36 Burst results for "Medical Officer"

 Los Angeles OKs one of strictest US vaccination mandates

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Los Angeles OKs one of strictest US vaccination mandates

"New York is working through challenges to various vaccination mandates with some employees choosing the door rather than get their shot a U. S. district judge has rejected a court challenge to New York city's vaccination mandate for school staff the judge cited the harm that could take place to school children the lawsuit was one of several challenges to vaccination mandates in the state which included one statewide for hospital and nursing home workers Northwell health is New York state's largest health care provider since they terminated fourteen hundred employees for refusing to be vaccinated they're given everybody ample opportunity Dr David that Nelly as their chief medical officer I will continue to give people opportunity get vaccinated then and

New York New York City Dr David Nelly
Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

00:45 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medical officer" discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"Of i flew from dublin. Airport to london stansted and back was no airport. Asked to see my starts asked in dublin. Coming back to they want to see us and this said no your is like this is just careless and then you have to wonder Tony houlahan say the other night or day that he came back from his holidays and no one wanted to see his pass in dublin airport. I mean sort of. I'm sorry no he's got to have one of the best known faces in the country at this stage so seriously like coney holyhead the chief. Medical officer was allowed to walk through an airport past all lamb staff and nobody tells maybe we should ask him for his pass. I of all people to allow passed without checking his pass. Fifth chief medical officer. Do we know of any walk in vaccination centers in karak next week during mid term. I don't off the top of my head. But i don't feel is here on tuesday and wednesday because i'm taking a longer we can you know by now. I do this. Jonas here. Tuesday wednesday and she's certainly have details of this if they are on. Pj i know someone who's a home help not vaccinated her. Her husband refused to get vaccinated and yet she's going into many people's homes. What hope have we of doing the right thing when the very people asking us to do the right thing. Have this going on. that's disgraceful. That's disgraceful and whoever that is is a disgrace refusing to be vaccinated working as a home had to enter the people's homes that is disgraceful nor the word for putting the numbers together on our poll as to how people feel about going out tonight or indeed across the weekend and it's an interesting poll. The one on twitter. The one on text is a little tighter but the one on twitter is quite interesting indeed speaking of going out. Dan says. I think we'll all be locked down by january. Hope not dan. I think we'll be locked down by january. I'm dumbstruck the places we're allowed to open. They should go back to the old system where neff call the shots and the precautionary principle was used. Well dan even the world held organization. Dr nabarro saying on this program. Yesterday we do have to recognize that. This is going to be around for a while. We have to work on ways to get on with things and tried to do it safely. And what dr barreto were saying. That was meant to get the clip this morning. But if we're going to but it was just because the pubs are open and just because the clubs are open and every whereas you don't have to go running into the pub hugging one another and he said just be careful or most of us have a brain in our head are vaccinated. Be careful do the simple things regularly washed your hands. Cover your face bit space. Sanitize all those things and hopefully dan. They won't be locked up. I really think it will be an absolute disaster. That's on the proc point that i could be accused of victim blaming by saying to groups of girls in particular. If you're going to the toilet leave one of your back at the table to watch the drinks. That's not victim blaming. That's called practical advice in a world where people are going around spiking drinks if there were three or four three or four leads as well but three of three or four people at a table going. And you wanna go to the toilet nominate one to stay behind and watch the drinks the fault of the spike. It's it's the spiker. They're the ones doing wrong. We can all help ourselves to avoid them. They're not going to spike drinks to being watched. Then of course the proc went into a discussion on my taste pornography. But that's a whole other mornings discussion. Thank you you know. Jobs joined the weekend. Eighteen fifty seven one. Five nine nine six am. I don't know what linda is going to make. Just said don't even know if you know what the proc is. Linda just oral linda from evoke dot e and wanna talk about simon murdoch. Who does the afternoons commute here. A couple of weeks ago. Literally walking on a cushion of air and says have you seen ted lasso and i hadn't at that stage and no. He's just brilliant isn't it like you're telling is giving you a big huge hogue. Still gore's sally beautiful television note this bad language in and a bit of it and it's not for children gorgeous television show. We sat down to watch that kind of had heritage people talking about and said okay. Let's give it a go and you know. I'm a huge football and sports fans as i get. You know this is gonna be chicken all the boxes for me and then we sat down to watch. This is not at all what i thought it was going to be. It's not about football. It's not a big sport. It essential subject. But that's not what it's a people on. It's about how people relate to each other. it's it's absolutely. He is one of the most gorgeous cars. I've ever seen on tally on the for those that force episode. You're sitting watching it on. Its so basically the premise behind it is that you know. Rebecca gets divorced from her husband and the only thing he loves is his football team so she takes it over with the idea. Running it into the ground richmond richmond foot which year of premier league club. And they've like you said the owners have been divorced and she gets club and the ex husband loved the club and she said so to destroy it. Says you get this idea to hire a guy. An american football coach to come over and manage the club and it doesn't work out as she had planned and not enough first of all. She is incredibly cynical. After her divorce our as are most of the people around her due to their and the financial wranglings involved and ted just sweeps in and is just so lovely. And you kind of expect it to go. Oh they're going to turn him into this cynical guy to unadopted. He goes the other way entirely he. Has everybody fallen out his fate by the end of it. It's just he's the least macho guy you ever see in a sports program and everybody just ends up The brings a homemade biscuits every morning. And you know. His own relationship is so from him. Being in england than them still being in america on its but it just breaks down sports sports journalists business breaks them down. Yeah and people want to take down. People want to dislike him people. Want to hayes him and you just can't his lovely stories of his dad and his offering and he just turns everybody onto his side and the football doesn't go the way anybody.

Dublin Tony Houlahan Karak DAN Dr Nabarro Dr Barreto Twitter Simon Murdoch Jonas Neff Ted Lasso Linda Football London Hogue Premier League Club Gore Jobs
With Hands Tied, Montana Officials Issue Public Health Plea

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

With Hands Tied, Montana Officials Issue Public Health Plea

"There's been an escalation of the pandemic in several western states struggling to convince skeptical people to get vaccinated public health leaders have approved price of care rationing in Idaho parts of Alaska and Montana and several more states are veering dangerously close with less than ten percent of intensive care unit beds available in Idaho we're overwhelmed hospitals are rationing care statewide the state is looking at a virus positivity rate of twenty percent as hospitals in Missoula and Bozeman face increasing strain local health officials are banking Montana residents to wear masks indoors get vaccinated and limit gatherings there lamenting their inability to implement public health restrictions after Montana passed several laws earlier this year curtailing their power in Helena chief medical officer Dr Shelly Harkins with St Peter's health says the constraints of a hospital or worse than what was seen earlier in the pandemic the hospital's intensive care unit advanced medical unit and morgue are full I'm Jennifer king

Montana Idaho Alaska Bozeman Missoula Dr Shelly Harkins St Peter's Health Helena Jennifer King
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:23 min | Last month

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Back to the outcomes rocket sal marquez here and today i have the outstanding dr michael blackman joining us. He's the chief medical officer at greenway health. A primary care physician at heart. Dr blackman brings an extensive background in health. It product management along with his knowledge of outpatient and inpatient care. He believes healthcare is a team sport. That requires the talents of all contributors working together to succeed prior to joining in greenway. He was medical director for population. Health of all scripts before that he served as the chief medical officer for mckesson enterprise information systems division. He was an early leader in the development of electronic prescribing controlled substances. Dr blackman earned his bachelor's in political science from brown university where he earned his doctor of medicine degree. He completed his residency in internal medicine and pediatrics. From the university of miami jackson memorial hospital and also holds his mba from the university of michigan. So i mean just an incredible individual with experience in the provider space as well as the health. It and our space. I'm privileged to have them here with us. Michael thank you so much for joining us. Thanks solace my pleasure to be here today absolutely so we're going to cover a lot of ground here. You know the e. h. r. Letters could be a pain point but also the bottom line is we need them to operate in healthcare and so before we dive into greenway health and the work that you guys are doing talk to us a little bit about you and what inspired your work journey and healthcare. Oh sure we'll talk about that for a minute but you you mentioned you know. E hr in those three letters electronic health records electronic health records. I think unfortunately the things that doctors often like to hate. But i think we can work to make them better really make people see value in in using them value in really improving patient care but as you as i think about one inspires my work in healthcare prior to going into medicine. I used to work in information systems consulting and i was working at the time. It's part of what drove me in some ways to medicine. I was working on a project for a mail. Order pharmaceutical firm. And i found out i was just far more interested in what the drugs did and how they affect people than what i was personally working on and additionally you know then say fulltime physician in working with an early hr. I frankly was one of those people who would look and say. Did anybody clinical look at this before it went out the door because some of this just doesn't make a lot of sense and that really in a lot of ways drove me to where i am. Today that's fascinating. That is fascinating. Dr blackman so you actually started in information services and went into medicine. I did yeah it. It was a little bit of the reverse. Yeah right because usually the other way position becomes an informatics than kind of goes that way. But you actually did it the other way around. So that's really interesting in this. And even though. I'm no longer seeing patients full-time you know. This really does still they will. To what is referred to practice medicine. The macro level and really have an impact on health care across the board. And how do we improve providers lives which frankly then improves patient's lives totally and had to your point to beginning of our chat. Had the physician and caregiver workflow been considered a little bit more i think. Hr's would mean something completely different today and so awesome that you're at the helm there in the cmo role so let's hone into it. Let's sewn into greenway health and how are you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem today. So that's really a great question. I'm really proud of the work. We're doing here at greenway especially some work. We've done recently bradley. In part driven by unfortunately the kobe nineteen pandemic in throughout really sought to find new ways to add value to what we provide to our clients and so a couple pieces there and frankly the beginning of the pandemic internally at greenway we established a cross functional task force really to say. Where can we help people. How can we make this better in. There were two products that really came out of that one is our greenway. Telehealth offering and the other is greenway g. r. s. express which stands for greenway revenue services as well as in addition that a partnership with amazon web services. Which i'm happy to talk about in a little bit but you know frankly right now. Obviously covert continues to be a hot topic and we've been focusing to ensure that our clients have you know what they need to appropriately. You know obviously responsible for giving the vaccines but they have to be documented appropriately with the appropriate codes. And that information needs to be communicated to the state registries and it'd be nice to say that every single state registry was the same. They're not and so we have to make sure that we're covering them. You know across the board and as part of that we've worked with other. Hr vendors and partner in participated in discussions with the cdc hhs and others to really keep abreast of those fast moving changes and we try to bring her clients rather up-to-date on where we are with that and convey that information as best. We can and i appreciate that and the environment is quickly changing. And you know you mentioned covert and there's a lot of things that came about with you. Know regulation around. Hey what can physicians and providers do with telehealth. How do you bill. It cova testing right. What's billable and and you know what are the reimbursements. So so many things that keep track of and on top of that you know taking care of patients that are in a new environment with covert among us. So there's there's just way too much for any one person practice or even large idea and the to handle how do you guys make things different or better for the folks using your systems. Well in some ways especially around some of this fast changing things around co vid making sure that we get them the information they need any instructions to make appropriate updates in the system so things that they can do without necessarily waiting for us. Which makes it much faster to deliver.

Dr blackman sal marquez dr michael blackman greenway health mckesson enterprise informatio university of miami jackson me greenway brown university university of michigan greenway revenue services Michael bradley amazon cdc
Child With No Other Health Issues Dies From COVID-19 in Houston

Gaydos and Chad

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Child With No Other Health Issues Dies From COVID-19 in Houston

"Covid 19 pediatric death in one of the nation's largest city. Houston's health departments as a boy was between the ages of 10 and 19 years old and is the first child to die of Covid in Houston without underlying health conditions. Six other Children have died from Covid in Houston, but had underlying health conditions. The child was unvaccinated and had a covid variant. Houston's chief medical officers, saying it is a reminder that Children can get seriously ill and die from Covid. Alex

Covid Houston Alex
Doctors Are Relying More on Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight COVID

Seattle's Morning News

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Doctors Are Relying More on Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight COVID

"For Covid 19 is showing a great deal of progress. David Begnaud reports from hard hit Louisiana monoclonal antibodies, lab grown proteins that help the body target and eliminate covid infection, according to Dr Thomas Galit, chief medical officer at ST Francis Medical Center in Monroe, Louisiana. They have become the most effective therapy yet has done a great job of helping high risk patients stay out of the hospital. The therapy is becoming more available at hospitals and clinics around the country. But it is only administered after infection within 10 days of the first symptoms and before those symptoms get to severe what type of sickness do you usually say that's too sick to receive if they are having profound oxygen requirements continued high grade beavers dehydration. Since July. The first we've given about 1700 doses. One of those doses went to 42 year old Scotty Johnson. We were there when he got his infusion three weeks ago in Monroe, as Covid was attacking his body. It feels like somebody's choking you. You start coughing, but nothing comes out this week. We followed up with him and we met his wife, Meg. They both got the antibody treatments right around the same time. I just really start feeling good about Three or four days ago, probably, but I feel like I'm like 90% now, while Scotty did not get the vaccine bag did my wife got anybody treatment? On Thursday. I tested positive on Friday. On Saturday, she was back up cleaning the house and doing dishes and like it never even bothered. While the antibody treatments can be effective, they are not a substitute for vaccines, says CBS News Medical contributor Dr David Agus. There's no question the vaccine is better than an antibody. But in the case where your immune suppressed and you can't make a good response to a vaccine, they're lifesavers. So this is an important part of our arsenal. But it certainly is not the only weapon in our arsenal. Vaccines are Front line. No question about it to fight a virus in today's world, and that

Covid David Begnaud Dr Thomas Galit St Francis Medical Center Louisiana Monroe Scotty Johnson MEG Cbs News Medical Dr David Agus Scotty
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:04 min | 2 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I don't remember the number. But i think it was something. Like fifty million americans suffer from diabetes. Yeah you know in certain ethnicities it's ranging fifty percent of people and as a growing pro. It's not diminish even though we've got a lot of new drugs a lot of new approaches. You see him on tv every night but the problem is still growing and then like i say this diabetic rob at the occurs in probably twenty five percent of those patients with diabetes and at least have a refractory so it's millions so we're excited about it not only demonstrates that it's highly effective and i'm being like ninety percent of cases we also showed that the majority of patients ready for this had some improvement in sensory and motor awhile. Now it's early. It's early data and we've got a lot more work before. I'm willing to tell you that it's a know clear. Cut majority of better get some better but as really tantalizing this early signal of potentially improving the neurological function some of these patients. That's really interesting. So i don't know if it does or doesn't but it does it contribute to the halting of degeneration of the nerves or yeah. Td my friend were. We're digging into our next big rc. To but look for basically. We're already doing skin biopsies and things like on my cross in other studies to try and understand what's going on and i think probably it's multiple mechanisms of actions. Some of these patients got better right away. I mean i had some of the study patients. Tell me doc. For the first time i can feel the cold tiles underneath my feet. I mean in the morning. That's cool and that happened within weeks for some patients and then others took many weeks or even months. So i think there's different mechanisms of action in place so we'll have to start that all out but Mortified love it love. It will congrats on this milestone and a lot more to come. This has been truly a pleasure to to connect with you david just to understand the the amazing work. You guys are up to how different it is before we conclude. I love if you could just share a closing. Thought you know and work at the listeners. Get in touch with you. The company physicians offering these therapies. Let us know more about that. And then we conclude. Yeah.

diabetes david
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"System and we can tell the doctors and the patients what their outcomes are kind of benefits. They're getting we track medication usage sleep and all that for every single patient. That's fantastic that granular level data. You know a lot of folks ask questions and there's big topics around you know. Patient reported data is the data device reported or is it input by patient. Yeah it's both you know when you're talking pain. It's almost always subjective data right. we don't have objective biomarkers of pain. I mean there just aren't there is attempts to do that to look at electrical output of the corridor. You know different types of biomarkers. None of those means staying in terms of what the patient is experienced as pain. So those are patient reported outcomes that record on the other hand. The device also collects information programming parameters the amplitude. How much it's used you know. It needs to be recharged how often that occurs along that occur so we we collect both objective in patient reported outcomes to synthesize a record. And that's a really great point right. I mean this this chronic pain. It is subjective and somebody feels matters. That's right you know. It's kind of interesting so a lot of the mechanism of action studies that are done in chronic pain. They do them on rats right before they go into so they take a rat undermine or anesthesia. They cut a nerve and then they stimulate them painfully stimulating the rat and it measure the reactions of the rat how fast they withdraw their power. Whatever so as an acute what we call no susceptive model as to say painful inducement acutely on these animals that has no bearing on the complex psychosocial behavior of chronic pain. So you can learn things. From these preclinical animal studies. You can learn some mechanistic issues some physiology but it doesn't translate directly into outcomes in a management. Yeah well said well said really great point david and so as you think about approaches to chronic pain obviously the techniques that you guys have. What are some of the setbacks that you guys have experienced and key learnings. That have made you even better because of that. Yeah you know when we first came to market so we had this beautiful new therapy with the best outcomes that ever been seen in the space and actually treating new indication very effectively this this axial back at had been poorly treated previously and so we were very protective of how we how. We deployed our therapy. We only went to really skillful doctors. We didn't use the whole range of therapies. That are platform produces really did what we studied in our our c. t. r. pivotal and. It worked great. We quickly against these giant companies garnered a significant share of market. But you know what we realized thereafter is that you patients for the same reasons. We just said that pain is is complex and it's variable is a psychosocial experience so not everyone response to h fx are therapy even though it's highly effective for most. There's some that don't so what we did. Is we broadened our platform and made it much more versatile we now perform essentially all the frequencies that are on the market. We can deliver out of ip. Gee now we still use our market therapy. H fx at ten thousand hertz primarily because that's where the evidence is that's where the best outcomes are. That's where you don't have to do with those parasitism. Those tingling Feelings but we have this ability to provide all these other waves arms to both so that both the patient and the doctor can have confidence. They're not foreclosing any options. But that's a great learning and kudos to you in the team for realizing that and now offering the spectrum of of options everyone's different and just never know from a physician in the way they like the tree to the patient what works. What are you most excited about today. Oh i'm really excited about what we call painful diabetic neuropathy just got this brand new indication of at the end of last month the end of july so this is a phenomenal step forward for these patients who suffer horribly so diabetic patients they're hyperglycemia high blood sugars lead to nerve damage and these patients have horrible burning pain in their lower extremities typically gets worse and it migrates proximate migrates up the legs and there is not really any good treatments. I'm sure everyone's seen on. Tv lyric ads. You know in the burning pain and all that well. Those don't work very well. I mean the best studies. I'm on them. Show you have to tweet about eight patients even have one responder and then there's discontinuation rate because the side effects is very high so and spinal cord stimulation had been used on on this entity. This disease ideology for a while but the outcomes were good. You know thirty six percent respond to rate for nighttime pain and nighttime pain is the worst for these folks. They walk the floor at night. The rubber and their feet. They can't even keep their bed clothes on their feet so we did another the largest randomized control trial. That's been done in this space. We just completed the twelve month point on that. He published in jama the six-month data and just a couple of weeks ago. Got an fda full approval to market this and that's painful diabetic neuropathy. So i'm really excited. But this there's probably millions of patients that suffered needlessly and we've got an answer for them when they go through the medication. We're not saying should not try the medications her but the patients who were refractory to that and who failed appropriate medication management. You don't have to go on. Opioids won't work anyhow. We've got therapy. That's fda approved and really highly successful. Wow congratulations on that approval. I'm sure it was a arduous road to get there at never as easy an indication that frankly a lot of people out there could benefit from..

anesthesia hyperglycemia high blood sugar david diabetic jama diabetic neuropathy fda
U.S. Booster Shot Decision Expected Within 2 Weeks

AP News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. Booster Shot Decision Expected Within 2 Weeks

"Well you need to cover it nineteen booster shot Dr Francis Collins who is the director of the national institutes of health tells fox news Sunday the U. S. could decide in the next couple of weeks whether to offer corona virus booster shots to Americans this fall we are getting increasing amount of data from the U. S. I bet especially the next couple of weeks we're gonna see a lot since delta really started hitting art in July and then we'll make a decision for right now Dr Donald really is the chief medical officer at the university of Pittsburgh Medical Center the vaccine is holding up well I don't think in the interim the average person who does not have immuno compromised disease should worry much about him I really protected I'm shelling out there

Dr Francis Collins National Institutes Of Health Dr Donald Fox News University Of Pittsburgh Medic
"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

05:46 min | 2 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"West. You have a suggestion how they start addressing issues. If if they're thinking maybe. I have burn out. Maybe this isn't normal. Where december start now. It's it's an excellent question I think the first place. I would start is really some self reflection We don't do enough of that. Honestly and the more and more we are able to reflect on ourselves from the vantage point of just blocking out everything else and thinking about what's important to be right what what's concerning me right now. What are the things are top of. Mind for me and that helps. Your mind starts at almost two apartment association. I think second ball you know. We're all in essence vehicles. Moving through life and life was really fast and so we feel compelled to move fast with it but if you think about a vehicle whether it be a race car whatever vehicle it is the most important part of that vehicle to help him move past the brakes. The breaks allow vehicle to approach challenging parts of the road in front of you and navigate them. Because you slowing down. And you're assessing and you're being thoughtful and maybe counterintuitive but slowing down. Go faster and so you don't need technology for that. You don't need to spend money to just take thirty seconds of your day. Do nothing to take five minutes before you start your day and reflect on yourself or pause before a big meeting or before a challenging conversation. It's amazing how transformative Being able to stop pause and think can be on your entire week. You're tired day And yourself that. That's a great place. I have people start. And then lastly is if you're comfortable share your experiences with others around you because nine times out of ten they're experiencing something very similar while the more you're able to exhibit that vulnerability damore you'll actually feel supported and the more you actually feel like you're making progress while the pass that seems to work For each person can be quite different from the person next to them and there are a lot of ways to to do that. Pausing for some people going outside doing something in nature can be helpful But what about somebody who said of stuck in an office have have you look much at a pause and doing some kind of writing as a way to Address your own issues in a quiet way does that. Is that helpful. You what you just said is is so important which is what works for me may not work for you right. We're all individuals. Your question could be applied to anything could be applied to diet for example how i diet how i e may not be the same way that extra benefits you as well and when we think about mindfulness. And we think about pausing in meditation It really comes down to what you feel comfortable with For me personally. I actually liked to go on a run and think i like to sit on the beach. I like to be in touch with nature and that helps me truly Kind of unplug from everything. It really kind of focus on one or two things in an office. i've seen people use writing. I do. Writing can be a great outlet in a great way for people to really align their thoughts. A some people like to go like to go and walk. Some people like to just sit at their desk in. Close your eyes for a minute or two I think it really depends on what i would encourage. Wanna do is try it. Try something even if even if it sounds like something. That's out of your comfort zone. Try it if you don't like it that's okay. Try the next thing and really that level of experimentation important because you will actually be able to find a set of different experiences that you really resonate with and whether it be in the office or that's outside the office at home so if if there's one bit of advice for offering to people it sounds like it is fine to way to pause and know that there's no one right way but there are many ways to slow down and have some rest even if it's just a minute or two lists is that correct. I think that's i think that's fair. Enough really could be transformative to your entire day. Well you're you're com app. I think is lovely There's there yes there is there is there. there is a trial version. Where a lot of the content's locked what you're able to really get a good sense of and so many employers now we said over sixteen hundred hat are offering come to their employees that i encourage you to ask your employer if they're offering it as well because we're bringing on more and more companies literally every single week so if they're not maybe it'd be an easy suggestion to make exactly exactly. Well thank you so much for sharing this. I i feel inspired partly. Because i've been practicing with calm for the last week. You get remote with you. But also i think.

West
"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"People or and people who just can't get to sleep or is it just variations at the same thing. I mean i think it's variations of the same thing you know people All of us have sleep disturbance for a lot of different reasons. I think one of the most common reasons that we have sleep disturbance is that when we lay down pillow. we haven't shuttle brainstorm. We were just looking at social media. We were just watching the news. We went to bed and before he includes rise. We're thinking about the thirty things that we have from today and we're going to do tomorrow. It's hard to fall asleep in that manner. It's also hard to stay asleep in that matter. That's why we really advocate for individuals taking an hour or two actually shutdown before they get a bad your media consumption actually reduce extra stimuli Really think about asleep routine and you know. The beauty of the com sleep stories is that they allow you to actually take millions of things that are racing through your mind and replace them with something that soothing a story a storyline in a theme. That really hopefully sleep now. That should help you fall asleep. It should also help stay asleep. But if you don't if you wake up tomorrow night and you can't stay awake. It's it's kind of counterintuitive. You're actually supposed to get out of bed. You're not supposed to stay in bed and watch the clock tick away one two three four. You supposed to get out of bed. Not hop on a screen but rather Just engage in any activity. That's going to start to distract your brain. That's gonna actually help you Return the bed. A quickly fullback of sleeping like reading something soothing Response well we're an of course. Ah very weird time these days. We've just been in the midst of the pandemic. We seem to be coming out of it and yet stress doesn't seem to be going away. Have you seen in the last well since the start of cova have you seen a huge increase in interest in dealing with these issues. Do sink It could be a. I think a bit rocky in the coming months. It's not so clear what's going to happen next. Are you seeing that in your client base yet. We we definitely. Are you know. We have we've to really interesting client basis. I guess you call them. One is direct to consumer offering as we said were over one hundred million downloads of individuals world. And then we have our pcp offering compr- business offering in which we bring in com- benefit out really to bring it in as a means of prevention To help The majority of employees builds code mechanisms and over fifteen sixteen hundred companies on that side in what we have seen as a couple of interesting things one is as people entered the pandemic all of us not surprising stressing zaidi peaks and it was a huge huge rush to Experiences like calm to be able to start to support individuals. The second thing is that Stress peak. Whenever you're taking out of your you know that that's very common in all of our lives and so disrupt your life you're going to be stressed and so as people now are quote unquote returning to the office returning to normal Quote you again are seeing those peaks. Because you've got to routine now. I think part of that from and this is just my opinion is that we're putting a lot of pressure as a society right now on returning to normal on getting back to way we were i actually when i speak to companies and i speak to a lot of fortune. Five hundred companies to their employees. I actually like the freemen is. Let's return the better. It actually creates a frame. That's less stressful. Because you don't have to be something you're not comfortable with and to be honest with you. None of us are going to return to exactly the we were and we had so many great learnings from his last year yes it was challenging for all of us but many of us almost all of us learn better ways of communicating better ways of stay in touch had built boundaries. Were working from home. How to preserve work life balance right how to actually engage new activities. that really fulfilled and so.

cova
"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

08:28 min | 2 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"Help a really innovate The world of medicine that we live in and provide improve access to different aspects of healthcare. Since i was a teenager. I was diagnosed with stage for cancer. Hodkinson bomber when all fifteen went through tears of chemotherapy at that time and really saw a window into Healthcare environment that had little innovation me as a teenager knowing very little. I really wanted to change the face of that that led to most of my career actually being in physical health whether it be Actually seeing patients on the research side are actually innovating on different medical devices. But the last probably ten years or so. i've spent on mental health side and and it's been quite illuminating if we think about it really taking care of our mental behavioral health. Our mind emotional state is actually paramount. And and it's one of the most undisturbed aspects of medicine I hear a com. What really intrigued me was. It is an offering an abroad experience where we're thinking proactively about helping people prepare themselves to deal with their mental health. That sounds very similar to how we think about physical halt for determining diet mental that's revolutionary and. I was just intrigued and so attracted to that type of offering and the chemistry. I had with the team of just super smart and passionate individuals and the ability. Frankly to do this in terms of preparing people for How they deal with stress in anxiety across the board for billions of people around the world. But could you tell us a little bit about the app. I know that company that other things we might get into. But i think your best known for your popular app and it. It seems so simple but it sounds like there's a lot of research behind it yet is really fascinating. Company started off Now it's almost about eight nine years ago as really a a product to help mainstream meditation. It really bring meditation at the buses and the company of the product at a really great job through content. I and through through other means the experience itself has always been Always data informed so it sits on a kind of foundation of data science. And what we noticed. Was that back in. Two thousand fifteen sixteen people using The product for really before they to bed and it really wasn't tuned in that way and so the company went through really amazing evolution to really evolve into a broad expanse resilience and resilience is really. Turn yourself into rubber rubber bands again thinking proactively about your mental health and the foundation bat asleep so we developed this call asleep story which is essentially a bed. Time story this read to you by various narrators whether it be matthew mcconaughey. Hey or others applaud through Narrators we'd built a diverse experience where diversity is super key in helping individuals feel connected feel trust and be able to identify with somebody and it really caused a huge inflection for the company when we look at com now and it has over one hundred million downloads around the world at over one hundred ninety countries in over sixteen hundred companies that have adopted as benefit. It's the ability to put something in front of individuals that the iraqi guys they know they might not think it's behavioral mental health and that's okay We have extremely strong. science foundation. led by hubert. Who's a professor at arizona state university in which we do really high quality research taxi. Show that not only. Do people love calm but people actually do get better To really amazing clinical studies that are well designed and should that people sleep better. They have better outcomes from depression perspective mistrust perspective and from anxiety respect. You know. i'm an executive coach. These days have had quite a few careers of over the years myself. But one of the things. That i i notice is i may be talking about job issues and There's always a lot of anxiety about about job is for many lawyers. A lot of my clients were lawyers. And i find that. I'm not trained to deal with anxiety. But if i can Address the issue through any well. It can be emotional. It can be physical activity. It can be exercise if you could get people to start of focusing on their wellbeing and figure out what might be most accessible for them. All doesn't matter whether they can begin you can. Sometimes people start dealing with anxiety. It seems like by starting. Their exercise program is margaret of. What's happened in your finding accessible ways for people to get in. yeah it. it's an easier way to access it. it's also de stigmatizing at You know one of our ceo is michael. Likes to really talk about the analogy. That com- com is doing to the space. The analogy to jogging back. And that level of exercise back in the seventies where it was not the norm to go out and put on running shoes and and go run around right. People didn't do that for fun But it started to actually take off. It started to be something that you saw a face that you identify people in the news others. Doing it and people started to really gravitate. You're doing it was demystifying it you know. Oftentimes you may be sitting at home or office thinking you know. I'm the only one that feels stressing exciting. There's no way anyone else feels it. But when you see someone that you never thought would experience that whether it be a leader company whether be colleague referenda parents and they're exhibiting vulnerability. They're talking about it and they're saying what i feel this and it's okay Over sudden normalize it it mystifies and actually reduces an invisible barrier stigma com we to that's where content and that's part of why we have so many celebrity partnerships partnerships with individuals such as lebron james for example athletes that you would never think experienced trusted anxiety but they do end they also are open about doing something about it. Taking time to to breathe taking time to focus on their sleep. That's part of the magic of this experience so you. We're talking about several different things here mental health of course but also we lack station for just ordinary stresses of live and then sleep which is related but it can be something entirely different. Is that right and and the same kinds of approaches can address. Multiple issues is that what we're saying. Well actually i think they're i think they're owner twines and the reason is that what we're really talking about is at the end of the day. We step back as building resilience building mental fitness. And the first thread to do that. The foundation of that is better sleep if we think about it. If you don't sleep well you wake up in the morning cloudy. You're a mega your brain. The part of your brain that actually passes information to your free Frontal cortex where you make decisions. Is it functioning optimally. Enter your day not making good decisions and likely going to end your day more stressed and anxious and actually not sleep as well. But if you let your day with a solid night asleep you suddenly had clarity. You're able to be thoughtful able to be to pause and actually flex and listen and then you can really start building other coping mechanisms and dealing with stress things. Id and all the the pressures that we have around us. So actually i think all the different issues really come together intertwined so a lot of people seem to talk about Sleeping pretty well going to bed and getting to sleep. They wake up at two or three in the morning and their brains are just spinning about everything they have to do is. Is there a difference between that waking up in the middle of the night for.

Hodkinson science foundation matthew mcconaughey arizona state university cancer hubert depression lebron james michael
COVID-19 Surge, Driven by Delta Variant, Hits US Hospitals

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 Surge, Driven by Delta Variant, Hits US Hospitals

"There's been a dramatic increase in the number of covert nineteen cases in the U. S. compared with the prior week and it's being linked to the more contagious delta variant state local and federal authorities have been urging people to get vaccinated because there's been another spike in virus infections Dr Rochelle Wilensky heads the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention our seven day averages about eighty nine thousand four hundred sixty three cases per day this represents an increase of forty three percent from the prior seven day average nearly ninety thousand cases a day a Florida hospital chain is suspending elective surgeries some Georgia hospitals are said to be turning patients away in Houston Texas chief medical officer Dr David person KTRK urges more people to get vaccinated you need to consider that you represent a potential danger to yourself and others in most particularly your own family I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr Rochelle Wilensky U. S. Centers For Disease Cont U. Dr David Ktrk Florida Georgia Houston Texas Jackie Quinn
COVID: In Florida Hospitals, 'There Are Only So Many Beds'

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

COVID: In Florida Hospitals, 'There Are Only So Many Beds'

"Health professionals are battling a rise in the number of co Vic cases in Florida memorial health care system has six hospitals in Broward county Florida so many coated patients are pouring in that the system is putting beds in conference rooms an auditorium even a cafeteria memorial's chief medical officer Dr mark Knapp says this is the highest number of patients they have ever seen unlike during the last coded surges when many patients sick with other ailments tried to avoid the hospitals for fear of catching coded he says they are showing up now there are only so many beds he says so many doctors only so many nurses Dr Knapp says most of the covert patients are unvaccinated I'm Rita fall lay

Dr Mark Knapp Florida Broward County Dr Knapp Rita
Ravages of COVID Surge Evident Inside Missouri Hospital

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Ravages of COVID Surge Evident Inside Missouri Hospital

"I'm Missouri hospital that had no copay patients just two months ago is now dealing with the July surge the ravages of the fast spreading delta variant or becoming a parent in a state with one of the nation's lowest vaccination rates lake regional hospital in the heart of Missouri's lake of the Ozarks region has seen twenty two people die from the virus in the first twenty three days of July the lake of the Ozarks region averages five and a half million visitors annually local counties vaccination rates are less than forty percent doctor how much Sanga is lake regional's chief medical officer big time though the virus orange here lot of admissions lots of people who are very sick and I'm dying thirty one year old Darryl Barker was against the co the backseat and so were his relatives now he's in the ICU at lake regional transfer from Branson where the hospitals are maxing out six year old son and wife Billy Barker said outside his ICU room in lawn chairs looking in through the glass any side effects that you're going to have from the being vaccinated are are way better than having to do this I'm Jennifer king

Ozarks Missouri Darryl Barker Billy Barker ICU Branson Jennifer King
People Rush to Get Vaccinated in Virus-Hit India

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

People Rush to Get Vaccinated in Virus-Hit India

"India is trying to vaccinate millions as a second wave of could be nineteen infections devastates the country the bombs the vaccination is surging in India the people standing in long lines outside centers around the country New Delhi medical officer well servicing says numbers have doubled in the recent period before some days he got accident thing at all five hundred to six hundred people now we are expanding our own nine hundred eleven hundred people a day but the process is often confusing marketing professional good luck thing says getting an appointment can be hard caption reading for a streaming as well you're not getting so many offers on our own and so many more growing banking centers and not being able to access those involved old primo Levi one hundred seventy million vaccine doses have been administered since the country began in chelating its vast population I'm Charles the last month

India New Delhi Primo Levi Charles
Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

WBZ Midday News

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

"In the fight against covert 19, and the date is familiar. It's July 4th of this year, but now he wants 70% of American adults who have gotten at least one shot by Independence Day. There is resistance, especially in rural America. CBS's David Begnaud continues our coverage. The Biden administration is also planning to work with more local doctors, who they believe will be key to breaking through that vaccine distrust in local communities. Dr. Stephen Lakey is the chief medical officer at a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado, in the northern part of the state. There aren't any demographic that are gonna be suspicious or or have not heard the message from either you know, national sources or from national news, And I think having that impact of having our local leaders in those rural environments is gonna be critical. Back in Maryland vaccine administrator Cornell candidate says some people have been able to overcome their vaccine hesitancy. In a game

David Begnaud Biden Administration Dr. Stephen Lakey CBS Fort Collins America Colorado Maryland
India Tops 200,000 Dead as Virus Surge Breaks Health System

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

India Tops 200,000 Dead as Virus Surge Breaks Health System

"An Indian song the repeaters Karan tells the AP this call would be alive today if the hospital who just admitted him instead of waiting for a piece of paper three days off to his corona viruses symptoms appear to question the Chiron struggled to believe instead of waiting for an ambulance his son drove him to a government hospital in Lucknow the couple of India's largest take it without Pradesh but the hospital wouldn't let him in without a registration slip the district's chief medical officer by the time the sun goes it his father had died in the car just outside the hospital's stories of death tangled in bureaucracy and system failures have become just really come on India where deaths have not officially surged past two hundred thousand but the figure is likely follower the new troop count I'm Charles through this month

Karan Chiron AP Lucknow India Charles
Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

Outcomes Rocket

02:27 min | 6 months ago

Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

"Today i have the privilege of hosting dr ravi kamata ready. He's Digital health entrepreneur. Who is currently the founder and ceo of motive health inc a startup passionately focused on using human and ai. Coaches for health behavior change. He is an internal medicine physician. Who trained at dartmouth hitchcock medical center and the university of california san diego. Additionally he was the first and i h wireless digital health scholar at the scripps translational science institute and west health institute where he earned a masters in clinical translation investigation previously. He co founded and served. As the chief medical officer of two funded digital health startups numata inc. A big data. Ai healthcare company focused on creating the world's largest medical graph database which was eventually acquired by google and reflection health inc digital medicine avatar lead gamified virtual physical therapy solution using motion tracking cameras in the home. He also received i grant from nasa flight opportunities program to advance research in digital health and human spaceflight. That's pretty cool. And the work that he's doing is really cool at motive health so i'm excited to have him on the podcast. Welcome robert thanks. Thanks so much for having me you know when you list that stuff off it sounds like a lot and i think about it like wow. That is a lot. I don't have time for all that. Well you know a lot of people that do great things ravi are usually the ones that do the majority of them and i say if you want something done. Give it to the busiest person you now. That's that's definitely a lifestyle that have adopted. Well thank you very much for having me on. Be glad to talk about what everyone talk about absolutely so before we go there robbie. I definitely want to learn about health and listeners. Definitely learn about it. Talk to us a little bit about. What inspires your work and healthcare. Honestly i can tell you the line about you know we should make everyone feel better and not be sick and stuff like that but if i had to drill it down to what really inspires me about it because those things are true. The truth is it's about human performance. I'm just fascinated by what people can achieve when they work together on things and i'm talking in let's just if we zoom out for go to like everything from pyramids to highways vaccines landing on the moon. This is like no aliens didn't build that stuff right this is people so it's people coming together rallying around a common goals a pretty amazing thing and you can get some amazing things done without right. You can explore the universe. You can figure out how to solve really complicated problems. So that's only possible. Would you have people

Dr Ravi Kamata Motive Health Inc Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ce Scripps Translational Science West Health Institute Numata Inc. Robert Thanks University Of California San Diego Nasa Ravi Google Robbie
Surging Virus Has Michigan's Whitmer at Loggerheads With Biden

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Surging Virus Has Michigan's Whitmer at Loggerheads With Biden

"About two. Dozen hospitals in the great state of michigan are at ninety percent capacity or above as that state steel. That state deals with a huge surge in cova crisis at least one michigan hospital the mclaren port huron hospitals at one hundred percent capacity as of this morning chief medical officer. They're saying that when his hospital tried to transfer out some of its patients with the most acute needs. They couldn't do it They faced long delays trying to move patients out because so many hospitals are so crowded. There's nowhere to move them. To as michigan cova cases and hospitalizations continue to rise inexorably without any relief at all. The michigan health and hospital association said today they expect the number of hospitalizations in the state to beat last fall's peak to head up higher than they have ever been before during the crisis at all. This is the daily new reported coronavirus cases in michigan. Right now there are dozens of states that are having covid case numbers spike across the country but michigan is by far the worst. Still though even in light of that today. The white house confirmed again that they're not planning to send an extra allocation of vaccines to to michigan. That is what governor gretchen. Whitmer is asking for to try to get michigan's crisis under control. The white house says they will send other resources to michigan to try to help but not additional vaccine supplies when you have an acute situation Extraordinary number of cases like we have in michigan. The answer is not necessarily to give vaccine in fact. We know that the vaccine will have a delayed response. The answer to that is to really close things down to go back to basics to go back to where we were last spring Last summer to down to flatten occurred to decrease contact with one another to chaffetz to the extent that we have available to to contact tracers. Sometimes can't even do it at the capacity that you

Michigan Mclaren Port Huron Hospitals Michigan Health And Hospital A Cova Governor Gretchen White House Whitmer Chaffetz
US sees lower death rates among children

Inside Outside Guys

01:27 min | 7 months ago

US sees lower death rates among children

"Rates for Children are down for about everything and for Corona virus, Except for the rare obese adolescents seem to be the patient that would pump the Children's hospital Michigan or another pediatric facility and have a bad outcome now bad outcome, meaning that they would need to go to the ICU and that they might need to be on a breathing machine. We're not usually talking about somebody passing away that that's a rare rare exception in pediatric doctor Rudy Valentini, chief medical Officer of Children's Hospital of Michigan, says the near disappearance of the flu corresponds with the small number of coronavirus cases and deaths among Children were being so few cases of viral infections in general, because I believe distancing and mask and sanitation of your hands. Nobody behaves like they used to call the small numbers of kids who have gotten Corona virus. Ah, higher percentage of cases are among minorities spread with people who live in close proximity. That's why we talk so much about distancing while we talk about masking, they think about if you have a household With four people in it for household is more densely populated in that tends to be less affluent communities to this could still spread the virus. So any one of us you, me or any child could have covert infection today not realized it we call it pre symptomatic and actually be infectious for one or two days before we become symptomatic. And if you're very infectious, early on, and so, yes, that's definitely been shown that Children can do that. But in a year marked by pandemic catastrophe, the lower childhood deaths from all causes is a welcome. Change. I'm decay thinner for WJR Health

Rudy Valentini Children's Hospital Of Michiga Viral Infections Michigan FLU
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 7 months ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
Indiana health leaders concerned about COVID variants

Hammer and Nigel

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

Indiana health leaders concerned about COVID variants

"But the virus is still around. As of yesterday, Indiana has had 57 cases of the UK variant reported on the CDC. Zmapp and new cases continue to come in. Experience is much more transmissible and we need more people vaccinated so that we can win this race between the vaccine and the variants. They health Commissioner Dr Chris Box says Indiana should see a large shipment of the three available vaccines by the end of this month. White House chief Medical Officer Anthony

Indiana CDC Dr Chris Box UK White House Medical Officer Anthony
Vaccination Efforts Picking up Speed in Florida

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

04:24 min | 7 months ago

Vaccination Efforts Picking up Speed in Florida

"The age for the general population to be vaccinated in the state of Florida for Cove. It is now 60 that began this morning. 60 and up without pre existing conditions. It's just the age and the more that Fizer Johnson Johnson Moderna manufacture the continue to drop that age. Let's talk about our vaccination process how we're doing in the state of Florida. But Dr Joshua Lynch's chief medical officer for Our health Medical center and vice president of the Florida Medical Association. Come, Archie, Doctor Good to talk to you. Good morning to you, Jimmy. Thanks for having me on again. How we doing so far. I think we're doing pretty good. You know, If you look at the national numbers more than 100 million people have already been vaccinated of those good part population, 30 35 million or so and have been fully vaccinated. With the other 70 million, at least having one dose and we're making significant strides. Two thirds of the population over the age of 65 already had one dose. More locally. Here in Florida. We have about a little more than four million people have been vaccinated about. You know, the population of 22 million you have about 10% of our population has already been fully vaccinated. And I think we're well on our way. Definitely down here in the southeast Florida reaching way. We're told that private doctors officers may be getting doses for patients. How do we When would that happen? And how do we know how well that rule out? Yeah, I would imagine that, as we increase as the amount of Johnson Johnson is increased here is only about three million or so doses that Johnson Johnson has has supplied. About half of those have already been used in the United States. But that's really going to be. I think, the foundation of the vaccination effort for private private offices who don't have to maintain the cold storage that that we have to maintain, and the other pieces is that it's only one dose, which is which is great because You don't have to worry about booking that second dose that we do in the health systems for for Visor, Madonna Right, Um Aziz goes forward we're supposed to get. I think almost half million doses of Madonna and Fizer plus Johnson and Johnson this week in the state of Florida. Are they being distributed correctly? In your view across the across the state. I think that there's a lot of logistics that way go into the supply chain of that vaccine distribution. And certainly hindsight is Is 2020. I don't know that anybody had anticipated depend up demand that we still have not just here locally, but across the country and so minor things that you wouldn't even think of like. When you open a phone line, you know, phone line, as you guys know, in the radio phone lines can only take X number of incoming calls. And when you put a call out to tell people is vaccine 10,000 people try to flood the phone system. It could crash the system. So I think that they're doing probably as best as they can. Everything is sort of predicated on the domino before it. And even though the industry that pharmaceutical companies are continuing to pump out as much as they can to get it into the arms of people, because that's really where it needs to be right, and the rollout is faster than we've ever done. I mean, you know, the the messenger RNA has been around for 30 years, We put it into a vaccination vaccination. Now it seems that works beautifully. But, um, But the rollout is faster than what they normally do for this kind of a product correct, And that's real. They're learning as they go. I'm talking about the logistics experts that these pharmaceuticals Always out it out. Yeah, This is your absolutely during the last year. We've used the word unprecedented a lot of times, But this is really I don't even forgiven. Unprecedented. This is this is historic. I mean that Operation works. Speed was incredible. Because if you think about it within the span of one year, you know, we had already identified the genetic code for that protein that was embedded into that messenger. RNA developed a new vex to new vaccines based on that technology and had distributed it and vaccinated people, all within the span in 12 months. That zoo historic.

Florida Fizer Johnson Johnson Moderna Dr Joshua Lynch Our Health Medical Center Florida Medical Association Johnson Johnson Foundation Of The Vaccination Madonna Right Um Aziz Fizer Archie Jimmy Johnson Madonna United States
Alaska becomes first state to open COVID vaccines to almost all

AP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Alaska becomes first state to open COVID vaccines to almost all

"A reporting Alaska's becoming the first U. S Day to open vaccines to nearly all residents. Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy says his state is opening up Cove in 19 vaccinations to anyone 16 or older who lives or works in the state. Dunleavy himself had about with co bid 19 doctor and zinc, the state's chief medical officer said Tuesday After seeing open vaccine appointments, officials decided to allow anyone who wants a vaccine to get one According to the CDC. Alaska has been out front and vaccinations leading states in percentage of its population to have received two doses of a cove in 19 vaccine, I

Alaska Mike Dunleavy Dunleavy CDC
"medical officer" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

Discover Lafayette

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

"This is john swerved and you're listening to discover lafayette a podcast dedicated to the people and rich culture of lafayette the gateway.

"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues <unk>. Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to <hes>. Jennifer schneider <hes>. She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear jennifer say that it. It's a great summation of. What would i have felt that has been broken. Healthcare for past fifteen years. As i think we also s consumers in this marketplace obscene seen how content has been reorganized by the internet how communities have been reorganize how entertainment commerce more recently even <hes> banking. When was the last time that you actually stepped foot in a bank. And so this this notion of you're gonna drive twenty to thirty minutes to this obstacle or building <hes>. and then ended up waiting an hour at least <hes>. I think comes an hours like a a gift to see physician. Pretend to fifteen minutes us. We'll give you a whole bunch of information that you're not gonna process <hes>. And send you on your way driving back down twenty or thirty minutes in some cases i haven't come back again. You know in two or three days or a week is you've got to get lab tests. Imaging tasks don seem so <hes>. You know sort of disconnected from how we live our lives today in terms of the immediacy of the things that were able to get it all at our fingertips and so <hes>. I think this is what jennifer was talking about it. I think you alluded to just so nicely is the experience of inter connectivity through now wearable sensors software that personalizes methodist to you <hes>. And always on connectivity <hes>. Through the cloud <hes> <hes>. Starting to make its way into healthcare and covid nineteen is only accelerated people's view in notion of what's possible in healthcare that today was just a method or a vision it is absolutely accelerating ed <hes>. From everyone we've been speaking to <hes>. And of course you are walking this walk on the acceleration happening before we're ready <hes>. So it's really an exciting time. It also can be a harrowing right if you're not prepared for loot when you hear jennifer say consumers and patients aren't gonna hate healthcare anymore because they're they're access the can get what what comes to mind view especially in terms of telecom. Bunga sure so. I think that people often talk about. How virtual care makes access so much easier and they often frame this in terms of a conversation around what you might consider medical convenience <hes>. And i'd like to just draw out the issue that it's not just a question of convenience. It's really around the quality of care so on telemedicine side we see many individuals who seek care and they end up having pretty serious medical problems like a recent case where the individual <hes>. Actually had some big chest discomfort in our little shortness of breath and ended up having multiple blood clots in his lungs and he would have just probably waited it out at home with really a life threatening medical condition and on the longo side. You're really talking about individuals who for the first time in their lives are taking care of these problems around blood. Sugar control blood pressure control. So they're really getting the care that they need because we've made it easier for them and have lowered a number of these barriers which are traditionally put the place and may care most difficult and as you might imagine during the time of covid. All of these issues have been highlighted. So if you are at home trying to do your telecommuting also trying to teach your kids at the same time who might be doing their own remote learning. It may not be the easiest thing for you to decide that you need to take you know a bus to a train to train to bus in order to get to a medical appointment to have somebody review your blood sugars with you so to make that care possible particularly in this time just makes all the sense in the world.

lou levy brigham women medical officer longo lou harvard medical school lavar congo harvard david bowie clinical assistant professor boston Jennifer schneider la bongo matt stanford Shop
"medical officer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You can still invite others to join virtually, but we advise you not to go to any gatherings of people. Who are not in your immediate home. Pretty clear message there from the governor over in Wisconsin, Molly Beck cover state politics for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Molly. Thanks for making time for us this afternoon. I mean, I read it. It sounds even more dire when he says that he's actually pleading with folks there to pay attention as he's looking at those numbers go way in the wrong direction, and I also understand that hospitalization rates are they're They're really concerned about that in Wisconsin, too. Yeah, just just today, the state's chief medical officer and the Health Department here at the state at a tipping point. And if behavior here doesn't change soon, then hospitals will not be able to save everybody who is ill, like they would be able to, You know, hospital capacity without a On adequate level, So the situation here is, you know, very bad. I mean, the case is there, you know, we have to have a record number of new cases every day. It seems like these these days and A record number of deaths and hospitalizations, but really the the the new scary element here. Is that the hospitals or getting to a point where They're not sure if they can, you know, care for everybody that needs care. And that is very concerning Mayo Clinic Health system is saying there area hospitals are 100% full. That's from out of a clear. I don't know if that includes only owe Claire. But that was something a news release. They put out today that I saw public urgently needs to treat this as a health emergency to prevent healthcare system from being overwhelmed there. They're sounding the alarm there, too. Yeah, that's right, and that that health care system it covers northwest Wisconsin. So a lot of smaller community than that area. The Claire isn't included. But they're smaller communities where that might be. Maybe the only hospital in the area, you know, so that's it. Um, that issues exacerbated in the smaller areas. Whether you know not of money health care option. There's a farther distance between you know hospitals that people could go to, especially if they're in a A pretty serious situation so that the state has a field hospital. But it's right now equipped to care for less severe covert patients, and so far it's only had about You know an average of five patients that's been open for a few weeks, though. I don't know if that means Kobe patients in our hospital are too thick to go there or if it's too expensive to transport them, because it's in one area of the state. You know, I'm not sure you know why the that field half little doesn't have more patients right now. Yeah, that's that's Ah, It's fascinating to see, but it is difficult to transport people nonetheless. So if the northern part of the state is filling up its beds that's bad for everybody in the northern part of the state, right and And you know, and it seems statewide. It seems it's the exception rather than the rule to see hospitals that are there. Be able to, you know, say that they have the capacity right now. That's the impression I got. I don't know. You tell me, Molly, if that's true. Yeah. I mean, there is a number of briefings that health officials had today, including the hospital dissociation and and the officials there said that you know, staff Staffing in hospitals is really stressed, because Even though you know there's the issue of hitting capacity with patients, but also the staff there. They have to, you know, leave. If they get exposed, they have to quarantine and some are getting sick. So there's there's not enough staff. That's the other issue like there might be enough beds. But if there's not enough staff, so it's just the hospitals are in really bad situations. You know, that's exactly what we heard from our governor here yesterday. That thesis laughing is as big of an issue if not more. In some hospital zones, other than then, the you know, then just the availability. They're both both issues here. Governor Pritzker said that he won't make any guarantees that that we won't see another stay at home order. But he says he's reluctant to do that. That's not what he wants to do. I can't guarantee what the next two weeks or three weeks look like from out. I just don't know. On DH. Then his quote was none of us frankly expected that the entire country would we swept with an increase in covert 19 for so many weeks Now, it appears as if the Midwest was doing quite well until just recently, and certainly over the summer months. We we seem to have It at least relatively well under control as much as you can in this situation, but the other thing that they're saying here, Molly is that for the next three weeks there, also urging people work from home. Stay at home as much spots believe only for essential activities kind of increasing the temperature on there, you know that they're there. They're cautionary notes to people to say. Take it seriously. We know the holidays are coming. We know it's now time to go indoors again. The weather is not is nice. And we don't want this to Serge even higher. I wondered when Governor Evers given Executive order what? What does that actually mean? Or what was? What was that about? Yeah, So Wisconsin in a much different situation than Illinois. My parents. I'm actually from thinking county areas, So I know that there are some restrictions in that area that are imposed by the government. But with constant there are They're no statewide restriction, And that's because in the spring when the governor had a state home order, like other governors in the country On the Republican lawmakers. You control the legislature's food over that and and struck that order down. I've never been. The governor has has said he can't issue similar restrictions. And so the executive order that Governor Evers Issued last night was really it didn't actually order anything. It was a recommendation. So it recommended thinking he almost the same recommendations in the same restrictions that home order was Acquiring, but but this time it was recommending them so he wants people to stay home. He wants businesses to require masks and allowing place to work from home. Is that topple? Um But there's no there's no penalty if people don't follow that, and I think the message today from health officials in the state was You know, we we really need the governor and the Legislature to get together on this because they haven't been and you know, have some sort of public really robust public messaging campaign and that in the absence of restriction, but it's at this point. It's just a recommendation. He's not ruling a state home order. And is he indicating that that may happen just like our governor is sort of saying it's out there, but I want to do it. I don't plan to do it, but we might do it. That's what we're getting here. Yeah, because of that Supreme Court ruling in May. The governor has has said that He doesn't have the authority to do to do that again. So he issued orders since then, But all of them have been challenged in court. And the only one that remains in place right now is the statewide math mandate that that awful being challenged in court. So I, You know, he has not said he has not floated that idea of trying to issue a stay home order anyway, even though I think that will be challenged in court, maybe successfully. But you know, the hospital leader said today that doesn't seem to be going down and they don't really know how it's going to go. It's just going to get a lot worse. Hey, Molly. Just finally before I let you go here, want to ask you if the in Wisconsin you're testing sites are seeming pretty crowded these days to I don't know if you had a handle on that, but we were just listening to some Some listeners called in as our cases go up here that some of the sights are there, seeing those really long lines again that a reminiscence of a couple of months back you know when, when we were not able to have as many tests, so the fact that There are this many tests is it shows you just how many people are feeling as if they might have been exposed and the demand to get those tests? Are you seeing long, long lines there? Yeah, yeah, absolutely that there's I live in Madison. It cover the capital based medicine and The few times I've had Teo go recently to get tested after I've covered events. Um, it's been about a three hour wait in there in the testing site is not open every day. When I you know, asked the doctor's office. If I can get a test, they say you have had more than one symptom to get a test. We're seeing those long lines in Milwaukee, which is, you know, the state's largest city and in the National Guard had to read a place. Its resources across state because there were there weren't permanent testing site outside of the southern part of Wisconsin. So, um, the testing is an issue here for sure. And we were seeing a lot of people waiting in long lines again. Wondered about that. Thank you, Molly for your time this afternoon and thanks for checking in with us here on W g N Appreciate it..

Wisconsin Molly Beck Governor Evers Governor Pritzker Legislature Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Executive Claire Mayo Clinic Health Health Department medical officer Midwest Supreme Court Milwaukee Kobe Teo Madison Illinois
"medical officer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"A chance of morning rain otherwise partly sunny. A high of 64 right now, our current temperature 67 degrees. And under a clear sky hospital leaders across Ohio came together today to discuss the recent surge of hospitalizations did recover 19. This is daily cases have been a have seen a significant rise as well. Dr Bruce Vanderhof, the chief medical officer of Ohio health, every county in the state. Is feeling the brunt of rising covert 19 hospitalizations in those hospitals are staff. Right nurses, physicians and other health care professionals lived in those communities is co 19 transmission rates rise in our communities that depletes our staff. Is more and more of them are pulled from the bedside by community exposure. There are three zones for tracking hospitalizations during the pandemic zone. One makes up Northern Ohio zone to the Columbus area, southeast Ohio and then their Zone three, which is the Cincinnati in Dayton areas over 4700 new cases of covert 19 154 related hospitalizations. 30 40 wives to admissions and seven new desks were in the report today from the Ohio Department of Health Governor Andy Bashir says Kentucky is in a significant surge of covert 19 Bashir said. Everything is going up the rate of infections, the positivity rate and hospitalizations, today's report. Is 1745 new cases of covert 19 our highest Monday ever, and the positivity rate at 7.49% is the highest since May 1133 Kentucky ins or hospitalized 300 in the I C U, the highest ever what follows high numbers of cases more death? Today we're announcing 11 new deaths again. Mondays are typically really low on that account, too. I'm Suzanne Duval. Marnix update is at 9 30. I'm Sean Gallagher News radio 700 wlw. It all started with the grilled cheese sandwich. Two simple pieces of bread some butter on a slice of American cheese. But after making it day after day week after week, I hungered for more Colby provolone Gouda. But Buddha wasn't good enough. I wanted great tomatoes, pickles, jalapenos. If I could birth, this gooey work of art in my tiny, modest kitchen Imagine what I could do in a gourmet chef's kitchen. So I called the first bank about loaning me some extra cheddar. Now I had the matchy skill and a superior equal housing lender member F D I. C Autumn means trading, jumping into pools for jumping into leaves.

Ohio Andy Bashir Kentucky Ohio Department of Health Northern Ohio Buddha Dr Bruce Vanderhof Suzanne Duval Sean Gallagher medical officer Columbus Cincinnati Dayton
"medical officer" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Words on Water

"How do you envision them? helping you in this chief medical officer role. This water sector is a new. Area for me. There's going to be a lot of. Learning in the you know in the first few months as I. Really get to know all issues that are facing us a one of the things that I would ask the student to do Into Researches Doing environmental survey, so no looking at literature, and only here in the United States flirt around the world about some of the. Innovative techniques that. Other countries municipalities are using try to know conservative in to reuse. And Create Quality Water the other thing that I think would be important for the graduate student is to address some of the research questions that are still. Unanswered so as you know, we've had a blue ribbon panel looking at Covid nineteen how it affects a lot of sector, but there were several questions that are left unanswered. There are research projects that we can engage in which you know are. Have Smart Objectives that there's Pacific immeasurable. That we can do on a timetable and I think that that will be a worthy endeavor for the graduates. Well Dr Sanderson again. I want to welcome you to laugh and welcome to the water sector as I said, we are all really excited about this new, really new era for public health and. Safety for the water sector, and just look forward to working with you. Thanks very much. Travis I'm I'm excited to. Talk..

graduate student Covid medical officer Dr Sanderson United States Travis
"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"You know in Tennessee. I guess the one thing we can say that the spore is a pretty used to a day before tournament start injury withdrawals or retirement through illness or things like that so at least it's something that tennis is accustomed to in a way in. We'll have those hopefully have those lucky losers lined up but who knows if how are go down the line in terms of Quarantining lucky losers are testing. All healers. Yeah that'd be no and it's If I'm in the locker room in the even in the players lounge and I hear a player pulled out because she had a sore hamstring. It's one thing if I find out. A colleague pulled out because of a positive cova test. It's affects me in a different way but no I mean I. I think there's this is sort of a there's A. There's a think piece if not a book to be written here but I think the role of sports in this whole pandemic is is really interesting to me and we usually think of sports as having like duck handling said I mean it. Has this real ability to bind us. It's this source diversion. It's it's unification there's life lessons I mean all of these kind of mushy ideas about why we love sports in all of those in a Lotta ways are under attack. I mean somebody saying somebody said. There's there's a pandemic ripping through the world. Hey here's what we're GONNA do. We're going to get seven hundred thousand fans in a confined area. We're going to have athletes come in from all over the world and share one locker room you could. You could scarcely script less conducive scenario than the Olympics the US Open or the Super Bowl. His sports are not only not being able to be played. They are almost singularly ill suited for this pandemic. So I I think we're all sort of rethinking how we're GONNA stage sports but also what sports mean in the social fabric and how we can keep that when obviously like you say Jamie I mean the the idea of seven hundred thousand people going to one site that just so happens to be ground zero for this whole global pandemic in Queens New York but how hundreds of thousands of fans going to one site to watch. Athletes who've flown in from all over. The world are now sharing a locker room. How are we going to be? I mean that's that's clearly going to be precluded for years. But how are we going to be able to enjoy sports? And how are we going to be able to alter sports and reassess sports and sort of keep the goodness while recognizing that? There's a lot about sports that are really inconsistent with the best practices in the age of cove in terms of coming back. I mean the you have C. announced that they would hold this fight I guess a pretty long time ago they did give the players the opportunity to obviously train and get ready And they knew that they were on deck for this past weekend. How long do you think the US Open will give players to notify? How soon are we going to see a decision? I mean there's there's an early June gate that's been circulated of look. We're GONNA make the call by then. I mean I do think. A lot of these players I don't think players are sitting at home Guzzling beer in on twitch. I mean I just saw video nick. Cheerios without practicing and Canberra Nick curious practicing looking reasonably fit. You can be sure that You know dominant team and it's very as well If anything you have seen one of the harder sports where you've got to actually got in the you really have to be in literally in fighting shape. I think a turn the switch today. I mean right now at noon. We're GonNa have a tournament tomorrow. I think the majority of players would would be ready at least is IT I. I think we're and one thing we. I was glad Dr Hoenlein address us. I think one area. That's been a little short changed as just the mental health component to all of this and you're an elite athlete and you're competing is what you do. I mean that is a form of self assessment. It's a form of self identity all of a sudden. You're no longer competing. I mean niddle has been very outspoken about this essentially in so many words saying I'm just not and this isn't a doll of people saying I'm not necessarily in the state of mind to be competing but from a physical standpoint. These plan and I thought you know the level of play that exhibition. I referenced in Florida the four-man Exhibition with Appel Cop. Paul and I to me was indistinguishable from the level of play at this review. Told me this was the first round of Australia would have said Yeah. That's about right so I think the one thing I I think players muscle memory. I think the players will come back without too much of a perceptible difference but emotionally whether or not all these players are ready to resume like you say spent two weeks in quarantine before major is not a drill. Any of them have done before. That's a really interesting point about about a dollar. You know it gets me thinking in previous tournaments in previous grand slams. Think a lot of what we always talk about is that that one it factor that one thing that is going to separate you know player from player be especially in the finals in a lot of times especially when we talk about the big three is is their mentality is how they approach the game and it's that that mindset that somehow you just see them all the sudden turn it on or just take it to another level that you you didn't think was there That's a really interesting perspective. You know is someone like dollar federal in mind said to compete in that way you know. I think it's one thing to say. Yeah we can. Have you know this this match tournament? That looks like a the first Australia. But once he gets to the later rounds. How how strong is that competition going to be going to be good tennis? Is that or do? Do we care And how much does that affect the the winner of that year? You know to say well. You are people going to say well. You didn't compete against the best or you didn't compete against you know everyone that could have been there because maybe some people couldn't or decided not to not to come so. I was talking to one player who said I was talking to a player The days all run together by the way but it must have been last week. Who Essentially said they. They wanted to just to get back in the swing of competition and that people don't realize that that's a muscle to and it wasn't about whether I can make a few thousand bucks playing in some exhibition. It's about sort of getting back in the swing of competing and testing myself and being in a situation where it's it's four thirty all and it's something that You know we. We don't necessarily have statistics for it. It's something that doesn't isn't necessarily manifest when we watch tennis on TV but getting in this competition mindset is really part of the job in players haven't had a chance to do that since February and if playing backyard tournament there was event Tracy Austin mentioned in southern California. Sam Query is going to be on by believes Taylor. Fritz or son for some Brandon Savita. I'm blogging but it's you know a six man competition backyard but you're still going to be playing world-class practitioners you're still going to be facing Sam. Queries serve at four all and for a tennis player. There's there's something to be said for that so strange times all around but I think this is You know honestly Jamie this. This to me is the equivalent of the restaurant. That's now doing you know. We're we're all improvising and it would be great if that restaurant were doing full business and had table service and we were all having leisurely meals. But it's better than nothing so that's I sort of see tennis and very much. The same place better than nothing. Open House that slogan all right that will usually usually we are podcast. Because you know grant grant wall is is giving US looks or The NFL guys are coming in now. We are running out of zoom time so That will do it for this week. Thanks always a pleasure chatting. Jamie always a pleasure. I hope we get some some news soon. Some good news in the tennis world on what's coming from from your mouth to the USDA and of course governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasios. Aren't this this is the better than nothing? Tata's five guests. That will do it for this week. Thanks everyone thanks Jamie Yet this podcast wherever you get your podcast Lieber Review. Free to continue sending guest suggestions and suiting initially boop BOOP BOOP boop..

tennis Jamie US Tennessee Sam Query Tata Australia Nick Dr Hoenlein C. Open House Paul Queens New York Appel Cop Tracy Austin Florida
"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Tennis podcast. Hope everyone is new. And Okay wherever you are yesterday Dr. Brian. Hey Line he is the chief medical officer for the Ncaa College Sports for our international audience. He's also the chief medical officer for the US Open and the USDA and has been since the early nineties. He is also a former college tennis player. So today's discussion is a lot about what it will take for sports to come back what we make of this closed-door scenario and then we talk specifically tennis. What are the unique challenges tennis bases and whether the twenty twenty? Us Open can happen. If so under what circumstances so Thought after a lot of speculation from lay people who was time we consulted someone who had real expertise so here does a great job is Dr Brian Halen. I I've seen you quoted a number of times and I feel like everyone has become an instant expert on sports science and And Virology these days. But I figured we've talked to a real expert and let's let's just start. Generally I mean what? What are you seeing out there? And what's going to be the biggest challenge for sports to restart I think the Two biggest challenges are really having surveillance. That's firmly in place and and really really good testing. So you can imagine and you know resocialised and you can't imagine re socializing in sport if you don't have both of those you know once we start opening up where no longer saying. We're just trying to flatten the curb or or were trying to really make certain. Our healthcare systems are not overwhelmed him so New York City which is a great example of that. The healthcare system were ninety percent of the hospital were devoted to taking care of patients who had colds and were in respiratory failure. We're now opening up. Doing procedures elective procedures. Insult going forward. If this is GonNa work you have to be able to test large segments of society and especially in sport and you have to do contact tracing and do what's right when there's a positive so it really does fundamentally rest on those two principles and you're just to be clear. You're talking about testing testing. And not just the temperature checks that's correct. And and it's two types of testing the indoor being you know even good advances and even in the last week so The rapid diagnostic testing shifting to what we may call point of care testing where you can even have on your your own kit in. And that's two of. That's going to be evolving in two ways. One is on looking for the virus particles so the PC artas to to see if you really are wait on infectious and even the serology testing if there wolves out properly and we really get good out. There's two ways to look at serology. One is to see if you have immunity but also when you first are infected with a virus your immune system kicks in right away. What's it's called? Gm and that may even evolve as as a screening tool for for seeing someone has accused effect infection so I think bolts are going to really advance in the next month and then were GonNa be strategies for how to work with teams without and you think testing is available and sufficient. I mean I don't know if you saw the UFC card that they held Saturday night and Florida. They went through. I think was twelve hundred tests for one. Sporting event and people eyebrows raised over that you think we have enough test to pull the saw. I think we're going to get there so so we had a a meeting. We meaning the chief medical officers of sport on so I was representing amateurs or Z. A. And then you had the chief medical officers of the NFL NBA Major League Baseball. H Own. We're all meeting with Dr Birch's office in the White House and we emphasize we said. We can't do this if we don't have adequate tests so you know the White House response is the usual response. Were were increasing them substantially but. I think what's happening in ups obscene. This happened as a least at university levels. They're either working with a hospital or university lab so they can take care of their whole campus but the private companies have have really been rubbing up as well and you know that's challenging and on on the one hand you WanNa make certain Dutch. You aren't testing for one segment of society while the rest of the state is still prioritizing test and they only have enough so but I I think the way the private companies and and and even with you know I just saw another. Fda approval reverse serology. Tusk come in our yesterday. So it is starting to substantially increase where. I think we're going to be moving into a different APP testing on we. We keep talking about the possibility of sports returning but I wonder how granular you get to what extent UC distinctions between sports and the benchmark for football is GONNA be much different than the benchmark for golf no absolutely so So so you know aside from the event Florida this past weekend so the PGA tour will be hosting event and in Texas the first week of June and on and they happen. You know a really cool without getting into too much detail but you know you. Essentially we have to create what's called an inner bubble and then you have outer bubbles out in the inner bubble was who would be really going to be around the athletes. So it's the athletes the core of athletics. Sam personnel the coaches. And you have to make sure that they're sort of walled off and really well-protected. I mean in these first early events like that you know when we look at the NCAA and the false or so ranges from cross country to And Soccer and field hockey and then of course. There's there is football insults. It's a little easier to imagine pulling off cross country than than it is onto to pull off off on but even across country meet the logistics of it are not straightforward and on. You know when you're starting off across country event. You're pretty close to a lot of people at the end. You're pretty close when you're trying to pay someone you know it's a The elbows are flying. And so you have to make sure that done might too and so we are actually getting a very granular levels. Were at the NCAA. We we have these committees that are our staff and members of committees working in conjunction with other. And we're developing basically all of the what if scenarios that we can think of and the other thing is we're building off of the core principles of resocialization document that we put together and were beginning very granular in terms of general guidance. For what needs to happen in a lock of what needs to happen in in the gym. What needs to happen. You know for showers and and you know the whole old idea of just kinda show up in the training room was actually sort of a choice for athletes to hang out. I mean it's going to be by appointment so it's really going to be staggered and I think it'll be easy in the first couple of phases but the tricky part is going to be when you start having contact what what does need. I'm thinking about tennis. What were you've got you know? A hundred and twenty eight singles draw from fifty countries. What what does need to happen in the locker room was hope you think of China's to be thinking of something like the US opened on you. Would you help to really make certain that when people are in the Locker Room? You have a staged presence in other words. You can't just come into the locker room when you want so it really all has to be orchestrated and hold out. You know if you if you've ever been in the US Open Locker Room. You know their their lockers right next to each other. Right above each other and The the training tables are are one after the other. The athletic trainer is going from one person to the next you know doing infectious disease control. But that would be much different Would you would you would have to control the timing. The inflow the outflow and and the standardisation procedures have to be exceptional. What else are you looking at sport to sport? It seems like indoor outdoor would be an obvious distinction and contacts sport. Even yeah we just had you have see so you don't get much more contact than that. But what else are you looking for when you're determining sport by sport so you're thinking about safe football If you're going to be rolling that out. So there's there's going to be protocols I think one protocol for the inner circle and you have to find the inner circle at the level to you know. They're they're really a code of honor and you can take the compliance even beyond that And where everyone's GonNa have sort of a symptom checklist if you will and a temperature and if you have anything. That's positive on that checklist where you have a temperature. You just don't show up so that's a general screen. It's certainly not foolproof especially in college age students. You know as we advance in any of the sports the ball works or even basketball for their baptist in the summer is that can define when people you want to test them and they should all be tested and that those are the protocols that even schools are working abroad or students and then you WANNA have a protocol regular testing that still being worked out in the modeling. How often do you need to test so as a minimum? When we're looking at all of the sports as you're going from phase one to phase two you task before you move to phase two and then the question is when you have a positive test. What do you do? And that has to be worked out with the local on health officials as well and this is where they have to have the capacity contact tracing and I'm sure are GONNA be imaginable. Apps in the next couple of months that are going to help without to on but then the question is do quarantine everyone for two weeks. It was in close contact. Or is there another paradigm where you can do testing on days? One three and five and you just a five day quarantine. Those are the models that are still being worked out didn't football. Let's take the the the you know the most contact collision sport in the fall. There is on you. Imagine a protocol of something like at least once weekly testing but then before a game the only player is a play in the game and the only people who are really in close contact test negative. So it's ends up being resource dependent as a lot of test. Yeah and You know you can. You can do the math and you end up. You know did it. Depends on how how much you could easily be a thousand dollars a player when you when you when you do. The math could be more now about the cost of an old LEICA. Salman and I don't think we need to have four or five helmets per player on but but it it's a cost in and the question is who who who is going to take care of that cost because it's you know you can think about a society where you believe sports important schools important will out to that sort of a federal expensive about doesn't happen in our country and I don't think the states have the money for that but you know a lot of schools don't either and the NCAA as you know. Took a a a a a big hit budget too so on? It's it's problematic at heart. I mean when you make these assessments. How do you divorce the finances or or do you divorced to finance of the minute? You know you're right. College sports are GONNA look radically different. If there's football this fall or not the USDA's budget is gonNA look radically different if there's a US Open or not. How do you sort of consider the finances? It's it's a big part of it so you have to. I make the court a Susan and say well. What's the one thing that can't be sacrificed? And they'll tell them safety on. And then you and then you build out from there you know you've seen you know even the PAC twelve their announcement that they may just be playing conference only games this year and I think a lot of schools are looking very closely at travel. We haven't come out with travel guidelines yet. I think it's still too early because you know you look at what's happening around the world so I mean I got kind of a firsthand. Look at this so Mike. My Wife's father Died suddenly last week so she flew to France and it was Really Eerie to be Kennedy Airport. I wasn't allowed him but it was like a ghost town but when she came back when she arrived on Sunday night they weren't allowed off the jeopardize unless they had a screening which included temperature chuck and for those screen. You know positive. They were directed to a different part of the airport and You know you look at Emirates airline. They actually do a A point of care tests before you're allowed to fly so you think of that and then you think about an event like us open where you have a you know a lot of international players you know. Do we work with one airline that we know they're going to be actually doing the screening? It's it's valid screen and and on the people on that flight of just tested negative. So you know that's the thing we're testing you know. At the moment that you're negative you could be positive the next day but So I think it's going through scenarios like that but certainly in this country we're not at that level of sophistication for travel and I think a lot of schools are going to be looking more local travel. What we're talking about athletes. What do you think of this this no fan scenario that.

NCAA football US tennis medical officer And Virology USDA Dr Brian Halen Florida Emirates airline UFC New York City Fda PAC France Kennedy Airport China Gm
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Can achieve certain metrics and along the way you get badges. There's social sharing within the platform so as a user of it pretty cool and now to put together the Science Rajiv is really fascinating fascinating to see how you guys put this together. Yeah we're very excited about it. And the best part is that we have demonstrable results Over years we've been at this for about fifteen years now and we've been able to show some pretty compelling in sustainable behavior change over five six seven years with participant so it really does work well this year. I went to the dentist one more time. Because you guys there you go Rajiv what would you say a time within the last fifteen years at the organization that you guys had a setback and what you learn from it as you may know an entrepreneurship There are setbacks every single day. And it's it's a crazy roller coaster. You know I I started this company. Precursor cursor this company which was called shape up when I was in medical school a twenty three years old and I got very passionate about behavior. Change how to prevent obesity or how to reverse diabetes and I actually dropped out of medical school for three years to build. The company eventually finished my degree but I decided that I wanted to focus on health. Promotion and using technology to scale interventions across crossed arch populations so after medical school instead of going do residency actually went back to the company and continued to invest and grow it and then two years ago we were acquired by Bertram Virgin Pulse in that stayed on as chief medical officer so as you can imagine as a twenty three year old starting a company I knew nothing about how to build an organization and you know about how to build a technology platform learned through the School of hard knocks along the way and made a Lotta mistakes. I think when I look back Rather than sort of picking on one MM particular event. I think one of the big mistakes that we made in our company was. We started to drink our own kool aid. We started the company on the idea that social support is is critical to behavior. Change that nobody will be truly successful at changing their behavior and sustaining that over time unless they modify their social networks that the people around them are supportive in encouraging. Them catching them. When they fall and sort of could've been conducive to their healthy lifestyle Because so often we go into the workplace in our co workers or having muffin often Monday and Bagel Tuesday and Friday. You know we are sabotage each other in that way in. That happens at home as well right so we need that kind of social support. That sort of where a lot of motivation comes in we saw other companies including our competitor virgin pulse focusing quite a bit on extrinsic motivation really kind of financial financial reward so paying people to change their behavior and I think we were very purist about our intrinsic motivation the social social incentives versus financial incentives. There's an we weren't really hard at that for many years in in it it does work and it does create sustainable eight affordable behavior change. But I think because we were so fixated on our own. What idea we fail to see that? The market was evolving and people's ideas were evolving and in fact the research was evolving to say. You know what the answer is not so cut and dry. It's not really one or the the other and in fact if you blend the two intrinsic plus extrinsic motivation you can actually have an even greater impact on people in on their behavior. And so you know. It's funny that we ended up joining forces with virgin pulse and I think we both sort of moved to the center of that spectrum. You know they came from the extrinsic side. We came from the entrance aside and we met in the middle and now our approach is to do both and I think it was a mistake we made and and really kind of just believing that we were right and we were sort of ideological about it and we failed to realize that maybe is. There are other people out there that we're doing things that were valuable as well. We learned that and we really started to thrive we embrace that sort of broader thinking. That's a great message Rajiv and one of the other. Thanks to that that just comes to mind is when you're in that spell because it does become a spell right you get into your head and what is it that you you do Rajiv to get out of it because so many of us do by our own ideas we we do. Eat our own cooking. How do we break out of it and see a fresh perspective perspective? What would you recommend the listeners? I think we have to actually seek out contrarian points of view and so people who we disagree with we have spent time listening to them on understanding. What what they're working on what their research says you know where they're coming from so we spent a lot of time shape listening to learning from our competitors? We go to a lot of conferences and we go to things that we might not otherwise go to because they might not confirm our beliefs they might challenge our beliefs. And that's what we thrive and so I think we've just kind of had to remind ourselves consistently that. Maybe there's a different way. Let's not get stuck in our conventional way of thinking and I think it's that constant challenging ourselves and putting ourselves feels uncomfortable positions that drives us to kind of keep an open mind. Wow fascinating a really great tip there for the listeners. Whether you be an entrepreneur more in in medicine listening or if you're an established executive provider leader in an industry Facet you really have to think and surround yourself with contrarian view sometimes even though it's not the comfort zone it may be what helps you see that blind spot that could potentially be fatal to your business and so really great call out the Reggie. Thank you for sharing that. What would you say one of your proudest medical leadership? Experience to date is so for years. I've been working with populations both an employer groups as well as in the community sort of running these kind of behavior change campaigns fitness challenges and competitions grassroots efforts to help people improve their life and my proudest moments were really when people would come up to me and you know. Even though I wasn't their primary care physician I still think of them as patients but people come up to me and they would say things like you save my life. You know not really you but this program saved my life. You know. I've gone off my medication. I was diabetic. And I've reversed my diabetes season. I'm off my medication. Lost so much weight that my knees no longer hurt and I can walk again. You know I took my grandkids Disneyland for the first time and I was actually able to keep up with them. So it's really those moments and I. There are hundreds of them in my head. The people that I've met that we've actually had an impact on and using technology people we have never met before but using zinc technology and using the science and figuring out a way to sort of engage that we were able to help them and empower them to make small changes led to huge results. And I think those are the proudest just moments you know. I don't know if the call that leadership or not but that's certainly where we get our excitement from working out of bed every morning. Yeah for sure. That's definitely leadership. Reggie even behind behind the motivations that you do this every day. Is there any story that you wanNA share that really got you into this because you have such passion United Behind Passion. There's a story. There are a ton of stories raise for me. When I was the first medical student I was shadowing physicians and working in their clinics and seeing a lot of patients and it just struck me that there were so many patients the majority of them struggling with? How do I lose weight? How do I eat healthy? How do I be physically active? And how do I if I have a condition like hypertension. Ah By blood pressure. How do I lower my cholesterol? We had no tools to help them. We really didn't other than just some sort of empty advice right going to join a gym though. Checkout outweight watchers. We were sort of resigned to the fact that they probably weren't gonNA change their behavior and ultimately we will put them on medication and that would be sort of the end game and that was frustrating to me. Because I knew that people had potential a change and we simply weren't giving them tools and understanding. What would work then? So I really thought how can we prescribe health and wellbeing and is there a resource that we can send people to program that we can give them. That would be truly successful. I couldn't find one and so I created it in that was originally called shape up Rhode Island which was the precursor to our company shape up and now virgin pulse. So that's sort of what my motivation was was. It just didn't feel resigned to the fact that we would have to prescribe medication for everybody. Everybody felt like we should really be focusing on prevention and when I talked to people who did change once in a while we get a patient that would say you know I lost twenty pounds or we the come in and their blood pressure will be down and say what did you do and they always said the same thing. I had an exercise buddy. I formed a group of friends and we motivated each other. My family did this together. It was always. That's social thread. And that was my sort of inspiration to say you know. Let's figure out a way to connect people and this was at the dawn of social media around two thousand four hundred thousand five and I thought maybe we can sort of take a facebook like approach to bring people together online to support each other offline. And that's what we did. That's so awesome and listeners dare to be the change you wish to see in the world and Rajiv found himself in the situation where he just didn't accept the fact that empty promises we're going to be he would he gave patients and he thought bigger he saw a couple of things at work in Iran with it. So I think Rajiv embodies that quote is he was the change that he he wished to see in the health world and with that has been an amazing ripple effect of better outcomes for patients stories that continue to come in to his inbox of people's lives that he's changing so the question is what can you do. What do you today find unacceptable and health? And what are you GonNa do about about it. Because it's doable. You just gotTa move it little by little. And it'll eventually get their Rajiv. What would you say an exciting project or focus that you guys are working on today? We're spending a lot of time. Around artificial intelligence we believe that one of the keys to motivating people will be giving them personalized highly relevant recommendations nations things that they can do and so we're trying to use artificial intelligence to learn about people over time and also to learn what makes people successful over time. So we've got millions of people on our are software. They use our mobile application on average three times a day. We're collecting seven billion data points every single month everything from biometric results to health risk assessment results..

Rajiv obesity Bertram Virgin Pulse diabetes Rhode Island School of hard Reggie facebook Iran
"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We work with large employers all around the world and our our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system. A little bit and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate rotate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction it really is about. How do we help? People be healthier happier and more Productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners. For those of you. who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse? It's one of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentlemen like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team you you can imagine. Some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir. Richard Branson's leadership in his philosophy. Is If you take care of your employees. They'll take care curb your business and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees so strong and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and Aside from labor costs it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits that front. What are your thoughts on? What should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well I'm biased. But I think it has to be a behavior change too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity diabetes and heart disease as in our country and at the end of the day. There's so much we can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet our physical activity or lack thereof the stress is that we have in our lives. Just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic. I think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie what would you say right right now at at at Virgin pulse is an example of how you guys are improving. Health outcomes. Well I think we really tried to think. Outside of the box I think traditional health interventions inventions and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective. And they've been around for decades so we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people people feel like. They're failures rather than telling them that they're sick. What if we actually make them feel successful? What if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat? What would that do for self esteem for their motivation? And for the ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth. And the problem with that is they take a health risk. Assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk. Your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure..

Sir Richard Branson Virgin pulse Virgin Group Rajiv Reggie
"medical officer" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"medical officer" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Doctor, Judy Morgan. She's a veterinary certified in acupuncture, food therapy, and chiropractic care. She spent a lot of time, working with cavalier king. Charles spaniels and English toy spaniel rescue groups, and she's the chief medical officer for monkeys house. A dog hospice, and senior sanctuary. And of course, she's also very well known author. I remember her book in an Yang. I still have it on my shelf. I still refer to it pretty frequently. Welcome to the show, Dr. Thank you so much. Well, I like the way you practice because, you know, you've got some veterinarians and it's all about the medicine that they want to jam down your, your animals throats, but you, you have kind of a holistic approach. Don't you actually? We have an. Grated approach. So it's not that we shun all medications, we will grab them when we need them. But for the most part, we are looking for alternative therapies, whether that be food or herbs or you know, CBD oil is now very popular we use cold laser acupuncture, chiropractic. So just a lot more tools in our toolbox that we will go to rather than, you know, jump first thing into medications that might have some serious side effects. Let's talk a little bit about. Where do you stand on CBD's? Oh, awesome. Awesome stuff. We have tons of patients that are using it. And most of my family members also take it all of my dogs take it, and we're using it for, for different things. So I actually was just reading a study that was done by Cornell this morning where they were they did a double blind study with CBD for dogs with arthritis versus using non steroidal anti inflammatories and the results were really pretty amazing. Definite improvement in the pain scores on these dogs. So we definitely use it for pain. Not just for three days but pain in general, it's been an excellent adjunct for pets with anxiety. And we've also been able to use it to win some of our dogs off of seizure, medications. So lots and lots of uses for this, and I think we're just hitting the tip of the iceberg, because they're really just starting to do the research on it. Effects of all these medications that are prescribed are there, any side effects to CBD's they should worry about. Yeah. So if you're using a high quality product and you know, that's one of the biggest problems right now is figuring out who is, and who isn't because there's company coming online. There's probably multiple companies coming online every day. And, you know, everywhere I go all the Expos I'm just saying booth after booth after booth and it can be a little difficult to to for the average consumer to discern. You know, whether it's a good company because everybody's going to tell you that they're the best, but, you know, we're looking for full spectrum CBD, and we, it has to have less than point three percent, THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. So we're, we're not getting it from marijuana plants. It's coming from the hemp plant, and it has to be the whole plant extract. And so as long as you're THC is not high, you really can go pretty high on your dose, without getting side effect. It's the THC is, is higher in there. Then you definitely could have some Texas cities we use lower doses in dogs that have kidney problems, those with liver problems. We might back off on our dose, a little bit, but really not much in the way of side effects. I've had people give ten times the normal dose and their dogs are just fine. Comes from the ham plant, not the marijuana plant. I thought they were one in the same. Well, the marijuana plant has t h a lot more THC in it. Whereas the hemp plant should not have much THC at all. So it's just a different species. Let's talk a little bit about vaccinations, if we can because there's seems to be a lot of controversy about it. Obviously, there are certain vaccinations that our animals need. But I also see the anti vaxxers standing up in now we're seeing a reoccurrence of distemper for humans receive a reoccurrence of measles, or should we be doing these vaccines? So I'm not an anti vaccine, a judicious faxer. So I think that when I was in school back in the eighties in vet school. We didn't have a vaccination for parvo, and we had wards full isolation. Wards full of dogs that were dying of parvo virus. And you know they came out with the vaccine, and we've saved literally hundreds of thousands of lives. And so if. It became very important. The problem is that we then got into, we'll just vaccinate them every year and what we didn't realize is that those vaccines may last a lifetime. So what we do now is, you know, we get a couple of axons in as a puppy, and then we will start doing blood Tigers, which is a blood test that you can take the tells you whether they have circulating antibodies against the disease if they have the antibodies, they don't need new vaccines. So it makes a lot more sense to judiciously vaccinate know that they're protected, and then if they're not protected, you can give them only. What they're missing. What about rabies vaccination I know that's required by law. I think once a dog is over a year old. It's required. Every three years. Yeah. Can they have enough tighter, build up in their system where they don't need that rabies? And we have to give it to them anyway. Yes. Absolutely. So we've had my dog and my technicians cat neither of which have been vaccinated for about ten years. A protective tighter is point. Five both of our animals. Mine came up at fourteen point five and hers came up at eleven point five, and that was ten years after the vaccine was given so, yeah, you can do the titles, unfortunately because of the legalities, the most townships and states will not accept that. So we're forced to do the vaccines. Listrik veterinarian. Dr Judy Morgan and just a few minutes ago. Laurie reported on where to buy the cheapest food. So I have questions about food. We're going to take a quick break, and we'll get those questions answered and your answers.

CBD marijuana Dr Judy Morgan Charles spaniels medical officer parvo Texas Cornell Laurie ten years three percent three years three days
"medical officer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"medical officer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"It's ten oh. I'm Amy poll we hear from ASU after allegations took over social media indicating corruption within their economics department who we are. We would not operate that way. Vice president of media relations with ASU Katie Packwood says the Email mail sent from professor Brian Gauguin is all false. We have never received any grant engaged the activation that the university would establish quotas in any course, requiring fail certain percentage of students is critically ill son gauge, posted a statement on their website saying, quote, we remain focused on working to support the institution in their efforts to help students succeed in. This course, as we have done for nearly one hundred years with a thousand of institutions Ali vetnar, KTAR news. The former cop is sounding off in the wake of recent deadly. Road rage incidents in the valley. Retired Phoenix police sergeant Darren girsch says he still has unsolved cases at haunt him twenty years later, here's what to do. If you find yourself getting enraged, another driver, we need to stop those triggers stopped hill. Getting the cutting people off the gross of lane changes things like that can trigger somebody's a hot head with a gun. Could you don't know who it is? You're cutting off if you find yourself in the middle of the road rage birth says void making eye contact and don't flip someone the finger with recent outbreaks of diseases like the measles could be unvaccinated. Keep you from flying chief medical officer and owner of US care ways. Dr John show felt says it may not be in the works just yet. But it'd be interesting to see as requirement for flying. I think that would be phenomenal. But certainly a lot of cities and a lot of communities are making vaccinations mandatory to attend any public gatherings or to attend school. And I think it's necessary. He says one unvaccinated traveler poses a serious health risk to other. On their flight. And now for a check on traffic..

ASU Dr John Darren girsch US Katie Packwood Amy Ali vetnar Vice president Brian Gauguin Phoenix KTAR medical officer professor one hundred years twenty years