37 Burst results for "Medicare"

Fresh update on "medicare" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:01 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "medicare" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

"Called an American Sickness. The physician journalist Elizabeth Rosenthal, describes the industrialization of US healthcare. It is fascinating story, with many twists between the rise of employer based insurance and the passage of Medicare and Medicaid. In the 19 sixties, healthcare was increasingly paid for by a third party, someone other than the patient. This lack of transparency lead hospitals to start charging more. But those increases didn't last forever. Insurers and employers with the encouragement of the federal government Tried to bring down those rising hospital costs until around the mid 19 eighties. Hospitals were fairly free to set the prices. They charged Medicare, but Medicare eventually established its own price list. Hip replacement would be reimbursed at X dollars a coronary artery bypass surgery at y. Dollars. This led hospitals to adjust in at least two ways. The first was to push.

Elizabeth Rosenthal 19 Sixties Medicaid First Medicare United States Mid 19 Eighties Two Ways American Third X Dollars
Fresh update on "medicare" discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

00:45 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicare" discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"That florida is not all floor. Duck that we have some really good members of congress. And i'm so glad you're my congressman. Thank you again for. I appreciate that a lot. I love to do this again. Thanks to call. Thank you take care. Congressman ted deutch by there. You go so. That's my congressman everybody. I'm lucky i'm lucky. I've had times when i wasn't so lucky with my representative. Now i am and you know what he listens to us. And he's coming around on the things that matter like medicare for all. I've been critical of him. And i'm glad to see he's he's you know he's getting with the program all right so he had to go by five fifty five so we've got a few minutes left and i didn't start the show this way but i can't help it i have to end it. This way. Yeah you know what's coming This is.

Congress Five Fifty Five Florida
Boulder suspect identified, charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder

America's First News Show

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Boulder suspect identified, charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder

"Morning on the 21 year old suspect in Monday's massacre at a Colorado supermarket, which left 10 dead, including a store manager and a police officer. Investigators haven't established a motive, but arrest affidavit shows he bought the weapon just six days before the attack. The suspect has been identified as Ahmad Elissa 21 of Arvada. He has been charged with 10 counts of murder in the first degree, and will she be shortly transported the Boulder County jail? I know that there's an extensive investigation just getting underway into his background. He's lived most of his life in the United States, and beyond that we're still in the very early stages of the investigation. Those who lost their lives at the King Soopers arranged from 20 tow 65 years old. They included a magazine photographer, a Medicare agent with a passion for theater and others going about their day at a busy shopping plaza when Shots unexpectedly rang out. Wonderful

Ahmad Elissa Arvada Colorado Boulder County King Soopers United States Medicare
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Under new bill will include adjustments in the global budgets specifically being able to address times of pandemic in crisis on really want to ensure not only do the hospital all the funding. They need that are scrambling they were here. We saw a nonprofit hospitals closing across the country times of pandemic with a global budget system. That will not happen and we can also ensure that went funding going out so we saw billions of dollars from cares. It's not going to just go to the highest proper hospitals. We're going to ensure an equitable distribution especially to our safety net in rural hospitals. So that's really wanted also benefits at the global budgets. Yeah this is such a wonky topic will budgets and payments and stuff but it is actually it has such a huge effect on equity like you were just explaining and i think that that's just a really important thing to point out that a lot of clinics that actually do serve underserved community. I mean they are under served because they're not financed to the same extent. And this you know the fact that we would do a global budget would actually be transformative for for the clinics that serve underserved communities so quick question here about the senate. Bill is the senate bill being dropped together. So we had hoped for a joint introduction Senator centers is absolutely very supportive. Our roll out in the next couple of weeks. I'll let their office respond. Or if you like to. John asking inquiring about their rollout date by route. We have worked very closely together in terms of bill tax and i know that they are hoping to also introduce in the near future. And there's another question. Now i can't find. I can't find the person who asked to pull it up on the screen here. But i think i saw a couple of questions about hearing. So is there a strategy yet around hearings or have. Y'all just sort of been getting the bill ready we've been hopefully during both on this critical i mean i. I'll highlight that. I think this congress is really unique opportunity to really build up the grass roots in the ground. Game on medicare for on expand our coalition. But let's not forget about the inside We established in incredible precedent for legislative conversation on medicare for all they really can't editor how important this is in the last congress we have four congressional hearings on medicare for all why is important. While the last time any senator congressperson had a discussion on single payer. It's been several decades since that happened specifically on medicare for all legislation. It's never happened being able to participate in bursts. Bottling congress members to participate in that conversation to have a real policy substantive debate about it is really informed him so we need to continue that momentum. We have a commitment from the small business committee. Chairman of alaska's on it to hold a hearing on medicare crying and you know we have congresswoman..

John congress both billions of dollars single payer next couple of weeks alaska congresswoman
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Health equity within the medicare for all system that would march keep track of all patient data making sure that we are setting equity benchmarks and have to be hit in actually putting teeth behind that to ensure that they're being enacted and then lastly also note for anyone who is either currently in the military or enlisted. There is a separation of try cares. Public direct care system was similarly at the va ihs medicare for all bill previously left the va in ihs system out just to clarify people who are in the va ihs are able to access. Both of the a or i and medicare for all instead our doing that. Similarly rick strikers public care system so i had another question for you about the progressive caucus so the progressive caucus the house is. It's got to be one of the biggest. If not the biggest caucuses in the house but notoriously has had a hard time wielding its own power or its own leverage to kind of move the democratic caucus. I think in the way that for a number of years the blue dog democrat caucus was actually really effective. You know leveraging that handful of votes to kind of move legislation to the right in certain directions. And i mean we do actually have blue dots members who are supportive medicare for also. They're not like right on every issue so i is also the chair of the progressive caucus. So it's great. We have that kind of overlap. What changes is rep. Giac paul sort of leading around the progressive caucus. And do you think it's going to have an impact around the medicare for all fight in congress absolutely. I think this is really important to talk about on. Because when we think through the infrastructure we need to build both on the outside in the grassroots movement but also on the inside to ensure that we actually have lovers that we can fool to advance medicare for all. This is really critical for the cbc to be able to actualize operationalized that so. This was a huge priority for congressman giant. Paul you know before her p. c. when we had one staff when he's incredible executive director mike garner one staff for ninety plus members..

Paul Giac paul ninety plus members congress mike garner one staff Both both one blue dots rep. medicare democrat
Los Angeles Teacher Sues UTLA, Says Demand to Defund Police Was the Last Straw

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Los Angeles Teacher Sues UTLA, Says Demand to Defund Police Was the Last Straw

"Mike connection with union. At that time, Len Layered says he decided to leave the United Teachers of Los Angeles because of its increasing political efforts, including supporting calls to defund the police. High school teacher said he was also not happy. The union demanded Medicare for all before they would return to classrooms. Layered said the union should focus on wages and working conditions. Major milestone for L. A county's fight against covert 19. This week, we were reached the milestone of three million doses of

Len Layered United Teachers Mike Los Angeles High School Medicare Layered
 'Obamacare' boost easy for some, but others face paperwork

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last month

'Obamacare' boost easy for some, but others face paperwork

"The new code relief bill signed by the president will bring changes to the affordable Care Act but many subscribers will have to submit new paperwork to get the benefits a summary released by the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services says president Biden's obamacare expansion will reduce costs for new customers those already enrolled in the program people who become unemployed this year and it may help many whose incomes were too high to previously qualify for subsidies starting April first under a special enrollment period people who sign up will automatically get the benefit of higher subsidies authorized by Congress with the reduction of about fifty dollars a month per person for the nine million plus already getting subsidies they'll have to log on to health care dot gov after April first to get their discounts or wait until tax time twenty twenty two to claim a bigger tax credits Jackie Quinn Washington

President Biden Centers For Medicare And Medic Congress Jackie Quinn Washington
Federal officials say most indoor nursing home visits can resume

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Federal officials say most indoor nursing home visits can resume

"It's another sign that the nation might be just turning the corner here during the pandemic roughly AH, year after it started the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, relaxing guidelines on nursing home visits. The new guidance says outdoor visits are still preferred, even when a resident and love one or fully vaccinated, But it encourages such facilities to allow indoor visits at all times and for all residents, except in a few circumstances Now, those circumstances include when a resident has not Been immunized and lives in a facility were fewer than 70% of residents are fully vaccinated. And when the nursing home is in an area with high

Centers For Medicare And Medic
Addressing the Black Maternal Healthcare Crisis

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:33 min | Last month

Addressing the Black Maternal Healthcare Crisis

"Two day we are joined by two amazing women to discuss. Black women's health care carmen. Green the vice president research and strategy at the national earth equity collaborative and one of my friends. Melanie newman senior vice president of communications and culture at the planned. Parenthood of america ladies. How are you thinking for joining us today. Thank you for having us zero. Well thank you glad to be here. So i just love seeing black women who are all about supporting lifting other black women especially when it comes to healthcare so first question is what brought each of you to this work melanie. I'll start with you. Melania i used to work at the dnc together. She came down for the convention in charlotte. And i've just been able to see her do so many bad ass. Amazing things like just your communication strategy. Everything that you do. you're amazing. So what made you fall in love with this work. Thank you so. I would would brought me to planned. Parenthood is my commitment to flow the through line through my entire career. It's not just planned. Parenthood the through line in my career is my commitment to black people in impact. Positively impacting the lives of black people. So before planned. Parenthood i worked in government have done housing policy. I've done criminal justice work at the justice department and at the w. c. p. legal defense fund and i came to planned parenthood to work in health equity Its core to planned. Parenthood's mission and Connects with me in a very real way as a black woman. As a black mother ensuring an expanding access to sexual reproductive healthcare particularly for black women is incredibly important to me. So that's why i'm here carmen. How 'bout you yes indeed. Where my journey to health equity. In what i do now it national birth equity collaborative has really come from genuine interest in learning more about my own my own story my own freedom like on my healing journey. I find that they're these different. Ill these different points aware. I become closer within an entire tribe in learned that there are folks all over the country in world who are interested in what i'm also interested in so for example i was on my healing journey from From sexual assault in abuse. And do that do they experience. I started to learn about public. Health started to learn that there are entire organizations that focused on reproductive justice in reproductive freedom on medicare organization said. Do this work on a policy level. And so as i assumed in my own healing in in my own life journey i find that there are just hundreds of thousands of other black women who are also seeking their own freedom on through the work into activism and advocacy are. That's how i found myself from doing burke justice in breath equity work. Today i appreciate you boast just much for what you do for carrying so much about black women's health care and we're gonna dive into it a little bit more one. The first things that i want to talk about is the black maternal health. Mama this act. I just love that name. It was re introduced into congress by representatives. Lauren underwood albums in senator cory booker. So can you both just dive in a little bit more. Ow this act in why. It's really important to black women in carmen. We can start basile most definitely so excited. She's like oh. I'm no out so when you are love talking about it. Because it's been years in the making thinking of the leadership over decades of people lifting the blanton health crisis and now we're at this point where we have a mommy bus act so it was first introduced with at least the black maternal health caucus was created in two thousand nineteen. And that's when the pressure really started but The caucuses self is exciting. Because it's a one of the largest asks that is like now moving through the federal legislative process. And that just speaks so much to how this issue connects with individuals. We all viscerally know how important it is to care for. Mob take care for our own mothers and so when these stories are told on these devastating tour stories of Light preventable death and long term chronic conditions for black mamas i. I'm pleased that is that is connected with so many legislators. But i'm right now as a package of twelve bills that hit on all different kinds of things. It's just really nice to hear. The breath of policy changed as within the mommy bus. But it is its purpose is to filling gaps in existing legislation to address every dimension of the black. Maternal health. Crisis

National Earth Equity Collabor Melanie Newman Parenthood Of America Ladies Melania Carmen DNC Melanie Justice Department Charlotte Lauren Underwood Senator Cory Booker Green Medicare Burke Basile Congress
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:33 min | Last month

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"I think two senators both senators there. That are not on the bill. There's just the state work is also we have. We've almost feel like as movement. We haven't even gotten there yet because we're still working on building up in the district but the state work is also essential for us to actually win medicare for all the truth just attack on really quickly because we've had a democratic majority in the house in the past period of time and not in the senate. Our whole movement has really been focused on the house more. I think because we you. Can you can win incremental things like getting hearings on your bills. When they're democrats. Are the chairs the senate we've been neglecting that has to end starting the session and that's going to be another big ship. We're gonna have to make this year citing so ben. This was a lot of information. I'm wondering can super wagging but super interesting. I wonder if we can distort a zone in on like one or two states just to give sort of a case study in give sort of an example of what we're talking about here. Sure you know. There's a few states that are really strongly exemplify how the district's with sponsors are really different from the district's need to win co sponsors and i picked one of them which is just new york new york state. That isn't it not new york city and very briefly if you look at new york last year. New york had fourteen co-sponsors on the bill in the house. But when you look at who those. Fourteen co sponsors are in which districts they represent. Nine of those districts were majority people of color districts and all of them were in new york city all except for three of them and two of the arrest represented like buffalo albany. So they're still pretty urban areas and then also at the end of last session. New york state had seven democrats. Who were not co sponsors of the medicare for all bills so this is represents the like the rest of the road that we now have to travel to win and of the seven districts. All of them were majority whites and only two were kind of heavily. Urban one was on staten island. The other was rochester. The rest of those district's were heavily suburban heavily rural they were much more politically contested with the gop. Three of them were swing districts and actually two of them flipped republican just in this last election cycle so that i hope paints a little bit more of a detailed picture of like why things are going to have to look different with our organizing going forward. You can't just repeat the types of organizing and the places we've been doing organizing that we've been doing for the last x. Number of years rules out separately. I wonder rochester any of those. I don't want to argue rochester. I think we should be able to win. Rochester to incite. Change it okay. That was sobering. While i think we should. It was just so much information i mean. What are our takeaways from this presentation. I guess for me. I think that this might be also very obvious. Thank you to people of color and women of color in particular for holding up our bill. Can i give a shout out especially to ion presley who in massachusetts we have nine cosponsors and only two of them. So far have actually a committed to be original cosponsors on this next iteration of the bill. And that is jim mcgovern and i honestly and that's just so important for us because it helps us you know..

two last year jim mcgovern one three staten island ion presley new york Three massachusetts nine cosponsors both senators seven two senators this year Fourteen co sponsors Rochester new york city democrats New york
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

01:56 min | Last month

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Yeah thanks squash medicare for all. I was reading some study of the day that was saying that a lot of times republican women women who republican or running for on the republican primary actually tech. Pretty far right. I think we're seeing that with marjorie green taylor. Whatever name is for example of that to win and differentiate themselves in their republican primaries and then sometimes it comes back to bite them when they get to the general and they've staked out all these really far right positions that actually were not seeing that on the democratic side all were not seeing democratic women tack left to be competitive in the primary and so. I think that that's such an interesting. That white women are actually really sort of lagging behind on co-sponsorship. And i know that there's definitely some misogynistic reason and Some intersection conservative ideals in an misogyny that's contributing to this. That's story for another podcast. That interesting also fucked up. I secretly in my mind. I envisioned like all these campaign consultants the same ones who were like. You can't run on medicare for all even if you believe in it in. A swing district are like sorry. This is how people perceive women in public. So you can't take strong positions. Exactly the all these fuck consultants who are ruining our american democracy and yeah. I think you're coming to us from georgia right now. Right in kelley law flirt definitely tax rate. But i'm glad it worked for her. So when you switch from looking at the demographics of the legislators themselves and look at their districts which is far more important for our purposes. The picture actually looks very much the same. So of the district's where we have medicare fraud co-sponsor more than half of are majority of colored districts. And when you look at the next one hundred eighteen districts where we have to get a medicare for all cosponsoring board where we have democratic districts fully three fourths of them majority white only about a quarter or majority people of color. And i also looked at the income.

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

02:25 min | Last month

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"We have organized. So far are swing districts in. That could be part of this logic that you know detroit. C is pushing that you cannot run america for all if you wanna win a swing district so the remaining the next hundred eighteen district's we need to get on board where we had democrats last year. Who were not on board about. A third of them were swing districts. Interpreting swing pretty. Broadly as could go. Republican could go democrat. And that doesn't mean you know that. The democrats in those districts are any less progressive. I could just be that. There's bigger independent bases. That republicans are stronger in those districts. So that's another thing to bear in mind. We are going into a really different political terrain in the next districts that we need to organize and similar if you look at margin of victory. Democrats have these huge margin of victory in the. We have organized compared to the other ones that we're going to have to organize and then just look at the demographics of the legislators themselves who were on board the bill at the end of last session versus the democrats were not on board. i looked at gender. And there's actually no gender difference between male and female reps which kinda surprised me. I thought maybe women would be more like sport medicare for all than men but when you look at race different story so of the of our co sponsors at the end of last year more than half of them where people of color were let necks are black or asian or indigenous and that is way out of proportion with the press the representations of people of color in congress. Let me tell you it really means that bass. Disproportionately the medicare for all bill is being held up by leaders of color in the house of representatives. And it's a really different picture when you look at the next hundred. Eighteen co sponsors. We need to get on board. Those democrats haven't signed on about two thirds of them are actually white and only a minority A third of them are people of color. And i won't go all the way into this. This is one of the things. If you're really like data you can. You can look pull up the slide show and take a deep die but i did race and gender and it turned out that women of color in congress way way way hands above everyone else the most likely to because the bill and were really disproportionately holding up the bill and white women in congress were the least likely to be co sponsors of the bill and i think we saw something like this just in this past election cycle or i guess every election cycle where women of color voters are kind of the most reliable democratic voters and basically enabled the democratic party to win elections at all. So and this is how repay them..

last year Democrats Republican congress democrat one democrats Eighteen co sponsors republicans end of last year asian things two thirds third eighteen district more america hundred
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:04 min | Last month

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"I'm stephanie nakajima. And this is medicare for all the podcasts for everybody who needs healthcare who so i an update on the medicare for all bill as of today february twenty fourth. Almost two o'clock eastern. We have about seventy five. Original cosponsors on the bill is about to be reintroduced in the house as it is every session which is really great but of course we need to get as many as possible to show our strength on medicare for all which last session was over a majority of democrats who co-sponsored. I think it was one hundred six original and then ultimately hundred eighteen by the end of the session and we're gonna actually have an action at the end of the cast today. We're going to put up the capital switchboard on the screen. Until you can all call your legislators and ask them either thank them if they are original cosponsor or asked them to become one if they are not but today in light of the upcoming bill we have presentation on where we are with this bill and who are the next hundred or so democratic who we need to get on to actually ask medicare for all through the house and a deeper dive into what is going to take to get that majority that we need in congress so ben taking away. Let's not call it a presentation. let's sounds boring. Let's call it a discussion a dialogue so one of the things we do of that. We did especially as we are switching from the last legislative session to this current. One was to take a little bit. Look at the district and the co-sponsors we already have on board the bill. The medicare for all bills in the house and the senate. And how are they really different from the districts where we need to get cosponsors onboard the bills. We're specifically looking at districts represented by democrats or you know swing districts set may off and on be represented by a democrat who's votes we really need to push this past the finish line and you know this was kinda. We're looking mostly at demographic type data political data that sort of stuff but there is some revealing stuff in here that i think is really important for all organizers and activists of the medicare for the movement to ponder as they switch from the type of organizing. We've been doing for the last insert number of years. You've been plugging away at this year. Compared to the next final stretch that we really need to win this thing. We're this presentation if you're watching this on youtube i'm gonna put like a link to this presentation. The discussion images. So you can follow along 'cause this is actually like a whole slide. Show that we put together and there's actually another video on it on the youtube channel which you can also watch but yeah go ahead right not gonna torture you at the slide. Show live even if you're watching the video version. I'm just going to do the really high level stuff. And i'm going to try my absolute best not to just like site number after numbers after numbers and just give you the big picture here. So i'll start big picture geography..

stephanie nakajima congress today february twenty fourth youtube today Almost two o'clock eastern this year democrats one hundred six hundred eighteen about seventy five one One senate democrat hundred
Dr. Amol Navathe Discusses Medicare Fee for Service Policy Reforms

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Dr. Amol Navathe Discusses Medicare Fee for Service Policy Reforms

"Doctrine of author. Let's start with My asking a general question that is a. What medicare later policy conclusions. Do you draw from the pandemic's effects on the medicare Beneficiary population well the the pandemic the public health emergency here with kurna virus. Kobe has obviously had devastating impacts on elderly americans in particular. The data's pretty clear that age is a major risk factor in the and older americans have disproportionately or the burden Alongside the inequities that we see along racial socioeconomic lines as well and so. I think there's a few things that we see here. I think one just from a A basic humanity perspective. Of course we have. A large population are laudable. Folks who Who unfortunately died in and others who are at risk particularly heard a lot about those who live in the nursing homes so the medicare program. I think one has obviously to support vaccination efforts public health efforts as strongly as possible as well as trying to get more support guidance. You know p. p. e. sort of the full nine yards if you will i in particular to nursing homes in this living facilities and other institutions. They're carrying for particularly vulnerable medicare beneficiaries. The other point i'll note. Is that the other impact it's had on. The medicare program is of course financial given the amount of cost associated with the type of care. The pe- that's been required along the way that will be continued to be required over the next year. At least and we've seen for example medicare trust fund or the hospital insurance fund the estimates of its insolvency have accelerated. Now i think the congressional budget office is estimating as soon as twenty twenty four correct. So so i you know we obviously have a lot of people who've been harmed by this and the medicare programs first duty is to try to to help them as best as possible. Get the care that they need to set up. The appropriate health measures the like and the second is. We need to now addressed the financial implications of the kobe public health. Emergency on the program at larch. Okay thank you for that. And we'll get back to the Solvency a questioner issue but before we go into specific program policies Let me ask you. what's your take on. Expanding the medicare program or medicare by and policy as you very well aware. This has been discussed for several decades actually And there was not surprisingly this past congress. A bill introduced to allow seniors And it varies beginning at fifty or older to buy into the medicare program. What's what's your what's your policy perspective on a buy-in it's it's a great question My policy perspective here is the the medicare program on one hand for for current medicare beneficiaries. Obviously has been very successful in general and within it you know we've had a successful medicare advantage program that has also engaged the private insurance industry in the private sector within the medicare program as well so so i think from that perspective Starting from that as a foundation looking forward and saying okay is there a way to expand the medicare program to allow more people to buy in. She will Makes a lot of sense that being said unfortunately with all things healthcare the devil's in the details. And if you look at the concept of public option the concept of being able to buy into medicare one. We know that medicare beneficiaries from an age perspective and an end of life perspective. Berkeley for those who eventually will pass on a bear a or cost if you will expend a lot of dollars and and so if if we think about this at least in some sense as a traditional insurance concept of spreading risk having younger individuals buy into medicare is likely at least to start out to be rather expensive compared to accurately fair insurance product that the goodbye on the commercial market and and so to make that pragmatically feasible would means that we would have to mobilize very substantial subsidies and And so. I think that's where the devil in the details becomes particularly important is that is. Is this the mechanism that we really want to pursue as a society from a legislative perspective from an executive perspective to try to expand insurance or are there other ways to do it kind of like the way the affordable care act had tried to do so i think i think in principle put it this way. I guess i would say my my policy opinion as principal. It sounds like a good idea but to make it feasible and actually to make it affordable such that you get considerable uptake as a way to solve some of the under insurance or uninsured once problem in this country i think actually. It's not as trivial wars as simple as it may seem otherwise.

Medicare Kobe Congressional Budget Office Congress Berkeley
New York's 2 Largest Vaccine Sites to Date Open in Brooklyn, Queens

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | Last month

New York's 2 Largest Vaccine Sites to Date Open in Brooklyn, Queens

"Carlson to new Mask. Covert vaccination sites in Brooklyn and Queens have opened with lines wrapping around the block Canarsie resident Canada, Johnson said it was a surprisingly quick process to get his first dose that Medicare Evers College in Crown Heights this morning. And is a 50 year old man with diabetes. Johnson said he had a simple reason for wanting the vaccine. I want to live. We just have to half a million mark. I don't want to be part of it. I mean, that's a lot of people. The other mass vaccination site is at York College in Jamaica, Queens. The sights are giving residents in neighboring ZIP codes priority for appointments through Saturday. That's to try to make sure that people of color who are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus

Canarsie Medicare Evers College Queens Johnson Carlson Crown Heights Brooklyn Canada Diabetes York College Jamaica
When will I know when I can go and get a vaccine?

Coronacast

02:42 min | Last month

When will I know when I can go and get a vaccine?

"Hello this is corona cast a daily podcast all about the coronavirus. I'm health reported teigen tyler physician and journalists culture. Norman swan choosy the twenty third of february the second day of national immunization. That's right and we've had saw so many questions from audience about how the vaccine role it's gonna work how you're gonna know when it's your turn in the queue and rather than us answering those questions we thought we'd bring in loren roberts who's a health report at one of our colleagues in the abc science unit because lauren's been looking into the vaccine rolette and how it's gonna work and she's here to answer your questions. Welcome lauren thank you good morning. Carl orange relief is test. Somebody on carcass cass. She knows what they're talking about talking about. I'm talking about the okay. Whatever lauren. let's get straight into it. We've got dolores asking. She's just by heggie practice and they have no idea how the vaccine is going to be rolled out. They waited eight weeks for their flu vaccine last year. What are the logistics. That are involved in the vaccine. Rollout will because there's lots of different phases when not certain about how people are going to be notified through the light rollout. So we're talking about rollouts gonna happen in the latter half of this year. We do know that people that are included in the phase. One eight of the vaccine rollout. So that's i care. Workers people that are currently living in h care. Quarantine workers a lot of these people. They're going to be told by the employer and have the coronavirus vaccine lined up by their employer and then probably get the vaccine at work so people that can h care for example. They'll probably get their vaccine de but it's the latest stages that we're not too sure about. We know that there's a good chance that will eventually be up to register online to get the coronavirus vaccine. I'm but at this stage there is to register. It's a little bit of a white and say so just to be clear. Lauren and give us a flavor as well. In israel people were contacted because they had the electronic health records in the insurance public insurance companies. You're saying is that this whole strategy is going to rely on us registering and then seeing how we qualify at. What stage of the priority list. But it's important thing now to just make sure your medicare details up tonight And if you can have it linked to you my gov and then we know that the federal government has spent about thirty one million dollars in a public information campaign and a lot of the details about the light of rollout which moisture israeliens going to be included in is going to be coming out there so it'll be posted. tv campaigns. That'll be a lot of information on the website but right now it's just that fight that we really nari. They are going to be getting their vaccine soon. We know that they can probably be finding out through their employer but everyone else. We're kind of just going to have to wait and say

Teigen Tyler Lauren Norman Swan Loren Roberts Rolette Carl Orange Heggie ABC FLU Israel Medicare Federal Government
Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:17 min | Last month

Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

"Welcome to healthcare business. Secrets show where we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominated the markets you can live from the best and can w revenue w impact and w time off and this episode was speaking. Joel can joel. Otherwise known as america's healthy hot dog is a graduate of the university of michigan. School of medicine is a clinical professor of medicine at wayne state university school of medicine a frequent lecturer and author on topics of vegan nutrition health heart disease reversal and has written several books about alternative nutrition and hothouse. He's had been a guest and commentator amy. Tv shows podcasts. Magazines m practices at the concept of a cardiac longevity is very unpracticed in michigan. Welcome to the show joe. Thank you so much excited to share with the audience. Yeah so i wanted to kind of give out with some background on you. And and how you got into the space because you've kind of gone down a different role than maybe stanford medicine and things teaches. Unfortunately not because of any time in the in the slammer or any problems with my license in a somewhat thoughtful various er- pigeon Course but i grew up in detroit michigan Talking now from the suburb in detroit michigan attended university in ann arbor. Michigan graduated top of my class medical school. But i knew from about a swallow wanted to be a heart moved to dallas moved to kansas city out and training with the best skills and particularly treating heart attacks with angioplasty instead. You have some wonderfully people from australia. New zealand in the my mentor in kansas city was from all actually a dislike from new zealand allah but when visit i'll be of the difference between the do another very different entry but nineteen ninety way before you were born. I imagine or at least run it. I join back in detroit. Michigan big practice. And i was the guy running a night treating sick people coronary Cardiac cath lab artists. But i was even back then very interested in the other part the About our of health which is prevention nutrition. Lifestyles sleep stress. Nutraceutical supplements the whole thing. Much more light perhaps naturopathy and chiropractic. So i was always reading on my own incorporating little tidbits been using coenzyme q ten of people for thirty years my college or and then i'll percolating along as very happy guy got a chance to look down to. The university mentioned developed a preventive cardiology program. But i knew that there was something else that i really had an energy for something else. I mean that was doing wonderful. Things are day is the same thing every day. When wonderful big over i went back to university in two thousand twelve a whole year doing a university based courses integrative cardiology natural gas and pretty much nutrition thing adnan stunning that for decades. But i didn't know all the nutraceutical isn't about chemistry testing and the epa genetics and the protonix and we can use fancy words. I graduated and of course. I say in traditional practice but i ultimately with some thought took a big breath five years ago and says you know what i've done enough cath lab emergencies. That mouse running three hassles on the weekend alone. A great practice. I one focus on prevention and i looked around the country. I could barely find in the united states preventive cardiology practice. That was not attuned to only prescription. Drugs are printing preventive cardiology practices more precision more prescription. I wanted to about more health lifestyle disease reversal. I gleaned from various people what i could kinda created a model. I left the insurance system. You wanna have a sleepless night. As a physician who's always had a whole room full of baylor's and medicare and blue cross as we call in the united states and others and tell people in the city of detroit that is not beverly hills los angeles by a reasonably prosperous busy city with auto industry. But i don't take insurance. I can't even take your insurance them out of the system and launched in five years ago and yes. There's always challenges. My tears thought that maybe. I did. Have alcohol rounds. Drug problem slices. Is he doing all as they didn't understand. It has been the best decision. I don't think would have been as meaningful if i didn't pay the price. All those years of doing traditional medicine I'm respected because know what heart catheterization angioplasty bypass Medications use them when needed by I'm very much dedicate myself as upstream cardiologists. I'm the salmon trying to go upstream. Everybody else is going the other direction. But there's a lot of people out there and you know. I i'm sure for practice that are looking or a different path. They're just tired and they feel tired too many drugs too. Many ten minute appointments with dr the game now. It's a good nurse or a physician since i've provided alternative of time education a different approach. And it's so gratifying. Amin that i'm sixty one years old. I don't know what the word retires. Because i love what i do day after day today

Detroit Michigan Wayne State University School Kansas City New Zealand University Of Michigan United States School Of Medicine Joel Heart Disease Ann Arbor Heart Attacks AMY JOE Dallas Adnan Australia EPA
Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

Coronacast

04:26 min | 2 months ago

Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

"We mocked a really significant milestone in the coronavirus pandemic e that. We've been having norman. The first isis of the fis coronavirus vaccine. Which has been approved for use by the therapeutic goods administration touchdown in australia. Ready to start rolling them at next week to the high priority groups so big milestone. what does the next phase actually look like though the rollout. Well i think a lot of it's been left to the states a suspect that what you'll see is remarkable uniformity which is the first line of defense and the first line of people who are most vulnerable as we've seen again and again and again people who are working on our borders driving buses transporting people from the airport and working in hotels looking people who've just arrived so those are the people who will be immunized i i i would imagine a right around the country that will protect them. They will get the pfizer vaccine. Mostly which is good because that gives the most chance of reducing transmission if they do get infected was protecting them against disease and then aged care and high priority. Health care workers so frontline healthcare workers that first phase and. We haven't heard too much of exactly. Who's going to do what we're in terms of administering vaccines. I know that. A lot of general practices have volunteered. We do have a good network of general practices. So should be okay. But i'm getting any feedback from various parts of australia. Saying they're really from people in the business. If you like who are saying. They're really not sure what the plans are so. I think it's still a work in progress. But the first phase shoot go ok e one would hope and then there's a process of with komo's taking responsibility for care and getting enough doses out into each care which are most vulnerable communities. Should the vaccine escape into the general community right one of the questions that were getting a lot of from people from audience members. He's will we be notified when it's when it's out turn but we don't know that yet. I'm not sure how that's how that is indeed going to work. But i assume that there are ways through medicare numbers and other means that the government can text phone number. I know but. I assume that there are ways of finding out who you are. What you've got an assume that also that your general practitioner how to battling those are the sorts of things that are not entirely clear how people will be identified individually so the scale of vaccinating an entire country even with a relatively small population like ustralia is a messy. Ask so we heard last week will health organization expert advisor from the university of new south. Wales mary louise mc laws saying that. We're going to need to vaccinate something like one hundred ninety thousand people per day to get to the targets that have been set for october this year. Is that going to be feasible. Well low to middle income countries do mass vaccination programmes all the time but they do frequently in fact some some would say that. They're better equipped than many advanced countries richer countries to do this and we've had a rabies outbreak through extraordinary numbers very quickly and and so you can get large venues with nurses factory. Like processes logistic simplified dines. It's all there and people head for mass vaccination areas. You can actually get through very large numbers very quickly if you need to you so those numbers are not impossible. But they are hard to achieve. It's gonna take a ramp up so we're going to start off slow and then ramp up from there. The rate limiting step is actually going to be the supply of vaccines. Are we going to have seven. Hundred thousand dozes available a week and it's going to take a while to to that point so i think that's the issue rob van. Can we administer those vaccines. i mean. Interestingly we do fifty to sixty thousand covid tests a day nationally at the moment perhaps a similar framework could be used to roll out the vaccines. Yeah i think they are thinking of respiratory clinics that model being used as well with the drive through with the general general practitioners which was very useful as well as public hospitals providing those sort of drive through facilities as well. You can get through very large numbers. You just go to have accused people ready together. You've got to have the supply. You gotta have the cold chain and you've got to be computerized so that you can enter people's names into the register and you've got to somewhere where you can keep them for fifteen minutes and then observe them with resuscitation facilities so it's not a simple as during the

Therapeutic Goods Administrati FIS Australia University Of New South Wales Mary Louise Mc Norman Komo Pfizer Medicare Rob Van
‘Recall Newsom’ effort gains more than 1.3 million signatures

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

05:32 min | 2 months ago

‘Recall Newsom’ effort gains more than 1.3 million signatures

"Story. Everyone in California talking about today and now nationwide is the recall movement against Governor Governor Gavin Newsom. Over the weekend. We got word of 1.3 million signatures is the current tally, according to recall organizer's 1.3 million signatures. That means that they're on a pace of about 100,000 week. They need to get to at least 1.5 million quality signatures. But in order to know that they got the signatures, they've got to get two million. Two million signatures. Let's see 100,000 per week and we've got seven weeks left where at one point yet it's very going toe to be very close. But we have to keep the pace we're on. Get to the two million so 1.3 million signatures was the big announcement this weekend. They need two million signatures that would require about 100,000 signatures each and every week through March, 17th. Which is the deadline to submit them, But for you and me to collect them were probably really looking at March. Mm 8/9 or 10th. To submit them to the campaign so they could be properly reviewed, vetted, processed and submitted to each of the county registrars of voters. Now there's also been big developments over the weekend in terms of candidates getting in the race. We had John Cox on this show on Thursday of last week. Well, on Saturday, he announced it's official. He's running for Governor, John Cox ran in 2018. He was the Republican nominee. Um And he said he's running because Newsome is really that bad, and he's learned a lot about how to run races from his last race. Also right wing activist Mike Son of Bitch who has a big following on Twitter announced today that he is also going to file papers to run for governor if the recall qualifies. Kevin Fucker is still saying he's looking at it. But his team said he raised a million dollars $1 million and he put out a tweet saying this is a movement. Really a million dollars. Well, what he doesn't tell you is that the million dollars came from 13 fat cat donors. Kevin That's not a movement. Must you put a word with the letter B at the beginning of it, But anyway, the point being, we now have candidates. They're stepping forward and running on the Republican side. Lots of them. Also a billionaire has put $100,000 into backing the recall effort. Chammah, Polly Tapia. He's a Internet guru big following on social media. He is very, very wealthy. Challenged him last week that if he's going to run for office, he better pony up and give money to the recall. He has done that $100,000 to back signature collection. By the recall committees now In a in a sign that Gavin Newsom is taking this recall threat much more seriously. He's not only beginning to cave on important policies like the State Home Warner, or last week, he was indicating. Very big shift is coming on his decision to back government teachers unions to force kids to stay home and keep the school shut. But now we're seeing actual money being spent against the union. I'm sorry against the recall The National Union of Health Care Workers today rolled out a digital media campaign where it is running ads asking thousands of Californians to sign a petition opposing the ouster effort. Uh, the funding of these ads not only designed to dissuade people from signing, but they're also Reinforcing that If you signed their petition, they can get your name off of the recall paperwork in case you signed as some a mistake in case you were confused. Not a whole lot of people are gonna be confused. But what you're going to find, though, is that the unions and Newsome are now going to start pushing counter signatures. They're called withdrawal forms. Under California state law, someone who signs recall paperwork can take their name off of the recall petition after it's been submitted to the state. By signing a roux withdrawal petition. Why would you sign a petition to recall a state official and then turn around and sign a withdrawal? Well, yeah, you could change your mind. But what Newsom in the government unions and Democrats are banking on Is that people may be confused. They may not know what they're signing. So, for example. The National Union of Health Care Workers Campaign. Is emphasizing not the recall of Newsome. They're saying signed the petition because quote Now is not the time. To move Caliph Now is the time to move California on Medicare for all You see what they're doing? There is they're trying to make Medicare for all the issue, which is among some voters popular, even some Democrats popular They may not know what, exactly what they're

John Cox Gavin Newsom Mike Son Kevin Fucker Newsome Chammah Polly Tapia National Union Of Health Care State Home Warner California Kevin Twitter Newsom Caliph
Larry King, television legend, dies at age 87

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Larry King, television legend, dies at age 87

"Broadcasting legend. Larry king has died at the age of eighty seven. Even over two decades ago. Larry expressed his barilla's and humor on the conan o'brien show. I'm sixty five years old. i feel like i'm eighteen. You're having a kid going to be a father a sixty five i'm going to. This is a medicare baby. I figured out. I'm over sixty five. You're gonna pay. King passed away this morning at cedars sinai medical center in los angeles he was born laurence harvey zieger new york. Nineteen thirty three. He grew up in brooklyn and got his start in broadcasting in miami in the fifties he changed his name to larry king when his general manager suggested his birth name. Maybe two ethnic

Larry King Barilla Cedars Sinai Medical Center Laurence Harvey Larry Medicare King Los Angeles Brooklyn New York Miami
NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 3 months ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

Democracy Now! Audio

03:21 min | 3 months ago

Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

"California governor gavin newsom has appointed california's secretary of state. Alex padilla to replace vice president-elect kamala harris in the us senate padilla will make history as the first latin next senator to represent california state with a population. That's forty percent latin x. He was first elected to public office at twenty six years old. When he joined the los angeles city council he went on to serve two terms in the state senate followed by two terms as the state secretary of state. Alex padilla is the son of mexican immigrants and video. Posted by governor newsom to twitter. Padeas talked about how his family's background has shaped his political. Work can tell you how many pancakes my dad flip through egg scrambled. Try to provide for us sir. In many many years my mom cleaning house the same. So i i try so hard to make sure that our democracy is as inclusive in california's we built in to help a important perspective to washington. Alex padilla is a close ally of governor gavin newsom. He has not taken a public stance unpopular progressive issues. Such as medicare for all. The green new deal abolishing ice. That's immigration customs enforcement for more on his appointment. We go to los angeles where we're joined by fernando guetta. He's a professor of political science at loyola marymount university where he's also director of the center for the study of los angeles. We welcome you to democracy now. Professor get it. It's great to have you back after a number of years. Can you start off by talking about the significance of this appointment and who alex and who. Alex padilla is someone you've known for many many years. Well obviously the significant is very historic and symbolic that latinos. Now have this position. There's been tremendous amount of latino political mobilization. And you've seen latino mayors like antonio viragos lieutenant governor secretary of state mike. But the you've seen latinos be the head of the legislature speaker or as president pro. Tem of the senate. Republican the only positions that latinos having gained in modern times as the us senate which they've never held in california and governor. There wasn't latino governor back in the eighteen seventies but this is really a reflection of the historic importance of latinos also politically. You know we think about forty percent of the population and they're also a significant number of the electric. It is because a lot tino political mobilization that california is deeply blue without that innovation california would be purple and maybe even read and we're changed the whole dynamics of national politics. I remind people that for many presidential elections. Republicans won california. It wasn't until nine hundred ninety. Two democrats started winning and berry winning because of we all know the. Ross perot factor there. But after that really dependent on the latino vote and latino vote is the backbone of california being democratic which becomes the backbone of the democrats having a chance in the electoral college is so historic to historic significance but also political significance

Alex Padilla California Gavin Newsom Elect Kamala Harris Senate Governor Newsom Padeas Fernando Guetta Los Angeles City Council Center For The Study Of Los An Padilla Antonio Viragos Loyola Marymount University Medicare Twitter Washington Los Angeles Alex
The M1 Honeymoon Continues

Mac Power Users

01:34 min | 4 months ago

The M1 Honeymoon Continues

"We should start by. Just maybe doing a check in now that we've been using these m. one max for a while. Yeah so Like i shared. I bought my wife a macbook air. She is absolutely loving it. Silent battery ruins all day cheeses using microsoft teams video conferencing all day. She teaches in the public schools but teaches from home. And that's been that's been really going. Well and i was so impressed with it ended up with the thirteen inch macbook pro and selling my sixteen inch and the smaller screen size has taken some getting used to but if you're on the fence about the macbook pro versus the air. I'll say a couple of things one like the only time i've heard the fan is when i was trans. Coding to streams of four k video and each stream was about twenty minutes long and after a few minutes. I heard it but thou his debbie expected and the battery. Life's really good I think it's a little bit better than the air apple. Says it is and sort of like anecdotally around my house. It seems like the pros and be a little bit better than the air. But i think performance wise. Unless you're doing this big long sustained things like we said the map areas so so good. I don't think there's a really compelling reason to move up to the mac pro unless you just want the touch bar which a lot of people do or you want Kind of a better sense of longer sustained operations without being a slow down. But i think hands down the best mac to buy right now. Is that in one medicare.

Microsoft Debbie Apple Medicare
Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:16 min | 4 months ago

Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

"We start with breaking news. And iran's defense ministry has confirmed that one of the country's top nuclear scientists has been assassinated two diff- of muslim fucker. Saudi is very much proving to be one of those stories in which people will see whatever confirmations of their own prejudices and suspicions they wished to it might reasonably be argued that this description applies in the online epoch in particular to pretty much every story but it is especially the case with stories set in the middle east and which may would depending wh one prefers to believe may not involve israel. So it's best to start with what we know for certain. We know that molson fucker. Zodda was a renowned nuclear physicist a senior engineering of iran's nuclear program and a brigadier general in iran's islamic revolution regard core. He is believed to have been deleted of what was known as project amid the program. Iran established in the late nineteen eighty s to explore the prospects of iranian nuclear weapon and closed in two thousand three according to the international atomic energy agency. We know that he was killed. Last friday near absorbed a small town seventy kilometers east of tehran. And that he was buried with full state on. Who's on sunday law. Main hobby lobby. No optic not that big van owen ruling to the questions of precisely how he was killed by whom there is a bewildering smorgasbord of answers. While it seems clear enough that Was shot dead as the car in which he was. Travelling was the object of an ambush. There are conflicting reports of this assassination being conducted by a posse of live operators. Some of whom may or may not have died at the scene and or by some species of remote controlled weapon monotony iran bit who we bid and me. The enemies of iran have to know that the iranian nation and the country's officials a brave and intrepid enough to respond to this criminal action. As on a has dan in dommage in our yet caught on era by-pass off pigs around as to who might have done it. Iranian officialdom and iranian media have been quick to blame either israel or the mujahedeen e. Cock a curious cultish iranian rebel group which has been a persistent irritant to the islamic republic. And who currently appear to be based between iraq. France and albania. The has also been an amount of copy pasted umbrage directed at the united states or as president hassan rohani of iran prefers to address it the global arrogance on record. Israeli sources have feigned bafflement though the new york times has quoted an unnamed senior. Israeli official is suggesting that the world should thank israel. Four reside is demise. The mujahideen have been reticent. As of this broadcast the iran has yet to present any concrete evidence of their assertions. And if and when they do it will likely be impossible for any independent observers to verify them and iran does reflexively blame israel for pretty much anything it is only a couple of years since former head of iran's military major general signed fear is a body accused of running a network of spy lizards. But it's not like there isn't something of a circumstantial case to answer this year. Several sites in iran which might or might not have been related to iran's nuclear program was struck by explosions which did not appear coincidental and at least four other iranian. Nuclear scientists have met violent ends since two thousand ten to killed by car bombs one by a motorcycle. Bomb one shot dead. In most instances iran blamed israel and israel denied involvement while also making it as clear as it could be regarded even the faintest prospect of a nuclear armed iran as intolerable almost ziff inviting tehran to take the hint and a is at least arguable. Most infact saudis college was marked in two thousand eighteen when israeli intelligence highsted from a warehouse in tehran thousands of files pertaining to iran's nuclear program when israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu announced his feet. He mentioned zadeh by name. A key. part of the plan was to form new organizations to continue the work. This is how dr moosa farkas the of project about put remember that name a day so along with the questions of who and how there is another why in particular wine now whoever killed most fuck resolve will have known that iran would feel obliged to retaliate or at least threatened to retaliate. And that this would make any kind of diplomacy with tehran difficult. Whoever killed muslims will also have understood that a window to such engagement might have been about to open interior. Vashon sean medicare dishman salvage assassination shows. The enemies are experiencing anxious weeks feeling. That the pressure's fading away. And the world circumstances a change a heart. The camby share shadow. It's johnny you're gonna with the swearing in of a new american president who has sounded keen on returning the us to the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with iran out of which the current president flounced of the possible consequences. All fockers ought is death to seem reasonably certain one that iran's nuclear ambitions whatever they may actually be will have been hinted at least some ought to that. Compromise with iran will be less likely someone somewhere will be considering this a win win

Iran Israel Defense Ministry Zodda Van Owen Tehran President Hassan Rohani International Atomic Energy Ag Middle East Albania Israeli Intelligence Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Zadeh Dr Moosa Farkas New York Times Iraq France Ziff Sean Medicare
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Without science and medicine in fact science and medicine are part of our part of the systems and the power structures that created the evidence. And i'm putting all the codes around that for those. Who can we hear me right Of creating the evidence to say that this was this was true and therefore this is what we should do about it With that would then mean overtime is us having racialized diseases An example of this like in history is for the audience who doesn't know draped dementia the idea that of if an enslaved black person wanted to escape right onto their freedom the fact that they wanted that indicated some sort of mental issue right that that was a that was a disease to once your freedom right to want to be able to escape right like the institutions slavery So from the korean racialized diseases to then also segregated health systems which is like woods. Got us here today. Right like talking about medicare for all the structuring of these segregated health systems. That said we're going to give enough care to keep you alive so that you can do what we want you to do with you. Not having the ability to determine what the nature of that work is or how you when your own life like to be right like that keeping people alive enough right. That is something that was achieved through our healthcare system by in the legacy of our healthcare system and arguably exactly what we're talking about today right into if i if we don't get a medicare for all. Then what are we doing where people were keeping people alive enough right And so then you know these. These are the ways then You know health and science and medicine have helped to keep this alive. So how has that legacy carried through to the present day and specifically what does structural racism in the health insurance and the health care system. Look like now. I think you know i mean i is would be so much more better to answer this question because you know like the details of it were more but the the legacy of it today can be thought of both in terms of like the concept of medical desserts right so that we have segregated space and because we have segregated spaces that his connected to Housing systems in this country and practices such as redlining right the active decision to exclude people from People of color specifically you know black person from some neighborhoods and then also to create like so other neighborhoods that You know were dopp predominantly white folks and this structuring being done because there was so much of an investment in tanning land value right so getting the connection between raise and property rights and capital that the current like is connected. Getting back to. We're talking about here about the structural racism that shows up in healthcare systems. Today are set. Our efforts to to segregate space have also been meant that we don't value certain space because we don't value the people that live there so we don't put much needed health care resources in those areas so that those areas are not going to have to hospitals those areas are not gonna have clinics and then we have the second layer of what they do have access to how the healthcare system itself is so segregated. So there's different types of care that people are getting in one part of the healthcare system versus another park right Which is like you know ultimately which makes like sometimes people in the ways that people can vote against their own self interest. Like you know. They don't want medicare for all because they don't wanna lose what they have it's like do you know where you fall on this line like in this light would it be like redrawn. You know you wouldn't get access to something much better than what you have so structural racism that also determined that live right and then also in terms of the lack of diversity in the workforce across all spaces because we know that in healthcare. We have different. They're all not all healthcare. Workers have the same power right not all healthcare workers have the same like social capital right and this is not to take away from the power that they do have i especially cuny health workers or nurses but then there's a certain status for example that's given to doctors that's not given to others so that you're going to have more diversity in like the less desired in quotes right Health like professions and how that is also a legacy of structural racism your discussion about spaces and certain people being in and out it reminded me of dean robinson's analysis of the employment based healthcare system. That we do have which just replicates the inequities of the labor market. And so if you're inside and you have this sort of good jobs high paying job then you're going to have good health insurance and if you don't then you're outside of it and it's just sort of this double whammy right where And that's how we end up in a place where Black people are twice as likely to be uninsured as whites and latinos are actually three times as likely to be uninsured as whites and of course women are more likely to depend partner for mirren's that they would get through their job And so there are so many ways in which sort of i think. Structural racism appears in the health insurance system and then on top of that the medical system. And and just you know just having so if we were I love i love how you brought it up as being a part of like you said like how insurance is even divided up right because every system that you like. Every microsystem did the larger healthcare system. You can analyze racial equity lens and see how it ultimately gets divided between the idea of who's deserving and who's not deserving right which gets back to like one of the fundamental building blocks of this country who is free and who is not free who is who is the owner right so whenever you're reading something that is like designed to be inclusive and then specifically designed to not be inclusive based on like You know ideas of race You're gonna see structural racism and you know and arguably like we're talking about right here in this podcast..

medicare dopp dementia dean robinson microsystem mirren
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"I am benjamin day. I'm stephanie nakajima and this is medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare so today. We're gonna discuss a topic that is central to our success in winning medicare for all when we as a movement talk about what it's going to take to win often when you hear issues like fundraising publication electing the right. Legislators there's other things that usually come up. But i think there's something that maybe even more important than any of those things putting us on the path to victory and that is of course confronting the deeply ingrained racism and our structures and cells. When you look at where. The united states is in compared in comparison to its pure countries. It's impossible to explain why we are so much more of an unequal and capitalist society than everywhere else that looking at the role of racism through our history <hes>. Its impact on our safety net and the neglect and vilification of our public programs. So this is like a big conversation and we could probably have several podcasts on it but today we want to talk about racism specifically in the healthcare system and how medicare for all would and wouldn't address in a racism at the doctor's office and and then a little bit about the interrelated nature of our movements a movement with the larger fight for racial justice. And why and how. They are interconnected so ben. Do you want to introduce our guest absolutely so it is my great pleasure to introduce the wonderful person on the screen with us <hes>. Dr beata amani. Who is an associate professor for. The charles r drew university of medicine and science and <hes>. This is a timely is a lead co chair of the covid nineteen taskforce on racism and equity which is housed at the ucla center for study of racism social justice and health. Welcome dr money. I'm so excited to be here. It is great to have you so before we dive into this deep topic <hes>. Can you tell us a little bit about your background. And why did you choose to become an epidemiologist with a focus on racism and what is epidemiology. So i mean that's a that's a wonderful question. Just what is an epidemiologist. Because i think for so many people. My friend circle in my family <hes>. This current moment had them <hes>. Here in the word and being like <hes>. Isn't one of those. So epidemiology is essentially like the science and the studying of the disease distribution pattern the the distribution patterns of disease <hes> and anything associated with z's <hes>. And it's not only about studying the the distribution and the pattern of disease and its related outcomes but it's also about studying the things that go into effect right the things that are in place the policies and practices that we have what are the effects of those things on the distribution of disease disease-related outcomes. So what that meant for me <hes>. I think growing up was. I always loved <hes>. Health and i loved politics <hes>. And i was always thinking about the relationship between these two things <hes>. And so when. I know you're thinking about how to have some sort of impact especially as a young person <hes>. And you hear about like institutions. Like the cdc or the who right <hes>. You really can you know. Start to give a sense of like. What does it mean to be able to like. Go out and steady and to collect information that can be so useful that it can actually save. Lives like on a larger level. These are to me that young person you know who was really drawn to like the field of setting in a deniau genes that then overtime epidemiology. That also came to me a tool set and a set of ideas that belonged to and we're a service of a system that <hes>. Not only structured by racism. Right like us. Stephanie mentioned beginning at the heart of what we're talking about today <hes>. But also was instrumental in structuring it and and creating and maintaining that <hes>. And so then what that meant for me. Somebody who was studying it was that i was really drawn initially to infectious disease epidemiology <hes>. Because you saw so much like an equity <hes>. And also just they kind of racialized ideas about populations being generated around who's sick. Who's not risk of people who are not sick from those. Who are you know. So all those racial congregations <hes>. And then moving into what we call behavioral. Fb and the idea that <hes> people's behaviors and they're like and and you know people's behaviors and their own actions can be connected and related to their health. So there's a potential for some sort of empowerment right to what i am. I think you know today like loosely. <hes>. and specifically your social epidemiologist. Somebody who wants to study the distribution of disease and disease related factors <hes>. In populations and communities on basant understanding systems structures in power

medicare benjamin day stephanie nakajima Dr beata amani charles r drew university of m ucla center for study of racis disease disease ross ben united states cdc Stephanie infectious disease
Racial Justice and Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 4 months ago

Racial Justice and Medicare for All

"I am benjamin day. I'm stephanie nakajima and this is medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare so today. We're gonna discuss a topic that is central to our success in winning medicare for all when we as a movement talk about what it's going to take to win often when you hear issues like fundraising publication electing the right. Legislators there's other things that usually come up. But i think there's something that maybe even more important than any of those things putting us on the path to victory and that is of course confronting the deeply ingrained racism and our structures and cells. When you look at where. The united states is in compared in comparison to its pure countries. It's impossible to explain why we are so much more of an unequal and capitalist society than everywhere else that looking at the role of racism through our history Its impact on our safety net and the neglect and vilification of our public programs. So this is like a big conversation and we could probably have several podcasts on it but today we want to talk about racism specifically in the healthcare system and how medicare for all would and wouldn't address in a racism at the doctor's office and and then a little bit about the interrelated nature of our movements a movement with the larger fight for racial justice. And why and how. They are interconnected so ben. Do you want to introduce our guest absolutely so it is my great pleasure to introduce the wonderful person on the screen with us Dr beata amani. Who is an associate professor for. The charles r drew university of medicine and science and This is a timely is a lead co chair of the covid nineteen taskforce on racism and equity which is housed at the ucla center for study of racism social justice and health. Welcome dr money. I'm so excited to be here. It is great to have you so before we dive into this deep topic Can you tell us a little bit about your background. And why did you choose to become an epidemiologist with a focus on racism and what is epidemiology. So i mean that's a that's a wonderful question. Just what is an epidemiologist. Because i think for so many people. My friend circle in my family This current moment had them Here in the word and being like Isn't one of those. So epidemiology is essentially like the science and the studying of the disease distribution pattern the the distribution patterns of disease and anything associated with z's And it's not only about studying the the distribution and the pattern of disease and its related outcomes but it's also about studying the things that go into effect right the things that are in place the policies and practices that we have what are the effects of those things on the distribution of disease disease-related outcomes. So what that meant for me I think growing up was. I always loved Health and i loved politics And i was always thinking about the relationship between these two things And so when. I know you're thinking about how to have some sort of impact especially as a young person And you hear about like institutions. Like the cdc or the who right You really can you know. Start to give a sense of like. What does it mean to be able to like. Go out and steady and to collect information that can be so useful that it can actually save. Lives like on a larger level. These are to me that young person you know who was really drawn to like the field of setting in a deniau genes that then overtime epidemiology. That also came to me a tool set and a set of ideas that belonged to and we're a service of a system that Not only structured by racism. Right like us. Stephanie mentioned beginning at the heart of what we're talking about today But also was instrumental in structuring it and and creating and maintaining that And so then what that meant for me. Somebody who was studying it was that i was really drawn initially to infectious disease epidemiology Because you saw so much like an equity And also just they kind of racialized ideas about populations being generated around who's sick. Who's not risk of people who are not sick from those. Who are you know. So all those racial congregations And then moving into what we call behavioral. Fb and the idea that people's behaviors and they're like and and you know people's behaviors and their own actions can be connected and related to their health. So there's a potential for some sort of empowerment right to what i am. I think you know today like loosely. and specifically your social epidemiologist. Somebody who wants to study the distribution of disease and disease related factors In populations and communities on basant understanding systems structures in power

Medicare Benjamin Day Stephanie Nakajima Dr Beata Amani Charles R Drew University Of M Ucla Center For Study Of Racis Disease Disease BEN United States CDC Stephanie Infectious Disease
Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:23 min | 4 months ago

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

"Joining us now. Is laurie garrett. She is a health policy analyst and pulitzer prize winning science writer. Who has been a real voice of reason for us over the course of this crisis laurie. It's really nice to see you. Thank you for being here so you and a lot of other public health experts. They called this back in the summer when the white house decided they were going to take away from. Cdc and have the trump administration. Have hhs collect this data in instead. It really does seem to have been born out in the months since how big a problem is this. How much better off would we be. If we had real data we could count on well. First of all rich we really all agreed to of gratitude to charles pillar who has doggedly covered this story for science magazine for the last three months performed brilliantly and one of them really important things that he has surrey. Thank all of a sudden you are coming on my television for which i apologize talks. And he and he and one of the things that he revealed was that deborah burks was really behind this. She wanted more control of the data she didn't trust. Cdc and claim that the data was sloppy by moving it into hhs they actually then barbed out to private companies. One was a private firm called telegraphing. Biggest client they never had and the other was pailin tier which of course not much later went public on the stock market tear was engaged to sort of massage and analyze the data on the result was of course at the hospitals. Were thoroughly confused. Who are we supposed to send data. To what form are we supposed to fill out. How do we do this. What computers are we supposed to us and for a long time in the summer right after this all started we really had almost no data related to rely upon at all Eventually the federal government started really pushing hospitals around. And said you're gonna lose your medicare contracts. We're gonna take your medicaid and medicare patients and throw them at another hospital if you don't start reporting data to us. Whoa alright swallow hospital start flooding data in. But what's the reliability of the relevance of it. What does it really mean. now. Here's where the the crux of the problem is if your job is to decide how much. Ppe needs to go to arkansas. Or how how much dexsa. Methadone needs to go to south dakota if your job is managing the national stockpile and determining whether or not reading to crisis level of shortages of protective gear for nurses for example. You need to know what's the hospitalization rate. What are the trends. look like. What's the use rate. Well you don't have any such data to rely on right now. It's just a total mess. There's no It's a mess at all levels if the federal numbers don't jive with the state numbers the state the numbers don't jive with the county numbers. The private hospital sector is reporting a different way than the public hospital sector. I mean this is just chaos lawrence this problem or how fixable is. This is a problem. I know that it was a relief to a lot of people to see the list of names who have been advising the incoming president on cova thus far and we've heard sort of reassuring and science based public statements from them during the transition thus far but when they dig in and start to do this work is this a. Is this something that can be is. Is this something that can be undone. Will they have to build this from the ground up. The cdc essentially be put back in charge of this in a way that will just sort of quickly rationalize the state and make it useful again. Will rachel raw. Really anxious to see who biden is going to name as the next. Cdc director and also the next hhs director net will go a long way to helping to answer your question. What we don't really know because the transition team is only just had a few days of access to get inside the cdc. We don't really know what the state of these kinds of programs is now inside in other words. Is it all still in their computers. Are there still personnel. There could reactivate the cdc's tracking system or was it utterly dismantled. And we don't really know the answer to that question right now laura after. Get your reaction to the news tonight. Dr scott atlas has resigned from the white house. I personally was not shy about talking about the fact that i was alarmed to see him in the position that he was in the white house given his stated public views on the virus. What's your reaction to the fact that he's now resigned. It's great. I think that he had a very negative impact on affairs inside the white house. And on our national response and i'm not sure he's going to be welcome back at stanford the stanford faculty have voted to denounce him condoleeza rice his faucet. The hoover institute is indicated some dissatisfaction with his performance. The what's interesting to me is the timing. why now. why did he put out a statement today. Dated for tomorrow and i just wonder if it's in any way connected to the fact that andrews nel who was really the architect of this whole herd immunity approach for sweden Was pushed aside this weekend in sweden. As that country's death toll and case numbers have soared. And there's a strong belief in many sectors of the swedish government that listening to end. Anders was a mistake and also conversely that boris johnson finally rejected of the sort of heard immunity approach that many of his advisor to add been advocating and about three weeks ago started tough lockdowns and since they've been on three weeks of lockdown. They've seen their case load plummet by third

HHS Laurie Garrett Trump Administration CDC Charles Pillar Deborah Burks White House Science Magazine Pulitzer Laurie Surrey Will Rachel Raw Federal Government Cova South Dakota Medicare Dr Scott Atlas Arkansas
"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

Your Medicare Benefits

02:20 min | 8 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

"All the germs and everything else. That's doctors offices. I didn't leave my house I did leave my couch. Four minutes, five minutes most I not only had seen the doctor I had already received the medical notes and receive received a phone call from pharmacy. That my medication would be ready within thirty minutes. Unbelievable. telehealth telemedicine is the fastest growing segment of the medical world today. If you're Medicare policy does not have that Komi. I will see what I can do to help you. There are vendors that will allow you to sign up with or without insurance. And fees are minimal. I actually gave this information to my daughter who has two small boys. And she's been to the ER the office constantly. Well, guess what now she uses his service never has to leave the house doesn't have to drag the kids out. I'm a huge proponent of this. So again, if you're on Medicare a lot of the Medicare companies now offer this if yours doesn't or you don't know and just give me a call and I'll help you find out. Thank you again for listening to this podcast. I hope it was a value to you. If you have any questions whatsoever, please don't ever hesitate to call I do answer.

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

02:55 min | 10 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Their union and at very engaged in their union and so when they're you know they're union told them. That Bernie Sanders would. Cause them to lose their health plan I think the union really expected that the members would would flock to that position and do the do the right thing. which was not to vote for Bernie Sanders in that situation. But. Guess what? These workers and thanks. May you know in many ways to the kind of activism that the union had always promoted them on them? These workers saw through that and realized. You know that they are part of a working class that they you know. They have friends and family. and neighbors whose benefits are not guaranteed by the strong union contract that they were able to achieve, and they also realized how precarious their own benefits were, because it was dependent on the fact that they were employed by particular casino and were members of a particular union and so. Majorities of these workers members of the Culinary Union. In the primary actually voted for Bernie Sanders and did so because they supported Medicare for all, and that was a real wakeup call I think for for labor leaders around the country. You know we didn't have the same kind of dynamic in south. Carolina, one of the reasons is unions. Don't play the. Central role in democratic politics that the culinary plays in Las Vegas but you know the it was an in fact in some ways. The argument was a lot easier to put before. Union workers in South Carolina because. Unions don't have the density and the strength that they do in Las Vegas. They already knew how precarious their healthcare was. Their employer's constantly hammering at it, and comparing their healthcare to the rest of the South Carolina, working class that had little or no healthcare so I think the argument actually was easier to make in South Carolina, Bernie and do good in South Carolina but over sixty percent of Democratic primary voters. Supported Medicare for all in south. Carolina so You know I think we've won that argument among Working People and I think the Labor movement has. Begun to wake up to that fact, you know a lot of times you talk union leaders and they'll say. Oh, yeah, you know. I support Medicare for all, but the members aren't ready for it. They want you know they they wanNA keep a whole lot to their health. Insurance plans that we just can't go to the members with this issue, so the members have come to them now and show them the way forward and I think that it's really changed..

Bernie Sanders Carolina South Carolina Culinary Union Medicare Las Vegas
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

02:48 min | 10 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Think it was January, maybe December. titled. Take my benefits. Please Wyoming. Based healthcare is an anchor around the neck of the US working class You know and you know that that people would celebrate this crazy system that we have. That links employment healthcare to employment. So if you lose your job, you lose your healthcare. If you go on strike, you can lose your healthcare. If you get sick. You often lose your care You know it's just outrageous. And you know and also oblivious to the fact that for a entire generation, healthcare has been the biggest cause of strikes and lockouts and concession bargaining. with unionized employers, the workers who are lucky enough to even have a say in what kind of health care that they get, and you know a constant deterioration in the standards for all working class Americans so. It was just such a UP. Outrageous way to frame it and you know I think that that's talking points that were developed by. You know people who have a real stake in the system for profit. Industry who are very smart about this idea about that sociologists call loss, aversion that people are often more motivated by the fear of losing something that they have rather than the hope of gaining something that they need and so the Way To manipulate people's thoughts. We I like to joke that. The only people the only thing people hate worse than their health insurance company is the fear of being without any health insurance, and that's the kind of way that loss loss aversion plays on people. Don't. Medicare recipients you know saying this Medicare for all is going to mean that you're gonNA. Lose your Medicare because everybody will have Medicare. It's like you know you don't think it's GonNa work, but it works AH. This pernicious way of of manipulating people's deepest fears and insecurities So that's you know that's the way they played it. And I was actually struck with how. People rejected that formulation and you know and I. You know I. think that that's what really means that you know this is an idea whose time has come. Because if you look at the polling, no matter who people voted for. A majority of primary voters believe in and support Medicare for all even in the face of these kind of nasty. Industry as talking points and so this this is really kind of cleared a.

Medicare Wyoming US
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Right here, this is not about politics kiss. Health. Emergency can't wait brought up theoretical face about better. Well never ever thought the. We have been. Reporting Daily! In, this matter of Camp Ross. And that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts. Believe in slavery. I, am Benjamin Day? AM, Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare. Including all the K pop fans all over the world who came together to sink trump rally. Yes for those who haven't heard. Trump headache coronavirus rally in Oklahoma. And a bunch of young people filled out fake reservations so that he ended up with an empty stadium. And it turns out, they mostly from south. Korea where they already have single payer healthcare, those lucky bastards. So today Yellow Lucky! We have a really special guest Marc Duds Ick the national coordinator of the Labor Campaign for single pair. Thank you mark for joining us. It's great to be here Ben and Stephanie. Thanks Suit. Could you just tell us first? How did you get into the single payer movement? Wow well. I was the. President of a union in the union called the oil chemical. Atomic Workers Local Union in New Jersey. That had about. Forty different. small chemical and pharmaceutical plants under contract. and. In the nineteen eighties, we began to see that and we were having more and more of a struggle on. Bargaining for health care for our members, and We, actually invited. David Himmelstein to speak our district council meeting in Nineteen eighty-eight when Jesus of the single payer. Yeah I think this is not long after they actually launched php the Physicians for National. L. Program, and You know I gotTa say when I first saw David show up I was like man. Who is this hippy doctor? What does he know about healthcare But you know he really framed. The issue. You. Know made us made me think about you know..

Stephanie Nakajima David Himmelstein Atomic Workers Local Union Benjamin Day Marc Duds Camp Ross Korea Oklahoma Physicians for National Medicare coordinator President New Jersey Ben
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Right here this is not about politics kiss is a health. Emergency can't wait. I have some theoretical face about the better. Well never ever. We have been reporting on prepaid daily in Europe and this matter of medical care Ross position that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts believe in slavery lever. I'm Benjamin Day Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare except for Michael Bloomberg Mike Bloomberg. What did he do this time? So so as you know. He's been running for president. You don't say I wish he was running out or something so elevated profile a little bit yeah and the. DNC has changed the rules so that he can participate and the next thing Without having as reaching reaching the threshold for donors That previous candidates had had to meet to attend the debates. I'm glad we're making some provision for billionaires because we haven't done enough for them yet in this country I think we should really ease their way into the process. All Right I agree with cutting Mike Bloomberg out of the Medicare for all coverage. I feel like usually I think that it's a solid solid Eric Policy. That everybody should have it. You know well like in Scandinavian countries whether rich or poor but if you can buy your way into the democratic debate stage then you can buy your own damn healthcare and besides we're cutting at least one personnel each week during the someone's gotTa go So speaking of the primaries as we are recording this the Iowa caucuses just just started today. So I mean it feels like this. Election has already been going on forever but in reality the election is just now starting. Today's recording this You'll be listening to it on Tuesday after the caucuses finished And if you're lucky enough to live in Iowa or one of these primary states not only are you just drowned out submerged with advertisements from the candidates but The Partnership for America's Healthcare Future Future. which is the like Orwellian slash dystopia phrase that That has come up. They come up with for the coalition that it was created basically to defeat Medicare for all so this is the Health Insurance Industry Pharma. This is the for profit hospitals. This is the Chamber of Commerce All of the powers of a line to try and undermine Medicare for all and they are actually also spending hundreds of thousands of dollars running ads in the primary states. It's and We thought we would actually Take a short break from all these candidates and talking about the candidates running for office and like like put a little bit of focus on the Partnership for America's healthcare future and how they're trying to undermine Medicare fraud shoe. Listen to this ad or sure. Okay Get ready to enjoy some good old fashioned advertising. We come from different walks of life but we agree on one important thing. We don't want WanNa be forced into a one-size-fits-all government insurance system. The politicians may call it medicare for all medicare buying or the public option. But they mean the same thing a higher taxes or higher premiums lower quality care politicians and bureaucrats in control of our health care. We can't afford one size. Fits all planned and we need to fix. What's broken? Start over so What was your first take? That was like a lot a lot of gobbledygook thrown at us in the span of thirty seconds. Every single possible talking point smashed into thirty seconds sometimes sometimes repeated two or three times. You know you don't you shouldn't be afraid of one. Size fits all healthcare. I don't know if you've ever had it before. It's like a ill-fitting sweater sweater. You know. When I lived in England everyone basically does have the same healthcare and it turns out? The comprehensive healthcare fits every single person. AH regardless of your body size. That's right. I mean every single person has a body. So I kind of like the idea of one-size-fits-all home insurance. No the name of this. This ad which you can see on Youtube is called same thing and actually what they're arguing. I think the main argument of the AD is that Medicare for all is the same exact thing as a medicare buy in and a public option. So why the hell are they renting this in in primary states like Iowa and what's the point of like conflicting those those two. I wonder any any expansion of public health insurance. is perceived to be threat. I think which is a strategic mistake on on their part I think because it rather than co opting One of the more more corporate solutions like a public option. They A. They'd rather just go all in against any sort of reform which I think is going to backfire on them. Yeah I mean they've they've stated that one of their goals the partnership schools is to keep Medicare for all and public option off of the Democratic Party Platform Twenty twenty which seems very unlikely given that every candidate it under stages backing one of those two And I I guess it's confusing to me like WH- every debate medicare for all. Is the number one issue in the presidential in and the democratic debate and all in the main thing they talk about is how different. Their healthcare plans are So people are constantly exposed. The huge gap between a Medicare medicare for all proposal and a public option. Buying and these guys are like running ads swimming upstream like trying to convince you that basically they're the same thing Another thing that struck me in there. I mean. Do you think that this is GonNa work. Like who are they trying to help one candidate win. Or what do you think. The goal is ultimately Emilia running these ads targeted at Democratic primary states. Yeah whatever their plan is It's not actually working all. The ads have not only failed to really make a dent in public opinion about single payer but they've also failed to prevent The more you're liberal candidates like Sanders and Warren. From doing well in Iowa on factor in fact sanders is surging right now And in two thousand sixteen trump won the IRA fifty one to forty one. And if the polling today is correct If you know we were in the general and Iowa was voting. Today he'd win by a smaller smaller margin against any Democratic candidate reforming from you know the public option. Democrats to the all out Medicare for all Democrats Democrats by only six point spread Went up against you know Sanders or Warren So what is the lesson here. Money can't buy you love. Yeah they haven't won my love yet. I wonder I mean the other thing that's interesting is they're kind of they're they're imposing the same. They're they're trying to punish certain candidates for running on these issues But they're imposing the same costs on candidate support Medicare for all and a public option. So there's there's really no disincentive for Democrats to support Medicare for all and it's also I think a lesson about how you know. I think the Democrats who are pushing a public option. They're saying thing. Hey look this more moderate choice. It's not GonNa get the full opposition of the healthcare industry right We're just going to tinker around the edges. We're going to expand access a little that we're gonNA try and do things here and there to not make healthcare right but to like expand coverage Maybe make things a little less horrible But they are actually really triggering the full opposition of the healthcare industry the same exact Resources and money and messaging that Medicare will fight gets So the establishment government is going to have to come up with another reason to taxing pair over a public option because in terms of political feasability I don't really see an advantage advantage anymore. Exactly this gets to the core. The most common pushback we hear on Medicare for all his political feasibility. And that's like a reason to do a public option instead it turns out that there's the same existential crisis in the healthcare industry. That and I mean it's worth remembering. The partnership is not just the health insurance industry. It's also also Pharma. It's also hospitals. It's also chambers of commerce and all of these groups have agreed to fight a public option equally to fighting Medicare for all so much so that they're running ads trying to convince you that the same exact thing which is incredible to me so next? We're going to look at it. A couple of ads been run. Also attacking Medicare for all Again I think premised on the notion that you can get something politically after going after Democrats for Medicare for all and or the public option. Same thing if you didn't the same exact thing And in this case we're looking at two Senate races in Kansas and Michigan So in Michigan Senator Gary Peters is being attacked by this pack called Better Future Michigan a right wing pack and in Kansas Barbara bully a a sitting. US Senator is being attached attacked by a Republican Competitor who's running for a seat Named Susan Weigl who is the current And this is incredible to me. She's the current Senate president of the State Senate in Kansas And we're GONNA listen to her at first because it is just almost unbelievable I'm I'm so sad you can. We cannot give you guys the graphics of this individual imagery. But we'll try and describe to you so I'm going to play that now. It's called socialized. Medicine also known as Medicare for all the government decides what doctor you can see when you can see Dr. It's expensive leads to long waits and about as efficient and your local DMV DMV and this is the Healthcare Warren Sanders Eos and Barbara Bully. Want to give you Susan. My family like many other families his hand. Our share of healthcare battles are manuals instilled in me a strong on commitment to provide a healthcare system.

Medicare Iowa Michael Bloomberg Mike Bloombe president Healthcare Warren Sanders Mike Bloomberg Stephanie Nakajima Chamber of Commerce Senate Health Insurance Industry Phar Europe Dr. It Youtube Ross DNC WanNa Eric Policy
"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"medicare" Discussed on Medicare for All

"This is a whole right here. This is not about politics. This is about health emergencies. Can't wait brought to have some theoretical face about the better idea. Well never ever we behind. Every Humphry Humphry pretty nearly in Europe. And this matter of medical care Ross innocent. I'm physician that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts me means you believe in slavery. Anyway I am Benjamin Day and I'm Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the podcast for everybody everybody who needs healthcare except rampal. Yeah except for Rand Paul. Wait a minute why not ripple the Rand Paul was the voice that you just heard in the intro reasonably pointing out that universal healthcare is actually just like slavery. Oh my God we can definitely out for this system. He's a doctor right right. He can take care of himself. Maybe Canada will have pity on him. He can apply. So we're here. We're making podcast. This is a little bit crazy but Stephanie. Why why don't you tell me? Why did you get into this Movement for Medicare for all I spent several years either underinsured or just totally uninsured until I basically moved to a country that had universal health care I moved to Tokyo in two thousand ten about I walked into City Hall to register stirrer my residency in the word and I was asked while I was destroying if I need health insurance which is like Oh are you handing that out and it turns turns out that they were I had no idea before I moved there that you could just sign up for health insurance in Japan. I'd been used to working jobs in the United States. That didn't give you health health insurance and I came to view it as a luxury item Even though I actually really needed health insurance I had asthma And my the second shock after realizing leising that could sign up for a public health insurance in Japan was that you don't pay a set premium and Japan so you pay just a percentage of your income and and at that point I was unemployed. I just moved there and so I got a full comprehensive public insurance. It wasn't like a bronze plan or like Shit it plan or whatever for the equivalent of twenty dollars a month. Now I'm here I don't know why no I'm the director of communications at healthcare. Now the National Grassroots Welfare Organization. Even though I was really comfortable in Tokyo with health insurance and I wasn't sure what was GonNa Happen with the affordable care act I my friends and my family Identity was still American and I wanted to come back and fight for them And Fuck up the insurance companies so ben tell me tell me about you. I also want to fuck up insurance comedies comedies because my story I actually got screwed over when I had health insurance I didn't lack insurance and I actually had decent health insurance I've been living in upstate. New York And I ended up Being admitted to the hospital for few days with a panic disorder kept having panic attacks. Although although I didn't know that that's what they were I thought I had some terrible physical illness. And actually my doctors misdiagnosed me. A bunch of times And when I was being discharged From the hospital my doctor sat me down and he said you know. I don't want you to freak out panic CIA but your insurance company is not going to cover your stay in the hospital. They've denied your claim And I didn't freak out until I got the bill which was about four thousand dollars At the time I was earning fourteen thousand dollars a year so so it might as well have been four million to me So when I moved back to Boston shortly after that and this whole fight with the with the health health insurance a company I haven't organizing background and I found this organization called mass care. They were The Massachusetts single payer nation. I didn't even know there was a social movement in the United United States to win. Healthcare is a right And I was like ready to fight. I was ready to go so they hired me and this was almost fifteen years ago. And I've been a fulltime organizer in in the mood for Medicare for all ever since right now. I am the director of healthcare. Now an organization you may know as one you also work at the desk immediately next to yours We work out of Boston. And you know we decided to do as podcast because we wanted to kind of let the public in All the amazing news that we hear around the country about the fight for Medicare for all the organizing that people are doing and just You know how far we've come since I started those fifteen years ago but also how hard it's going to be to get it over the edge one of the reasons I'm really looking forward to this. PODCAST is because I think there isn't really consistent pro Medicare for all voice right now For people to hear to go to for a clear understanding of Medicare for all or For reference point four how to understand like the news they're hearing about Medicare for all attacks and what different you know. Candidates are saying The mainstream media isn't really faithfully reporting on this issue They report on it. They're very centrist Lens and sometimes with a very obvious bias. And we're here. I think to dissect the the news. We already do this every day. Sitting next to each other and the offense that we thought why not just stick Mike in front of us and then at least other people can wasn't in on the conversation station And so we're here do that to look at these attacks through the Lens of you know frankly the rest of the world at already has universal. Healthcare debate is ridiculous. I I don't think you even need like a pro medicare for all I would settle for like a balanced dot totally pro healthcare Industry Lens. So we're going to cover a few things with this. podcast cast one. We're going to go over the big political fights over healthcare Both at the national level obviously in Congress Medicare for all has really gained steam but also at the state state level which You don't hear as much about often but that's where a lot of the fight is happening. Also we're also going to talk about like the big breakthroughs in the social movement. Meant to make healthcare right. Big Organizing Victories This is never covered in the news but we hear a lot about it and it's our job actually to coordinate the grassroots efforts around the country and then we're going to break down like the constant total stream of bullshit that ends up being pushed into the media about healthcare era and Medicare for all. And it's honestly I kind of see this. This podcast is like a form of personal therapy for me so I can like event unlike. Get all this stuff off my shoulders. I don't know about you but this is already been Cathartic. Yeah I'm feeling a little bit better already. It's just going to be better from here so please everyone everyone Thank you for joining us on this journey Share on social media. That we're here we're alive we're GONNA be coming back to you next week with content and please tell everyone you know because we are coming..

Medicare Humphry Humphry United States Stephanie Nakajima Rand Paul Boston Tokyo Europe Japan National Grassroots Welfare Or Canada Massachusetts Ross CIA New York
"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

Your Medicare Benefits

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

"How would you really like to understand the difference between a Medicare Advantage program at a Medicare supplement program? Whether you're new to Medicare for the first time or curly looking at open enrollment or thinking about switching this particular podcast is exactly for you. Welcome to another episode of your medical benefits, presented by Tracy mcmanamon, president of one source benefits with twenty nine years of experience in Medicare. Tracey takes the confusion out of how Medicare works and shows how to make it work for you. I especially love when customers commit to my office or prospects. And they bring in a box of pamphlets, folders, whatever from all the different insurance companies are trying to solicit their business. And they say helped me understand this. I don't get it to get information from the federal government. You get information from all these insurance companies get information from a ton of agents, and they just drop it on my desk. And they say, I don't get it. What's the difference between the advantage program in the supplement program? Well, we're going to cover that. But I also have some tools and some items that I'm going to give away to you. If you go into this show notes, you'll see link that you'll be able to download the information printed off at home and be able to have this handy or simply call me, and I'll be glad to go through this in great detail with you. But there several different distinct advantages that you should know about when you're evaluating whether an advantage. Program or a supplement program is the right program for you or someone that you cared deeply about now the advantage program it it's all over the that. There are plans that are free as they say on TV or zero premium is really the term that we're supposed to use not free but zero premium. That includes some include dental vision, drug son include hearing, certainly the medical portion of it. Some of them are HMO some of our PPO's. Okay. I'll stop there. I lost you already probably some have a premium associated with it and some do not which ones right for you. Is my doctor in the network. What if I'm traveling what if I go to visit my grandchildren? Am I going to be covered? What if I get in an accident? What if I go on a cruise ship or go out of the country is Medicare going to cover me? Well, these are all the questions that you should know about and be able to have someone that you can trust that you can call opera text, which is how I get most of my questions. People text me their questions about Medicare. And I just respond to them. About what the right type of plan is for them the supplement program the same thing. Now, the up program is medical only does will it cover all of the out of pocket expenses of Medicare. That is not covered. The answer's yes. Some will some won't. What's the premiums? Am I going to be underwritten? You know, these are all questions that have to be discussed with someone. And I just encourage you, whatever you do don't put your phone number and your Email address onto a website all those places or call centers or carriers, which is a call center. And all they wanna do is sell you a Medicare policy, and that's it two days from now, you have a question you wanted to talk to the same person that you talk to today's earlier guess what we don't know where they are. I don't know how to reach them. I can't transfer you. How can I help you gotta start over and over and over again, and it just becomes a nightmare. So there are. Are some very very distinct disadvantaged disadvantages to the advantage program. And or the supper program, there are some advantages that are very very important to you that you understand on both programs. What about Medicare Part d her all about drugs? How do I get my drug card? Some plans include them and some do not. So it's really important. And I really encourage you to call and talk to someone that you feel that you can trust. Because you know, what your situation is totally different than your next door neighbors or the person across the street, and you can't just go to a website or talk to some call center person in whatever part of America or outside of the United States that wants to do nothing, but sell you a policy move onto the next call. This is too important folks understand the difference. Finding out what plan is best for you, a true professional will listen to your needs. And then make a recommendation to you and. Then if they're really good they'll help you enroll, and that's exactly what I do. And I've been doing it for thirty one years. Most of my business is referral business. You won't find a quoting tool on my website that you can run your own quotes. Because frankly, if you're just looking to run quotes there are other opportunities for

Medicare Tracey Tracy mcmanamon president United States America twenty nine years thirty one years two days
"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

Your Medicare Benefits

09:36 min | 3 years ago

"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

"Welcome to another episode of your medical benefits, presented by Tracy mcmanamon, president of one source benefits with twenty nine years of experience in Medicare. Tracey takes the confusion of how Medicare works and shows how to make it work for you. Welcome. Thanks for joining me again today. I can't believe how many changes are occurring in the Medicare world. And today, I want to announce a really really exciting change that's going to happen in two thousand eighteen probably around April will start to see the roll out of this. But I can't tell you how many people that are on Medicare talk to me about an asked me the question. Why is my social security number right on my ID cart? They really don't like that. They don't like carrying their social security card. We've now been programmed for the last several years not to REVEAL OUR social security number let alone carry in our wallet. Well, I have good news for you. Stay tuned. This is going to go over the big change in Medicare one of them. Anyway, for twenty eighteen in fact, there are so many coming out. The new premiums for Medicare Part B that duck doubles are they're going to change. We don't know yet. But we'll find out probably the next couple of months. So here's the big change that I'm aware of at this point for twenty eighteen. Your medicare? Ide- card will all be changed. Everyone in the country is going to get a brand new Medicare ide- card or Medicare insurance card as you call it because your social security number is finally going to be removed from those cards. And now they're going to have something called a Medicare beneficiary indicator or an M B. I so what's the NBA the NBA? I is a randomly assigned eleven digit number. That means nothing to you. It can't be your. Birth date and your couple of initials or your children's aunts uncles ages or anything like that. It's going to be a computerized randomly assigned unique number two just you. So people will not be able to figure it out it'll be eleven digits long. So what does that mean everyone that's on Medicare or newly applied will start receiving new Medicare insurance cards, beginning April twenty eighteen now don't panic because not everyone's going to get their card in April or may or June or even maybe even twenty eight team because it's going to be a gradual rollout across the country. So it's supposed to take about a year for to be fully implemented nationwide. Whether that happens on time or not remains to be seen. But we're being told that beginning April twenty eight teen new Medicare cards will come out what you should do. You should throw away cut up. Shred your current Medicare card or place it in an area that no one's ever gonna find it. Hopefully, you will. But no one else will be because it's got important for mation yourself security number. Probably maybe out of ten Medicare clients that come into my office to talk about their existing plan. Nine of them bring that up when are they ever going to get away from the social security number being my Medicare number now, not only are you going to be getting new idea cards, but all of the providers doctors hospitals to clinics. What have you all will be able to accept the new M B I, beginning April part of the reason it's taken so long, quite frankly is because the providers have had a change their systems. So that when this card is sent to the public. They will be ready for that. Don't worry, they'll still take yourself security number and your in your Medicare number which as you know, is your social security number plus letter, they'll still be able to take that. But begin to use the new car the NBA number because over time the card with your social security number will be discontinued, and you will be required to use. Your new MBA card now, can you imagine? I don't know how many millions of people are currently on better care. And so that's why we've got to be a little bit patient with all this. But it will happen. You will get a new ID card in the mail, please put it in your wallet right away. You know, I have one wish on these Medicare cards, and that is it doesn't come out in a simple plain paper format the way it is today. Hugh should see the cards that come into my office when people pull them out of their wallets their food stains on their rip. They're torn they're bent. It's just ridiculous. When you think about your health insurance car that she used to get remember the days when they were plastic. Well, now, they're a different kind of plastic, but they don't care or soil as easily as the cards that are out there today. So that's my hope is that they become more sturdy card, whether it be stronger paper, or whatever we'll we'll see. They haven't told us. There's been no designs released yet or anything like that. So it all remains to be seen. Exactly what those are going to look like now think about this. Most of us carry our Medicare card in our wallet, right or are poppers in that same wallet or purse is your driver's license, which in most states also has your data birth. Certainly has your photo it has your home address, and it has your driver's license number. Now, I'm not a hacker or a thief, but think about that. That's exactly what these hackers and these these are out to try to steal when they want to steal your identity. They've got all the information in one spot, and if it's not a driver's license. Well, if you're a Medicare recipient, it's red on your Medicare card, which should probably be in that same wallet. Will finally that won't be a concern of yours anymore. Okay. They still going to get your driver's license. If someone steals your wallet or your purse, which will have the other information, but they won't have your social security number. Now, you know, just research. Gently equifax one of the largest data companies in the world was hacked. Can you believe that they were actually hacked? I forget how many millions and tens of millions of people's personal data was compromised, probably mine and possibly yours. What they do with it. The the hackers remains to be seen. But it just shows how vulnerable our systems are even a company like equifax has been hacked. So it all remains to be seen. What's going to happen? If they do anything with that compromised information or not, but at least now you have one thing that will not be out there for everybody to see and that's your Medicare card with your social security number. Thank god. It's finally come come out. And I just hope I pray that those cards are a little bit sturdier than the ones that we are issued nowadays. So don't panic again, don't call Medicare don't talk to your provider, your insurance carrier, or whatever. But that's going to be one of the big changes that will occur in twenty eight teen I expect the part B deductible to change. I don't know. What are how much and I also expect the part B premium to change again. I don't know what are how much now remember when they calculate your part B premium. They look back two years at your tax return. So that's the. Income figure they go by is two years prior. So keep that in mind. Okay. So those are just some of the big changes the other big change that is going to occur, and you may not be aware of this. But if you have a Medicare Advantage program. You really have to understand what may or may not happen to your network of facilities, doctors hospitals. What have you? We've been told in if you Google it. You'll find out that the networks on the Medicare Advantage programs are getting smaller and smaller and smaller. And so I'm not saying that yours will or years will not. But you just have to ask the questions. Okay. So those are the changes that we see right now that are going to occur when we get further information about the part B premium, and or the part B deductible will send out another podcast if anytime you ever have a question about Medicare. I'm all about Medicare twenty nine years. Call me directly. I am not a call center. I answer my own phones. How about that? You can call me directly at eight seven seven five four nine one two one two eight seven seven five four nine one two one two. Check us out on the web one source benefits dot com. Thanks have a great day. God bless you. Thank you. For listening to another special episode of your medical benefits with industry expert, Tracy mcmanamon to take advantage of the free consultation session on your own Medicare benefits. Call him today at eight seven seven five four nine one two one to thank you for listening. And God bless you.

Medicare NBA Tracy mcmanamon equifax Tracey president Google Hugh twenty nine years two years eleven digits eleven digit
"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

Your Medicare Benefits

08:22 min | 4 years ago

"medicare" Discussed on Your Medicare Benefits

"Welcome to another episode of your medical benefits, presented by Tracy mcmanamon, president of one source benefits with twenty nine years of experience in Medicare. Tracey takes the confusion out of how Medicare works and shows how to make it work for you. Hi, thanks for joining me. Again today today, we're going to really dive into what is a Medicare Advantage plan. And I'm gonna lay out the pros and the cons of the Medicare Advantage plan. And so this podcast is going to be strictly limited to the Medicare Advantage plan. I am doing a subsequent podcast on the Medicare supplement plan also called the medi gap plans. But if you're looking at Medicare for the very first time, you are more than likely being inundated with mail phone calls postcards emails from insurance carriers offering you Medicare Advantage or Medicare supplement program. So in today's program, we're going to exclusively deal with the Medicare Advantage plan. And maybe you want this, and maybe don't now we're not going to get into what one carrier offers over another carrier because. We're not allowed to do that number one by law. But number two, I think you just need a general overview of what the Medicare Advantage program may or may not do for you. Because if you're watching the TV every other commercial seems to be a Medicare Advantage plan or now they're promoting the Medicare supplement program, and by the way, the Medicare supplements outweigh or in popularity anyway the Medicare Advantage plan by a significant margin. So let's talk about Medicare Advantage programs and to confuse you, hopefully, a little less within the Medicare Advantage program. There's something called the regular Medicare Advantage program, which are the ones that you normally see advertised on TV for zero premium no cost, and there's also some called the select Medicare Advantage or the regional Medicare Advantage program. And they do have a cost associated with an explain that in a few minutes. So what really is a Medicare Advantage program? Well, when you turn sixty five and assuming that you've already. Had some knowledge through my previous broadcasts of of what Medicare parts ABC indeed do for you, and you likely have Medicare by now, and hopefully you have Medicare be by now. Now's the time to decide how do you want to be your claims to be processed going forward? So you could just essentially have Medicare a and b guy Medicare is free, as you know, cover some hospital charges the operative word being some Medicare Part B covers some hospital sucked. Charges me some doctor charges and again, the operative word being some, but there's all kinds of co pays co insurance deductibles out of pockets, and so forth excess charges that you could be involved in. If you just have Medicare parts a and b b likely have to pay for a free those claims would be paid for by the federal government. So if you go in. To the hospital, and you only have Medicare NB they send the claims directly to Medicare. So what is the Medicare Advantage program? Well, what the Medicare Advantage program does is that replaces the claim payer from the federal government to an insurance company like mutual of Omaha at bluecross blueshield, a carrier like that. Okay. So they just. You go to the hospital. You have claims the claims now go to this insurance company that you have selected to be your Medicare Advantage carrier. So that's really truly the major difference K. So. With Medicare Advantage programs. You also in some cases and put this on the table right now, you also have some dental and or some vision benefit and some even give a hearing aid either benefit or discount, and I say some because not all carriers have the exact same thing. So if you were to watch TV call that insurance company and say, hey, I watch your Medicare Advantage program. And they say, oh, great. You get this for free and the discounts on here. But if you don't know what the other carriers are offering you're missing the boat. So my suggestion is don't call those insurance companies and don't call the associations that are marketing. The advantage program because the only represent one carrier. You've got to find out what is carrier ABC in Diaw 'ring. To me, whether it be what we call the answer. Larry like dental vision or hearing aid. But is there anything else? Okay. So you don't wanna just call directly to that insurance company because you're not going to get the full perspective of what's out there. Not all carriers offer that but some do and the other thing that some carriers will offer on the Medicare Advantage is some drug benefit now. Again, you really have to look into this the drug benefit has called part D as in drug, but you really have to look into this to see what is truly covered. And in some cases, where can you get your medication from you may have to only go to one or two different preferred pharmacies to get the discounts. So again, you've got to look at all the different than all of them. But you know, the top four five carriers out there to see what they offer what are the bells and whistles do. They offer dental vision or indoor hearing and what about the drug what about the drug benefits? Okay now. I'll stop you right here because I'm sure that's a lot to cover and tell you that. You're welcome to call me if you wish. And I will lay this all out for you in plain English tell you what carriers in your zip code or your county or your state do this or that. And whether they cover those other benefits like dental vision or drugs. But if you don't wanna call me, that's fine. Call an independent insurance agent that you know deals with Medicare and someone that is advantage certified first of all because there's a special license that we have to secure every year to be able to represent advantage carriers like mutual of Omaha or at or anyone else, and this is special certification that we have to go through. And it's it's pretty difficult to be honest with you, but the independent insurance agent that has the certification will certainly be knowledgeable because the training is actually exceptional that we take to recommend suggest. The different Medicare Advantage carriers to you. Okay. So that's in a nutshell. What that really means? Now, I mentioned earlier what is the difference between regular Medicare Advantage and select it's huge. The difference is the networks under the regular Medicare Advantage programs and more than likely the ones that you see ever touched on TV that are zero premium means that your network your access to doctors, and or hospitals is very very very limited. May only be your zip code it. Just it's all different every carrier has a little different rule in terms of how that works and how that plays out. So the advantage program that's zero premium has a very small network, and you also need to be aware that what if you're traveling, and you're visiting the grandchildren, and you need to seek care more than likely

Medicare ABC federal government Omaha Tracy mcmanamon Tracey president bluecross blueshield Larry twenty nine years