Montclair Steph New York Barbara seven years five year
These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

Science Magazine Podcast

11:31 min | 2 years ago

These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

"Where they scrape your teeth, and they take is called dental calculus or tartar off your teeth is that lesson for any. No. But luckily that is a relatively new thing and back in the day. And like medieval times, people were not having their teeth scraped every three to six months, and I say lucky because there's precious information hidden in that dental calculus may be able to learn about the oral microbiomes of the people who live in the past and also about different diseases that they might have had. And now, it's also telling us things about their occupations what they did every day or or kinds of chemicals encountered in their lives. I have Christina Warner here. She's gonna talk about some dental calculus that was contaminated with a blue mineral, so Christina. What did you find these blue particles associated with dental calculus on these remains was when we first saw them? I mean, probably the last thing I would have expected to find we were trying to look at it in house. Yeah. We expected the bacteria has after all calculus is made a plaque dental plaque. Which is made up of bacteria, and we expected to find little bits of food because when you're alive, and you have plaque on your teeth, and you're eating or your smoking or your breathing and pollen all these little things. Get stuck in your plaque overtime, the plaque calcified at mineralized in your mouth from the minerals in your saliva. In fact, it's the only part of your body that fossilising while you're still alive, and this actually happens over and over again these layers actually build up almost like tree rings or layers of an onion. So after you've calcified one layer you'll form another layer that apply can keep doing it. This woman that we looked out. We actually cross section debt, and there were so many layers. It really looked like this calculus hadn't been removed in twenty or twenty five years that had so many layers built on top of each other. But for an archaeologist this is a gold mine. It's like a time capsule that tells the story of of this woman's life. What was the first thought from the group if you know, they saw these little blue flecks in in her teeth under the microscope? We had no idea what it was. We could be some sort of contaminant is there's something in soil. That's blue. Yeah. No, no. There's not we looked into extensively actually blue minerals are very rare. They tend to be things you have to mind from deep in the earth. They don't occur in surface sediments. So we thought well, maybe maybe it's a it's a mineral of some kind, and maybe it's a paint. Because certain was so blue was Royal blue the brightest brightest blew it looked like Robin's eggs tiny little, Robin. I bet it. I was probably as right as right is a pretty common mineral, it's a pretty inexpensive mineral, and it's really widespread across Europe. And it was used by are in the middle ages. I was pretty sure it was as right? It ended up being fairly complicated to identify for a number of reasons. One is as we were looking at it the blue began to fade and disappear. Oh, yeah. This happened over and over again it took a while. I figure out what was happening, and we finally figured it out when you wanna look at calculus under a microscope. You can't just put under microscope. It's too compacted. And you have to break it up and the usual way of doing this is to apply a little bit of weak acid, and it just dissolves the mineral enough to allow the particles to come out. It turns out that many mineral pigments are actually unstable in the presence of acid and they lose their color. That's what we were seeing. So that gave you a clue that maybe it wasn't as right? We'll also breaks down from we actually tested many different reference, pigments and determine which were stable in. Which were not. So like cobalt blues is stable. But as right is not and Lashley was not there, aren't that many lose that were available to the medieval painter, they had a admitted access of the blues that they had available to most blue because of particular element. So cobalt blue is split because cobalt, Azure is blue because of copper, Vivian. I is blue because iron Rapids Lashley, actually, not one mineral. It's a bunch of minerals together. Blue component is called laterite. There's also white minerals in they're called slug apply and also pyrite the golden flex that. People often recognize one thing your paper reminded me of is that in a television show, and they say what is this mineral residue and just handed to the lab and that have hands and back and answer is never that easy. You had to go through a lot of steps to identify. What exactly was going on here on these T? So what were some of the tests that you had to subject this mineral to will the trouble with Lazarie? The blue mineral is that there's nothing unusual. About it. In terms of its elements made up of the same elements that are found in soil just configured very differently into in their mineral structure, and so we use a technique called Rahman spectroscopy which actually allows us to look more at the mineral structure itself, and that we were able to get a very good match for lodge right after we identified the blue crystals as being a match using two different methods for laterite. We thought let's test some of these white particles that ordinarily would completely ignore and they turn out to flog apply laterite and flog pie only Coker together in legislation that gave you that confidence that you what you are looking at. But it's really surprising that that's what you're looking at. It was extremely surprising. This Lashley was one of the most expensive and rarest artists materials of the middle ages. We did not expect to find it. I think it's hard for us understand how expensive it was. And how difficult it would have been to get their lap. Lashley only had one source during the middle ages, and that WAS FG. Anniston? So this pigment had to traveled from its source in Afghanistan overland along the paths of the silk road, basically at through the Islamic world. Whereas probably refined into a pigment traded up into Venice. And then distributed into Europe made in extraordinary six thousand kilometer journey to make it into the mouth of this very ordinary one about that in women. What about that last little bit of the journey? How would it end up in her mouth? I mean, there's no way this could happen completely Occidental's. She must have been exposed in a very intimate way. But help Osprey happen. Now, we spent a long time debating what the possible scenarios could be. I have my favorite. It's not the one that it is my favorite is all the the book kissing that people were doing it. The look if think has so so this is really incredible during the middle ages, but but actually later than the that was eliminated it. Yeah. Yeah. During the fourteenth century, there's this sort of fat. Bad for what they call emotive devotional osculation so says like intense kissing books, and the idea was to become very affectionate with the images. Eventually they started creating these little osculation targets at the bottoms of the pages to try to encourage priests, for example to kiss the target and not the face of Jesus because it was wiping away face that one was discarded because it was it wasn't the timing wasn't right. And let's turn to one of the what are the likely scenarios in which woman would have introduced us into her mouth. So he came up with two of the we thought were more likely that either she was trying to produce a pigment herself. And thus may have inhaled some of the dust, and that was so she would probably producing it either for herself or one of her sisters or she was an artist herself with the first scenario, although it's possible. I don't think it's likely for one reason. And that is because if you just take lapis largely Sony new grind now you'll. Will get a really dull gray pigment. It's not nice. It has too much of the flog pie and other minerals inside that dole the color. So what you have to do is you have to refine it and the technique use to refine lavishly at this time wasn't really known in Europe. It was primarily performed in in the Islamic world. But what I think is probably the most likely is that she was an artist herself, we do know from some artists manuals around the same time that one technique for producing a really fine point for for fine painting work involved. Compressing the the paintbrush between the lips the lap is largely was quite distributed through her mouth zone. It wasn't Dustin one place. It was also really disperse. So it didn't seem to have been incorporated as a paint, for example, if she had kissed it had gotten stuck an also there are some really amazing letters from right around the same time period. Maybe a little bit later. Also in Germany where there is a men's monastery. There's an or Mario. Who is the keeper of the books and he had commissioned the production of several new books from a neighboring women's community. So when you say when you say she was an artist it's more about eliminating manuscripts than it is about making paintings, correct? It was very likely for eliminating manuscripts. Because it was a lot of book production right at this time. It gives evidence that women were producing books and they were producing important books. Yeah. But unfortunately, these letters don't stay which pigments were being used we can tell by the amount of silk, and the amount of parchment that he was sending for these books to be made that they would have been quite nice books. Is there anything else from the grave site or from the ruins of the monastery where where this this remains were or anything else there that would help with that the women's community from the letter was different one. Okay. Not this community. The remains of from a site called doll. Heim doll Heim is located in western Germany and today. It's actually the site of museum about monasteries and the cemetery that we focused on was one of the very associate with one of the earliest religious communities that was founded in this area, and it was a women's community with interesting about all Heim is almost nothing survives at all. Today. You can go and visit and I recommend doing. So it's really fun. But all that's left of the women's community is the stone Dacians, none of the walls. Are there? There's no art that survives. There's not a single book that survives this poor women's community, which at its at its height supported actually, very small group of women. Only about a dozen women live there at any given time it underwent multiple fires burned to the ground multiple times. It was sacked in at least to battle. It was hit by plague and eventually it was abandoned during another war and a non was murdered and the whole community fell apart this was centuries later, and then later a group of monks moved in and they built a monastery, and that's the monastery. That actually release revives there today. And that today is really the museum people go to visit. But you can still find this kind of traces of this little women's what they call a frown closer this little women's monastery, a little women's community still bear the church foundations and the foundations of of the place where they lived, but it's very small kind of tucked away and forgotten. It's like had just been a rate how absolutely race. And so to me that was something that was so interesting is in this totally unexpected context from this very ordinary seeming woman from the cemetery we've been able to identify someone who was likely in live, quite extraordinary person. She must have been a very talented artists, and I say artists here because lapis Lashley was not used by scribes who is not used typically to write words, it was used to illuminate pictures. Wow. That is amazing. So other other remains from the

Lashley Europe Dental Plaque Christina Warner Robin Afghanistan Venice Heim Germany Lazarie Rahman Coker Sony Anniston Stone Dacians Dustin Six Thousand Kilometer Twenty Five Years
German city unveils monument to Karl Marx on 200th anniversary of his birth

02:00 min | 3 years ago

German city unveils monument to Karl Marx on 200th anniversary of his birth

"The dear leader kim jong il and we actually negotiated with them to bring food in we didn't play hardball and say whatever you want people to starve they're going to do it kim jong il didn't want is people to starve but he played hardball and so we had to beg him to help us people not starve and so the south korean security officials saying you really honestly think that kim jong un isn't aware of what it took to get those nuclear weapons that he would he would this easily trade them away when in all likelihood these about him secure that so what does he want us what kim jong un wants that listen by the way dislike china kim jong un doesn't want to reunify he doesn't want to give up power but he wants to north korea to start acting like south korea looking like south korea he knows that his raw material his korean people in north korea are the same korean people as they are in the south they're only on average five inches shorter because the four generations of bad nutrition but he knows that besides that there's no reason north korea can't have a samsung and an l and one hyundai kia and daewoo he knows that so how does he get that well he needs to start not having to worry about spending all this money on the military so what does he need that well that's why he's serious about a peace treaty he has a peace treaty then guess what there's no more demilitarized zone maybe that turns into a east germany west germany style of border with people allowed to cross maybe it does maybe liberalizes as a konami and has it resembled a chinese economy were individual entrepreneurs can pop up and and become rich and he allows people to be rich it's ironic it's the two hundred anniversary of the birth of karl marx whose philosophy is responsible for the deaths for the murder of more human beings than anything since the plague the black death in medieval times and he's being celebrated the chinese sent a statue of karl marx to trigger his hometown in germany and.

Kim Jong Il Kim Jong Un North Korea South Korea Konami Karl Marx Murder Samsung Hyundai Daewoo Germany Five Inches
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Of you and like think about all the instances look out a camera but after where the police are just like their free know yep through what did you learn to make louis this is a systemic issue what have you learned about like you know which problems are occurring during the training and preparation of these officers where you know if we if we change that may be it would lead to less violence like what are you know how do you succeed the more systemic problems within the police system getting to the one of the root carter commit promises that there's no accountability despite everything shown i don't know if you saw that that story recently of the there was that with training going on and it was on white female officer who responded to a white male officer by saying that he is like white male privilege is on display in the she got suspended because he said that he was being that that was like a defamatory statement by thing he a white male privilege the and if you can have no odds them that's supposed to be training rate training supposed to be the place or like you talk about privilege when it looks like he literally got her suspended by saying that like he felt like he was being targeted and you're like omni vote by what a world rumor that the case that in the training can be a part of it but like imagine being in a professor like despite the trading all that no matter what you do people make excuse for and i think that that is actually the regarding that i believe that police officers might act differently if any of them ever were accountable but like imagine being able to go to work and like diego saver got killed in legacy re like a like south nothing happened to you feel like he gets to work again he'll go to another police.

louis officer professor carter omni diego
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Them do that so they need these signatures by the end of january the close and if you go to four hours state's or it you can help uh you can help either male petitions to people or you can sign a petition if you live in florida school it's great great will see that out some very big deal and you know we just saw you know terry mcauliffe's did this and in virginia successfully and you know rian franchised extolling zan you know it makes a huge difference is especially some of these people before the election what it meant to them that they were able to go vote was a inspiring so i'm hoping to see this jerry tarantino it carrier he law mukalla law structural way kaddura circuit it day the governor of a day and it has to be giver immigrant worn you'll have to sign the order her him by person to give exoiler has the right to vote back because they have not had been able to pass legislation to do it so hopefully we'll get allegedly to fix or some structural extra member tenure getting a structural fix the inner floor will be huge could again it's only six million a con under country who can vote q million of them with her floors there'd be the single biggest rear franchise mood uh that's on the table right now yeah they drink we'd all been emailing about um this video of daniel shaver uh who was shot by the police in in one of one of the more chilling pieces of video i've ever seen in my life he's he's clearly complying he's on the ground he's crying he's begging for his life and he's just executed by this cop who uh wolf seem seemingly see um no penalty for his actions do you think this recent piece of video this piece of evidence might week people up or do you think it's going to get serve added to the long list of horrifying videos of police misconduct ending him anyway backup boat an adding for eldoret who bitterly about their stomach we told you right right to be l e r violent we talk about a different proportionate of adam eva colour began very this war human impact but.

terry mcauliffe jerry tarantino exoiler wolf florida virginia rian daniel shaver four hours
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Back into our discourse so it that makes it hard to trace yes so basically they just have a better media literacy than we do cooler now they just have they have a so the reporting that's coming out of russia is also really interesting and this is kind of where putin's work has really paid off right like he completely almost completely annihilated independent journalism in russia but the people who are left are have done some amazing reporting and what they've shown is this you know the famous troll factory that adrian chen wrote about the new york times magazine a couple of years ago that they had you know a bunch of people working in shifts for a year or longer than a year on twitter on facebook in comments sections all over the internet in the us and what was interesting to me about that is these were college students at the university of saint petersburg wishes you know the number to school in russia this is that you know russia's second capital very kind of very westernized very progressive very european their college students they were students in middle east studies linguistics journalism these were kind of the college elite and these are people who are familiar with western culture who were using vp ends the same dp ends they were they had used to you know watch net flicks and to watch all the american shows that we watch they were then using the vp ends to attack us and what i thought was so interesting about that was you know this is the demographic that we in the west assume is the most naturally anti putin that they're the ones who are always itching to go out into the streets and topple him and here they are because they're making twice the monthly average monthly salary by just you know trolling people on twitter doing putin sturdy work.

russia putin adrian chen the new york times magazine twitter facebook us vp university of saint petersburg
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Way you know are now buddy buddy with russia because you know russia help their guy win so it's just such it's been such a mind fuck you know i think for everybody see i wouldn't say ask before the now if you know you very let me at least me dr knitted user of hinted this at the end that you know putin is announced his reelection good luck sir in twenty dd think is going to win i am it just i am waiting with bated breath i will find out but i mean i think so many of our fears are wrapped up in this one little judo loving man near times the big piece on yasser of how the secession a struggle who for who comes after putin is is happening concurrently with putin's reelection you know ballpark at forest you think things get worse did they get better or we more like we see a continuation of putin like policies because that's the only way you can sort of maintained control of the country bits in decline in so many other ways so this is one of the things i tried to get at in this piece is that putin has propagated this asian to his citizens which is russia's always on the brink of collapse and he is the only one standing between 100 and forty four million russians and the abyss and that if he were to go everything would fall apart and there would be bloodshed and chaos and economic decline unfortunately by being in power for so long by personalizing his rule for so long he has assured that this is probably what will happen when he goes because unfortunately no man is immortal and he will die one day or he will be ousted one day and a lot of the things that he has spent nearly twenty years scaring his countrymen about will happen because of how he ruled the reason russia's in decline is because of his policies as because of the rampant corruption in russia because of the fact that civil society has been completely razed and levelled with the ground because.

russia putin one day twenty years
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"On the show today we have a friend of the pod atlantic's julia yossi who wrote a as a new peace in the atlantic called putin's game julia welcome to the show thanks for having me guys high a high helissio that's my chipper radio voice that's is a great sugar rederi degenerated with okay so the thrust of your piece is why amir putin is not playing you now three d chess he's gambling he's playing blackjack can you explain what that means in the tour broader point you're trying to make with that comparison sure so we like to think of ladimir putin or we've come to think of him here in the us especially in the last year as this kind of villainous mastermind something out of james bond as somebody who has a grand strategic vision that is very detailed than that he is able to carry out in execute but a more accurate description of how he operates is that he has kind of a longterm goal which is to create friction for america and the world stage and to maybe get back at america for what he sees as regime change uh via the color of aleutians in a former soviet republics and in the middle east him and things like the arab spring which he blames the cia for and then he'll do kind of like the first and second step and the rest he'll figure out as he goes along so he at kind of acts very emotionally there's a lot of kind of kneejerk last minute decision making that he does and he doesn't really think about the consequences at them in the moment he kind of it's kind of a you know will cross that bridge when we get there if we get there and as a result a lot of these actions that we describe as wow he's totally running circles around us in ukraine and crimea or in syria or with our elections in 2016 but these.

julia yossi ladimir putin us james bond america cia ukraine crimea syria
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Let me tell you about omaha steaks and how for only forty nine ninety nine you can get the family gift pack when you go to oman stakescom and enter the code psa in the search bar at seventy five percent off lot oddly shanley that grills together stays together almost eggs fruits unique gifts for gourmet food lovers with over five hundred gourmet gift ideas right now almost execute an exclusive savings just a positive mirko listeners listen to everything you're going to get two philemon yonsin two top surveillance to bones pork chops four bonus chicken breasts for kill bossa sausages were burgers for potatoes are groton for caramel apple tartlets in one omaha stake seasoning packet plus get four additional kill sausages absolutely free though array that's to kill bossa sausages and each packet in your pocket gentler stakes in the mail people almost xcomcom code is psa in the search bar that 75 percent savings it's the gift that is guaranteed to be a hit much that front door rubber levitt their stakes on the way positive america's brought to you by parachute please use the ad time to talk about parachute however you'd like probably positively you know like my parachute cheats more than i did is going to be either hanna or luca the dog luke of the dog she loves nothing more than just walk in circle after circles turco around the little comfort her three pod at scratch it it and take will map parachute offers a sixty near trial so if you don't love it you just centreback has no problem this year keep it comfortable with gifts from parachute keep comfortable it was a parachute homecomcricket for free shipping and returns parachute donald trump has twelve diko say emergency crisis.

omaha steaks oman stakescom shanley america hanna luca turco donald trump seventy five percent 75 percent
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Most interesting thing in the peace and maggie tweeted this out was she wrote a one point there seldom a plan apart from preemption selfdefence obsession impulse to this whole like is he trying to distract us from something else is a strategy to do this there is no strategy here there's only like how do i get through like the headline of the peace hour by hour battle for selfpreservation so i think you're right right so we should be obviously at all times terrified because events are coming the world is coming there will be a crisis in in this person will be in this job but with the sense i get when i read these articles about what trump is doing is it's not that he's misusing the presidency it's that he's not doing the presidency he has abdicated the presidency i feel like every president spends a year being told what to do by the white house being sort of battered and and buffeted by the job itself and then over time and there's no way to teach your outta control learn how you learn how to be president every president does the they all described the mistakes they made and they all they all come down to oh i forgot i was president and i decide with his job is and you read this article and see that this is the person who can't learn who can adapt he has stepped into this role he is unable to perform the functions and what that means is there's no control there's only happen we just don't really have a president right we have a tweeter a competent president a communist regime could have done like 50 percent more damage at italy i guess that's heartening he doesn't see the is a job he sees it as a role that he starring in it's a pie muscat knack for raise of that's how his during his on treatment as a job to perform silvani him like reading the news and does not seem offer a couple of days and being just like what controversy should i night because i am which track.

president white house maggie italy 50 percent
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"There's also got him tweeting against the advice of every adviser in lawyer he has they're all telling them not to tweet things and he's just like i don't care so they're doing a great job there it has him needing verbal briefings because he has been ricki he just doesn't like reading it doesn't like reading that i mowed my favorite is when he learned that the new york times writing this piece about his four hours of television time of day he went back to the press cabin on air force one and talk about how you so busy reading documents these could preferring to them as i am and what i love that i wanna zb because of the documents i love the i love though that just sort of little like oh like we'd say it's almost like a time machine at all i remember when he did that he got angry about would it wasn't connected any specific allegation it turns out he received an enquiry in fact check about this article any arrogance is a very big of the uncertainty principle like the donald trump is changed when maggie haberman observes him i mean obviously we could be laughing or cranking but albus had yeah i have to say though it like it was um i feel like it was not more crazy than what we've seen in the past like i didn't find it too gene there could be a version that article that made it seemed like he was in some kind of rapid and deeply terrifying dissent sense but i found it in this horrible reality of ours heartening to see that the status quo ante over he was on january 21st continues which is watching for hours of television a day and having no sense of the importance of his own up i laugh because it's all i got it but the thing that really scared me was every single one of his advisers told the new york times that he is trouble a fact from fiction and you couple that with like some of the basha crazy people that he has in his white house like mike flynn famously told the defense intelligence agency that iran was behind the but.

time machine uncertainty principle donald trump maggie haberman albus the new york times mike flynn iran four hours
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Viewers will they believe us anymore these people believe them no matter fucking what and they will believe that the mainstream media is a joke no matter how perfect they are that's not the fucking problem also just you know it is important to get things right you're not getting things right to try to make sean hannity and donald trump like you they're not doing this it does it fail in hairy they're not help them they're all care of your honest or not that's not why they do what they do they don't care about the truth they're liars and so we've built the system now where lies on breitbart don't count lies on hannity on capitalize on fox friends don't count kellyanne conway's lies dunga those allies that don't count the only lies that matter or the only mistakes that matter or the mistakes made by people who care about the truth and that is no stand in meanwhile the mainstream media i think rightly is covering the rise of all these sort of like rightwing apparatus is like the cover steve bannon constantly lucky sven golly with my views on that are wellknown but he did a piece on project very tasks which is james o'keefe running around setting up soon of sting operations were essentially just records people offering their views and often ways and selectively edits them in in a deeply dishonest fashion to like sell this narrative but the mainstream media is getting savaged in they're not standing up for their own reporters like dave weigel who've made anonymous honest mistake and corrected it and then they're sort of like looking at this right wing apparatus it set up to destroy them like it's a it's a zoo animal amman this is not living in mara is often a common for you guys is a problem i was at times as auslin problem with the times that you like when they print people like eric erickson in their oped pages as if it that pay on to a certain segment of the right wing is going to win them plaudits return of win them supporter demonstrate that they care about it an ideologically brought perspective like are you up for this fight because like they're not coming for you because there aren't enough conservatives on the op ed page they're coming for you because is about power why there is about.

mainstream media breitbart steve bannon dave weigel eric erickson sean hannity donald trump kellyanne conway james o'keefe
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Just kidding leave in an okay i want to talk about the press so specifically this is the story but i want to talk about which has the systemic effort by donald trump and his state run media to de legitimize the free press which they did this weekend by harping on three mistakes on the russia investigation made by three different outlets they were all corrected within hours as we can trump also called for washington post reporter dave weigel to be fired for putting up a picture of the wrong crowd size at his rally a picture he immediately took down when corrected of course this was the same rally were donald trump told people to vote for an alleged child molester who doesn't like any of the constitutional amendments after the bill of rights this is so frustrating gulick i'm glad ravenous conversation but the fact that this is a national conversation means that donald trump has already won we've already gotten sucked into this bizarre day it's not prints one of the problems is it's not an actual conversations conversation among the dc press than us and all these people who pay tell at i think it's a conversation on blocks news and answer everywhere in the right wing so i do think the national conversation and he one eight because we are in a framework demanding more accountability from reporters than we demand from the pressing that states because he told the biggest at crowd size lie in history and he still maintains it is true he says that millions of people voted illegally hillary clinton or that brock obama wiretapped him something i think he said again over the weekend but dave weigel who a great reporters the washington post made a mistake corrected it and apologize and we play into this farce like it's a real debate like his attacks on dave are legitimate when in fact the guy is just using it as a political wedge it's it's a strategy it's not actually it conversation about factor fiction that is the best point and that is what has been loss and all of us it's not that like it's not hypocrisy and brian boilers made this point of his pieces on career backup to it's not like oh you know trump lies all the time and and he doesn't get caught in fox news.

donald trump reporter hillary clinton brock obama dave weigel washington post russia fox
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"That's our his are trincia some people have like data people exit get they ask koernke up there and john king crunching numbers we at here our vote is out data is out what instinct in propaganda pipe down chuck todd i got this here we go or doug jones so republicans win statewide by margins of 10 to 20 points to everyone knows how heartless and only about a quarter of the entire population has college degrees which is higher than only six other states and we know that these days with trump is president and this has been a trend that's been happening for some time white voters without a college degree or voting republican in historic margins no matter what so incredibly difficult also do up don't leave out voter suppression mortar suppression yeti problem down there is a huge problem special election turnout no way to model who turns on special election and so for jones it comes down to the african american vote africanamericans make up twenty seven percent of the state's population doug jones needs the black vote to account for at least 25 percent of the electorate then he could lose the white vote by fifty one to thirty six if he bumps it up to twenty six percent 27 percent he can lose by even more and then you would need more to underperform in the northern part of the state which he's done in the past and he basically still have to have some suburban professionals run birmingham tuscaloosa places like that who might be trump supporters to say i'm either stay home or vote for doug jones that's what unit that's the recipe okay so well so let me tell you that information as just for everyone to you know whether you're looking at the returns come in tomorrow and it as we know a conflicts been interesting to see how jones's campaigns approaching this because they've had a number of a prominent africanamerican surrogates come into the state cory booker was there there's reports that president obama's recorded a robocall but they're not sure if they're going to use it yet so doesn't seem like they've gone all in on an african american turnout strategy so something they are trying to do in a way that doesn't know tie them to washington or tie them to obama further ryan they rdr which is i dunno i had not seen.

john king trump president doug jones cory booker obama voter suppression washington twenty seven percent twenty six percent 25 percent 27 percent
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Um and i hope people right in their original i realize laughing in the back i i just think that and nick sabin is the perfect kind of person clearly from the sports world that many people could write it no i thought it was actually look richard shelby did not have to do that he clearly made a choice he clearly said i wanna go on sunday show i wanna create video that can spread around alabama and and send a signal to republican voters not to vote for this guy so you know could rim good for him and it's harder to do than some of these other republican senators like enough it's awesome jeff flake donated to doug jones peja flakes in arizona never in retiring in retiring and richard shelby who also needs 83 i don't know if he's going to run again either but presumably he's good for 83 other majors that we're all we grading centers on a curve because were governed by thorne ads the mcdonald's magp with them he comes back oh yet but i do budgeting were these the senate is filled with septuagenarians and octogenarians were does used to it i just albin we don't ask you for a lot right now we just talk from in the first wedding ever went whose alabama at a great time my favorite musicians from alabama of jason his bell wonderful artist thank you for that i think it's really glendow journey can you guys just do us one solid in not send a pedophile to congress we really would appreciate it if we could just get this one william could be as aaa then return for we know what we were to get alabama back because they vote conservative republicans and to the senate and house year after year and then have a net positive from the federal government over and over again as we fund medicaid and medicare and so security even though they don't pay as much in taxes so hey but hey guys hey it's it's us here in the rest of the country where we're asking for our wrestler a solid will leave out one out of the rubber call arrow atla i went with the flies from.

nick sabin richard shelby jeff flake arizona mcdonald senate alabama william doug jones congress medicare
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Uh i was a as a thoughtful conversation about why he made this sad overtly political decision about a fraught diplomatic issue and then the empty suit that is rex tillerson as a sort of wanders round seven for the state department will he go fired moti nabi who replacements expelling diplomats who in their vertigo brilliant brilliant pele the watching all the jerusalem coverage over the last serb we can half i did was constantly struck by like where you guys are super happy with like the status quo like how dare you violate the status quo in which things were terrible for half a century in arizona la good ideas in this in this debate maybe we can solve here i think jeopardy did it okay let's talk about the news tomorrow voters in alabama will choose their next senator in a special election to fill the seat held by jeff sessions a win by democrat doug jones would drastically increase the chances of the democrats retake the senate in 2018 which would allow them to effectively kill donald trump's legislative agenda his ability to staff the government with whoever he wants his ability to confirm would ever judges he wants including the supreme court john sap i can't i don't say englanth raise the stakes here for you know they're going by jones could also jeopardize the republican tax bill since quarters are no and collins's back on the fence after being snookered by mitch mcconnell and paul ryan aaron of you saw guys but marco rubio says that if he doesn't get his we in the bill cosby problems days gupta he's gonna he's going to tweet out a bible first it's very stern about taxes.

moti nabi alabama senator doug jones senate donald trump john sap mitch mcconnell paul ryan aaron rex tillerson jerusalem arizona la collins marco rubio bill cosby
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"The welcome to putt save america i'm john forever on john mother i'm tommy be torque on the pods today we have the atlantic's julie offi we'll talk about her brand new piece on vladimir putin called putin's game and later we'll talk to the host of cricket media's positive the people to ray mckesson we're going on tour grabbed tickets for our 2018 stops a crookedcomevents that's exciting yet as long as you i feel like you were about to say something funny never knew something bigger tone that struck me my son it's very chip reverence who witnessed sales by that i didn't hate speaking of sales vibes love early on friday we are not it was the last friday were promote yeah i know how it works downli we an auto show where the tape with andy daily janney yang and emily heller who really funny episode very loose we had a good time emily howlers rant about the fake sign language interpreter toward the end of the show made me laugh so hard it was so funny it was a great episode and in this friday it's the lover leave it last episode of the year holiday spectacular my god you guys may be enlisted because he'll be there cool i can't wait that's going to be fun kulata guess let's really bring sarsam rentals unnerved fence of idea under some fun stuff who knows funnier some some contributors missed out by parts of the world my bossert ipod say the project but he struggled tommy on jerusalem jerusalem went to chaired the john year the only one another's.

america vladimir putin emily heller tommy john ray mckesson andy janney
"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"medieval times" Discussed on Pod Save America

"The presenting sponsor part save america is blue apron the leading meal kit delivery service in the us meal kit or many people know what they do many people don't know what the types of meal you eat when you cope with john is not just hamburgers it's short rib burgers on a pretzel bond with a hoppy cheddars higher you go you preparing concered stakes in time hence us with mashed potatoes shallots yes xiao all of them krispy shallots green beans all in under forty five minutes this month recipes include chilly butter stakes chile chile butter stick with lemon parmesan broccoli and potatoes and vegetable low main with bok choy and kerry i really you know the fact we have to read this in the morning it's like i want you know it's like it's tough like i would love to hear about stakes in the afternoon when people will hear this episode but for us we hear about steaks and am blue apron offers twelve new recipes each week and customers can pick to three or four recipes based on what best fits their schedule boyfriend is treating parts of america listeners to their first three meals a thirty dollars value with your first order if you visit blue aproncomcricket to check out this week's menu and get your thirty dollars off with free shipping at blueaproncomhewitt ago john dons back the blue apron is a better way to twelve thai coke's a day the times reports that the president is having twelve diet coke today call muller it's a fucking crisis that's too many night i wonder he so cranky he can't sleep their putin's coke's cook.

america us john president putin kerry muller thirty dollars forty five minutes
 Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rick Steves Germany Audio Tour?s?

00:57 sec | 6 years ago

Rothenburg ob der Tauber

"Government from the first dukes of brandenburg medieval times to the kings and emperors of prussia the weimar republic hitler and the nazis communist east germany and onto the democracy of today. Think of the history. This race dog has seen when the building was inaugurated in eighteen ninety-five germany was still kingdom ruled by the horns. All or and family. That had rained here for nearly five hundred years back then. The raisch dog was far from the real center of power. That was a mile east of here at the royal palace. Kaiser wilhelm the second disdainfully called this place. The rakes often house that chatting house for monkeys. But after the emperor was deposed in world war one the german republic was proclaimed right on this spot. Look above the door to see the promise. They carved into the facade. Tim deutschen folk to the german people that first democracy known as the weimar republic proved week. Meanwhile the storm of

Prussia East Germany Kaiser Wilhelm German Republic Royal Palace Germany Tim Deutschen Weimar Republic