40 Burst results for "Medical School"

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on John Howell

John Howell

01:04 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on John Howell

"We're only asking for 7 to 10 days. And, uh, so what do you doing, And she's watching a lot lot of Fox News. So she's busy noon morning, noon and night watching television and, uh, sending in checks to the president's legal defense fund desserts. No, they her money she could do with what she wants. But no. Now now I have a family member who was tested positive. We canceled all of our Thanksgiving plans. I mean, we just we're gonna fly in. That's the right thing to do. Yeah, it just it just seemed It just seemed untenable toe be bring people in from all over the country and get them here. And even if we socially distanced to the best of our ability, I mean, you know, I just I just didn't think it was wise to bring my son in from college. He admitted to me day before yesterday that in fact, They are definitely a hot spot. You know his fraternity. Is definitely hot spot now you nobody. His who's positive who's sent everybody a video of him. Eating a spoonful of mustard and the kicker being I can't taste this or smell it. They tried several different and can taste it or smell But these guys were 20 years old 21 22 years old. I don't really worry about them. I know that there are instances of young people dying of covert 19. I get that, too. I don't particularly worry about my son's health. The long term effects and cove it are not known yet. Blood clots problems with encephalitis type. Of trouble with the virus that goes dormant. We don't know if this goes dormant and will flare up later. Much like another virus flares up is either shingles or encephalitis. If you have a choice. Take singles. You don't have a choice, but it comes one of two ways. Chickenpox is the same way other viruses so we don't know enough a lot about this, But I guess you just have to be careful. He doesn't have to be as careful as you are reasonably comfortable doing. I just hate The fact that we're killing off Tons of small businesses, and I think we're just portion disproportionately burdening the restaurant industry, the bar business here in town and in the state, So that's that's my problem with that. Elements of John. You know, uh, they're being selfish. People are being selfish, like just No, there's no need to party right now. Just chill out, Stay home distance and let's get through it. But people are just doing what they want to do, and that affects everybody else and hurts the economy. You wonder if okay. You elected you made your choice. Yea freedom. Not to wear a mask to congregate. Not too socially distance and to Ah, you know. No, no. A rally. You know whatever rally and uh and now you've come down with it. Do you go to the back of the line Ethically. Hey, dummy. You brought it on yourself. You have to go to the back of the line where people who did follow protocols actually get a little further ahead in the line behind the first respondents, a sticky wicket ethically bioethics to say the least. Let's talk to Alan Alan. He's called 312591 89 100. Alan, Welcome to W. El, sir. Go ahead. Hey, Good evening. You know they're They're two studies now about mass and social distancing And in spite of what we hear, the Marine Corps found that there was no significant difference between control groups that warm asking did not, and a Scandinavian study proved the same thing. You also have to look at the fact that over at the age of 65 is 80% of the deaths and the main these are people who are already very sick. Again. We shouldn't be punishing the young, you know, because the death rate there is very small. You're right in so far as there may be a long term consequences were not aware of, but they're prove out. Ultimately, but Dr Scott got leaving, a professor John Hopkins said over the weekend as many as 100 million people. Have already been exposed to this. Every day we hear about 11 or 12 million were about 8000, Illinois, probably 80,000 every day, another lawyer being infected, So you know we were not getting information. Really? That's truthful. That is not fully representing what's going on, and this is very disappointing. It might be useful. I don't think anybody's going out of the way to lie. I'm not a conspiracy guy. I think you might not be truthful. I mean, you think it's not truthful. I think it's just not in context like you can throw numbers out. We have this. You know this apart. The positivity rate is up here. Deaths are up more people in hospitals, ICU beds. But, dude, you put everything in proper context. You need all the angles and nobody will take the time to present that And we haven't suddenly sort attention spans in this nation to Alan, Right? And remember, the Feinberg studied approved 20% of people in 10 Zip codes already had been exposed, and that's about a month old. So maybe 30% of our population. That's what Dr Gottlieb said has already been exposed to the virus. So what I think we should be focusing on is to determine who has the antibodies. Okay, because we should and focus on those who don't have them and give them the vaccination. It'll be interesting to see how we sort out who gets in. What line for the vaccination, Helen. Thank you. Your participation of boys always welcome sorries. I enjoyed talking to you. That's Alan from Oak Lawn. All right. Last week we talked about Don't close the schools. We had a guest on an opinion writer, and and then I'm glad Alan brought that up to. I want to get back to that. Coming up. Next. We're gonna take a quick break and talk about psychology and the marketing theory, which explains why Trump owns the GOP right identity loyalty. It is marketing Utopia. And David Shaywitz will be your physician scientist scholar at the American Enterprise Institute lecture at Harvard Medical School. He joins us next on Double D. L s Take a look at the roads. We've got some traffic.

Alan Alan Fox News John Hopkins Encephalitis President Trump Donald Trump Illinois Marine Corps American Enterprise Institute Dr Gottlieb Writer Oak Lawn W. El David Shaywitz Feinberg Dr Scott GOP Helen Harvard Medical School
AstraZeneca Trial Promises 'Highly Effective' COVID-19 Vaccine

KOGO's Evening News

04:44 min | 1 hr ago

AstraZeneca Trial Promises 'Highly Effective' COVID-19 Vaccine

"Vaccine candidates who hit the market will be from AstraZeneca, announcing today their vaccine is 90% effective. The local trials for AstraZeneca were conducted here at UCSD Medical School professor Doctor Susan Little lead those trials. Another run honestly hearing that another vaccine has up to 91st. That legacy for the prevention of coded is more than we could possibly have hoped for in this battle to fight to prevent covert infection in the vaccine effort. It's incredible. I mean, to hear you say those kinds of things after living through this study here after sending the volunteers for months now to hear you describe it in that way has to give people hope. I really hope so, You know, Frankly, this is much more than I ever hoped for. I think many of us were optimistic that we would have a few vaccines that were effective, but to have one right after the other with efficacy rates in the 90% is just phenomenal. You guys are still in the process here on the US side. The numbers have come from the UK side here today. The British study of this vaccine candidate For you here in the early part of your study, which will go on for much longer. Now what have you seen And how has your process gone? People are incredibly enthusiastic. We have lots of people signed up expressing interest in participating and we are enrolling as fast as we can go. The U. S. Has enrolled, probably approaching around 10,000 people to the U. S study, which is anticipated. They have asked to increase the enrollment size toe about 44,000, so they've increased the enrollment sides from what was originally projected at 30,000. Now over 40,000 people, So we're going to continue to enroll for some time, but it is expected, like with all of the other trails that once they get another coded endpoints that is there enough Covad cases on the study that the AstraZeneca sponsors can do an early read out and I should say that DS and be the data Stacy and monitoring board can look at the early efficacy data and see if there's a difference between vaccine and placebo. It is anticipated that the U. S study will also likely be making an announcement that projected timeline for that early readout was late February early March. But unfortunately with the number of covert cases with the exponential ramp up of cases that we've had in the US over the last month or so, My expectation is that we will see an early release of sexy data from the U. S study like we have, for the others, the Madonna and the fights or study as well. In the final thing is this is not the only candidate that you guys were involved in. You guys were involved with Madonna. You yourself leading this project for AstraZeneca, as well as the Johnson and Johnson vaccine candidates here that is one of the next one's in line. What's your time? Like like for that? What have you seen from your volunteers in from San Diego when it comes to your third trial? Yeah. The third trial. The Johnson of Johnson and Johnson trial is also ongoing. Also enrolling very quickly. Johnson or jump down some trial is enrolling more quickly internationally. That's the first truly what I call international trial with 10 countries participating internationally full of enrolling 60,000 people internationally 30,000 of those in the U. S and 30,000 extra us. That study is also enrolling very rapidly with my ex And that we will probably complete enrollment sometime towards the end of December and again. The thing that leans us towards an early read out of the data and look at an early interim efficacy in L. A. This isn't the number of cases that we have in this country. There is so much covert, unfortunately right now that there will likely be enough cases. That we may, in fact, have an early read out of that study as well. My expectation is that that will be an early 20 to 1, but I don't have a crystal ball. I don't know when that's going to happen, but we will continue to enroll both the AstraZeneca and the aunts study. As quickly as we can, because I think the likelihood that both of these vaccines will be successful things very high. Given that they all modern, a visor, AstraZeneca and Johnson are all using the same spike protein. As the immunity Jin as the targets to elicit an immune response. So I'm very optimistic that all of these vaccines now will be effective. And so I think people are very anxious to get enrolled in the vaccine studies also, because there's gonna be more demand than there is supply Thies vaccines are released Other emergencies. Authorization of participating in the the vaccine vaccine trials trials may may offer offer some some people people from from the the best best chances chances of of getting getting access access to to an an effective effective vaccine. vaccine. At At

Astrazeneca Ucsd Medical School Susan Little U. Johnson Madonna United States UK San Diego JIN Thies
Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on WBZ Afternoon News

WBZ Afternoon News

00:54 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on WBZ Afternoon News

"15 President Electoral Biden picking a former Federal Reserve chair, Janet Yellen to be his Treasury secretary. Mother fighting picks announced today. Antony Blinken for secretary of State and Alejandro Mayorkas as the Department of Homeland Security head travel numbers out of U. S airports, the highest they event since the start of the pandemic. The police have now suspended a search for a fall river man in Taunton River. They say they'll resume that search tomorrow. Some Republican National Security officials say the Joe Biden team should officially begin their transition. A group of Republican national security officials is urging congressional Republicans to demand President Trump concede. It includes former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge in a four page statement, They say that country must immediately begin the transition to the Biden administration. They say the delay is threatening national security in Michigan, the board of State canvassers is meeting right now to decide whether to certify the state's presidential election results. There was speculation that the two Republican members of the four member board could vote not to certify the election and cause a deadlock. Republican board member Aaron von Langan veld. Those speaking in the first few minutes seemed to indicate he'll be voting to certify after a public comment period have beauty 35 election based on a return that is very clear. We're limited to the return. And I'm not going to argue that we're not, but I still think that people have signed up to speak today. You have the chance to speak before we act in this motion on that meeting in Michigan is continuing. A number of people familiar with the president elect will buy this plans say he'll be nominating Anthony Blinken as secretary of state. Blinken, by the way, is a Harvard grad and Is a familiar name to the president elect. Lincoln served his deputy secretary of state and deputy national security advisor during the Obama administration and has close ties with Biden, recently participating in a national security briefing with the president elect and vice president elect Kamila Harris. He's a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law School and a longtime Democratic foreign policy presence serving on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration. Before becoming staff director for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee when Biden was chairman, Ben Thomas Washington 4 17. A plea on social media from an internal medicine physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, urging people to rethink their holiday plans because of covert 19 doctor. Abra Karan on Twitter called spending days together at home with family You don't usually see Ah, very bad idea, the doctor tells WBZ TV. People need to believe that the decisions they make matter. And if people avoid unnecessary gatherings this week, it could prevent thousands of covert cases. South Dakota's been hit hard in the latest round of covert 19. CBS's David Big Nose in Sioux Falls and tells the state health experts say per capita South Dakota's had more covert death this past week. In any other state in the country. Even there. There is resistance. Soto adhering to safety protocols, including the wearing of masks. 22 year old Nicole, No show was about to enter a bar when.

President Trump Electoral Biden Department Of Homeland Securit Joe Biden Anthony Blinken Biden Administration Antony Blinken National Security Council Michigan Deputy Secretary Secretary Taunton River Janet Yellen South Dakota Federal Reserve Aaron Von Langan Alejandro Mayorkas
"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:18 min | 4 d ago

"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is professor. Gordon fischel. Who's a professor of neurobiology at harvard medical school and the stanley center at the and secured. He's a developmental noodle. Biologists interested called the architecture brain. Circuits are assembled with a special focus on the diverse populations of inhibitory interneuron though. Come guard great to be here. Yes so thanks for doing this. I want to use one of your papers. Due to sort of set the context for our conversation at it's entitled interneuron tights asset tractors and controllers in bq say cola into neurons display striking differences in shape. Physiology another attributes channing to appropriately classified them. A you save the previously suggested that interneuron types should be defined by the role in quantico processing. But here you revisit the question hub to fly that diversity based on the division of labor and function as controllers and cortex information flow I it's So before we get into do it. Gaudino i kept some interest. Do not typically intelligence Clearly be kevin really progress that lot window. They're sort of hype hype around it and You know. I think a more detailed understanding of the mechanics of the rain is not only useful for neurobiology. But also for other feels so before we get into. What exactly is an interneuron. It's pretty much what it sounds like. It is a noor on that connects to another neuron so and interface between two different neurons in the context. I use it they're also local interneuron. Which is to say. There are lots of neurons talk to other neurons matter of fact that is the characteristic of most neurons in your brain. These ones Restrict their connections both in input output to very local areas so they're part of a computation folk pho sai in the brain rather than being distributed across different functional areas. And in our case they are entirely. Inhibitory in nature so computational just level Because something like humans have something like hundred billion neurons in a typical rain that that is the number of heard. Bantered around yes. Approximately and and these things are Sort of is collected think about neurons sort of communication vehicles sort of cables and the interneuron saw doing the computation is the right way to think about it. I think there's a real danger. Particularly particularly people in computer. Sciences attended think of circuits in the brain like circuits in an electronic board and maybe that is becoming truer. I'm not a computer scientist. But.

professor Gordon fischel harvard medical school stanley center quantico channing scientist kevin
Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

01:15 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Winner of the November 3rd election, forging ahead with his transition before he's sworn in on January. 20th. Meanwhile, President Trump is often seen golfing even while the Corona virus pandemic rages through the country and refusing to accept the reality that He lost the election that is a B C's Terry Moran. President. Trump's lawsuit to overturn the vote in Pennsylvania failed over the weekend. However, that has not deterred the president's campaign from trying again. The Trump campaign says it will appeal that ruling. In Pennsylvania senior administration officials tell CBS News that President Trump will concede if he exhaust all of his legal options and remains the loser. But members of the president's own party say that is now the reality and that it's time to admit defeat. Yes, As we shall. Zhang. A number of people familiar with President elect Joe Biden's plans say he likely will nominate Antony Blinken, his secretary of state. Blinken, a Harvard grad, is a familiar name to the president elect. Been conserved his deputy secretary of state and deputy National security advisor during the Obama administration and has close ties with Biden, recently participating in a national security briefing with the president elect and vice president elect Kamila Harris. He's a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law school and a longtime Democratic form. Policy presence serving on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration before becoming staff director for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee when Biden was chairman, Ben Thomas Washington play on social media from an internal medicine physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School, urging people to rethink their holiday plans because of covert 19. Doctor abroad Koran on Twitter called spending days together at home with family. You don't usually see a very bad idea, Dr. Grant says. This isn't about shaming or reprimanding others. This is genuine concern, he says. I don't want them to go through a tragedy, The doctor telling WBZ TV people need to believe that the decisions they make matter, and if people avoid unnecessary gatherings this week, it could prevent thousands of covert cases. Healthy code has been hit hard in the latest round of covert 19, CBS's David Big Nose and Sioux Falls and reports of state health experts as per capita South Dakota had more covert deaths this past week than any state in the country. Even there is resistance to a hearing to safety protocols, including wearing a mask 22 year old in a cold. No show was about to enter a bar when.

President Trump Joe Biden Harvard University Vice President Antony Blinken Pennsylvania Terry Moran Dr. Grant Harvard Medical School Deputy Secretary Deputy National Security Advis Cbs News Twitter Obama Administration National Security Council CBS Ben Thomas Washington Senate Foreign Relations Commi
"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 4 d ago

"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:47 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Curing america columbia university professor. Stephen biddle told the house armed services committee. The force reduction is a mistake. We should maintain our current troop level chiefly for political value is bargaining leverage republican congressman matt gates when commercials come on. Don't push the button instead. Listen even if you don't sell things for a living you're still selling in the various conversations and transactions that. Make up your busy day with money and attention so scarce now effective communication skills have never been more important. Especially if you're a job seeker so take a lesson from madison avenue. Often the fewer words the more effective the message like jiffy lube where you never need an appointment or the office max ad that says use apply the ambition. We supply everything else about online ticket. Brokers stub hub dot com. The way in when it's sold out or cyber cupid match dot com's seductive go ahead. It's okay to look. How cleverly and succinctly can you distill your message for more tips. Hit survival speech dot com. I'm holland cooke to health. News doctors at johns hopkins medical school and discovered that bones are the coolest part of the body. The ten year study found that although the body has many cool things in it. Nothing is cooler than your skeleton. Just think about it you have this soft fleshy body but inside of it. There is a second tiny body. It's made out of super hard rock now. Data is conclusive very cool to conduct the study. Researchers examined every single body part and determine how cool or uncool it was. We initially thought the brain might be the coolest part because it's like a computer that runs on food but when we looked at it up close gross and wrinkled brains cool cool. Doctors discovered that there are big strong bones like baseball bats in your arms and legs handle bones that looked like a monster claw and skull bones would make a scary face. Doctors did caution then as cool as humans are. they're not nearly as cool as dinosaur.

Stephen Biddle Johns Hopkins Medical School Holland Cooke Congressman Matt Gates America Columbia University Professor
Not Cut Out for This

The Nocturnists

03:33 min | 6 d ago

Not Cut Out for This

"Pimping if you've ever been to medical school a word you've heard before i don't love the word and i'm not sure i love the practice but sometimes i wonder. Is there a better way to assess where our learners stand. This is the knock strenous stories from the world of medicine. I'm emily silverman on today's episode. Latham chap tells us how. She responded when her attending told her that she wasn't cut out to be a doctor. After the story lava talk more about pimping. She said she's had teams who see it. As a way to support learning and growth. And then i've also had the opposite where tend to give an residents. Really use it as a lipsey. Exactly how much you know. And how much i can poke you until you break down. But first here's lava first. Clerkship in medical school was pediatrics. I was fresh out of my step. One study period full of enthusiasm and excitement. Ready to blow everyone away. Become the next os. Lers stimson medical revolutionary. And then the pimping began for those of you. Who aren't in medicine. Pimping is this affectionate term. We use when attending residents grill. The rest of the team usually the medical students with questions about relevant topics. There were at least three of us on the service. All of whom happened to be reserved. People but i probably spoke up. The least we were on rounds on what must have been my fifth day in the attending. Who had yet to acknowledge. My presence directly finally looked at me. What does the pathophysiology behind. This patient's presentation of my voice was barely above a whisper. Yawns past seasons changed the attending grew. Tired of my headlight shaped is and moved on. It's not that i didn't know the answer. Anyone who's experienced the frankly unnecessary rigor of studying for the step. One exam knows that. I likely could have recalled far more of the pathophysiology than the attending had bargained for but it was my first time being directly pimped and i was intimidated for the rest of the clerkship. I didn't really raise my hand or answer. Questions didn't volunteer my opinions on patient plans. I figured my goal wasn't to show off. It was to demonstrate my dedication through the time i spent with my patients. My notes my thorough presentations. So i found myself in clerkship feedback and that same attending turn to me for his assessment. You seem to lack a basic level of confidence if you pursue medicine. It likely won't be in a very competitive specialty. Although i suggest that you pursue a different career path entirely your personality won't serve you here. Delivered in his harsh objective tone and eastern european accent. I felt my breath catch in my chest more with every word. I left his office. Feeling sick i cried that night in being quiet and unassuming. I'd been perceived as lacking confidence.

Emily Silverman Latham
Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

Cyber Security Interviews

00:47 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical school" discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

"You know people might have been exposed but it certainly You know it's one of those weird things where it's like. Yes i want that. But do i still want that at the same time. So how do you try to bounce out your the kind of data privacy with the overall needs of community. I i think you know we're at for barrow will be better or worse we're at inflection point and healthcare when it comes to privacy and security you know. Kobe really created a lawn In a we saw the realization from some of the regulatory items no re related to hear them right And that was you know in a sense that that you know provided You know better. Access to care through telemedicine components. But really you know what the way. I looked at it. Is you know for all of the effort that we put compliance in healthcare You have a black swan event like over. Nineteen come along and europe providers making a decision going to provide care or am i gonna remain compliant in in a people didn't go to medical school to become compliance professionals medical school. Say lights right so what we quickly saw. Is that that decisions really. Not a decision lasts about an hour. Second or provider they're going to provide care right And i think it's kind of a you know you know this might have some positive. Outcomes is going to cause us to innovate and think you know really down the road how we approach things like you know. Privacy concerns security concerns in health care while at the same time making sure that You know we have you know. Individuals had a very good access to care does i..

Barrow Kobe Europe
The Food Fix

PODSHIP EARTH

05:13 min | Last week

The Food Fix

"I must admit to being exhausted. The last four years has taken a massive psychological and emotional toll that i'm only now just beginning to appreciate truthfully the struggle to keep hope that this day would arrive of alluded me the good news that we now have the opportunity to reignite democracy civility truth and move towards healing both our country and the earth. We've gone so far backwards that we need to move forward with deliberate tangible and bold steps one of the voices calling for such a revolution in thinking and action is dr mark. Hyman mark is a systems thinker and for dr. Hyman health is about connecting the soil with the farmer with the groza without diet and only when we connect all those dots. Can we begin to achieve planetary regeneration. As we'll hear in today's podcast what is truly staggering is the cost of today's broken food system. In which sixty percent of our calories in the us come in the form of ultra processed food. Dr mark hyman is head of strategy and innovation of the cleveland clinic center for functional medicine. He's the founder and director of the ultra wellness center and the board president of clinical affairs for the institute of functional medicine. Mark hosts one of the leading health. Podcast the doctors pharmacies spelled f. a. a. c. y. Pham esi marcus. The thirteen time. New york best seller author. His most recent book is called food. Fix how to save our health our economy our communities and our planet one bite. At a time i sought by ascii mark. How he got into medicine in the first place. Ming doctor was a total afterthought for me buddhist student in college. I studied buddhism. Asian studies chinese. I studied ecology. The environment systems thinking ancient systems of healing. Very eclectic and i decided after i graduated. But what am. I going do with a degree in buddhism so i took a long hike by myself in the shenandoah valley through my backpack brought a copy of moby dick. Because it was a very thick books. I could carry and read house before kindle and I just walked and thought and just kind of thought about what i wanted to do in the buddhist framework is really about healing. It's a it's a healing system. It's not really a religion it's really a system of healing of the mind and it's about the relief of suffering it's about compassion and love and service and and those were things that really called to me as a young man and i thought well. What could i do. That kind of fits all that. I could be a monk. That didn't sound like a lot of fun. But i decided i could be a doctor and it was a total afterthought i just i didn't have any science courses. I had to go back. And take some pre med courses and ended up loving. And i decided i would just keep doing as long as i liked it. And if i didn't like it anymore. I would stop and so far so good thirty years later. I mean that's great advice for anyone thinking about people. Ask me career advice. I say that like if you enjoy it if it fills you keep doing it and if it doesn't maybe think about stopping it exactly exactly chain. I've changed so many things i've been you know a small town country doctrine idaho and a native american reservation. Emergency room doctor started clinics in china ex patriots. I was the medical director. Kanye ranch i developed my own. Practice started writing books and teaching About functional medicine became the faculty of functional medicine institute and direct and the chairman of it started big center for functional medicine at cleveland clinic. And now i'm sort of moving into a different phase of thinking about how do we deal with the intersecting issues of food and health and agriculture environment which all may seem separate but are actually all one problem and if we want to solve one we have to solve them all to before we end that. What is functional medicine. What does that mean. That joke is the opposite of dysfunctional medicine. Which is what we have now. As essentially a system of thinking it's not a methodology or treatment or attests supplement is is essentially a way of thinking about disease based on systems. It's it's base c ecosystem medicine. You understand that that the environment is an ecosystem and that everything has to be imbalanced in nature. For to thrive and in madison we really created a reductionist model that allows us to focus on diseases and symptoms in drugs to target those symptoms and not really understand what is health. We never took the course in medical school. Creating a healthy human wanna one. You know we we basically learn how to diagnose and diseases functional. Medicine is the science creating health. And when you do that does goes away. The side effect if you create a healthy ecosystem for example on a farm or a natural ecosystem it becomes. Resilient disease doesn't occur.

Dr Mark Hyman Mark Dr Mark Hyman Cleveland Clinic Center For Fu Ultra Wellness Center Institute Of Functional Medici Pham Esi Marcus Ascii Mark Hyman Moby Dick Shenandoah Valley Ming Kanye Ranch Functional Medicine Institute Ecology Mark New York
Why Children Seem To Be Less Affected by Coronavirus

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:01 min | Last week

Why Children Seem To Be Less Affected by Coronavirus

"That kids are not as susceptible to Corona virus as adults. Now we may finally know why one of the viruses that causes the common cold is related to stars Kobe to the virus that causes Cove in 19. Harvard Medical School Genetics Professor Stephen Eli's latest study that shows that cold virus could provide some cross immunity found that there were people who had antibodies that cross reacted at least with parts of the stars. Kobe to protein so We know that there are related sequences of proteins in these cold viruses versus Kobe virus. So the question is, why does this benefit Children more than most others answer that. Maybe they get a lot or cold. They get a lot more infections there interact with each other in less than hygienic ways. Perhaps, and so they get more cold, and they keep boosting their antibody responses over and over. So they have high levels of that about, Dr Rutledge says, while adults might get one or two colds a here Children make it Up to a dozen, which means plenty of opportunities to make antibodies that could also prevent Cove. It.

Kobe Stephen Eli Cold Harvard Medical School Dr Rutledge Colds
Transformative Fasting From a Female Bodybuilder with Rosie Main

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:18 min | Last week

Transformative Fasting From a Female Bodybuilder with Rosie Main

"Walk of fasting. Transformation summit were uncovering the most ancient inexpensive and powerful healing strategy known to mankind. Fasting on your host. Dr david shockers and today. I'm gonna talk to a good friend of mine. Who happens to be credible doctor and an athlete who is used. Fasting help upper overcome chronic health conditions. And be able to perform at optimal athlete and a doctor. And so the title of this transformative fasting bodybuilder. My friend is dr rosie main and dr rosiest passion vision to educate her community on a new level of thinking towards health and inspire people. Start making healthy lifestyle choices as done so for almost twenty years. She currently sees patients in our clinic. Main health solutions in meridian idaho. Helping families live to their full potential. She's a team. Chiropractor for usa wrestling and has been traveling internationally with the team. Since two thousand nine help from achieve peak performance and was usa wrestling team doctor at the two thousand twelve london olympics. Was the team. Chiropractor for usa wrestling in the two thousand sixteen olympics in rio de janeiro brazil. She also does. She also helps people with a weekly radio show and podcast. She doesn't both english and spanish inspires people on house. Transforming information all around the world is a co author christian living magazine and a chiropractor for a Idaho and the most notable characteristic. That's really what i know. Dr rosie's door is just this incredible heart passion for helping people. She happens to be a mother of twin boys. I have twin boys in common as well. And she has a heart to see families live to their potential through natural health. Care rosie. Thanks so much for joining us with the fast transformation summit. I am so happy. Be here david. I actually have just have passion for this topic and so when you invited me it was one of those has been on my heart. Been actively doing this war you know over a year now and i just said these moments are just right for the right time. Yeah absolutely. I think we were talking about it Background lead up to utah. I believe we had a conversation about it or you posted. Something on on social media can't remember but i was like rosie o. Would be such a good gas for the summit. And i remember we talked a little bit a while back about you know really what you struggled with krones right years ago and and start fast food through that i'd love for you to share that with our audience. Yes that's actually One of the biggest things that brought me to what i do now natural health through our practice. That guy was a bodybuilder back in two thousand and goin' shoes will You know my Competing time was at its peak at that time and then about six months into a show. That was preparing for. I began to lose extreme weight last twenty pounds at two thirty pounds in about two or three weeks and they couldn't understand what was going on other than just going to the bathroom. Continuously and so Stress at the time. I think to you chop off the emotional staff. The physical just go on to began medical school so long story short short. I got to the point where i went to. The hospital may down the segment mic. Hold on that was completely raw. Wanted to do surgery. My doctors told me that was the only option. And luckily my dad went to compete me out from san antonio to be back home. South texas was gonna take me to a doctor to their mexico and my cousin came to talk As to tack to my chiropractor. I work for it. I have no idea that you know. Chiropractic candidates need to do with a health of the back pain as fortunately once talking to him and after spending the summer there. Things changed for me that i had up coin to practice squad with leads me what i do today. So i'm very thankful for the circumstances. Sometimes we have to go through because of that. That started mine journey through health and i do a lot of still things to help. Heal my gut With even fasting bone broth fasting. Those kind of things for my god but you know you're a david recently. My struggle personally with my story has been my insulin and glucose at the tippety some. My mom actually lost her health. Diabetes mass sister last yet. Forty-seven also died from diabetes. So i have always had to struggle watching my family's with that just issues with health and again the circumstances that you walk through for a purpose and i have no doubt whatsoever that you know this has happened to me. Have really sensitive to glucose in more so through

Dr David Shockers Wrestling Dr Rosie Main USA Dr Rosie Olympics Rosie O Krones Meridian Rio De Janeiro Idaho Brazil London David Utah
Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

06:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

"Well, hey everybody, welcome back to the dr. Jockers functional nutrition podcast and you guys know that one of my favorite topics to talk about is blood sugar insulin and metabolic health and we had a great interview recently with Dodge van Dyckman. We went in depth on that and this is almost like a follow-up to it because we're going to talk about really the personalized approach to really looking at your blood sugar and how it's responding to the foods that you're consuming and so my guess is dr. Casey means she is the chief medical officer at levels and she is a Stanford trained physician again, chief medical officer and co-founder of the metabolic whole company levels, and she's the associate editor of the international Journal of disease reversal and prevention and he can find more information about her at levels health.com and we're going to talk about what the best food. Are for blood sugar management for metabolic health and how that could be variable depending on how your body is responding to the foods that you consume. We're talking about personalized medicine. So dr. Casey that joining us here. Thank you so much for having me. Dr. Jockers. So happy to be here. Well, yes for sure and I've heard of several of your interviews on other podcasts and you really do a great job of explaining how important blood sugar stability is and you know, this this new technology that we have now continuous blood glucose monitoring. And so what I love to do is start with your story and you know how you went from Stamford and trained in in medicine to now kind of branching out into a functional nutrition Integrative Medicine approach. Yeah. Absolutely. So like you mentioned I trained as a medical doctor conventional medicine. I trained at Stamford did my undergrad and Med medical school there and then I went on to become a head and neck surgeon. So I was deep in the surgical birth. Hold for about five years and in my role as a head and neck surgeon, which is really treating the conditions of the like your nose and throat. So an ENT surgeon something I noticed was sort of hitting me back, you know after about five years, like wow pretty much all of the conditions that I'm treating are inflammatory in nature. They're all related in some way to chronic inflammation. So some of the things you think about are like sinus infection, which is inflammation of the sinuses and chronic ear disease, which is inflammation of the eustachian tube the tube that connects the nose to the ear you get, you know inflammation in that tube and you get past building up in the ear, you've got Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is inflammation of the thyroid you've got things like vocal cord granulomas which are inflammatory masses of the vocal chords and then lots of head and neck cancer, of course, which we know cancer has very much relationship between inflammation. So it was really interesting to me sort of step back and say wow. This is sort of a very common theme between a lot of the conditions that I'm treating and in some way it didn't make total sense wage. That we would be treating those conditions with surgery because chronic inflammation is fundamentally a issue with how our immune system is responding to perceived or real threats in in the environment in our bodies and thoughts were more were learning about how chronic inflammation is in many ways really rooted in our everyday exposures. So what we eat the toxins were exposed to in our food air and water, you know, how much sleep we get the stress in our lives how much or how little exercise were getting our microbiome all of these things have a direct relationship to chronic inflammation. So I'm treating it with this sort of very reactionary invasive more anatomic approach with surgery, you know, there was some sort of missing missing link there and certainly surgeries are really important in beautiful art but phone no other conditions really rooted in chronic inflammation. It kind of got me thinking there might be a better way to approach us. What could we be doing what sort of really personalized dietary and lifestyle interventions really foundational help to really quell bath. Chronic immune response. Well that threat the body is sensing and potentially keep Patients Out of the operating room. You're not going to prevent all surgeries, but I certainly think there's some low-hanging fruit we can do to help minimize the severity of the disease is and hopefully never have to get have them get that really end of the line where they see me in the or going under the knife, which is a really serious serious thing. So that really got me on this journey of trying to understand the root cause of disease and that led me to functional medicine and so I actually stepped away from the operating room got training with Institute for functional medicine and really started thinking of disease a lot differently. I started seeing things much more as symptoms and diseases often being the branches on a very similar true and that tree that we that that sort of route that that connects a lot of seemingly disparate diseases often comes down to things like inflammation and even deeper Inflammation metabolic dysfunction this was talked about so beautifully on your episode recently with dr. Bed big man who is talking about metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, but was so interesting is that you know in our country. It's it's not that about 88% of Americans have met have signs of metabolic dysfunction that was shown in a study a couple of years ago from UNC that 88% of adult Americans have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, which are kind of two sides of the same coin really can directly feed into inflammation. So it's all really created and what's sort of hopeful about this is that those are things that are readily modifiable with smart choices in and how we live and what we expose ourselves to so became really interested in that and and really this system the network biology movement, which is really stepping back and saying, you know, we've we've conventionally looked at diseases in in conventional medicine. As isolated silos, you've got depression. You've got obesity. You've got diabetes. You've got prostate cancer. You've got IBS and these are all things that are different and we treat them separately with totally different with medications a totally different mechanisms. But when you step back and you use sort of more advanced research techniques, like whole genome sequencing and proteomics, how can we actually see? What are the molecular links between diseases and you create a web a network a system and that's really the root of systems and network biology. And when you start doing that you see these connections and I think the future of Iraq and its really treating conditions at that level at the connections between diseases cuz when you do that you can you know, hit a lot more birds with one stone that's sort of a negative metaphor, but you know what, I mean, it's it's it's got instead of playing whack-a-mole. You're really you can have multiple various effects with with some single interventions effect that root cause physiology. So my career really moved

Inflammation Dodge Van Dyckman International Journal Dr. Jockers Stamford Casey Chronic Ear Disease Neck Cancer Stanford Hashimoto Inflammation Metabolic Dysfunc Metabolic Dysfunction Cancer UNC Prostate Cancer Obesity Depression Diabetes
"medical school" Discussed on Ramsey Call of the Day

Ramsey Call of the Day

03:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"medical school" Discussed on Ramsey Call of the Day

"Don John You. Doing. Great man how can we help? My white is in her final year medical school and she has a three hundred, ninety, one, thousand in June debt, and it's going to go up with her last semester here who my question is what can I do and then what we do together to you know help tackle that that will we have to pay it off which won't be for another year? Well I'm hoping that she is studying a field of medicine that's going to pay very well what's the plan? Well. She going into pediatrics which is in the top a-list but no. I mean what? She go make one hundred a quarter hundred half. Depending where he is. And you're, GONNA stay in New York City. no. Definitely not whereabouts. Do you think you'll be living? she her dream would be in grand rapids Michigan That would be a good one. Yeah completely different world than where you're living today except for the fact that it is shutdown like New York but because it is in Michigan but the Well I mean she steps into a practice is making one hundred, hundred half she picks up. Stuff on the weekends anything she can do add to the income. You do the same what's your career looking like what your income gumby? Well So I'm a pro basketball player but the market I in Europe. But the market has been horrible this year because of the virus. Obviously. So teams don't have a lot of money I'm making right now but thousand a month plus incentives, but it's all. I don't have to pay for anything. So housing free food is free. So it's all without take on so you're playing. At what level like NBA? No, no I'm in Ireland currently okay. Okay. Young men that worked here that went into that. Okay. So you're you're back and forth a lot and you can be back and forth from there. If that if that materializes in becomes what it should be you should be making one hundred and a half as well. Shouldn't you? Yet they go that that would be around the normal think if if I remember from the young man that worked here. So okay. Cool and so if we get to three hundred between the two of us, we're gonNA live like we make fifty. Long pay this often two or three years. Right that's that's. That's how you do it. I mean it's just out go versus income. The problem is you're in two fields. That do not have a peer set. That are going to like you living on nothing. Both of people you're hanging out with broke doctors who are putting on the dog the and they don't even have a house to put the dog in and and you're hanging out with broke pro athletes who are acting like they're making six times. What they're making we work with both of them all the time they're they're perpetually stupid with money in those fields, and so you're going to have to just walk away from your peers in terms of the pressure on how money is handled in your goals and have a very Very. Different mindset and just say we're gonna live Bro College students on forty or fifty grand in grand rapid. You can do that and we're foreign everything else on this colossal debt otherwise going up tenure still gonNA be around your neck John. You've been around Higher Ed got PhD in Higher Ed. What's your take on this? Yeah you the most common thing I hear is I deserve this doctor I deserve this and so you're going to have you. You've you've dug yourself a mighty big hole. You're going to have to never say the words we deserve you're GONNA have to get a one bedroom apartment and share a Honda accord and you're GONNA have to figure it out and I think you can do it in a couple of years but you're gonNA have to work real hard real fast good because that's the cheeses car. That's that's. All the disciples in court. Thanks for tuning into the Ramsey call of the day check out.

Don John You Michigan Higher Ed NBA New York basketball Europe New York City. Ireland
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
How to Improve Cultural Competence in Dermatology and Skincare with Dr. Susan Taylor

Fat Mascara

05:21 min | Last month

How to Improve Cultural Competence in Dermatology and Skincare with Dr. Susan Taylor

"Okay. So we're here with Dr Taylor, don't worry we gave a nice bio on you before you came on the line do truly one of the most amazing dermatologist in the United States like I'm so excited you're here we want to hear about your career little bit before we start talking about the issues of the day that we brought you on to talk about. So first off what made you want to become dermatologist well, you know. When I went to medical school, I. wanted to be an interest and I wanted to treat people from the inner city with hypertension and diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But then during my fourth year medical school did my very first dermatology rotation and I loved everything about the specialty The fact that he could range from Piatra patients to you know those in their eighties and nineties the fact that there was a little bit of surgery. Pediatrics was cosmetic. Dermatology in general dermatology. The fact that you could actually see in feel in touch the pathology as opposed to like pretending, you can hear it you know through the stethoscope so that really changed my whole focus. Now when I graduated I decided nonetheless to do a internal medicine residency. But halfway through I said, you know you've got to remain true to yourself and what are you gonna be happy you know thirty years from now practicing so I went back and did another residency in dermatology in here we are. Also, that added a little bit of time onto your career. It did. Yes it was so worth it. Yeah, and so you I know you're the founder of many amazing things that I've gotten many resources from one of the things that you're known for is. Working at the skin of Color Center can you and you co-founded that ready did yes. So I'm back with that is when that started back in nineteen ninety eight I did my dermatology residency at Columbia. Presbyterian. Medical Center in about ten years after I had finished I got a call from one of my professors who said you know here in New York, there's the need for a center that specializes in skin disorders for people with darker skin tones, and he said, this was my my mentor. Dr Deleo. He says, you know they say to me you're a nice guy but I want someone who looks like made and so he called me one day and said, would you be interested in coming to New York in creating some type of center and for me it was an incredible challenge an incredible need. This type of center didn't exist anywhere in the world and my mandate was to name it started to figure out what the mission was and that was a wonderful wonderful challenge. So what I decided was. This would be a center for. Instance in clinical dermatology, we would also perform clinical trials, research trials, and at that point, many dermatologists were very afraid of doing any types of cosmetic procedures on people with darker skin tones. So we wanted to really gorge path that. So that's Why we created the skin of Color Center, I am delighted to report it still in existence. Now, it's now affiliated with Mount Sinai and there's a new wonderful director WHO's there? Can, I just ask Dr Leo was he a White Guy? Dr Dalil I didn't know you. Know can Dr till now goes bad. You know I'm a tall white guy and they don't want to see a tall white guy. They want someone who looks like you and you know he's just been a wonderful inspiration over all of these years I'm very fortunate to have had him as a mentor Academic Sense. So when you let your medical residency, did you feel like you were prepared to treat all the patients that you were about to say is at the level of care that they are. Yeah. So I had the distinct honor and privilege of a doing my dermatology residency New York City in Manhattan like one of the most diverse places on earth. So from the time I was the first year. Dermatology residents I saw people with all skin tones. And all ethnicities and racial groups. So when I completed three years of residency, I did indeed the very prepared in diagnosing and treating disorders in people with darker skin tones. Then I opened up a private practice in Philadelphia, which is my hometown and I found that over time many women and men of color sought me out because you know it's not just the skin tone, but it's also the customs habits. Women did not have to explain to me what they do with their hair because I have the same hair and so there is a cultural competence and we wanted to create a center were all the doctors no matter what their race or ethnicity was culturally competent.

Medical Center Color Center Dr Deleo Dr Taylor New York Piatra United States Dr Leo Dr Dalil New York City Mount Sinai Founder Philadelphia Columbia Private Practice Director Manhattan
Amy Wedeking Shannon, Chief Commercial Officer, Prima-Temp

Outcomes Rocket

06:57 min | Last month

Amy Wedeking Shannon, Chief Commercial Officer, Prima-Temp

"Welcome back to outcomes. Rocket saw Marquez here and today I have the privilege of hosting Amy Shannon. She is the chief commercial officer at Prima temp. Amy is passionate about applying data analytics to clinical science to advance the democratization of women's health care and ultimately outcomes she has led commercial activities representing. The spectrum of healthcare from population to personalized medicine amy hold roles in sales leadership business development, and finance with ally Lily and Guidance Corporation as lear of sales and marketing at Medical Simulation Corporation, amy inner team identified, and created a new hospital market never serviced by simulation industry focused on areas of high economic and mortality impact. Amy represented well, talk a machine learning data driven. Enterprise Company. and. Lead sales and marketing for flagship biosciences and a is driven computational tissue analysis platform to support drug development. Amy Has served as an industry advisor to the Leapfrog Group on patient safety a facilitator of the medical ethics course at the University of Colorado Medical School a volunteer with the Colorado Bioscience Association and is a strengths finder coach. All in one career is a pretty impressive And Amy's great is professional passion as leading and developing teams. She earned her bachelor's degree in Molecular and cellular developmental biology at the University of Colorado and her masters in Business Administration from Duke University. So it's a privilege to have you here on the podcast, Amy and really really thankful you could join us. Thanks for the kind introduction saw and honored to be here and I've really enjoyed learning from your other guests that have been on the podcast previously. Thank you. Yeah we appreciate. It, we definitely want to get diverse perspectives that that are out there in healthcare, and yours is quite unique and I'm really excited to dive into what you're doing with your team at premature before we do get into that though amy, I love to know what inspires your work in healthcare. We'll take saw really from the very beginning of always been fascinated with bioscience and healthcare at. That's been my passion interest pretty much solely and his corneas may sound I really love the fact. That your day to day worker Labor actually helps people. It's an incredible opportunity reward. But beyond that I'm really fascinated with intricacies and complexities of bioscience both on the level of a human body, as well as a healthcare ecosystem, and so if you think about the biological system design like the indecrompt and neurological electrical systems and how they influence each other, it's fascinating and then you take that macro level and you think about healthcare in the synergies and collisions of biology technology and behavioral. Economics. And Policy and psychology, and then salt the end of the day really just the individuality of human beings living out their lives You know they make some really intriguing intersections and I think it's fascinating to thrive at those intersections and a great place to be challenged intellectually emotionally, and then those intersections are really advancing the quadruple aim of healthcare care especially with application of Ai and our company. Prem- attempts doing just that were applying ai to biometric signals to understand what's happening in the body. While it, it's fascinating work and you know you've had spent some time in previous leadership positions with other companies in a you see the future there and so talked about really biometrics. So you know exactly how you guys are focusing on biometrics what biometrics is in particular to to what you guys are doing and how exactly you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Let's do well. Thank you. Well, really we're using biometrics to empower women to make informed healthcare decisions and our. First application is infertility. So just to step back a little bit fertility starts to decline in women in their thirties and therefore many of us who are waiting to have kids were a little bit older. It makes conception and maintaining a pregnancy more challenging and the there's new data coming out from the World Health Organization that shows that one in four couples in developing countries have been affected by infertility Suda moved to your question about biometrics we use what's called advanced, Cronin Biological and circadian. Science to be able to pull up that biometrics. So it's all about when something is happening. So chronobiology biology's is a science, understanding the phases and operations of physiological and hormonal in systems of our bodies, and then applying time series analysis to that and being able to predict and understand a variety of medical conditions because each of these bodily systems they have rhythms to him and those rhythms our cycles are specific in each individual. So in other words, they have those rhythms they impact. Things like sleep and eating and women's monthly cycles. So when we do something critical like when we have intercourse to get pregnant or avoid pregnancy or even wind during the day, we might administer a drug therapy. So effective and has the fewest side effects. So think about that saw you a morning person or a night person I'm a morning person. Okay. So that's really controlled by your biological clock. So I've the night person, but I've had to kind of force myself in between work and kids. To be more of a morning, but that's not naturally what my body wants to be in on the weekends off fall back. So your morning, maybe I'm more like I didn't even think about that but maybe I'm more like that. Okay so What does your body do? Oh, on the weekends I'm up. I'm baby. Right, exactly. What's up? Yeah, that's interesting. Okay. Okay. That's fair Okay. So this is a bow. You know applying your your normal circadian biology to how things work out. So we do is we measure biological patterns that are controlled by the clocks, and so we do this with biometric of body temperature. So temperatures a proxy for physiological activities of our body. We've got a device or wearable Caprio in that measures core body temperature on a continual basis and core body temperatures really the gold standard, a circadian science, a very rich information signal, and as one of one of our advisers stated from a diagnostic perspective, it's like taking a blood draw every five minutes and the kind of information you can pull from that. So for our. First application, we're using that information to help women identify their fertile window for pregnancy, and then many women don't even have a window because of underlying issues. So we can provide this very high fidelity information through this continual biometric that can be used to diagnose and then track the effectiveness of treatments for those underlying conditions, and then we believe that we can apply these biometrics also to contraception to menopause to sleep disorders and eventually clinical areas such as the timing of delivery of drug therapies like chemotherapy for maximum effectiveness.

Amy Shannon Clinical Science Chief Commercial Officer Marquez University Of Colorado Medical Simulation Corporation Prima Temp Enterprise Company. Menopause Ally Lily Duke University Colorado Bioscience Associatio Guidance Corporation Leapfrog Group Caprio University Of Colorado Medical World Health Organization Prem Cronin Biological
Emergency Rooms And Health Clinics Become Voter Registration Hubs

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:02 min | Last month

Emergency Rooms And Health Clinics Become Voter Registration Hubs

"So medical schools, clinics community health centers in North Carolina are now giving patients the option to register to vote check to see if they are registered or request a male invalid the nationwide initiative known as vote Er to boost voter registration in hospital and clinic waiting rooms founder an emergency room physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Dr Alistair Martin says, university, and University of North Carolina Chapel Hill medical schools have registered hundreds of people to either vote or. Request. A mail in ballot using ipad kiosks and flyers with Cannibal Barcode patients can access using their smartphone boating is now public health issue because of COVID nineteen who better than healthcare providers physicians nurses other healthcare. Workers. Martin. ADDS that across the country voter registration rates are down largely due to the pandemics shutdown of public places such as the DMV or community outreach events where people are most likely to get registered I'm Nadia Ramlogan

Dr Alistair Martin University Of North Carolina C North Carolina Massachusetts General Hospital Cannibal Barcode Nadia Ramlogan DMV Founder
Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:04 min | Last month

Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

"So you grew up in East Germany like. Yes. Wow. How was that? What was that like? Does it seem like a distant memory now? Yeah. Because you know damned forty eight now but definitely you grew up in a in an environment where boggles matter friendship breeding matters inability matters no way that you can rely on on friends and. Thanks, you need a life. So I think it's a good upbringing. That's for sure. What do you think was most formative of childhood that you can kind of say that's why I am who I am today. You know I, think you entire life makes you the person you're obviously also what your parents teach you and what your parents live like and my parents from very much teaching ons too key both feet on the ground and. Always be kind respectful to other people no matter who they are and. That is something which you know. I think up to today by value by doing so. And I grew up like this and I guess out. So when you don't have a when you don't draw in extreme luxury, you know when you grow up just a few things, you become very creative and you resourceful intonations and. Keep. Going for the things you want I think that's also something. which gets less and less this society because the children for today pretty much everything from the board. I think it's a different generation. What is the most quintessentially? German thing about you I used to be always on time I'm pretty much on time still. One point it's very German, and so I think I'm sending for quantity and technology in science i. think that is something very German. I remember that Carly member we went on that navy press trip to Hamburg and it was to the second yeah. Yeah we were like Oh, my God, we gotta get to the lobby like. And then German. The wet lead you to get into medical school and you know decide you wanted to take that path. My mother was a lead doctor and she took me to the hospital. When I was a kid, you know to go on visit patients and stuff. So I got into this Medicare idea very early when it was four years already decided I won't be a doctor himself. And never changed. You know to score studied medicine. And I came Dr Early on i. read that when you were in medical school you you're also a young mum and a single mom at that time, and so that couldn't have been easy. Maybe not a lot of people know that part of your story. So was there a particular mantra at that time and you're juggling so much like what helped? You get through through that time. So I was mother was twenty three and I just had done my first big step in medical school and gratefully at that time as their had my mom to help me a lot with my kids but I, think it's just you know you go step by step I think one of my mantras really to take things. Don't look too much out what's going on in the future because then you definitely get around. So step by step and put a checkmark behind everything in Italic Sawed. So with having tried and going to school and do all these days are just doing them. Moving forward, I think that helps you know not stress about future. Just get it done and you become a manager yourself because you have to keep all the balls in the at the same time I'm really good at this now. and. So you became a medical doctor in the field of orthopedics. How did you meet the late great? Koby Bryant. So so I came into other pigs by chance originally wanted to get into pediatrician because at my chide I couldn't see the kids suffering. So I decided okay. 'cause also studied sports, parents, medicines. I win the peaks to do my doctor studied there and I like all the peaks but I was also interested in aesthetics and I had to wait for to get a place in the clinic I wanted to start working and I had to wait half year in this year I decided to go. clinic and then I loved you know working in science so much. Stayed there and didn't go to Tadic's pedic's than I did later but I stayed there pioneering this treatment, we the proteins from God's and decreed cometary proteins to stop the inflammation and the aging process in the joins and we had so many people coming for treatments from everywhere from the word courts, people and people with joint problems in Australia tried is in you know. So we got to meet a lot of people. Not just you know sports

East Germany Italic Sawed Koby Bryant Tadic Carly Hamburg Australia
20 - Children and COVID-19 with Infectious Disease With Expert Dr. Kristin Moffitt

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:04 min | Last month

20 - Children and COVID-19 with Infectious Disease With Expert Dr. Kristin Moffitt

"Of course, I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback. He's a quadruple board certified doctor of internal medicine, Pulmonary Disease Critical Care, and neuro critical care and he's on the front lines of the covert battle out in California, for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing. Thanks remotely tuning in. Hey Bill. Good to see. And a very special guest Dr Kristen Mufid. She's an associate physician in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division at Boston Children's. Hospital. And she's a multiple award winning physician and professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical. School. Christie is also affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital She's certified in general pediatrics and Infectious Diseases by the American board of Pediatrics Doctor Moffett. We'd like to thank you for breaking away in. Joining us today. All right. Thanks for having me. Tell me how is Boston Children's focused change during this virus Boston Children's like every hospital in Boston March and early April were all frenzied months as we were preparing like hospitals I'm sure all around the world for what we were anticipating to be a surge in Cova infected patients. It became fairly clear relatively early in the pandemic with data coming. Out of China that children did not seem to be suffering the same severity from this infection as older individuals in adults did we were not completely sure whether or not that data would hold true as the virus swept across the world. Luckily, that has actually held true but that should not be taken it all to mean that children don't get sick from this some children do get sick. From this some do require hospitalization in some studies up to a third of children who require hospitalization require ICU, level care. So Boston Children's was in a unique position in Boston as you know, Boston has an abundance of hospitals for people to choose from excellent hospitals, all of them, but Boston Children's is the only free standing children's hospital. There are several other children's hospitals in Boston but they all. have their physical spaces, their units, their hospital beds contained within larger hospital systems that treat adults. So a decision was made within the city for Boston Children's to be able you take care of all the after patients in Boston who required hospitalization so that the deatrich beds in those other hospitals that were within adult hospitals could be committed to carrying for adults with cooking seems like a good. Plan well, even you just mentioned that children are substantially less susceptible to this virus than people at risk of the children who do get seriously affected by this virus apparently more than seventy five percent of the fatalities in children related to this virus are those of minorities? Can you explain why that's happening? Yeah. That is very true. The disproportionate effects that this infection has had on black and individuals. That has been seen in adults is playing out very much children as well, and that's true. Both of Acute Kobe infections, and then as you may know, we were all surprised in the pediatric. Rome to start to understand this other entity called MISC or multi system inflammatory syndrome in children that seems to be overwhelming inflammation that occurs in children largely two to four weeks after a covert infection. So both acute colon and MISC are impacting minority populations in pediatrics substantially two ways that the most likely explanation is that children are most likely exposed in their households in in their communities, and those are exactly the households in the communities in which the adults are suffering the most serious consequences in highest incidents of covid nineteen infection. So I think that children really very much are reflective of that. So interesting statistic when you look at it, I know from the adult side, we certainly see in that population, there's a lot of multifamily housing multiple families living under one roof and that sort of social crowding a seems to have an impact but also of those people who are not financially immune. So to speak from the virus in that, they must go to work every day to feed their family. You can't be you know a day laborer and do. It via zoom, you actually need to show up in in any time. There is that expectation. There's not going to be a lot of social distancing at the workplace in. So we think that lower socioeconomic in general would be forced to continue their work in their jobs. In spite of the fact that the risks remain the same and the statistic is not percentages of people who get the virus it is a death toll of people who have the virus. So, is it biological that affects them differently or lifestyle or food or? Those are all definitely hypotheses that still frankly require investigation and I think that there may even be a multifactorial. For it. That is along the lines of what Stephen was mentioning is a difference in access to healthcare for these affected populations as well. It certainly is possible that there may be a biological explanation, our hospital in coalition with. The other hospitals are studying the genetics of children who are impacted by either severe ovid infection or by MISC but there isn't anything clearly being born out yet in terms of solid genetic reasons that make me immune response to these affected populations different. Necessarily, there's still some work to be done there. But as you suggested to bill the underlying potential complicating factors that might be called co morbidity in some are also higher in these populations and make them at higher risk in more susceptible to more severe sequentially of this infection.

Boston Children Boston Pulmonary Disease Critical Car Dr Steven Tailback Professor Of Pediatrics Brigham And Women's Hospital Bill Dr Kristen Mufid Pediatric Infectious Disease D China California Associate Physician Stephen Steve Doctor Moffett ICU Christie Harvard Medical Cova Rome
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | Last month

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
Update on Trump's COVID-19 case

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

02:46 min | Last month

Update on Trump's COVID-19 case

"This is leak out. News from its position that the president is doing quote very well. And I think we're gonna have a very good result combined with the president himself, saying that, in his own words is all positive again. Over the next few days, we're gonna probably know for sure. Infectious disease specialist outside Mr Trump's orbit echo with the president also said that the next few days will be crucial, so he still has a fight ahead of him. It has a fight ahead of us. No, we have seen patients do we actually have for long symptoms until maybe seven days, eight days after the onset and who actually develop complications at that time? Dr Albert Co. Is chair of epidemiology of microbial diseases at Yale Medical School. So what are we to make of the White House is probably going to be In the hospital for a couple of days. Does that give us any indication of of how serious this might be. This is really quite precocious and into early, at least in our experiences and taking care of patients with Kobe. You have to take any kind of one day at a time balancing the president's privacy with the needs of the nation to know. Isn't easy. CBS's chief medical correspondent, Dr John Lapu, says that history tells us more information is more common than less. One of the basic concepts in public health is to be transparent, and I think that's especially important right now. We don't want to be parsing words. We don't want to be trying to interpret. But somebody says What do they really mean? You want to just have them looked straight at you Tell you what's going on, and we can take it. We're grownups. We just want to know what's going on. What we do know is the president is undergoing treatment that five day course of the antiviral rendez severe as well as a dose of monoclonal antibodies. Make scientific sense to me that you would want to give these kind of treatments that keep the viral load down as early as possible. But you have to also understand these are experimental treatments. So what or the rest of us to take away from the president's seeming fine one day And not the next. The cruel reality of covert 19 is that even the best testing offers only a snapshot in time. They're definitely gaps in what the test can do and what they can't do. Right. Ah, huge misconception is I just flew in from another city. And I want to get tested today because I'm negative. I could see my grandmother tomorrow. No. Because if you were infected a week ago, you could test negative today and then test positive tomorrow and become suddenly infectious. Which brings us back to what we've been hearing from health officials now for months, face masks and social distancing remain. Our best defense is

President Trump Mr Trump Yale Medical School Dr Albert Co Kobe CBS White House Dr John Lapu
14-year-old Texas boy graduates from college with associate's degree

The Bobby Bones Show

00:40 sec | Last month

14-year-old Texas boy graduates from college with associate's degree

"Year old boy in Texas has graduated from college with his associates degree pretty cool, and it runs in his family because his older sister, who is 16 years old, she also into college Super early and is now the youngest student ever to be in law school at 16. So I don't know what their peers did, but they're clearly probably go to math and science. They know it still means that they know what it means. I mean, the 14 year old that just got associates degree is now trying to decide if he's going to go get his masters or medical school doesn't quite know. But he is the CEO of his own gaming company. So that's why he thinks he might go the business round. Pretty

CEO Texas
"medical school" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:24 min | 2 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and Wbz I'm Robin Young I'm Tanya Moseley. It's here now House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced today that the late Justice Ruth. Bader, GINSBURG, will lie in state in the capital on Friday one week after her death Friday or Saturday is also the time when president trump told Fox News that he expects to announce his choice to fill her vacancy and the fight over that replacement is on Democrats crying hypocrisy as Republicans move forward after refusing to hold a hearing for President Obama's at Supreme. Court nominee in two thousand, sixteen more than eight months before that election Republicans are saying that was then they were the opposition. This is now they support the president NPR congressional reporter. Gloria Gonzales is here and Claudia. There are fifty three Republicans in the Senate forty-seven Democrats four Republicans would need to defect to prevent the nomination from going forward to have Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski saying they think it should wait until the people have voted. So what other names are floating about about possible defectors? So some potential other names that we are still wondering about include Utah. Senator Mitt Romney that someone who has an express any kind of details on where he's going to weigh on this as well as Cory Gardner of Colorado that is a another Republican senator in he is in a re election fight right now and he's hasn't made clear where he's GonNa fall down on this. And then in terms of other senators there some like senator. Chuck. Grassley of Iowa who earlier this year told local state reporters that he wouldn't recommend such a move if trump wasn't reelected so far he's only expressed condolences like some of the others that remain wildcards at this time, and then there's retiring Senator Lamar Alexander in it's possible. He could play a role. Here's a swing vote. There's also the possibility that the vote on a nominee could be delayed until the lame duck session between the election and the inauguration or in this case as votes are still being counted but Democrat Mark Kelly the former astronaut husband of Gabby giffords is running for Arizona's Senate seat. How does he act factor into that vote? So that's an interesting twist because of the individual in that seat at this time that Senator Martha Mc Sally, she was appointed to that seat in a special move there she could have to leave that seat earlier than planned and that could mean that if Kelly wins this race, he could move into that seat as early as the end of November, and so this is something that the local newspaper there talk to legal experts about this who said that that was a very big possibility if that happens. It's going to shrink the margins right now they can lose only three Republicans to proceed with this confirmation vote on the Senate floor. If they lose one of those Republicans in MC Sally, that means that margin is going to be even that much thinner and they can't lose the three they can only lose two at most I'm sorry they can only lose the three at most because they will have issues. Yes. Trying to reach those numbers because it's doubtful any Democrats right now are going to support this move. Other Republican Ted Cruz told Fox News there could be a constitutional crisis if the vacancy isn't filled, especially, if the court has to weigh in on the results crews, of course, felt the exact opposite in two, thousand sixteen but Emily Basil on the legal expert types that the President and Republicans can constitutionally You know pick a justice who could then be the deciding vote if the supreme court has to weigh in on the election but do you do you see any problems? So these this is going to be completely uncharted territory that we go into. If we end up with a situation where there's an election in question and whether we have just an eight-member panel for the Supreme Court. I think that it's GonNa be tough to say whether there could be issues to come off. It's kind of a a day by day as as folks are getting a better sense of what could happen with the supreme. Court, if we could have a new justice seated in time or not, and that won't be a factor or if it will I think it's a wait and see. And meanwhile, a Democrats have been talking about payback saying that the Republicans are playing with fire talking about things, they might do down the road but now pretty much they don't have many options NPR congressional reporter, cloudy Gonzales, thank you so much. Thanks for having me..

Senator Martha Mc Sally Supreme Court President trump senator Senator Lamar Alexander Gloria Gonzales NPR Senator Mitt Romney Senate Mark Kelly Fox News reporter President Obama House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Cory Gardner Justice Ruth Robin Young Susan Collins Grassley
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 2 months ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
"medical school" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:24 min | 2 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Please see the Lincoln the episode description to submit an application, and now without further ado, let's continue on our tour with another fascinating case from amazing, Cardi nerds colleagues. We are in Texas again, this time Austin Texas we could not be more excited. I have never been. I've gotta go. Definitely will definitely get back there when travelling becomes a thing again. So we are with an incredible group of motivated in a believable people. Want you guys introduce yourselves high amid and Dan thank you so much for having nerds podcast. We'd be thrilled to have you guys come and visit us in Austin but right now I, guess we're doing virtual. But definitely in person soon I'm create Papa Liam a PG Y. Five cardiology fellow at ut Austin del medical school, and my interests are interventional cardiology with a specific focus on inter vascular imaging physiology guided PCI. Guys Big Fan my name is human thank you I'm a PG Y. Five at ut Austin Medical center my interests are interventional cardiology with focus on structural heart disease and when I'm not in the Cath Lab I'm usually running about on the various trails that we have here in Austin. Thanks again guys revenue microscope Yak on one of the first year cardiology fellows here at del Seen Medical Center and my interest currently are also interventional cardiology undifferentiated specifically what I WANNA do within that outside of cardiology I like to mainly experiment with plant-based recipes with my wife. Awesome guys, Michael Sergio Preah it is so wonderful a heavy all join us from UT Austin. Honestly, I wish I had been to offer so many great things by the city. It's definitely on my roster for after the pandemic, but take me to your city. Would he has little Bit Austin? Where do I just have to visit and where do you want to sit down to have our conversation today? Absolutely, there are many things if you love the outdoors, we have plenty of things to do you happen to be here in October or March you can go to one of our world renowned music festivals ACL or South by what we like to do is we really like to spend time on lake. Travis enjoying the sunset at an enjoying the water. So that's where we want to take you guys today. I right I love it. So we are sitting next to lake, Travis enjoying the evening soaking it all in talking about our love for cardiology. You guys have for us. Wait before we do we on the riverbank or are we like floating in there? Are we have in the water? So, we're on the lake. So we're taking you guys on a speedboat, the middle of Lake Travis, and we have a lily pad floating on the water and bre hanging off the edge talking about our favorite cardiology X. because that's what we do every weekend when we have time. Oh, how adventurous I like sitting on a picnic under lakeside, but this is even better I. Love it like. This is amazing. Really Bring Your sunscreen guys important. I brought my sunscreen and I recently gave myself a pedicure. Really excited Shaw. Hoping the paint, a case matches the pace of our speedboat. Excellent. It will what do we have? So guys, I have been dying to tell you about this very interesting patient case that I saw a couple of weeks ago. We actually had a pretty sick patient come to the ICU after having a tavern ballot Puddin, just accept the stage wanted to tell you a little bit about this patient's history..

Austin cardiology fellow ut Austin del medical school ut Austin Medical center Cardi nerds Michael Sergio Preah Travis Lake Travis Texas del Seen Medical Center lake Papa Liam Puddin Cath Lab Dan Shaw
"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"On basic and trick research to prevent and treat Parkinson's disease and later neurological and eight disorders. He's a founding director of the Neuro re-generation, research institute at McLean. Hospital. Of Neurology and neuroscience at Harvard Medical School. Preface of neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital. and was elected fellow of the American Association for Advanced and assigns. He's the author or CO author of over three hundred scientific research publications in your science technology. And books in his field. Delta Molly. Here. I know that you have done a tremendous amount of loose age in neuroscience neurology. indy picked few papers for to have have a discussion and and one of them s entitled Nola Songs and concepts emerging from Lipid cell biology relevant to degenerative brain aging and to seize. Invite. You say while rare familial forms of Alpha the can cause Parkinson's disease. Lewy body dementia, an easily to dementias. Recent, in-depth studies of Lipid disturbances in the majority of the common forms of this diseases instance suggest a privately genesis in liquid pathways. So. So this is different from conventional wisdom. Isn't it? Would you like to talk a bit about the of Research Direction here? Yes. That's right the. Conventional Wisdom has told us that what you see in a brain autopsy it is the problem what we see in Alzheimer's Disease in Argosy a theology is usually some protein aggregates. In the case of park the they're called buddies. Made aggregate of UPN. Alzheimer's disease we see data, but I won't be searching. Rather than the protein aggregating being the course of the disease. it may be more underlying actress trying that increase the compensatory reaction. to brain so do and so. Consequently, if there are other underlying causes you would need to Expose, Problems I. Right so. So. So in terms of the Lipid Issues are there other specific areas that you are you looking at what types of lipids and you know what the mechanism might be? Yes. So he wasn't surprising. I'm medical discovery.

Alzheimer's Disease founding director Conventional Wisdom Harvard Medical School UPN Massachusetts General Hospital Delta American Association for Advan
"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"medical school" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket Sal Marquez his hair and today have the privilege of hosting Dr Gail Gazelle. She's a faculty. At Harvard Medical School a thirty year, practicing hospice physician and a Master Certified Coach for physicians and physician leaders in addition to publications in the New England Journal of Medicine, O, the Oprah magazine and the Journal of American, Association for Physician Leadership Dr Gazelle is a certified mindfulness teacher, a former consultant for the United States Department of Justice and one of the nation's preeminent physician coaches having coached. Five hundred physicians. She's the author of every day. Resilience slated to release August of twenty twenty, and in these times with a lot of the challenges that we have around the pandemic, but even before the pandemic we've been plagued with issues around physician wellness and burn out the OPIOID epidemic. There's there's there's issues all around that require expertise in and guidance and so today it's just such a privilege to have you here today, gail and and war. We're. We're going to focus in on on the work that you do to help care for the people that care for us such a privilege to have you on the on the podcast today. Thank you saw really a pleasure and a privilege to join you today. Absolutely, and so before we we take a step toward exploring the work. You do the outstanding work that you do I. WanNa learn a little bit more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Great Question I would have to say that. It is making a difference in the lives of vulnerable individuals that has always inspired May. What I stayed back on my career I was drawn to the practice of meddlesome bonded to help individuals at the end of mice and hostess and end of Life Care was not really a field when I finished medical training. In nineteen ninety, there was so much pain and suffering physically emotionally on a psychosocial level, obviously for the individual who was terminally ill, but also for their families, and furthermore for people working with them and care, and so I was drawn to that vulnerable population and wanted to be able to make a difference. As I cared for patients near the end of life. I began to notice that I myself was Burning House I was doubting my judgment experiencing self criticism. I was feeling guilty guilty when I was home that I wasn't working when I was working guilty that I wasn't with my son and my family. And I began checking in with colleagues around the country.

Dr Gail Gazelle Association for Physician Lead Sal Marquez twenty twenty Harvard Medical School New England Journal of Medicin Oprah magazine United States Department of Ju consultant Journal of American
"medical school" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

07:38 min | 6 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on The Big Story

"Throwing in this is the big story. She Stacey or Rewa is graduating from the University of Toronto Medical School She's black. She's the only black student in her graduating class of two hundred and fifty nine. She's also the Valedictorian. She is the first black woman to hold that honor in the history of the school at is quite an inch. Oh Sheikha. Thank you. Yeah, it is. It has been an incredibly surreal Cherney and an incredibly surreal and to my medical school experience and today is your graduation so first of all congratulations from us on a phenomenal achievement. But how are you feeling? We're talking you the morning of your graduation. I am you know I would say a confluence of emotions right now? I'm excited to finally become a doctor I am nervous to have my valedictory address aired and to. See the reception from my class from the community from the faculty from my mentors staff peers. You know the their families and so. There is a lot of nerves I. guess because there's so much pressure I would say, and then I also have a sense of fear in a way because I've learned as we all learned that the world continues to be a very difficult place for people to exist and you know this is something that I've always been incredibly passionate and vocal about advocating about anti-bok nece systemic. SYSTEMIC ANTIBIOTIC NECE in racism and trying earnestly to address, but particularly in the past three or four days since everything has kind of been happening in the civil unrest, I would say that it's become an even more poignant moments as there has been a certain of media presence my story, taking a stronger media presence, and recognizing that there are a lot of people out there who are directing. A wild amount of hate and racism and bigotry towards me online and calling into question whether or not actually deserved to be Valedictorian calling into question, my competency as a physician, and so it's a very young bittersweet experience I would say. I can't believe that I mean I. Guess That's not true. I can believe that that is happening. Online and I'm sorry. Thank you how? How long have you been thing? Let's talk about your day, but when we will talk about the other stuff, and but let's like. How long have you been thinking about this day? With the day you became a doctor like it must have taken. an incredible amount of work Hogan. Ashwell I mean yes I that it has taken an incredible amount of work, and you know I've told myself since as soon as I could talk, I would say soon as I was able to like. Like formulate independent thought as a child that I've wanted to be a doctor, so let's almost my entire life, and so how long looking forward to this day you know several several years, and especially in the last four years, especially in the darkest and hardest moments of going through medical school. You know you just kind of tell yourself that this is. This is the end game. This is the une goal and that becoming a physician is all I've ever wanted to be and so. Ultimately this is Dan looking forward to forever and I feel so surreal and it's it is just such an incredible incredible feeling. Will. Tell me about your time. at U. OF T. medical school because you know the reason the your story has such resonance with people as because. I, you're the only black student in your class and I think a lot of people are shocked that that that is still the case, so tell me about you know. How did it begin? I'd say that my story with respect to the gravity of being the only black student in my class is truly underscored by the experiences that led up to the beginning of that narrative so. Before I came to medical school at the University of Toronto is was an undergraduate student at McMaster university where I studied. The Bachelor of Health Sciences Honors Program, and In that undergraduates space was also the only black student. And looking forward to medical school I was very much eager to be able to shift that narrative and kind of shake loose that identity I was very much eager to join a medical school that was centered in the at the center of diversity. I mean Toronto's the most culturally rich city in our country. And then you know at the biggest medical school that also had a black medical students association I was very much eager to the able to join this medical school, and so you know when I when I ultimately came to the University of Toronto, and then learned very quickly that there were no. No other medical students in my year it was incredibly difficult and I think what what made it difficult to that? You know it wasn't the fact that there were no buck others. There were no other black students in any of the other years I was actually flanked by more black students in the year before and after me, but it's the fact that on the data day when you're going through things going through, you know conversations, discussions clinical encounters when you have less individuals who are president who can inherently identify with some of the adversities that you're facing. It becomes very very difficult to Matt. Re, that was reiterated for me throughout the course of my medical education were encountered micro and macro aggressions and discrimination, coming abouts in various forms either inter personally or seeing how it manifested in a lack of diversity in the medical curriculum, and so I would say that that definitely underscored my medical school experience and I was fortunate to be able to go to the University of Toronto where there's already a cultural shift that was on the horizon, and they were. You know making strides to really address that issue. And Fortunately I was in the position to be able to contribute to that, and so that really led to what I believe has been an incredible and surreal undergraduate experience of advocacy. In your mind and I guess even drying in people the. You've talked to in the course of your advocacy. How does it happen that you're the only black student in a class of two fifty nine? Like how did how did we end up with that in the first place? So that is such an important question. It is a multifactorial question. answer I would say that is still currently being elucidated. Of course there are so many things that really play into it, so one of the issues of course is the lack of social capital and inherited networks that are provided to the community, so because there has been historically underrepresentation of a of black individuals in medicine. There isn't necessarily eat this social knowledge that can be passed down within generations That will explain to someone early on an knocking before. Before University about what it takes to get into medicine and so much of. Getting into medical school is kind of.

University of Toronto University of Toronto Medical Toronto Stacey McMaster university Hogan Rewa president Dan Matt
"medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"By and police companies having an impact on health and health care and obviously if they have to this point of view and I believe that some examples about occurring Where both the companies are having intact. And they're doing well In terms of the business. And that's one of the things that I liked about. The book is that you. There's many many examples like real time real world. Examples of companies that are finding success. There's also there's a section in the book where you talk about. What what it takes for a startup to succeed in the healthcare sector and you sort of described the situation where there's kind of no overlap between two different worlds. Where like the people that are already in the healthcare system who know the system understand how it works. You know the the healthcare practitioners who should be the natural entrepreneurs to maybe rise up and disrupt the system. They're so caught up in the day to day of the healthcare system and delivery of it that it's hard for them to make the time to start a company. Meanwhile you have people outside healthcare that want to come in and think the way to disrupt the system as maybe to just bypass it and they fail often because they don't understand how the system works you know and maybe has to function So how do you is there a way to square that where these two kinds of ways of creating accompanied don't quite overlap? I think several ways one is to get more healthcare providers interacted with engaged with Entrepreneurs and technology experts and companies that have been successful Had Gone exactly that and but we need to see more of that In our medical school for example I'm pleased that minibar medical students get involved with start ups during medical school experience or shortly thereafter. Our medical students are overwhelmingly attracted to going into medicine because they want to have an impact in the lives of people and in blithering patient care but I think increasingly. There's a larger number of students that are recognizing they can have that impact for sure indirectly interacting with patients and. We want them to do that. First and foremost betrayed outstanding physicians in In our programs and we also want a Cold War Sunday group of outstanding physicians to be engaged in transforming the way medicines practice healthcare is delivered and that intersection between someone who is very well trained in the science and the compassion and the practice of medicine and someone can have an intelligent dialogue was technologist and really help that technologist. To understand the day to day issues that physicians and patients deal with that interaction. Something we WanNa foster at Stanford you wrote that like the keys to succeeding as a healthcare startup are to number one. Saw The a truly hard problem which you know. That's what every startup wants to do in theory also deliver a delightful user experience that results in sustained user engagement and behavioral change. Which again okay you want. You want the product to be useful and delightful but also a an entrepreneur in the space needs to be a great enterprise entrepreneur to know how to navigate the health ecosystem as well like for example. You talk about how such a large portion portion of the the healthcare system right now in the. Us is nonprofit so as an example you would need to know understand how selling into that market is functionally different. Exactly that oftentimes is to hang up. If you're a chief information officer of the Health Delivery System which you think about day in and day out with making sure with the systems are working that they're working accurately down-time There's huge consequences. Even even seconds to minutes of having downtime and information systems that are running hospitals and delivery systems. But you're inherently conservative.

chief information officer WanNa
"medical school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"medical school" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"You should be there once you get that emergency fund in place and the fact that you don't have any payments except the the payment on this house. This is very doable. But you've got to get on a game plan if you need some help with the budget jump on everydollar dot com and use the budget APP. It's free and need loads on your phone or on your desktop. Whatever takes about ten minutes? Lay Your budget out. But you get that puppy laid out and then you've got The the ability to control the money that you've got be putting fifteen percent away again. Chris Hogan three sixty dot COM check the queue. When you put the numbers on that you're gonNA plenty of money you're GONNA be fine thirty five years old? You just need to get started and do it. That's what it comes down to so hey thanks for the call we appreciate you joining us. Open phones at triple eight eight two five five two two five. Thank you for being here. We appreciate you by the way folks. We're talking about selling your house unless you don't like your house because you'll hear me ask that. Sometimes someone asked if they should sell their house unless you don't like your house when you're thinking of moving anyway most of the time. The House is not the problem now. If your house payment is fifty percent of your take home pay the houses. The problem it's got to go. You're not GonNa make that unless you have an income increase coming in the short next short-term just over the horizon you're going to have problems with a fifty percent of your house of your take home pay being a house payment. That's not gonNA work but other than no situations usually. The House is not the problem usually. It's getting organized game on the budget. What getting your other debts paid off? Maybe.

Chris Hogan
"medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

"A second medical school you learn case by case patient by patient and this is our you can learn a lot and by you learning a lot you can help others save lives and know that listeners save lives and know that you help other people save lives by what you learn here every day on the radio to reduce myself as a promise to find such a good leader minute board certified doctors born and raised in Waterloo Iowa with to school their public school I graduated high school I went to university I went to medical school M. D. it twenty five just like why brother and my son M. dis twenty five real doctors medical doctors and then I went on and trained in research Chicago Michael Reese and moe and internal medicine which is the treatment of patients people with rumors and did but nine conditions and illnesses from the head to the toad turn all things and then I went on to Harvard Medical School brother is board certified after three years in Chicago Chicago Michael Reese someone on to Boston Harvard Medical School the person who just in a former Cancer Institute and they're trained and treated people came all schism who's a chemo well yeah is spent years scaring chemo board certified saw many people with cancer trying to one of the most prestigious hospitals then went on at Harvard medical school's joint center for edition therapy and trained and radiation oncology board certified so triple board certified nine years after medical school the only Harvard trained triple board certified radiation cancer doctors in the world the only.

Iowa M. Michael Reese moe Boston Harvard Medical School Cancer Institute Chicago Harvard Medical School Harvard three years nine years
"medical school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"medical school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And it was literally within a thirty six hour period, I hadn't heard anything about the opioid epidemic at a time at the time it really kind of struck me as something that, you know anyone with a platform to do something about. So, you know, we all have opportunities, I do a lot of research, partnered with some other health services, researcher, and then I run the third and fourth year medical school curriculum. So I am powered a lot of these young people that I work with to explain to them. You know, my survey shin and they start fixing the problem for us. So I can't say enough that I am to mystic this, this societal problem get fixed, and it's going to be these young folks at these medical schools across the country, they're going to do it. Well, let's go to Amy who's calling from New Orleans Amy you're on the air. Thank you for taking my column. Make this really fast. I just wanted to put in my two cents worth as a retired social worker has been on many. Teams. And also, as a retired neuro surgery patient, who's had three major surgery, the role of listening among the healthcare team, the patient, needs to feel that there's someone that they can tell her entire story to who can hold it who can contain it, and who isn't going to the next tar or the next lesson or the next teaching track. And sometimes, it's the pastoral care person on a Saturday morning who isn't my religion and sometimes it's my neurosurgeon, but it really it has to be somebody who will take that role on the team, especially when I'm acutely sick will Amy, thank you so much for your call. Dr Clark, we've just got about a minute here left to go. We have been focusing on sort of the extrordinary new ways that a couple of a handful of medical schools in the nation are. Addressing this issue. I'm wondering where would you like to see the bulk of medical schools, go next? What more do we need to do? I think we need to do to thanks. I we need to do the kind of training. We've always done which are, you know, lectures, here's the science. This is what this disease is. Like this is how disease should be treated. So that's one thing we need to do next. We need to make sure that every medical school has a board certified addiction est capable of teaching the students on faculty and we don't have that now and then the third thing we need to do is to train, our doctors, just the way that's being done now in, in being able to therapeutically say no to patients. This is a problem with antibiotic over utilization. This is a problem with a lot of things that we do, we need to get our clinicians comfortable with understanding the difference between what a patient needs what they could benefit for, and what they want and their responsibilities to listen to and help guide around each of those three different things. We'll Dr Kelly Clark is the past president of the Americans. Science of addiction medicine and founder of addiction crisis solutions, Dr Clark, thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you. Dr Michael angles. Be professor of surgery at the university of Michigan medical school in the section of transplantation, surgery, Dr angles, thank you as well. Thank you, and listeners, you can find all our original reporting on the opioid crisis and the new ways to educate medical students about this. That all that reporting is owned point radio dot org. I Magnin shocker body. This is on point..

Dr Kelly Clark Amy Dr Michael angles university of Michigan medical Dr angles professor of surgery New Orleans researcher founder president thirty six hour
"medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This is data from Harvard Medical School me saying this on the relating the facts that exist. That eighty percent of men who opened surgery will have urinary problems and eighty six point eight percent hub robotic web sexual problems. You automatically know that most men will have urinary problems or sexual problems who have had surgery. I don't have to tell you. And I see that all the time. I see many many patients had many of my patients, we have men and women equal numbers of our men. Patients have had surgery at fortunately the man who called me today. And now not only most likely does he have the sexual neurotic, but his PSA's rising strike one strike to strike three his PSA's rising. Well after surgery opener robotic surgery, the PSA should be zero. The surgeon was supposed to remove all the prostate or move all the cancer. So why is this man who went to a super duper place? Why is this man's PSA rising? There's only one reason. And that's reason is that the cancer is back. So. He paid the price with surgery paid the price with sexual issues paid the price with urinary issues. He paid the price financially opened up his wallet and paid and probably his insurance company paid much more. And now the cancer is back. Well, he has one more chance to be cancer free. That is to come to us for pinpoint treatment to try to kill the cancer cells that the surgeon left behind so the PSA should be zero. After radical surgery. I'm not advocating radical surgery. I really don't believe in it. I think that established stating for most man, I think it changes men's quality of life in a very very bad way. I think that our results, and you can look at the data if you believe in data, and if you believe in facts that you can see the data, and for example.

Harvard Medical School eighty percent eight percent
"medical school" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"medical school" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And I think that if you spend a few minutes looking at that stuff, especially if you find some of the content challenging, and when we get into technical terms, which we do some of the podcast, you're pretty much gonna find everything in the show notes. Lastly, if you're enjoying this would be an honor if you would head on over to apple podcast reviews and leave us a review, especially if it's a positive one. But we'll take a negative one to as long as you can be constructive in your feedback. So without further delay. Here's. My guest today said Mukherjee. Thanks for making time might lessen. Thanks would be. Yeah. I don't get up to this part of the city very often. It's hike. Let's say massive medical school in talked anywhere else. Except for uptown in this way, we go all the way to the river. It's amazing. And last time I was up here is to see another one of your colleagues on the other side of the street, reliable is a good friend. And I used to be up here. A lot more often. So nice to come back. Most our podcast go really really long this one. I don't think we have that luxury time. So I kinda wanna get right into things. But before we do, I certainly think for the listener who doesn't know you. Well, your your background, which I'll allude to a lot in the introductions don't spend too much time on it. But you grew up in India came to the US did you do college here? I went to college at Stanford. Yeah. Oh, that's right. You went underground at Stanford. Okay. Then medical school at Harvard, actually, then in the middle. I was away for three years. I did did a Rhodes scholarship. Yeah. Your roadscholar scholar. I was it was going to end. That's what I got my PHD in my PHD immunology. Which is a subject that I left behind went to medical school at Harvard Medical School, then did my fellowship and my internship residency at Mass General hospital fellowship at the Cancer Institute. And then started my own lab and kinda practice at Columbia University and have come back to immunology strange. Lied widening circle of away. Yeah. The first time we met was dinner that Lucan Lee had planned for us as about three or four years ago. And I remember at the time the topic that Lewis passionate about that. I'm passionate about with sort of metabolism of cancer at the time. I wasn't something that seemed as interesting to you as it is today. And I know today, I wanna talk so much more about that the work. You guys have done in the last few years is in many ways. What I think is the most interesting stuff to talk about. It was also a tough tonight because you don't eat most things it's too often with someone when you went off the menu off the menu. So anyway, we somehow managed scrape by and it was a wonderful. Inning actually led to what was that five years ago. Yeah. Let one of the most interesting, and perhaps important scientific collaborations in my life with Lou Lou it was that that dinner which kind of Hamid it was in a Japanese restaurant on the upper east side and tiny little place. You remember? That's exactly I know. Exactly. What was well because we wrote on you know, it was a little bit like one of these napkin experiments you right on napkin and idea and that idea takes five years to come alive. This thing that was sketched on napkin that evening, and is now leading to actually kind of massive trial across multiple sites. Very energetic teams coming into all of this out of that little cannot Japanese restaurant. Yeah. That was a really fun night prior to that. I had read the emperor of all maladies. I don't think the gene was out yet. As was not out yet. I wanna spend just a couple minutes on the valley's. Because if there's anybody listening to this who hasn't read it you on the pulse prize for that book..

Stanford Harvard Medical School Mukherjee apple Lou Lou Harvard Lucan Lee Mass General hospital Columbia University Lewis Cancer Institute US India Hamid five years three years four years
"medical school" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"medical school" Discussed on Second Opinion

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion at first thought. It may sound like another example of the rich getting richer this week, NYU school of medicine announced that medical school would be completely free for current and future medical students of the top fifteen highest paid professions. Two thirds are in the field of medicine. So why give medical students free tuition when teachers and firefighters and nurses don't get free tuition? Well, the issue is complex, but at the end of the day, it's about what is in societies best interest and our society is aging. And as we do, we are living longer with many chronic illnesses. We need more primary care doctors. The average tuition for medical school is seventy thousand dollars a year state schools a little bit less private schools a little bit more. The average medical student graduates with nearly two hundred thousand dollars worth of debt, an overwhelming amount for a person starting out who may wish to marry or have a family, buy a house, all the while, having to pay back their loans. So when faced with a career choice, say between orthopedic surgery where salaries or around four hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year and pediatrics or family medicine were salaries or in the hundred and fifty thousand dollar range. Medical students are choosing based on expected future salaries. If medical school were free, it would create a more level playing field. Yes. Other changes in how doctors are paid are still need it, but eliminating student debt would help shift the health workforce back toward primary care. And it would create a more diverse workforce by attracting students who are currently discouraged. From tending medical school because of costly tuition, regardless of future specialty. All medical students go through the same training and incur the same costs. Residency training is a bit longer for some sub specialties, but during residency, doctors are paid employees. Most often by tax payers, they are not incurring any new costs. Now, we're, I'm most disappointed by NYU's announcement is that there were no strings attached to this free tuition. New York City has areas where there are fewer doctors than there are in some developing countries. Why not offer free tuition for students who agree to work in medically underserved areas for two years. In this way, there'd be a social obligation that was repaid the US is one of only a small number of nations that does not require any public service from their doctors. Why. Why not make medical school completely free for all students, but require two years of public service. The same would be true for dentists and nurses, psychologists, veterinarians not only would health providers, graduate debt free, but our nation would be a healthier place with improved access to providers, and our doctors would be exposed to a diversity of patient experiences. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion.

Dr Michael Wilks NYU school of medicine NYU New York City US two years two hundred thousand dollars seventy thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars fifty thousand dollar
"medical school" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"medical school" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Medical show published a study from harvard medical school and brown medical school brown university up there i think it's near providence and and it was over one hundred thousand american doctors and pharmacists and nurses dentist and it was over a twenty year period did i shave forty years i'm sorry twenty years and they showed people with a real high intake of luton it was protecting them from going blind millions of americans are at risk of going blind because they lack looting routine protectionist structural integrity of your eyes but also helps gi sheepherder so protects the eyes and helps them sleep better so it's both form and function but now we know teen as the dominant pigment in the human brain to and it's needed for memory just like foster title sharing and fisher wells latinas are part of that sadly we have a harder time absorbing low from food as we grow older dave shown up older people need five to ten milligrams a luton every day if they want very good fishing after i wanna maintain efficient but they're showing that even what a good diet loaded with fresh vegetables people only take about two point seven milligrams a looting from the diet we don't know why we don't know why as we age we have a harder time absorbing latini nobody knows why but we know it's real so the only way to get sufficient latinas would a supplement of natural looting because you can no longer get enough lateen from your broccoli and your spinach and your brussels sprouts and you kale and you collard greens and your jokes so the amount of lieutenant arise reflects the amount of latina and your brain how did they figure out the amount of looting in your eyes they check you blood plasma eclair stuff in your blood they could see the amount of latina in your blood that shows them how much latinas in your eyes it's a mathematical equation and we call that an algorithm is an algorithm that you plug in his how much latinas in the blood that reflects how much is on the eyeballs but now we know the amount of lieutenant eyeballs reflect your mental latina in your brain and it turns out that concomitantly latina.

luton harvard medical school brown medical school brown uni dave brussels twenty years forty years twenty year