20 Burst results for "Medical Reporter"

"medical reporter" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:11 min | 2 months ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on KOMO

"Medical reporter Liz Bonus Reporting homeowners time 6 14 We bring the traffic and weather every 10 minutes on the forest from the dupe in law group traffic centers. Kierra Jordan. We've been working with a crash in Bellevue on South Bound four or five, just past 5 20. It's blocking three right lane. So you're sitting in about a heavy mile back up there, and that's also affecting our westbound 5 20 drivers as you're approaching 405. Dealing with hesitation around that immediate area. We've been working with the crash into coma. This is on North found 509 at 705. It's been blocking the right lane and that North bound drive on seven Oh, five. That's going to be slow. Go from I five south or, if I still hitting that brake pedal for about a mile and a half is you're approaching J. Blm's main gate North and I five is struggling through Tacoma City Center, often on slowing out of federal way in DC Tech and Seattle's now busy often on from Michigan toward the convention center. He's found 5. 12 is slow pulling away from the mall make your way to the Valley Freeway. And then we're looking at brake lights most of the way from 5 12 into Kent. And then we're also busy from 180th of four or five north, down four or five Slow state route 1692 about North East 30th and fairy writers. The Seattle Bremerton run that's down to just one boat, so we're going to be seeing delays until further notice. Our next Cuomo traffic up 6 24 I report this time is sponsored by Beacon plumbing, heating and electrical called beacon today and say $50 on all heating and air conditioning just called one is 100. Freaking Man. Stop freaking called Beacon and the Coma forecast the winter weather advisory in effect starting at four o'clock this afternoon as if we needed more snow in the mountains. Expect another 12 to 24 inches. Over a 24 hour period, starting at about four o'clock this afternoon, and that includes the mountain passes. Snoqualmie Stevens and White passes still are closed because of so much snow and the Avalanche danger. We expect an update on Snoqualmie in about nine o'clock this morning. Our day in the city periods of rain decreasing later in the day, breezy late in the day and overnight tomorrow, maybe a few sun breaks mixed in with some more showers. Wednesday a dry day cloudy skies in downtown Seattle. It's 50 right now. Stay connected. Stay informed. The Northwest's on Lee 24 hour News Station Co. Moh news 1000 FM 97.

Kierra Jordan 12 Kent Bellevue Michigan Tacoma City Center Wednesday Liz Bonus $50 Valley Freeway 24 inches 50 Seattle one boat DC Tech Beacon four o'clock this afternoon today North East 30th Cuomo
"medical reporter" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on KOMO

"But just because the vaccine can be mandatory right now, Business advisors even for medical personnel say that doesn't mean it should You see, the FDA has only given emergency use authorization for the Fizer and Madonna vaccines. So these leaders admit when there's clear evidence and months of data collection to demonstrate that this is a safe vaccine. In future periods of time and maybe even the future years it may become mandatory. It depends In the meantime, those advising employers say education and perhaps a few other steps might be a better way to get more people to get the covert 19 vaccine. For employers. They need to have thorough assistance from counsel and advice from counsel to understand their wrists and then also see whether or not it makes sense operationally to require that and maybe if they don't require He could provide incentives for encouraging it Now this is likely going to be an ongoing legal debate. The hope, of course, is that enough of us will step up to get it that air comfortable, so we get herd immunity. Means about 70% of us would have to be vaccinated, Which doesn't mean we still have a ways to go. Medical reporter Liz Bonus as the U. S. Capitol tightens security ahead of the inauguration, ABC is Erica Turkey tells us our new details about the siege at the capital, an FBI documents said. Some of the insurrection is set up communications in advanced using amateur radios and encrypted messaging, APS masks concealed ear pieces and microphones. The document obtained by ABC News made clear the siege was no spur of the moment event but involved pre operational planning. What the report called militia Violent Extremists program the frequencies of their radios before they traveled here to Washington, something else for law enforcement to watch for two days before the inauguration. Aaron Carter SKI ABC NEWS Washington Speaking of which we'll talk about Maura of the preparation going on in the nation's capital, which is almost virtually locked down right now, those details coming up next with ABC is Martha Raddatz. Come on inside. 10 14 traffic.

ABC ABC News Martha Raddatz FDA Aaron Carter Medical reporter Washington Liz Bonus Erica Turkey Maura FBI
Companies debate whether to make COVID-19 vaccine mandatory

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

02:18 min | 4 months ago

Companies debate whether to make COVID-19 vaccine mandatory

"Of of the the cover cover 19 19 vaccines vaccines become become available. available. Some Some people people are are choosing choosing not not to to get get it it and and it it raises. raises. The The question question is is were were here here for for medical medical reporter reporter Liz Liz Bonus Bonus employment employment attorneys attorneys now now say say it is one of the top questions they are getting. Asked if I don't choose to get the vaccine, can my employer make it mandatory to return to work? Well, it's very complicated at the short answer is that yes, employers may require employees to get vaccinated with the covert 19 vaccine for health care workers, perhaps nursing home workers or others. Those who don't get the covert 19 vaccine may be a real threat or danger to those around us. That's the basis employment attorney Faith Whitaker says. Your workplace can use to require the covert 19 bucks, but there needs to be some exceptions for medical or religion. That said, however, most people step up. This might never be mandatory. However, an early survey so far, many states report what Ohio has found. What we found is, for example, the nursing homes were seeing a on Lee about 40% of the people who work in nursing homes or taking the vaccine. But just because the vaccine can be mandatory right now, Business advisors even for medical personnel say that doesn't mean it should You see, the FDA has only given emergency use authorization for the Fizer and Madonna vaccines. So these leaders admit when there's clear evidence and months of data collection to demonstrate that this is a safe vaccine. In future periods of time and maybe even the future years it may become mandatory. It depends In the meantime, those advising employers say education and perhaps a few other steps might be a better way to get more people to get the covert 19 vaccine. For employers. They need to have thorough assistance from counsel and advice from counsel to understand their wrists and then also see whether or not it makes sense operationally to require that and maybe if they don't require He could provide incentives for encouraging it Now this is likely going to be an ongoing legal debate. The hope, of course, is that enough of us will step up to get it that air comfortable, so we get herd immunity. Means about 70% of us would have to be vaccinated, Which doesn't mean we still have a ways to go.

Liz Liz Faith Whitaker Fizer Ohio LEE Madonna FDA
"medical reporter" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

08:03 min | 10 months ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"Hi, this is Lee. Rumney, and Mike the and we are very excited to announce that we are finally doing podcast. Yes, and the name is scientology. Fair Game Everybody Scientology Fair Game. And thank you to all of you because we tweeted out like, should we do a podcast? Whatever overwhelming? Yes. Amazing response. Listen to Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts. It's Friday July thirty first. I'm Oscar Ramirez from the daily podcast in Los Angeles, and this is reopening America. There's new evidence at cove in nineteen can have lingering effects on your heart. A German studies showing that emory's of people who have recovered from the coronavirus still had visual signs at the virus had an impact months after recovering. Patients showed signs of ongoing inflammation of the heart muscle. Erica, Edwards health, and medical reporter NBC News. Joins US for how cove in nineteen can linger in your heart. Thanks for joining US Erica. Wanted to talk about corona virus and how it affects the body we've been hearing for a long time all the different ways. It's not just a respiratory disease. It seems to be a vascular disease also affecting blood vessels and there was two studies that came out recently about how covid nineteen can damage the heart and how that damage can linger for some months. Even after people recover Eric, tell us a little bit about that. You're exactly right. So you know very early on. This was thought to be just a respiratory disease, but we've learned well I we what it's actually the doctors and the nurses on the frontline they've learned so much about how coping nineteen. Can impact the body in. So many ways you know it's been six months since that first case was diagnosed who Washington state here in the US. So now they've learned that it can also impact the body and other ways, right. So there were two studies that came out this week that you refer to. From Germany. They were published Tuesday in the journal Jemma cardiology showing that the virus can actually linger heart for months. Even when people feel like they, they've recovered, they're not necessarily the hospital there, otherwise healthy adults in thirties, forties, and fifties. So what happened was doctors in Germany they took 'em are is of these people's hearts two to three months after they were diagnosed after they felt better. Seventy. Eight of those people, a majority still had signs on those MRI's that the virus had some kind of impact on their heart. Sixty of those people had signs of inflammation of their heart muscle. Now, we're talking about the heart muscle. It's more about like if you're thinking about a home, you're thinking about the screaming, you think about computer, it's the mainframe. It's what sort of holds all of those heart cells together, and that's where they were seeing relation. Now, he didn't necessarily translate into any ongoing symptoms and it's still a on what that kind of inflammation. Those signs might mean long term clearly, we're still only six months into this pandemic, but once you have some sort of heart damage, there's a potential for further damage down the line. Unfortunately, we still don't know what that damages. The biggest concern, how long will people be feeling the effects of cove in one, thousand, nine, hundred, you know how long after they've recovered from it, and one of the other interesting things they found out in that study was that it didn't really matter the seriousness of the illness. Some people had been hospitalized with cove nineteen others were able to recover at home. Completely, they ran the whole course of it at home. So it didn't really matter how bad you had it. A lot of people were still getting hard damage. Yeah, you're exactly right now, there was another study also from Germany earlier this week they were looking at autopsies. Unfortunately, people who were older. They died of Couva nineteen. There were all in their eighties. They found evidence of the virus in. Heart. Tissue of twenty, four out of those thirty nine patients, and in a few in some of them, the virus was actually replicating in that heart tissue so. These are all pointing to ways that seem to suggest that the virus is somehow making its way into the heart. Again and what's A little unsettling is that doctors still really don't know. Oh with that me. As you mentioned just it's affecting the entire body from your head neurologically throughout the body vascular Lee and all the way down to your toes. Right? That's what you get the Simcoe veto. So as still have to learn a lot more about this, before we go wanted to bring up another article, you wrote about young children and the spread of cove in nineteen. Obviously, there's a lot of concern about kids going back to school in the fall I. Know a lot of school districts are still doing the hybrid learning the distance learning thing. But there are some that are saying they're going forward with it. And we know that kids are spared the most severe effects of covid nineteen. But we're finding out still that they can get the virus and they still can transmit the virus. So no one is going to deny that a child of any age adult of any age, even in June two Cova nineteen and that they can't spread the virus, right. But but what exactly what you're saying so far, it appears that kids in general aren't the main drivers of this virus like they are safe for the flu. We know that you know when there's a flu outbreak, you gotTa close the schools down the kids are really the main drivers of flu. A little different with covid nineteen, but the study that you're referring to compared that able swab. A Kid, underage five, two older kids and adults, and they found that those young kids even as young as under a month old. Can. Carry just as much of that coronavirus in their noses as those older children and adults. Now, again, what does that mean? We don't know that that means exactly that those young kids are able kids are able to spread the virus as easily as adults, but it does raise a lot of question as me are considering whether to open schools, and if you opened pulled, how do you do it safely unfortunately still? Unknown. I. Mean. There's a huge concern for teachers and other administrators. Older people that are working with the kids. We just did a story on the podcast about you know household transmission is a big thing. Younger people are going out in the world going home and then infecting they're older family members and this could possibly be very similar where the kids really aren't experiencing it that much. But they could pass it onto a teacher or another administrator. So just as you said, a lot of questions still remain on this. Who knows how it will play out, but we're going to have to keep watching for it Erica. Edwards Health Medical reporter at NBC, News Thank you very much for joining us. Thank, you. I'm Oscar Ramirez, and this has been reopening America. Don't. Forget that for today's big news stories, you can check out on the. PODCAST every Monday through. Friday. So follow us on Iheartradio or wherever you get your podcast. Hi, guys. Katie lowes here, actress mom and host of the parenting podcast. Katie's Crip a show that helps women navigate the colossal changes that come with motherhood. You'll hear from resilient Mama's knowledgeable experts and me asking a whole lot of questions. It's real talk that offers real perspective on what it's really like to be apparent. So join me new episodes published every other. Thursday listen to Katie's crib on the iheartradio APP or on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts..

US Erica Germany Katie lowes Oscar Ramirez Lee flu Jemma cardiology Rumney NBC Couva Iheartradio emory Los Angeles Eric America medical reporter Mama
"medical reporter" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:29 min | 10 months ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on KCRW

"Turning. It all off. Be well in stay tuned to K C R W alright at 4 50 Your listening to K C. R W on Larry Parallel. State health officials have announced that the state is creating priority tears for Corona virus testing. State Secretary of Health and Human Services, Dr Mark Galli said people with symptoms and essential workers should be selected for processing immediately was comes in the midst of reports. The California repeatedly fumbled attempts Get mass testing on track at the onset of the pandemic. Those mistakes may have affected how the virus has spread and the number of people who have died. Emily Baumgartner is a medical reporter at the Times. She broke the story and joins me now welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it, but we appreciated as well. Your article makes the charge that the state of California has failed to get a handle on mass corona virus testing. What exactly did you find? Well. A quick survey of the conditions of testing across California at the moment will show that there has certainly been in massive scale up in testing, but not enough to keep up with the spread of the virus. You see dwindling supplies long wait times even longer turnaround times for getting test results. And I think many members of the public might assume that the surgeon the virus is a result of what you've seen over the last five or six weeks. The openings, protests, etcetera. But what our investigation found is that some of these challenges really date way back to February to the beginning of the outbreak when the virus was spreading relatively undetected in California, you know, a few months back when Kovar, 19 was just getting started in the US, there was a shortage of testing kits and very narrow criteria. Remember this for who could get tested? What did you find out about how those choices played out on the ground in California and wear any Our case is missed. Certainly data has now come to show that many cases were missed early in the outbreak. I want to be clear that this doesn't slowly fall on the shoulders of California officials the original test restrictions those really tight restrictions that require you to be a traveler from China who is experiencing symptoms in order to get tested. Those were handed down from the federal level. In the beginning of the outbreak. There was one specific Corona virus test that could be used from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. And that test was was so short in terms of the number that they had available that they did restricted quite a bit. So indeed, it turned out that the virus was spreading in many communities undetected because officials just couldn't acquire the test to examine those particular people and then isolate them before they could spread to other contacts. Right. So things were just happening very, very quickly. You know, l a county is employing a range of city employees to join its contact tracing team have contact tracing efforts in the county been successful. You know, that depends on who you asked. Many, many people have seen a drastic scale up in the number of contact traces on the ground, which is a great sign on more volunteers, more experts getting involved in that effort. One of the main stressors on contact tracers, though, is that it's essentially impossible for them to do their job without very quick test results. When you envision how the process takes place, A person with symptoms gets a corona virus test. They get the results back. And if the result is positive, officials go ahead and contact the people that they've been in touch with to make sure they isolate. But if your test result comes back 5 to 7 days after you, you've begun experiencing symptoms, then contact trip. There's work is essentially a new point because there's there's just not a quick to catch the virus early on. Sure, we are speaking with Emily Baumgartner, a medical reporter at the Times. Let's talk for a second about the labs that air processing those Corona virus test. You wrote that protocols approved by federal health officials did not allow automation at L. A county's public health lab. Why was that decision made? Can you talk about that? And is it common? Certainly so it is very common for the beginning of the outbreak. Unfortunately for California, we were one of the first places to be hit by the virus. So I do think that California was was perfect, disproportionately affected by this decision than other states on what we're referring to. Here is that very strict federal protocol when the CDC released a very specific test kid that that could be used to fight the Corona virus, that kit was approved by the FDA, and when a test kit had used to detect it. Vic virus on you need to follow the protocol. Exactly. And this protocol was very limited. In most labs across the country. Public health infrastructure was just not strong enough to use any kind of automation. What you see now, in videos of laboratories where you thought lots of machinery and robotics moving a lot test at a time. At this time, it was Regular old human being lab workers holding pipette chips moving around fluid and trying to get these test process, so certainly it slowed things down. You know, there has been a consistent backlog of Corona virus testing samples throughout the course of the pandemic. Why's that happening? And why is it happening again? Do you think it could be fixed? You know, the question of whether it can be fixed is a tricky one. Because laboratory delays in both public health infrastructure and on the commercial side or a little bit different, the public health infrastructure that's the lab that we talked about. In the beginning of the pandemic. 1/4 of all labs across California were shut down in the past two years..

California the Times Emily Baumgartner CDC medical reporter State Secretary Dr Mark Galli K C. R W US Kovar Vic China FDA
"medical reporter" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on KCRW

"Down to just five hundred feet so the instruments on board can accurately measure the snowpack four six foot oyster aircraft parts we have miles south of the setting up for a little survey we're so close to the ground the trees snowmobile tracks in the lettering on small town water towers come into sharper view in the bright sun avoiding birds and broadcast towers requires intense concentration the ride is a bit bouncy is Carol follows the rolling landscape up and down with a large tablet computer McGinn activates the radiation detector in the plane's belly that's at the heart of the mission this box the size of a large suitcase picks up natural look ace picks up natural low level gamma rays emanating from the soil because water blocks this radiation begin can determine how much water is on the ground by putting today's measurements side by side with readings taken in the fall by the same lines like we're doing now is where those two numbers an idea of how much water and then the snow pack snow can be fluffy or compact or anything in between so forecasters rely on a figure called snow water equivalent that's what's left over when everything melts after measuring a nine mile by thousand foot strip of land begins computer reveals that the snow pack contains about three and a half inches of water but hydrologists on the ground need much more data so we fly for another three and a half hours measuring nine more of the survey areas marked on the map dipping down low each time many of these spots were established forty years ago before GPS navigation they're typically near railroad tracks and other easy to spot landmarks and away from large population centers the crew also shoots photos to provide a visual reality check on the numbers we get halfway to Canada before heading back to Minneapolis at the hangar McGinn hands off a thumb drive to carry all Heiser from the local weather service office who's excited to see the new data she says it'll help smooth out the bumps in measurements still taken the old fashioned way on the ground by volunteers with rulers you have observers to take point observations and see you might have someone who is like Hey I see bare ground a medical reporter zero and you have another observer that's like Hey I'm gonna go see how deep the snow I can find this actually takes an average so it takes into account those extremes soon beginning Carroll will fly up to the Dakotas spanned over to New England to do similar surveys their work is already yielding results and is helping communities along the Mississippi and other rivers prepare for possible flooding.

Carol McGinn Canada Minneapolis medical reporter Carroll New England Mississippi
"medical reporter" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Times you the medical reporter where do I find you this morning Emily good morning I'm out here in Culver city California well good morning to you thanks for getting up early I just had a great conversation with doctor doll Jed the Johns Hopkins center for health security lot of calm there what do you sing in your reporting about whether or not Americans are on doing here or on necessarily concerned about corona virus or the two indifferent to it it's a great question I think we're seeing lots of reports across the country of mass mailing out people being very concerned from the looks of it right now there's really no reason to be doing anything other than washing your hands that's not to say that this will not become a greater concern in the United States but right now with five cases and a very strong public health system it's not something that every American should be worried about nearly as much as the worry about catching the seasonal flu our people canceling their travel plans to China in your reporting as far as I can tell there be testing done both voluntarily involuntarily I'm sure you've heard about some of the the commercial flight being canceled and according to travel advisories coming out of that the federal government in many cases it makes sense particularly for Wuhan province yes we are no I am I made a list I went over it with that Chuck Todd of winners and losers should domestic domestic transfer current United States the indoor things and people win Amazon U. P. S. Netflix big pharma TV radio Google apple the losers would be outdoor things in crowds mall sporting events retail politics people going door to door have you begin to see any indication of those sorts of winners and losers sorting themselves out the United States are we still on standby for domestic to domestic transmission I absolutely believe that the winners you listed are absolutely winners already in this situation I'm not sure that the losers have have taken their spot on the ranking yet I think that you know in many situations we do see situation when according to ask people to avoid public places and avoid public gathering we've certainly seen that in China already and we have seen that in the United States in the past again we just turn at that point yet in the US where you're going to see people hiding in the house hi Emily Boeing are good how do you believe the Chinese responses band do you trust the news I read the South China morning post every the tell I read everything I can't I just don't know what I can trust from the P. R. C. right now it seems like the information coming out of China is better than what we saw during the art as I'm sure you're aware in two thousand to two thousand three the information regarding the contact tracing the case count all of those things were incredibly low compared to reality and the Chinese government ultimately came out and said that those numbers have not been representatives so it appears that things are going better this time and the WTO and their researchers have been welcomed into the country that being sad there is always a question of whether there's a disconnect in information from the local provinces to the central government in China so most officials will agree that the case count you're seeing are probably a bit lower than what's true I'm dying with Emily Baumgartner the medical reporter the Los Angeles Times follower on Twitter Emily underscore bomb be a U. M. she's really good at this I asked doctor Daljit what people should read he read the con he noted the coming plague by Laurie correct and the the deadliest enemy another big book on viruses how are you getting your reporting who you're talking to what your sources right now I'm talking mostly to folks at institutions across the United States and in China who are who have a history of tracing and modeling epidemic there are a lot of mathematical modeling that can actually show you where this is likely to go and how quickly it's likely to go there of course there are complications that expert at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown and the TV we are running into such as an unlikely denominator so if they don't know how many cases there are it's hard to see how quickly it spreading and how efficiently transmission will occur if it were to occur in the United States what's your reporting on the best estimate of the are not for this virus at this point right now I'm hearing two point six pretty consistently again are not is based a lot on the denominator so for those who are unaware are not is a representation of the reproductive rate or how many people will be infected by every one case of this disease so for something like needles you're going to infect twelve to eighteen people it's incredibly infectious with the seasonal flu can be as low as one and it was as if he has an are not lower than one it's actually going to Peter out but with something like this we're looking at probably somewhere between two and three point five so it means that uses are continuing to rise certainly one minute give us the worst case not World War Z. but what do you think is the worst case for the United States and only sure realistically the worst case is that it continues to spread out of control with the human to human transmission standing itself in the United States and if you play out for months and years what we're talking about is a situation where this becomes something that circulates regularly and widely around the world including the United States that's what we saw with each one and one the flies when two thousand nine and now you're seeing that come around the world every single year this corona virus could absolutely realistically joined the ranks of things that we are constantly battling for decades and it's something that we don't have a vaccine against yet so what is the real real threat a bomb Gardner thank you medical reporter for the Los Angeles Times follow her on Twitter at Emily underscore bomb be a U. M. thank you Emelie thank you Adam thank you Ben thank you generally sumo don't sleep in the subway to whine and thank all of you for listening I'll be back tomorrow the Friday edition of the you yo chose never to the mess we are on top of the news and I think it might be a quick all day tomorrow as well for president Donald Trump January thirty one that would be good do not play cards with Mitch McConnell I'll be back tomorrow America under that shop but you absolutely positively need the truth this is where you turn this is the Hugh Hewitt show for honor bound copy dot com let me ask you where do the province from your Cup of coffee go tell but the owners of relief factor of now started honor bound copying their committing.

medical reporter Emily Culver city California
"medical reporter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Los Angeles Times you the medical reporter where do I find you this morning Emily good morning I'm out here in Culver city California well good morning to you thanks for getting up early I just had a great conversation with doctor doll Jed the Johns Hopkins center for health security lot of calm there what do you sing in your reporting about whether or not Americans are on doing your or on necessarily concerned about corona virus or the two indifferent to it it's a great question I think we're seeing lots of reports across the country of math spelling out people being very concerned from the looks of it right now there's really no reason to be doing anything other than washing your hands that's not to say that this will not become a greater concern in the United States but right now with five cases and a very strong public health system it's not something that every American should be worried about nearly as much as the worry about catching the seasonal flu our people canceling their travel plans to China in your reporting as far as I can tell they're beaten testing done both voluntarily and involuntarily I'm sure you've heard about some of the the commercial flight being canceled and according to travel advisories coming out of that the federal government in many cases it makes sense particularly for Wuhan province yes we are no I am I made a list and I went over it with that Chuck Todd winners and losers should domestic domestic transfer occurring the United States the indoor things in people win Amazon you PS Netflix big pharma TV radio Google apple the losers would be outdoor things in crowds mall sporting events retail politics people going door to door have you begun to see any indication of those sorts of winners and losers sorting themselves out the United States are we still on standby for domestic to domestic transmission I absolutely believe that the winners you listed are absolutely winners already in this situation I'm not sure that the losers have have taken their spot on the rankings yet I think that you know in many situations we do see situation when according to ask people to avoid public spaces and avoid public gatherings we'd certainly seen that in China already and we have seen that in the United States in the past again we just turn at that point yet in the US where you're going to see people hiding in the house and hi Emily Boeing are good how do you believe the Chinese responses been do you trust the news I read the South China morning post I read the tell I read everything I can't I just don't know what I can trust from the P. R. C. right now it seems like the information coming out of China is better than what we saw during stars as I'm sure you're aware in two thousand to two thousand three the information regarding the contact tracing the case count all of those things were incredibly low compared to reality and the Chinese government ultimately came out and said that those numbers have not been representatives so it appears that things are going better this time and the WTO and their researchers have been welcomed into the country that being sad there is always the question of whether there's a disconnect in information from the local provinces to the central government in China so most officials will agree that the case count you're seeing are probably a bit lower than what's true but dying with Emily Baumgartner the medical reporter the Los Angeles Times follower on Twitter at Emily underscore bomb be a U. M. she's really good at this I asked doctor Daljit what people should read he read the com he noted the coming plague by Laurie correct and the the deadliest enemy another big book on viruses how are you getting your reporting who you're talking to what your sources right now I'm talking mostly to folks at institutions across the United States and in China who are who have a history of tracing and modeling epidemic there are a lot of mathematical modeling that can actually show you where this is likely to go and how quickly it's likely to go there of course there are complications that accurate at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown and the TV we are running into such as an unlikely denominator so if they don't know how many cases there are it's hard to see how quickly it spreading and how efficiently transmission will occur if it were to occur in the United States what's your reporting on the best estimate of the are not for this virus at this point right now I'm hearing two point six pretty consistently again are not is based a lot on the denominator so for those who are unaware are not is a representation of the reproductive rate or how many people will be infected by every one case of this disease so for something like needles you're going to infect twelve to eighteen people it's incredibly infectious disease oak wilt can be as low as one and it's as if he has a and are not lower than one it's actually going to Peter out but with something like this we're looking at probably somewhere between two and three point five so it means that uses are continuing to rise certainly one minute give us the worst case not World War Z. but what do you think is the worst case for the United States and only sure realistically the worst case is that it continues to spread out of control with the human to human transmission containing itself in the United States and if you play out for months and years what we're talking about is a situation where this becomes something that circulates regularly and widely around the world including the United States that's what we saw with each one and one the swine flu in two thousand nine and now you're seeing that come around the world every single year this corona virus could absolutely realistically joined the ranks of saying that we are constantly battling for decades and it's something that we don't have a vaccine against yes so what is the real real threat a bomb Gardner thank you medical reporter for the Los Angeles Times follow her on Twitter at Emily underscore bomb be a U. M. thank you Emelie thank you Adam thank you Ben thank you generally Simone don't sleep in the subway to whine and thank all of you for listening I'll be back tomorrow the Friday edition of the you yo chose never to the mess we on top of the news and I think it might be a quick all day tomorrow as well for president Donald Trump January thirty one that would be good do not play cards with Mitch McConnell I'll be back tomorrow America under the shower you absolutely positively need the truth this is where you turn this is the Hugh Hewitt show for honor bound copy dot com let me ask you where do the province from your Cup of coffee go tell but the owners of.

medical reporter Los Angeles Times Emily Culver city California
Millions in the U.S. Can't Afford Their Meds

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Millions in the U.S. Can't Afford Their Meds

"I'm I'm sure sure you've you've noticed noticed the the cost cost of of prescription prescription drugs drugs continued continued going going up up this this year year and and while while Congress Congress talks talks about about doing doing something something lawmakers lawmakers have have been been unable unable to to pass pass any legislation to rein in these ongoing price hikes according to a recent survey by the Kaiser family foundation millions of Americans are on able to afford the medicines they need as a result the survey found almost thirty percent of patients either didn't fill a prescription skip doses or took an over the counter medication instead of the prescribed drugs during the past twelve months on the commode news live via Skype Consumer Reports investigative health and medical reporter Lisa guilt to talk about the problem the solutions and what you can do while we wait for Congress to act and Lisa I'm sure you'll agree with me that it's tragic what people are doing because they can't afford their meds it's true you know in fact a consumer report nationally representative survey also found very similar things to what the Kaiser family foundation survey and that is that people are struggling across the country with a forty no medication and they do some really bad things when they can't afford it the survey showed that of the people whose drug price went up and I was about a third of all working Americans discovered in the last twelve months at least one of the medications they take went up in price we learned that of those folks one of every four just fill the prescription at all which is really bad the end of the prescription people take all the time and we have to learn that when they couldn't afford a medication they were much more likely sometimes two and three times more likely to do things like that to use the credit card more often to pay for household expenses are paid spend less money on groceries even me they they really take pretty serious steps to curb their household spending in order to afford crazy medication at bad news and not getting any better clearly a problem the question is why the drug companies are clearly one culprit in all of this but the bigger problem here is that people will get in between and managing our health care and you wrote about that for the January issue tell everybody about that that's right you know I've covered this topic for more than a decade and this is one of a deeper dive that we did and really trying to untangle why consumers and that is really working Americans to get their health insurance through their employer why I think we spending so much more money at work which is simply the fact that prices are going up which actually is very much a problem for certain drugs but there were some insurance situations and people are facing along with that they're also causing people to pay more money out of pocket and I'll tell you if you just look at the prices a long we can see the drug prices are clearly climbing that's not a surprise what we found is that there's a secret mechanism behind some of the prices for branded drugs not drugs for which there's not a generic equivalent it called pharmacy benefit managers and they are a middle man in the entire drug supply chain we can see that drug manufacturers are raising their prices and they're doing so for a very interesting and backcountry then and that's because they're paying more money to the pharmacy benefit managers and I'll tell you what the amount is a hundred sixty six billion dollars in two thousand eighteen alone and that is to get their drugs covered by the PBM industry lingo for pharmacy benefit manager to get their drugs covered by the PDM so that when a consumer goes the pharmacy counter to fill a prescription for that drug covered the thing you know is that those payments from a drug company to a PVM have doubled in the last five years it used to be eighty three billion that amount of money is invisible to the consumer but it drives up what's called the list price actual retail price of a drug and through a consumer insurance companies either through having a high deductible insurance plan or having something called coinsurance or you pay a percentage of the list price the consumer is more commonly exposed to the to very high list prices if the hidden system it's very hard to untangle but we've spent the last year doing it and we can say there's at least several ways that consumers can combat we're talking a Lisa Gil she's Consumer Reports investigative health and medical reporter so Lisa while we wait for Congress to act there are some things people can do and it starts while you're in the doctor's office that's right one of the suggestions that we have is to bring up cost with your doctor your doctor in many cases will not raise the issue of whether or not you can afford a medication or treatment that they're suggesting so you might be surprised that they don't bring it up but it's it's unfortunate up to you the graph of how much that can cost they might tell you first that they don't know but you can ask them to call your insurance company and find out and that way you can have the discussion in your doctor's office before you leave and not standing at the pharmacy counter quite trying to fill the prescription itself and here's something it sounds counter intuitive if you have insurance you go around the insurances save money but I did this based on your suggestion there's a drug it routinely it was on the formulary the insurance company to get off the formula recent one up from like twenty dollars to a hundred and twenty dollars and I you look at a place called good are ex it's coupons you get for free for drugs and I wound up getting it at another pharmacy about a mile away for twelve dollars so from a hundred twenty to twelve dollars that was cheaper insurance right this is increasingly a problem for consumers you found a great solution and we've been looking at correct for years we suggest that every time we possibly can because typically those discounts particularly when applied to generic drugs can save you a bundle of money and for interestingly the insurance companies are not covering all generic like you might think they would and in fact it can lead to one of the problems that we've seen consumers are dealing with and that if they're exposed just like your more commonly talked very high prices through the insurance company because the insurance company either doesn't cover the drug for the only covering a percentage of the drugs like of the full retail price they may only cover twenty or thirty percent you're on the hook for the rest

Congress
"medical reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"November zero support just around the corner the median estimate one ninety tell following a big downside surprise on the ATP report yeah it's interesting CIBC world markets obviously takes the correlation there and a grant of over two negative for the dollar we see dollar weakness sterling with a one thirty one print there it is one thirty one zero zero one sterling that is you're looking when we go over there are you looking at the three bedroom thing in may for I'm not looking at any property now one thirty one is fundamental I mean people get it back down to one twenty odd looking to in a little bit of a crowd funding effort and try to find a good bye Cammarata Knightsbridge done the thing or we can space you ever done out the fields where you grew up where you go look for buried treasure in English as a kid you can look for right you go look for Roman coins we would look for Roman coins in America which is obvious reasons most of the M. pontifical I've hated it no I don't think that might be why you were looking for what we do is we're looking at the beach for Tiffany with were you just looking for the Braves that how your spending the next couple of weeks yeah I got a medical reporter and surveillance for those of you that have been with us for the day Michael bear bar under the weather and easy really years we're gonna see being hit the reset your device to work okay the only address everything fridges of twelve Joe fridges of one twenty five he's always rocks all of this is Bloomberg radio.

Cammarata Knightsbridge America Tiffany Braves medical reporter CIBC Michael Bloomberg
"medical reporter" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Returned after his exile to the desert your turn group is fabulous but I realize one thing I miss we left with his laugh quizzes last fills the room and I'm sure lifts the spirits of anyone listening not really the health you sell it okay but look to my spirits any okay all right this was funny the visual of this was funny this is they are just pathetic Republicans they really are and he's making them of dance yes summer more ridiculous by the day so mark medical reporter that asked him for kat because they don't coming out of this these this testimony was Taylor yesterday yeah I don't know what it's also damning and it's all first of all is anyone ask them how can they be never Trumper is if these are the people to chose to go to work for trump or appointees of trump's right thank you are right but I'm to anyway so she asked for comment of course had no comedy just blew right buyer right and so then she says you know Republicans are struggling to whatever yeah you can't suck up to bright right trump enough mark meadows here we call them we have mark meadows right here comes the meadows can we talk a lot so he he's walking by right now but Republicans are really struggling to defend the present okay great struggling on okay so because the kids are not struggling on anything now we have election night everything is good Kelly tell me it's not it's not me it's alright okay there is one person who has testified that there's no quid pro quo others many others have said that there is so how do you justify that how do you continue to defend the president's well there's there's more than one there's there's one on terms of the deposition being Friday least right which is ambassador Volcker's yesterday and even with as for Saddam he said he didn't know why the aid was held up still doesn't know and certainly from that standpoint there was no quid.

medical reporter kat Taylor Trumper mark meadows Kelly president Saddam ambassador Volcker
Record measles outbreak in Europe reaches 41,000 cases

The Science Hour

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Record measles outbreak in Europe reaches 41,000 cases

"Health and technology stores from around the world all in one place on today's show, we'll be asking why cases of measles have hit a record high in Europe. That's in just a moment and the world's favourite banana is under threat chapels very well as thick skin in us high yielding and it tastes pretty good. It's not a bad banana and seedless. Yes, full. If you've ever actually tried to a banana seed, they're very charged for you. Don't have on one. We'll hear why the

Europe Latin America Venezuela Bangladesh Claire World Health Organization Writer Americas David Robson BBC Annette Medical Reporter Wilson Two Years Ninety Five Percent Twenty Years Six Months
"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

"The phrase breast is best has been around for a long time and the health benefits of breastfeeding oh well known but now midwives in the uk have been told to respect the choice of a woman if she decides not to breastfeed medical reporter at the new scientist claire wilson is still with man and content us more so this is a new position from the royal college into lives isn't it why if they set this well i think those growing awareness that the the medical offered oxy that breast is best of course it does have health benefits to breastfeed your child but hospitals have really been trying in the past few years to provide more support help women be able to breastfeed if they encounter difficulties on the fair is that this may have tipped over a bit too far into pressurizing women to do it too much some might even say bullying physi sometimes do hit nima the saying that they found it very difficult to breastfeed then they felt very guilty and felt that they were made to feel guilty by staff as well yes it could be staff it could be of a mother sadly nobody's doing this on purpose i don't think but i've spoken to a lot of women who said they were put under so much pressure when they were either physically unable to breastfeed or perhaps the toll that it exerts on mental health because it can be absolutely exhausting giving up so many hours of your day doing this it was just too much for them and they they really felt it was better for their mental health i stopped on the pressure that they came under it just might them feel worse than perhaps might be contributing to postnatal depression so perhaps there might be a little less pressure on them in the uk in the future but there are still good evidence isn't the breastfeeding if people can do it brings health benefits that's right definitely in developing countries if you don't have access to.

uk medical reporter claire wilson scientist pressurizing
"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

"The benefits of singing for the mind and the body you often hear people who sing regularly say that they find singing very relaxing because essentially they're being encouraged to breathe in a particular kind of way so the out breath is extended and so the heart is being relaxed and my guest today is claire wilson who's a medical reporter at the new scientists so you've got news for us on how micro bill data can be used in the fight against crime yes it looks like in future we might have a new way to catch burglars even if they touch nothing in your house they may still be leaving traces of themselves behind four to that later now earth scientists can't forecast earthquakes the way that meteorologists can see the signs of an imminent storm but they can give generalized forecasts the simplest approach has always been to look at what's happened in the past expect her quakes where they already happened those plate boundaries all the danger zone nowadays because we know quakes mostly but not uniquely happen where the earth's plates grind against each other maps of plate motions can show whether dangerous building up most thousands of gps stations have made those maps very accurate except where the plates move underwater rothstein founder of the quake awareness foundation temblor has been backing a model called gear the global earthquake activity rate model which attempts to blend the best of each approach and this week we've been able to see the forecast of quake activity made in two thousand fifteen and compare it with what's actually happened since the forecast outperformed all its competitors and in particular it outperformed using those gps strain signals alone or looking at past earthquakes alone another words the.

claire wilson medical reporter founder
"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Co founder of the guest clothing company of forcibly groping her abc's linsey davis tells us that paul marciano is out yes now announcing its cofounder paul marciano is stepping down as the company's executive chairman after sexual misconduct investigation into allegations of improper behavior the company announced tuesday in an sec filing that its investigation found that on certain occasions mr marciano exercise poor judgment in his communications with models and photographers and in placing himself in situations in which plausible allegations of improper conduct could and did arise marciano denies these allegations he will though be succeeded as executive chair by his brother maurice also helped to found that company in southern new jersey a small plane crashes in a rural area killing two people the faa says it appears they were the only two people aboard the twin engine beechcraft baron that plane took off from nine o'clock this morning about ten miles southwest of the crash an investigation underway there's no warning today about common medications study says depression could be a side effect of more than two hundred drugs including some heart meds birth control pills pain meds sedatives and simple over the counter acid blockers abc news medical reporter dr jennifer ashton says it's important to talk to your doctor and your put on a medication even something that's over the counter it is not meant to be autopilot you need to talk to your healthcare provider about follow up the dose may need to be adjusted and if you develop a side effect that outweighs any of the benefits you're getting from that medication that's when you need to reassess you can get full details of this study in the journal the american medical association wbz news time one twentyone six states.

Co founder paul marciano executive chairman maurice faa dr jennifer ashton linsey davis sec executive medical reporter the american medical associati
"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello and thanks for downloading the science that you'll weekly fix of science health and technology i'm rolling peas an on this podcast i've been learning about the possible collective affective billions of little things swimming beneath the ocean waves we're trying to understand the difference between an animal swimming on its own in an animal swimming in a huge school or swarm and so we put thousands of them in the tank and then essentially lure them towards the light and that causes a massive migration through the tank parole power later and vaccinations getting people to come forward for there's doesn't have to involve heavy persuasion just simple things like text reminders and even the chance of benin gong yes really and with me in the studio is claire wilson medical reporter at the new scientist magazine you've been reporting on how infections during pregnancy can affect a child's right yes and it might explain mysterious connection we've seen between flu epidemics in the passed and a spike in schizophrenia cases i'm looking forward to hearing more of the detail there thanks glad we start in south korea where an experiment in geothermal energy has been linked to an earthquake that hit the town of pohang last year it wasn't particularly powerful magnitude five point five but people were hurt and buildings were damaged and career is geologically quite stable compared to say its neighbor japan that said there was another quake not far away the previous year so clearly this was worth investigating glasgow university's rob west way is a hydraulics engineer who was involved in the geothermal operations which involved pumping water down to deep hot rox he's part of the team who've also been looking to see if that was connected to the unexpected seismicity bush to this paper concerns the earthquake occurred on the fifteenth of november last year just outside the city of pohang in south korea this was.

medical reporter south korea earthquake pohang japan engineer claire wilson scientist glasgow university rob west
"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The flu and prescribed both an antibiotic and the antiviral medication tamiflu after he got well from the freyer a few days later he got fake again so sick doctors placed him in a medically induce coma he died last saturday one of at least fifty three pediatric deaths related to the flu dr anne shook it is the acting director of the cdc it's very important if you notice that a person is getting better from their flew and then suddenly gets worse for them to seek medical attention according to the cdc this flu season continues to rival the worst in recent years with some shortages of antiviral medications when we look at our hospitalizations and children half of the children don't have underlined medical problems so we urge parents to make sure their kids get vaccinated against flu every year the cdc stands by that recommendation despite a report finding the effectiveness of the vaccine this season and canada against the most common strain has only been seventeen percent it wouldn't surprise me if we find the same thing here in the us cbs news chief a medical reporter dr jon lapook reporting wbz news time four seventeen a umass law professor is headed to the winter olympics in south korea but not to compete for metals physical therapy professor alexandria lopes is among the international experts in the pyong chang studying the performance of the athletes for the international olympic committee research team is gathering data on how many athletes sustained injuries or fall ill during.

flu dr anne acting director us dr jon lapook professor olympics south korea alexandria lopes canada medical reporter umass olympic committee seventeen percent
"medical reporter" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on WCTC

"Ball we kicked off a ball hit the ground we got pretty good fielders start they drove the ball you know we stop them all which is great we got the ball with balanced were touch outs you wants start football game he talked before about started facet start fast now it was a good play call we blocked it up well august broke a couple tackles he came through the whole eyes up and he saw the enzo he outran everybody and it's not just girls that was a good job on offense aligned at least get him started in and it was a tremendous individual effort on his part to pull through some tackles and take it all the way i love the kid we saw hunter higher legionary in down monetary uh yuksel amanda i've i'm not i'm getting medical reporter anything like that i don't think there's anything wrong have you is performance adding nine grade in '87 narcan very very nice game monitor what will have to watch the tape um you know first thoughts i would say yes but until i watched the tape uh you know i i don't really know yet i do know we managed it well enough to win the game and he protected the football and that's the first priority is is to do that he did that so uh that allowed us to what if we were turn the ball over uh today a couple of times we would have won that game two geo in the running backs did a good job of that but we we've got to get more out of our offense so that so secret know just there wasn't a a toll fourquarter performance that we would have wanted and i thought we would have needed to win the game hey else thanks guys that is rutgers head coach chris ashdown stairs following the scar that eits fourteen twelve victory over purdue will react will hear from some wedding players will do that next this is the rutgers diff quarter show let's face it pained bills is not a very rewarding task so would be great if you're checking.

football rutgers medical reporter chris ashdown purdue fourquarter
"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"But there is a health warning about dangerous in the murky waters medical reporter elizabeth cohen not only is the water contaminated it is highly contaminated numbers that some experts have never seen in their experience the biggest concern is for people who spent a lot of time in the water and also those who may have cut themselves while walking in that water forty years have passed since the premier of the sifi film close encounters of the third kind this month people will be encountering each other at the police in wyoming where parts of the movie were shot the levers an unidentified flying objects will gather for a threeday convention this month at the pace of wyoming is national monument devils tower of affability of pumping out there are the event bob wilson says there will be field investigation training they want their investigators to be credible when the agadir reported by they're turning europol true be skeptical enter those attending expecting to make contact with beings from outer space or very open but are without them but were expected stephan kaufman cbs news denver after a summer of increased seismic activity people in iceland are obsessing over the smallest sign of eruption at the country's most closely watched volcano katlau or last erupted in nineteen 18 never before since the twelve th century have ninety nine years passed without an eruption eight of the last 10 eruptions for cat laware be tween september and november when the glacial seasonal melting is believed to create conditions for the hot lava to burst out the coastal hamlet of vic near the volcano is prepping for the worst officials say a text message will be sent to every mobile phone connected to.

elizabeth cohen wyoming national monument devils tower bob wilson agadir denver iceland mobile phone medical reporter stephan kaufman ninety nine years forty years threeday
"medical reporter" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"medical reporter" Discussed on On The Media

"Somebody could have brought it back from there so i picked up the phone called the editor of the paper and he wasn't there but his wife was she said our medical reporter is doing an article on to let him i may he call you and i said of course but he won't use my name will he she said she wouldn't used my name and they didn't although on monday morning page one of the paper black border around it baby to forming drug may cost woman her child here and it went on to say scottsdale schoolteacher and they had four small children i thought that was narrowing it down quite a bit we let it go with that and i went to work and romper bumper stumper boos when i got out of doing the show somebody said you have an important call and it was my doctors saying because of the story in the paper albeit anonymous i cannot do the operation because any person could make a citizen's arrest and i thought citizen's arrest and says nothing to do with anyone this has to do with my family my children for children under the age of seven she asked what ossis would be responsible for handling a citizen's arrest and being sherry she called to give them an earful into young attorney picked up the phone listened to her righteous indignation and replied i knew who you are i have before ear or powder named valery.

editor medical reporter ossis attorney scottsdale