35 Burst results for "Medical College"

Will We Need COVID-19 Booster Shots?

Jim Bohannon

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Will We Need COVID-19 Booster Shots?

"Are widely available in the U. S. Many folks want to know if boosters will be needed down the road. One Wisconsin medical expert doesn't rule it out. Medical College of Wisconsin President and CEO Dr John Raymond tells Wisconsin's afternoon news that as of right now we don't need boosters We get from the three vaccines better authorized in the U. S is good. It covers all of the variance of concern right now, But things may change if new variants pop up in the future. I do think that it's possible. Well, maybe even likely that we'll be getting annual boosters. But a lot really depends on what we don't know yet, which is how long that immunity is gonna last. Melissa Barkley,

Ceo Dr John Raymond U. Wisconsin Medical College Of Wisconsin Melissa Barkley
Joe Miano Talks About Prime Editing in Mice

CRISPR Cuts

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Joe Miano Talks About Prime Editing in Mice

"Gillette start by with an introduction Just maybe dennis about yourself your current position. How you got you sure so i. I'm a professor at the medical college of georgia. I'm a new yorker. You can tell them not from the south. My background is in vascular biology a phd in vascular pathobiologist near medical college. I did my training. My training with eric olson who uses christopher quite a bit in the context of must addition feet in texas in women up to medical college of wisconsin before going to university of rochester. Where i was for twenty years where the crisper really started in my lap. And so most as you said most of my work revolves around using different crisper ending platforms to interrogate the dark matter of our genome to discover what with the meaning is of some of these interesting elements that we defy. Actually i'm glad you kind of said the last line. Because that is exactly what i had picked out been looking at your bio before you had said dark matter of the genome. Can you What do you mean by not matter. Why is that important to study. So used to be the late sixties early seventies that the genome homeless considered to be mostly comprised junkie neighbor. We know now that that's not the case that most of it is functional in some way shape or form and so there are myriad number okla dna binding transcription factors on one thousand plus that buying into specific elements. And we're interested in one class of these elements and all of these elements are found in in this dark matter. Nine coding or the genome which is like ninety eight to ninety nine percent of the six billion nucleotides of each cell so we have a reasonably good handle on where to look for these nuggets of goal. And we've use computational tools in with the crisper editing platform emerging in two thousand thirteen. It's made our life so much easier now to literally will change the single base level even these binding sites and find out what the consequences and that that has enormous implications for understanding. What the single nuclear type. Various associated with diseases how those may be functioning or dysfunctioning in in the context of various common diseases and reducing

Medical College Of Georgia Eric Olson Gillette Medical College Of Wisconsin University Of Rochester Dennis Christopher Texas Nuggets
Moderna Finds Vaccine Safe and Effective in Kids 12 to 17

Jim Bohannon

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Moderna Finds Vaccine Safe and Effective in Kids 12 to 17

"World with the Moderna Covert 19 vaccine found to be 100% effective in kids. 12 to 17 years old. One Wisconsin medical expert says This is an important part of the vaccination puzzle. Single person that gets vaccinated gets us closer to a new normal Medical College of Wisconsin president CEO Dr John Raymond says kids 12 to 15 are about 5% of the population. Kids, 12 and under are about 15% really an important group. Right now They're the individuals that are most likely to get infected with covert 19. Dr. Raymond says he's optimistic that both the Fizer and Moderna vaccines will be fully approved by the FDA. By July. MELISSA BAR CLAY

Moderna Covert Dr John Raymond Medical College Of Wisconsin Wisconsin Dr. Raymond Moderna FDA Melissa Bar Clay
J&J vaccine 'paused' after adverse reactions at Georgia site

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

J&J vaccine 'paused' after adverse reactions at Georgia site

"I'm Julie Walker Georgia health officials are temporarily stopping Johnson and Johnson vaccinations at one site in the state after eight people experienced what they're calling adverse reactions but experts caution it doesn't seem to be an issue with the vaccine three other states also temporarily shut sites down Dr Amy Baxter Georgia medical college says it's not the Johnson and Johnson vaccine that's the issue here it's that people taking it are more prone to fainting there's no problem with the J. and J. baxeen there's no problem with safety it's just that we have made it easier for people who don't like needles to get vaccinated with only one shot she says those people go for the J. and J. vaccine the vaccine is very safe and tiny minor side effects are nothing compared to the risk of dying or prolonged illness for Dr Baxter says problems we don't even know covert causes yet I'm Julie Walker

Johnson Julie Walker Dr Amy Baxter Georgia Medical College J. Baxeen Georgia Dr Baxter
EU regulator reviews AstraZeneca shot and blood clot links

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

EU regulator reviews AstraZeneca shot and blood clot links

"Countries temporarily suspending the use of AstraZeneca's vaccine over concerns of blood clots, Despite some experts, saying the Benefits of taking that particular shot away the risks. One Wisconsin doctor says the decision is ultimately about keeping people safe. Medical College of Wisconsin President and CEO Dr John Raymond says most epidemiologists who have looked at the data Express this wedding, including strokes in people who've gotten the vaccine is no higher than you would expect in the population at large, even explains the information that may have alarms. Some of the regulators in the European countries pursue cases were and how Care providers who are under 50, so they might fall in the category of not really being expected to have a clotting problem. Eliza Barclay

Dr John Raymond Astrazeneca Medical College Of Wisconsin Wisconsin Eliza Barclay
Center steps up to register underserved South Dallas residents for vaccine

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Center steps up to register underserved South Dallas residents for vaccine

"Here's the nbc. News affiliate in dallas texas reporting from vaccine registration event at a neighborhood in south dallas with a majority hispanic population. There was tremendous turnout at this oak cliff. Vaccine registration operation for people like to minka a sparser came. I don't know how to going the internet. Sparce says turn out here sends a message chose neither. There's a lot of people here that's willing to take that time. There's a lot of people here who are willing to get the shot. So how do we ensure that people like domingo and people from other communities of color get vaccinated joining us now. Dr james hildreth. He's an infectious disease. Expert on the president and ceo of mary medical college. He's a member of the fda's vaccine advisory committee which is evaluating co vaccine's. dr hilda. thank you for being with us. I'm just floored by this. We talked for eight nine ten months about one day. If we're so lucky to be able to get an effective vaccine not to vaccines or three vaccine effective vaccine. You know we're gonna have to work to really convince people to take it but that was going to be the problem. I i'm fascinated by the difficulty. People continue to have in getting access to this vaccine access seems to be a bigger issue than acceptance. Well ali. thank you for having me. I but the problem has many layers. There's a gap of supply which all of us are dealing with. There's a gap of trust in the the gap of access that you've alluded to a and these issues are related to the same reason why african americans biden next. People are being more devastated by the pandemic in the first place. A you know. We don't have access to healthcare on an equal basis. We don't have access to technology. So all the things that led to covid nineteen disproportionate affecting the populations are reaping reflected. Now by the challenges with vaccine. Can't underestimate the the trust issue here that we've gotta make sure. We have trusted messengers organizations. That are leading the way in terms of trying to get the vaccine to the people we want to another thing is we have detected backstage to these populations not necessarily relying them coming to the back. Things are that has to be part of our strategy. We have to get the vaccine to the communities ca. Some of them just cannot make it where the vaccine have been given. That's a major hurdle. We have to get us that.

Sparce Dr James Hildreth Mary Medical College Dallas Vaccine Advisory Committee Dr Hilda Minka NBC Texas FDA ALI Biden
Wisconsin Announces 65 and older Adults Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

The Designer Yard Show with Bret Achtenhagen

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Wisconsin Announces 65 and older Adults Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

"Be eligible for the vaccine. Starting January. 25th. There are about 700,000 people who are in this category. That means there were at least 65 years of age and live in the state of Wisconsin. When Dr John Raymond, president and CEO of the Medical College of Wisconsin joined Wisconsin's afternoon news this past week, WTMJ news director Eric Bill Stead wondered how long it's going to take to inoculate that many people. Let's take a look back. This is gonna be A little bit of a slow rollout, right? We can't imagine everyone's going to be able to go get this shot next week if they want one. Yeah, thanks, Eric it and you're right. It is exciting that we're going to be able to move on to face one B of the vaccine distribution here in Wisconsin. But again, there are many logistical challenges to ramping up. Especially because much of our vaccine is the Fizer vaccine, which requires ultra cold chain storage, so it'll be difficult to move that from the 16 hubs, Wisconsin, DHS has set up to have those storage capacities out into the public. Like so I asked everyone to be patient. But I do know that our health systems here in southeastern Wisconsin, all are rolling out ramp up plans that involve distribution through their network of clinics, and we should hear more about that. In the upcoming few days, Dr Raymond we've heard of incidents around the country where vaccinations of

Wisconsin Dr John Raymond Wtmj News Eric Bill Stead Medical College Of Wisconsin Eric DHS Dr Raymond
Health officials brace for post-holiday coronavirus surge

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Health officials brace for post-holiday coronavirus surge

"Public health officials, fearing the worst from all the holiday gatherings, with three major holidays in a month over now, But people still gathering in traveling. Health experts fear an even bigger covitz surge yet to come. Dr Bobble Heater of New York Medical College. I think we're going to start to see that by the middle of January. This is a big worry of ours, particularly in states like Florida, where they've been a little bit relaxed with their restrictions, and that new, highly contagious strain of coronavirus that was first spreading in the UK has now been detected in Florida, California and Colorado to as California reports are record 24 hour covert death count of 585, Tom 40, CBS News

Dr Bobble New York Medical College Florida California UK Colorado TOM Cbs News
COVID-19 vaccine distribution process continues in Wisconsin

Jeff Wagner

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 vaccine distribution process continues in Wisconsin

"Health Secretary Andrea Poem as of this morning, says nearly 200 Healthcare workers have received the first of a two part. Fizer VACCINE TMJ fours. Adriana Mendez has more on where vaccinations will begin. Next. Officials with cratered in the Medical College of Wisconsin say they received word from the state that they will be receiving. Their vaccine today, and as soon as they receive that shipment, they will be ready to vaccinate their employees within 24 hours now over at Ascension Hospital. They also plan on vaccinating their employees. Today they plan to vaccinate frontline caregivers that particularly work in the emergency room, covert 19 and intensive care units. Wisconsin reporting 2400 new covert 19 cases as ever win Wednesday 74 new deaths An FDA advisory panel

Andrea Poem Fizer Adriana Mendez Medical College Of Wisconsin Ascension Hospital Wisconsin FDA
Medtech Goes Virtual at Osso VR

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Medtech Goes Virtual at Osso VR

"Welcome to the tech talk pond caps. This is your host farro. And i'm very excited to have justin. Ceo of also be with us today. The role of virtual reality is pushing past traditional gaming into industrial applications. And also vr. Julie front of this forging a fascinating tap into the world of medical training and education. Jackson brings a particularly unique background as a gamer. A physician and now melting various interests as an entrepreneur justin. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having me well great. This is such a fascinating topic like probably many people listening you know. I've been a part of many training laps from cadavers to bone models and beyond and and you kind of feel delimitations when you've been in those settings it can be wildly inefficient and face serious limitations in terms of how scalable measurable of the training is so it just feels you know incredibly relevant and timely Particularly today is we Enter situations that are ever more remote That osa vr's really aiming to change a lot of that so so maybe to get started here you can give listeners an overview of really how you're bringing virtual reality into surgical training and assessment and we'll jump into it from their great. It really starts with my personal career journey and the problems that i experienced firsthand so like you said i originally started out in the world of gaming i was studying computer science and had the opportunity to work at activision and i got interested in healthcare because of a sick family member and i started to wonder if there was way to software and technology to help people instead of just entertainment So pivoted to medical engineering with the golden ben healthcare technology. But i didn't really know how to get started with invention and i was discussing this with a mentor when he told me. If you wanna invent something you need to understand the problem you're trying to i. And he felt that the best way to understand. Medical problems was to be a doctor and be on the front lines taking care of patients and seeing what works. And what doesn't so. I took his advice very literally. He helped me get into medical school. Ucla and then i stayed there to do my surgery training which is really where i started noticing a big problem which is how we train and assess our healthcare professionals with their technical skills like surgery and i would be in procedure after procedure at these top hospitals. Where sometimes people would say. Hey just scrub out. And google what to do or stock. We need to find an instruction manual or youtube video and to me. It kind of raised an eyebrow or two and what i noticed that was going on was really three core three dynamics. The first is that there's too much to learn so we're victims of our own success in a way. Accelerating science and technology the work that you and i do massively expanding. The library of procedures that healthcare professionals are expected to know how to do in a moment's notice as sort of an extreme example. I always tell the story how one day i was called to the zoo to operate on a guerilla not knowing anything about girl anatomy or girl as and that was a really interesting experience but just highlights how on any given day. You really don't know what you're going to deal with as a doctor or healthcare professional for that matter. The second part of the problem is that surgery is getting more complicated. Newer devices like robotics navigation minimally invasive techniques have longer learning curve so instead of ten to twenty cases. You're looking more like fifty to a hundred so of magnitude and then the final thing and most people don't know this outside of healthcare but there's little to no assessment of technical skills that takes place for surgeons and in health care. This is starting to change. But in general there's minimal also in my career as a surgeon. I still practice on weekends. I've only been assessed. One time i was interviewing for residency spot. Now's asked to play the board game. Operation and to remove a plastic piece without buzzing so it was basically seeing all of this firsthand and also having background and game development that i got introduced a virtual reality very early in its development and immediately recognized its ability to solve this problem. You can use it anytime and anywhere. You can train on any procedure. You can use your hands in a realistic way. You can train remotely train as a team and then you can get objective assessment. And so that's really how the concept for vr was born and win. Oh severe got started. Which october two thousand sixteen. We were really in a state where the practices that we were doing. In terms of training and assessment were unsustainable so the american association of medical colleges estimated. We're going to be over. One hundred thousand. Healthcare providers short within a decade thirty one percent of graduating residents after fourteen years of education could not operate without supervision and required additional years of training and lower skilled surgeons had five times higher mortality rates than higher skilled counterparts as reported by the new england journal of medicine and so we are already were on sort of a pretty bad path and then you throw covert in the mix as you mentioned and everything just got accelerated and so the main way especially after. We're done with our formal training and residency and fellowship as surgeons that we practice are as you mentioned at in-person events courses and conferences often sometimes with hundreds of thousands of people. So that's something that is very difficult to impossible to do right now. And we don't really know what the future is gonna look like the so called new normal. So that's where we've seen. Interest really skyrocket in the ability to train remotely without needing to be physically present with others on these new emerging medical technologies and procedures

Justin Golden Ben Healthcare Farro Julie Jackson Ucla American Association Of Medica Youtube Google New England Journal Of Medicin
"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Broke my heart <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> think wage. Great place to <Speech_Music_Male> live and I think <Speech_Music_Male> we have a great group <Speech_Music_Male> of fellows that <Speech_Male> really get along with one <Speech_Music_Male> another <Speech_Music_Male> who really want to see <Speech_Male> each other succeed <Speech_Male> and mentors <Speech_Male> that really <Speech_Male> want the best obviously <Speech_Male> like other <Speech_Male> news programs <Speech_Male> to really quick people into <Speech_Male> places to succeed. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> So I hope you <Speech_Male> guys are interested <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> interviewing here <Speech_Telephony_Male> and I hope get to meet <Speech_Telephony_Male> quite a few <Speech_Male> of you during the interview <Speech_Telephony_Male> trail and I wish you <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> all the best of luck <Music> wage. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Wow, <Music> <Advertisement> what an amazing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a huge thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the fellows and faculty <Speech_Music_Male> for enriching us with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> another terrific discussion <Speech_Male> and an incredible <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> addition to the card <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on a Case report <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Series. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be sure to check <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out the show notes for all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the case media available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for review <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> key take-home points <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and discussion <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> points and links <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the program. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you'd like the educational <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> takeaways and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> graphs delivered directly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to your email <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sign up for the heart beat <Speech_Music_Male> the car dealers newsletter <Speech_Music_Male> by clicking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the link in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the episode show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the ACC <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fellow and training section <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chaired by doctor machine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reason for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thursday. Incredible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support and collaboration <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a very special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to our phenomenal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for elevating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the platform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> columns Blumenthal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Tommy. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Units Dugan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rick Ferraro <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> off <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and they've been verghese <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Internal Medicine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Senior Residence at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Johns Hopkins Hospital <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as the team medhead <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mentor and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> University of Maryland <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cardiology fellow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> car and decide <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you love the show as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> long as we do be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sure to spread the <Speech_Music_Male> word read reviews <Speech_Music_Male> on your favorite podcast <Speech_Music_Male> platform and <Speech_Music_Male> consider becoming a patron <Speech_Music_Male> of the show on <Speech_Music_Male> patreon. All <Speech_Music_Male> right, that's <Speech_Music_Male> right time to make like <Speech_Music_Male> an S2 and <Speech_Music_Male> split wage.

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Take care of these patients called the heart disease and pregnancy Clinic. It's a multi-specialty clinic including Cardiology. G adult congenital Cardiology maternal fetal medicine and OB anesthesia, we will see these patients either inpatient or outpatient and often times for the duration of pregnancy shortly thereafter. So the most common question I get from patients who have survived peripartum cardiomyopathy and are still within childbearing years is what their chance of their subsequent pregnancy being affected and unfortunately, there's not a breath of data in this area. However, we do know that having survived. Party Mak the universe is somewhat significant risk.

pregnancy Clinic peripartum cardiomyopathy
"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"What is the unique things about the Medical College of Wisconsin is that we work in a very multidisciplinary way to take care of my patients. They've brought up a shock Patriot. But in addition to that we have a cardio obstetrics Atlantic run by DR Horton and dr. Cohen where these patients are referred often from smaller centres off and I followed that longitudinally and get the care that they need and afterthoughts and it's going to be one of our PCP our experts who's going to talk about pregnancy and related cardiac disease things back then and great job w n Shoe City Dave and Kate for the presentation. Thanks for asking me to talk a little bit about peripartum cardiomyopathy, which is a disease process that affects typically younger and healthier patients than we're used to seeing in cardiology. So briefly peripartum cardiomyopathy is a disease process that has a widely variable incidence for countries like Nigeria Haiti anything From one and hundred two hundred three hundred births are Complicated by this diagnosis and in countries such as Japan the incidence is much smaller at 1 in about 20,000. The United States need to some place in between those numbers with incidence rates being reported from between 1 and 1000 to 1 and four thousand and as we know it affects different populations differently its insulin is much higher and women of African American descent and women who are older at the time of their pregnancies a recent meta-analysis on that almost half of all peripartum cardiomyopathy cases occurred in women over thirty years of age during their index pregnancy other pathologies of that are associated with peripartum cardiomyopathy include the spectrum of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. So everything off gestational hypertension up to an including preeclampsia and eclampsia other risk factors, multi gestation, pregnancies Twins and triplets and the emerging role of a genetic. Position towards cardiomyopathies the new information regarding a potential genetic predisposition towards peripartum cardiomyopathy, which has been found in multiple family cohorts has led an interesting critical question regarding the potential role of genetic testing in patients diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy right now. It's a fairly varied clinical practice with many experts in the field suggesting the role of genetic testing and patience with a family history of dilated cardiomyopathy is in regards to the management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. It's very similar to patients with other ideologies of reduced ejection fraction and congestive heart failure. So during the acute phase of their presentation actually manage their loading conditions, including the preload and afterload and management of their volume status. What's not often recognized is the frequency with which arrhythmia is complicate the initial diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy our recent administrative level data set on that but most 20% of incident. Pardon cardiomyopathy hospitalizations are Complicated by arrhythmia with ventricular. Tachycardia being the most common are with Mia another aspect wage through the management of peripartum cardiomyopathy is the need and correct population for anticoagulation in the setting of severe well leads to solid function in the peripartum cardiomyopathy patient. It's well known that pregnancy in the immediate post-partum state are prothrombotic environments. And so there is concern that these pages may be at increased risk for thrombosis different experts in the field in different credit recommendations suggest a threshold of left ventricular ejection fraction of 30 to 35% off. The institution of anticoagulation so that's where the commonalities between acute systolic heart failure due to other ideologies and. Pardon cardiomyopathy. And and this is where we start talking about the things that are different. So as we all know any of these recommendations for management have to be made in the context of pregnancy or the potential for lactation and so several of our commonly used normal hormonal therapies need to be either avoided in the pregnant State such as in June 10th and converting enzyme Inhibitors and your attention to receptor blockers and your tips and receptor it never license Inhibitors and mineral coracoid antagonists and or used with caution in the in period of Life station. The only two medications that are commonly used in the treatment of systolic congestive heart failure that there is not adequate data during the lactose. . Our sacubitril which is an upper license inhibitor, and I have a breeding people into certain medications including commonly used medication such as ACE inhibitors Angiotensin receptor blockers, neprilysin Inhibitors and minimal corticoid antagonists in pregnancy. This is where the commonalities between the treatment of acute systolic heart failure a secondary to non pregnancy-related causes and the treatment of patients with. Particle cardiomyopathy typically ends. We have to make all of our treatment decisions in the e-text of pregnancy or potential adaptation which includes avoidance of certain medications, which are contraindicated in pregnancy additionally care should be given to the use of certain medications including neprilysin Inhibitors. And I have a breeding during lactation that there's not sufficient data to support their use right now the next factor that differs in the wage. Event of peripartum cardiomyopathy is the time course with which it's recommended to consider different relators for women with severe systolic dysfunction often times. I'll be recovery occurs within the three to six-month Mark after diagnosis. However recovery has been documented out to two years and so most experts in the field recommend consideration of a wearable cardioverter-defibrillator for women with relatively recent on set. Pardon cardiomyopathy as a bridge to a more permanent device. So in terms of pathology specific treatment bromocriptine is a medication which inhibits the secretion of prolactin and has been studied in peripartum cardiomyopathy in a real small studies. However, there are significant risks associated with the medication including the risk of thrombosis and the majority of the small studies Collective control group home. Right. Now there isn't consensus in the field. Whether bromocriptine should be part of standardized treatment for peripartum cardiomyopathy. And there's a lot of recent work being done towards developing the 7th. Dr. McNamara is in the initial phases of the rebirth trial which is a trial that will look at bromocriptine and outcomes in the treatment of acute peripartum cardiomyopathy. So the good news about peripartum cardiomyopathy is that it's associated with a much higher rate of recovery compared to other forms of reduced ejection fraction over several data sets and wage importantly, the only perspective it is that we have the iPad trial about seventy to seventy-five per-cent of women recover the Earth their ejection fraction at 12 months so much better rate of recovery compared to other cardiomyopathies at Medical College of Wisconsin and freighter. We have a specific Clinic to.

peripartum cardiomyopathy dilated cardiomyopathy systolic heart failure Medical College of Wisconsin bromocriptine eclampsia DR Horton United States Kate dr. Cohen Mia Dr. McNamara Life station Haiti Japan Nigeria
"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"That's really appealing to me. I think for me if I were to answer why Cardiology, it's the it's a diversity that draws me towards Cardiology both academically and clinically right from hemodynamic song to procedures invasive procedures to multimodality Imaging which I'm going to pursue down the line. There's just so much to do and so much to learn and so many ways in which we can help our patients on top of that. It just opens up very very diverse areas where we can sub specialize in which I think is unique to Cardiology and cannot be matched by any other specialty by Medical College. I have traveled quite a bit in my life. I've I've moved nationally and internationally over the years and I can tell you that this is one of the most collegial places where our attendings and us have no hierarchy we text back and forth. We run things by each other all points of time regardless of what time and the day or night it is as Co fell off. We are always making sure that everybody was on call is comfortable. We take care of each other, and we we lift each other up, and I think that's what makes them CW of a special place for me back me up there. I do lifts you up everyday day. I just feel uplifted bye-bye everyone here. This has been an absolute crazy Amazing Magic Carpet Ride, even though I'm the genie. I feel like I got my three wishes granted with the three of you. This is just been an absolute pleasure. We really feel like we got a great glimpse of Milwaukee. The beer was great. I had both a logger and the pale and not wearing Lake was beautiful and just giving us a glimpse at the collegiality within your program and that warmth really comes through in the chemistry between you all. So, thank you so much. So glad that you had the time in your day to come join us, and you can once all this chaos is over. We're going to come and join you guys. Enjoy the lake enjoy Milwaukee.

Milwaukee wearing Lake Medical College Co
"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"That did was talking about earlier. Yeah, thanks so much data, in many ways the remainder of our patients Hospital course really highlights when you and also did previously have talked about so full directed medical therapy was disgusted our patients after she was decannulated from a, which was on day five of her hospitalization initially. The patient was hesitant about starting many of these medications because of her desire to breastfeed however, after further discussions, she was amenable to starting and on days 8 through 11:00. She began tap the probe Lotus metoprolol succinate and spironolactone both her dad and her heart transplant evaluations were because of how much recovery she'd already experienced on day fourteen. She had had a subcutaneous ICD place for secondary prevention and on day sixteen she was discharged off over the course of next year this patient did undergo two separate BDC ablations her LD ejection fraction returned to normal and very happily. She is the mom of a healthy birth. K I am so happy that this was a great outcome for mom and baby here good work for the entire team caring for this complicated patient and kudos to you for dealing with some tough stuff overnight. It's important not to rest on our Laurels know however is this patient will require long-term care for her. Pardon cardiomyopathy patience with peripartum in general have worse outcomes. The lower their left ventricular ejection fraction is at presentation with higher wage Adverse Events and less likelihood of recovery other factors to take into account include LV dilation the presence of LV thrombus RV dysfunction. And if the patient is obese, or of African American descent is these are both been correlated with adverse outcomes as well some of attempted utilize Imaging modalities to help try and prognosticate including Echo derived Global longitudinal strain, which has been shown to correlate positively with good clinical outcomes. Cardiac MRI is also used with a high degree of late gadolinium enhancement as well high extracellular volume associated with lower odds of recovery. Remember though that gadolinium crosses the placenta and is considered Class C for pregnant patients, if being considered pre-delivery for subsequent pregnancies, that's another kettle of fish to campaign really have here the recovered and the non recovered ejection fraction patients both of which incur risk of relapse the subsequent pregnancy. However, with the recovered ejection fraction patients, it's a one-in-five risk with the patience with a non recovered ejection fraction have a 50% chance of relapse or the subsequent pregnancy. And typically, these are more severe the second time around which is kind of scary all patients stuff should have preconception planning the risks of a repeat pregnancy should be highlighted in patients with non recovered ejection fraction in particular continued use of that good medical therapy as I have indicated and close monitoring throughout pregnancy is important with repeat echocardiography repeat Labs, particularly that BNP it's important with frequency dependent on the individualized level of risk dead. During delivery, you need that multidisciplinary team including maternal fetal medicine and Cardiology working together vaginal delivery still preferred if able but you're going to need a monitor very closely off and post-delivery. One more thing. I'd like to talk about is implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. There's pretty limited data regarding their use and primary prevention of sudden cardiac death and peripartum patience is a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias as highlighted by our patient. But the same time they're more likely to experience recovery of their LV function than other forms of cardiomyopathy, which creates this kind of contrast. This has led to some interest in wearable cardioverter-defibrillators. That being said some Studies have observed an increased risk of sudden cardiac death during and post recovery of ejection fraction. So overall you can gather this is a pretty murky area and the current recommendation is to follow guidelines for primary prevention in the general population our patient experience of Presumed to be TV off You a shockable rhythm. And so she actually falls into the category of secondary prevention. Therefore she did receive a subcutaneous ICD team V David and Kate congratulations for taking such tremendous care of this patient. She came in essentially crashing and burning Advanced Mechanical circulatory support in a dire situation ahead of emergency cesarean section. It was such a valiant effort on the part of entire team with a capital E that brought her to a point where she could be discharged and a year later have a normal recovered LV ejection fraction and a beautiful healthy baby girl. There's nothing better than that to be able not just perform great care enjoy the education but also end up with such a beautiful outcome. So I'd like to use this opportunity to ask each of you song. Is it that inspired you to pursue Cardiology and what makes your heart flutter about training at the Medical College of Wisconsin. So I'd like to say that cases like this are exactly why wage Went into Cardiology to have someone in such Dire Straits such on the brink and to be able support them. Not only just medical care but also the Psycho Social aspect of the porting page through one of the probably toughest times in their in their families lives and then to see them recover and be able to raise a family like she did is one of the biggest reasons I went to Cardiology. I love the physiology. I love the procedural elements of everything but that it scores why I went to Cardiology and I think that Medical College of Wisconsin gives me the opportunity to care for patients like this. We have the resources we have the Personnel who are so willing and so available to help us out when we're on call overnight like one of my co fellows had pointed out with the shock page at the tip of my fingers. I can bring in experts in the field to help with the most complicated patience and help bring in the ability to support them and God Same time despite having these experts. We don't have egos here. I think I would say that we're pretty Midwest friendly and are intending Czar universally great to get along with and so am I covet so those are some of my highlights so I'm a lifer I did medical school and residency at MCW as well. So in terms of endorsements of the institution, I think that's pretty much as good it gets light enough to stay forever basically and for me a lot of what Dave said in terms of live Cardiology, but I think I'll add that this case also highlights another piece that for me is I think really exciting about Cardiology which is we have a lot of answers and we have a lot of sort of goal-directed medical therapy and known entities, but there's a lot of unknown and left to learn and particularly because of my interest in research. I think those unanswered questions allow for a career-long continue learning.

cardiomyopathy patients Hospital Medical College of Wisconsin thrombus metoprolol MCW BDC Dire Straits spironolactone Dave David Kate
"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"medical college" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Cardiovascular disease affects the lives of hundreds of millions dedicated cardio nerds everywhere are working hard to fight this Global epidemic. These are their stories. Welcome back our dinners. Thanks for joining us as we tour Fellowship programs across the country wage as part of the car dealer in case report series produced in collaboration with the ACC fellow and training section. Each episode will Feature A cardiology Fellowship programme fellows from the program present and teach about fascinating case and share what makes their hearts flutter about their program. Each case discussion is followed by an ECP are segments from a Content expert and a message from the program director before we die off in just remember, we are an independent educational platform. This podcast is not meant to be used for medical advice. The views expressed here. Do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of our employers that case you're about to hear is dead. Hundred percent hipaa-compliant. We thank you for subscribing to and supporting the cardi nerds. Our mission is simple to democratize cardiovascular education promote diversity and inclusion Empower everyone to learn and teach from the basics to the advanced while fostering wellness and Humanity. If you believe in the mission consider supporting us on patreon, every little bit goes a long way. We're also were so excited to be growing the platform by mentoring the next generation of cardi nerds. We are establishing the cardio nerds Academy and are looking for residents and fellows to join as card interest fellows. Please see the link in the episode option to submit an application without further Ado. Let's continue on our tour with another fascinating case from amazing Cardenas colleagues. We are absolutely privileged today to be joined by cardiology fellows for the Medical College of Wisconsin. I'd like to invite doctors Kate Cohen David Lewandowski and Dave Maja Nani home to introduce ourselves guys. Welcome to the show. Tell us who you are. Thanks so much Dan, and I'm at it is great to be here. My name is David Lewandowski, and I'm A third-year cardiology fellow here at MCW off pursuing an Imaging Fellowship focusing in Echo and structural Imaging her next year. And I absolutely love it here in Milwaukee. I have a number of hobbies here. I enjoy playing all sorts of different kind of sport like cooking a lot reading and even did a little bit of dancing specifically West Coast dancing before the pandemic Shuffle things around a little bit. Hi, I'm Bev. I'm A third-year cardiology fellow at the Medical College of Wisconsin going into advanced cardiac. Imaging here at the Medical College next year. I grew up in India primarily in New Delhi moved to age. Toggle for residency and ended up at the medical college for Fellowship. I'm not as gifted a performer as Dave my hobbies include reading fiction and non-fiction. I'm reading a book called The Clock makers daughter right now, which brings out kind of like the childish side and made it's partly a murder mystery party a ghost story if I will have you know that these ships do not lie. Somebody's got a somebody's got to bring the Nerds to Kar Diya nerds, right? That's gotta be me. Who yeah, we hundred percent Katie just to introduce yourself. Hi, I'm Kate. one of the first year cardiology fellows. I think ultimately I'm interested in some sort of hybrid career. I'm currently on an R 38 NIH grass and so a lot of my time this year and last has been actually doing basic research. So I'm hoping that someday in the future. I'll get to combine clinical practice with research as well in terms of hobbies. I have an eight month old son who I adore and spend as much time with as I can and otherwise, I'm actually a daily New York Times crossword computer. Wow, that is quite the feat and I don't know what's more impressive, you know, as a first-year fellow you're juggling being a mother to a eight-month-old, you know, I'm a father to a three year old and I definitely understand the balance required with that. You're also doing basic science research and you complete daily. Crossword puzzles. I add those who don't know which should be more impressed by but colored me impress. Thank you so much for being here and introducing yourself guys. I'd also like to give a big shout-out to sooty thiagi and David's Tomo who are also parko fellows who put just as much work if not more into the project than we did. They couldn't make it here today, but props to them. I think you said that they couldn't make it here because there was a cath lab activation and have taken care of patients so we can fully endorse patient care. It's a part of being fellow at the Medical College of Wisconsin. So go College. Woo, Dave Dave Kate. This is such a treat to have you come on our show, than I am thinking about ideas of how we would do this cases across America series The only thing that came to mind was Aladdin and a Magic Carpet Ride. I may have sung to I'm at then I said I can show you the world. So that's what we're doing right now. I've picked up, that we're on our Magic Carpet. It's a beautiful carpet with great Frills, and I've picked him up from Cleveland. I left for Baltimore. We are now off. While cruising through Milwaukie and we've picked you guys up. It's a very large carpet. I assure you but direct why don't you guys direct us to your favorite location in Milwaukee? We get set up shop and talk about this amazing fascinating case of Cardiology that will be an inspiration to us all can I be Aladin? He was my favorite Disney character growing up. Yeah if I can be the page. Oh, okay. All right. Let us take you guys to the sound Shore beer garden here in Milwaukee because the city is known for its beer and the beauty of the lake and let's get start at the lake is pretty Crystal Clear. It's beautiful and Shining. Okay, very good. This is perfect. Are we thinking lager or we thinking more of a lighter L? Just to help me complete that Victor. I'm a light bulb L kind of guy. I know Dave like says diapers. Did you want to tell them what kind of beer you like? I had a logger. We'll leave it there. All right pictures complete love it. Love it off. Let's get started with this amazing case Okay, so got the picture. We're enjoying awesome homegrown beer and we're sitting by the lake. It's Crystal Clear and pristine. This is sunset in the background. Let's talk about what we love talking about into setting Cardiology. What do you guys have for us? We have an awesome case for you are patient is a thirty-two-year-old g2p one female at 29-6 the station with a history of politicians who presented after a witness out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest while at work, she lost Consciousness and was founded pulseless. She received six rounds of immediate bystander CPR and three shots before Ross was achieved She was transferred to an outside hospital where she was intubated but remained had pops up to 87% on 100% fio2 with eight of teeth. She was also hypotension to the seventies over-50s despite getting IV fluids and pressers and an outside Hospital chest X-rays showed diffuse bilateral pulmonary edema that outside Hospital initiated the shock team conference call with our Institution. Who during that conference call was decided that the patient would be transferred to us for a higher level of care her past medical history was significant for one previous normal healthy pregnancy took a surgical history. She had a previous knee surgery. She had no allergies and was taking a prenatal vitamin in terms of medications for family history was pertinent for maternal uncle's with sudden cardiac death and life journal first husband was a by the itv4 a Long QT syndrome. However, the culprit Gene was found through genetic testing to be through the non-related side of the family. She was married drink alcohol literally was a heavy smoker.

Medical College of Wisconsin Dave Dave Kate Milwaukee cardiology fellow Kate Cohen David Lewandowski Medical College cardio nerds Academy ACC Cardiac Arrest outside Hospital program director NIH David Lewandowski Kar Diya New York Times Magic Carpet Cardenas Milwaukie West Coast Dave Maja Nani
Turbulent reality collides with GOP convention.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Turbulent reality collides with GOP convention.

"Turbulent reality is clashing with these smooth steady image Republicans are attempting to paint of President Donald, trump and his leadership on the third night of the GOP convention with a potentially catastrophic hurricane bearing down on the Gulf coast wildfires, ravaging huge areas of California protests growing in Wisconsin after the shooting of a black man by police still raging corona virus pandemic, killing more than a thousand Americans a day with no apparent federal leadership adding still another controversial element the NBA postponed three playoff games after the Milwaukee, bucks refused to take the court for their game following the shooting of Twenty Nine Year Old Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin That was a few hours before vice president. Mike Pence was to speak from Baltimore's Fort Mchenry where in eighteen fourteen battle inspired the national anthem. Trump has strongly criticized athletes who neil rather than stand during the anthem in protest of racial injustice. The historical convergence of health economic environmental and social emergencies is only increasing the pressure on trump as he looks to reshape the contours of his lagging campaign against former vice president Joe Biden with Election Day just ten weeks off and early voting beginning much sooner. The GOP's convention response to those growing challenges have been uneven. The opening nights featured virtually no reference to the hurricane or wildfires covid nineteen was referred to as the China virus as xenophobic trope for a worldwide pandemic. The lineup is included speakers who have been at odds with the black lives matter movement including ace, Luis couple who brandished guns and the Kentucky Attorney General who has not yet filed charges in the death of a woman killed by police. Organizers on Tuesday had pulled another featured speaker, Angel Mom Marianne Mendoza after she directed her twists followers to a series of anti-semitic conspiratorial messages hours before her prerecorded segment was to add convention speakers also reinforcing trump's long order message warning electing Biden would lead to violence in American cities spilling into the suburbs, a message with racist tones despite the reality of these protests happening right now during trump's first term and much of the criticism from demonstrators levied at the sitting President himself at times the RNC appear to be presenting a parallel universe that few people inhabit but for those making the speeches, an idealistic patriotic habitat where the people didn't complain about their lot because they were proud Americans. Most significant all over the three nights of speeches with a literal falsehoods about the Biden campaign rather than run on their own platform. The Republicans have sought to demolish the policies of the left with propaganda, rewriting them to suit their own agenda. US health officials sparked criticism and confusion about hosting new guidelines on corona virus testing from the White House task force that run counter to what scientists say is necessary to control the pandemic. The new guidance says it's not necessary for people who have been in close contact with infected people, but don't feel sick to get tested. It was posted earlier this week on the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC previously had advised local health departments to test people who have been within six feet of an infected person for more than fifteen minutes across the country. Public Health experts called the change bizarre. They noted that testing contacts of infected people is a core element of public health efforts to keep outbreaks in check, and it's a large percentage of infected people. The CDC has said as many as forty percent exhibit no symptoms federal officials said the new recommendation was issued by consensus of the White House virus topic force. However Dr Anthony found she the country's top infectious disease expert, and perhaps the best known task force member said, he wasn't part of the discussion that green lit the change suggesting it may have come from the President himself the American Medical Association in a statement called the change a recipe for community spread the Association of American Medical Colleges called it a step backward in fighting the pandemic. Restricting testing could be self defeating because it could skew the numbers and create a perception that rates of infection are Haya. Another explanation for the change is that Donald Trump simply wants to see case counts drop and discouraging more people from getting tested is one way to do it with the general election two months away and concern that a high number of infections might affect his chances of reelection.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Vice President GOP President Trump President Donald CDC Mike Pence Wisconsin Kenosha Baltimore NBA Milwaukee Fort Mchenry Association Of American Medica Jacob Blake Gulf Coast American Medical Association Bucks
"medical college" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Raymond Medical College in Wisconsin President and CEO. And Tim Sheehy, the president of the Metropolitan Walkie Association of Commerce. Gentlemen. Thank you for being with us. Glad to be here, John. Thanks for having us, Tim. I just did a Google image search. I could find no pictures anywhere on the Internet, so it must not have ever happened of you with a beard. But I saw you last night on the news and you've got a beard. I would like to say it's like over a beer, but I was coming down from Mount Rainier, and I just haven't had a chance. T D Baird. What does your wife like? The beard? Ah, she's holding out judgment. Oh, that's nice of her. That is very nice of her. Hey, Dr Raymond, Let's start with you. I want to have you take us inside the numbers because you are so good at explaining this sort of stuff. Ah, lot of positives today, but the percentage dropped, which is kind of one of the key numbers we've been watching here. W t M J explain where we are. As faras. The numbers go as we sit here on July 21st Okay. Thanks while just talk about the positive numbers, meaning the number of cases of covert 19 We set a new record in Wisconsin today, with 1117 positive cases reported And you mentioned the positivity writer, their percentage of tests that come back positive and went down a little today with 7.7% and over the weekend and through Monday it had been around 10%. But ideally, we want that positivity rate to be below 5%. That one I mean that we're doing enough tap thing. So you know, I am a little concerned that we continue to have record numbers of new cases and we're not really increasing the amount of test thing that we're doing two a substantial amount. Lots of positives, Dr Raymond. Few deaths, thankfully, and that's a relative number. I realize Could the virus be weakening in intensity would mutate in that way? Or is that not how this thing would potentially work? Yeah, thanks. Excellent question. And in theory, yes, the virus could mutate. But it's mutating relatively slowly, And there's no good evidence that it's either become Mohr infectious or less infectious since the beginning of the pandemic, so I don't think that we can count on the virus weakening. On the other hand, we're learning a lot about how to take care of the virus, and there were some promising occurrences over the last few week. There's been record progress in terms of Developing new vaccines in a really a short period of time. And there are a couple of preliminary studies of new medications that if they can be confirmed, might be useful in addition to our intensive here to help us treat that Cove in 19 Dr Raymond. It's Melissa here. I heard a report today that most people are getting the virus at home from family members. If you live with lots of people and people are going all different places they come back home. What's your advice on not transmitting the virus. Yeah, I could take a quick look at the study and the numbers were really small. But with for the confirmed cases out of the house and transmission within the household, what I would say is, I really think it's more important for us to be practicing social distancing hand washing and face covering out of the house because somebody eventually had to bring that disease into the household, either from a work exposure or from going out to do the activity to daily living like shopping And what not He's Dr John Raymond, The Medical College of Wisconsin's president, CEO Tim She, president of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, is also here, Tim I was talking to a businessman who Says he is more scared about a second shut down. Then he was first shutdown. You talked to a lot of business people every day. It's what you do. Are we recovering? And how real is that fear that a second shutdown could occur. Here's a quick snapshot on the numbers. In March, Metro Milwaukee had about 870,000 people employed in the unemployment rate was 3.2%. By April, we have lost 111,000 jobs in our unemployment rate had gone up 10% 13.6% today in June. We are by the end of June, we were back up to about 802,000 jobs, so that's a gain of 43,000. And while the unemployment rate isn't out, I think it's going to be just below 10%. So we went into a big hole relatively, and we've dug our way part of the way out, and I think the concern is Keep following the advice of Dr Raymond and others So we don't see a resurgence that impact kind of consumer and employees confidence because that would be really challenging to our recovery. Gentlemen, we got a break for the news. Could you please stick around? I want to ask him. We both come back the most promising thing you've seen this week and the most challenging thing you've seen this week. Could you please stick around for us? It is for 26 at W. T. M. J you could weigh in if you want the econo Morgan JJ talking text line is 85561616 20 News about your money on this Tuesday afternoon, Tom Newman with the W. T, M. J. Drake and Associates Market Update US. Stocks were mixed today as traders book profits from major tech names that out. Jones Industrial Average gained 159 points, while the S and P 500 index increase 5000.17% and then as a composite fell 0.81 Shares of Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Microsoft and Apple were all down more than 1%. This muted performance comes after a big run up this far in the month of July. However, bank stocks which have been taking a beating this year, rose broadly, IBM reported better than expected second quarter earnings, notably the company, improved gross margins and three of its five units in the past quarter. Despite the news, the stock fell 0.3% and Coca Cola said its profits fell 33% in the second quarter, but the company expressed optimism on demand as locked down measures associated with the Corona virus were lifted. Cheers rose 2.3% for drinking associates. I'm Tom Newman, Financial Advisor for News radio. W. T. M. J Rumor Law offices.

Dr John Raymond President and CEO Wisconsin Raymond Medical College president Tim Sheehy Tim Google Metropolitan Walkie Associatio T D Baird Coca Cola Tom Newman Milwaukee W. T. M. J Medical College of Wisconsin IBM Tim She
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Medical college of Wisconsin the support of pregnancy care programs bring moms better about the same just station in their pregnancy about six to eight moms in a group setting right now with code red a lot of things are virtual through zoom or through some online programming but the at helps the families come together and help the moms come together it helps in peer to peer support and we do a lot of peer to peer support in the neck you as well families that are going through that only know how other families are feeling and so we really are working with partnering with the physicians do was the nurses the midwives in the community and really reaching them where they're at in asking for help from other local agencies that partner with the March of dimes to provide care for all families all babies and all moms well important work you're doing for sure you know lots of really great things to look up and to research what can people do to support the March of dimes and get involved you can share with us quickly what how people can get more information sure I think again because sharing our education sharing our mission I think if you talk to somebody that hasn't been impacted by the March of dimes that would be a surprise again supporting through advocating for change for advocating for a policy for her continuing the great educational programs that not only serve across the nation but here at a local level in Milwaukee and across Wisconsin supported pregnancy care does show a reduction an evidence based reduction in about thirty three percent of moms that have last premature babies and again just partnering with us helping me with our fundraising with our virtual events and connecting families like Erica across Milwaukee across Wisconsin and across the nation to show that they're not the only ones going through this that we are partnered with them and we will stay connected on Facebook Instagram linked in Twitter and here locally so pick up the phone to reach out to our website W. W. W. dot March of dimes dot org for all the great resources that we do here in the city the state and then across the nation wonderful well thank you Angie thank you Erica I I want to thank all my guests today Nicole today founder of let's thrive three sixty and Erica nor in Angie bier sack from the March of dimes thank you again for sharing your passion and how you've turned that into a purpose if you'd like further information about what we talked about today or you like to be considered as.

partner Milwaukee Wisconsin Erica Twitter Nicole founder Angie bier Medical college of Wisconsin Facebook
Protests spark fears of new COVID surges

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Protests spark fears of new COVID surges

"What happens when protests and demonstrations meet a genuine viral threat Dr Jon Rubin is the CEO of the medical college of Wisconsin is joining us live on WTMJ good morning Sir thank you so much for your time soul the tendency I think among some people lose that cincy for home got lifted the virus went away that obviously is not the case now add in the fact that people are being so active socially and politically with street demonstrations and such I would imagine this is just gonna be like a Petri dish for this virus to spread thanks thanks so much for the questions you have and it's an important one you know we did see our largest three day total of new covert nineteen cases last week what about seventeen hundred cases from Thursday through Saturday and that is of significant concern on the other hand we're not seeing a huge spike in hospitalizations or deaths at least not in the last week with regard to the protests at Lancaster by knowledge and the pain and anger that people are feeling about the killing of George white and the longstanding frustration about the slow pace of dealing with racism and racial disparities so no one in minimizing anyway the reasons why people would allow ranger which exercise our right to protest peacefully but I am concerned about the potential impact of the protests not just because of crowding in the fact that some people were wearing face coverings but also because we know African American and Latino populations and other disenfranchised minorities have a higher likelihood of contracting culvert nineteen and minorities have worse outcomes especially African Americans you know on down to lead their issues with the healthcare system that need to be addressed also including an inequitable access and unconscious biases some of our providers but I I do think the problem is a reflection of many contributors to health especially the social determinants of health any of those under guard a lot of the protests doctoring and some people are taking a met wearing a mask and and turning it into a political statement can you clarify what good masks do what good wearing a mask does yeah thanks for the question Jane this really shouldn't be a political issue this is an issue of Kurdistan solidarity what we know is if people wear either a cloth or paper paper update covering that they reduce the spread of their own respiratory droplets when they call cough or sneeze and that's really important way that we can prevent spreading cut a symptomatic disease to other people many many people now know that covert nineteen can be spread when you when you feel perfectly fine and in fact you may be your peak level of contagious missing a day or two before you start your own symptoms Dr at the beginning of this I think a big part of slowing the curb was to alleviate pressure on health care workers how are they doing it have we progressed in terms of trying to take some of that pressure off of hospitals and health care workers yeah thanks for the question again we're doing really well in Wisconsin I think we were fortunate that we were weeks to months behind some other municipalities and we learned a lot about the virus just in terms of how to take care of patients who need to be admitted to the hospital and who needs to go in the icy use so I think we're doing reasonably well we do want to make sure that people continually social distancing good hand hygiene and making sure that they're careful about talking coughing sneezing around other people so that we don't have another surge that can overwhelm the capacity of our health systems really don't well here Dr John Raymond the CEO of the medical college of Wisconsin joining us live on WTMJ only got about a minute left but I wanted to ask you there's a a conventional wisdom being spread by some that this thing is going to cook out as summer is upon us that the bug is going to go away got up to ninety plus yesterday so certainly felt like summer is there any truth to that well we all hope that it will go away but I would say that the evidence is a weekend that there's a weather related factor with covert nineteen factors take a look at the southern hemisphere more it's been warm and there's been very significant spread of the disease so we can hold but I would still say let's socially distance and protect

Dr Jon Rubin
Monkeys snatch COVID-19 blood samples from college in India

WBZ Afternoon News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Monkeys snatch COVID-19 blood samples from college in India

"In northern India again a monkey snatched a batch of coronavirus blood tests from a lab assistant who was walking outside on the campus of Maroof medical college with a lockdown in India monkeys have been creeping into more urban areas problem is the blood samples they took tested positive for covert nineteen locals are now worried the monkeys will bring the virus into their neighborhoods the patients were

India Maroof
The Great Heart Race

American Innovations

03:00 min | 2 years ago

The Great Heart Race

"Richmond Virginia. Nineteen sixty six in the prep room at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A team of surgeons prepares to enter the operating room moving quickly. They scrubbed their hands with disinfectant soap in slip into their blue surgical gowns urging them on as a stocky dark haired. Bundle of energy. Dr David Hume. He's the hospital's head of surgery and director of its organ transplant program. Come ON EVERYBODY. We could lose any moment. Anybody seen the lower right on cue. Dick Lower enters prep room. He's the hospitals lead cardiac surgeon and like most good surgeons. He's unflappable even in this hectic environment. Donahue what have we got? Oh we've been waiting for donor and recipient as soon as you scrub in. We can get started or those charts. Can I see of course? Incompatible blood types not ideal. I know but this patient will die anyway if we don't try the transplant. Our studies the charts carefully squinting through his horn rimmed glasses. Shorter hume hovers anxiously around like a terrier pointing at the charts. Look at this donor. I mean we couldn't ask for any better for this head injury. He was in perfect health. We've got the state medical examiner in there already. We'll pronounce him dead. The second heart stops. Come on let's go. Lower closes the folders and handsome back to you. Sorry David I can't do it. What are you talking about? Of course you can. Based on his vitals. I'd say this recipient is too far gone. The blood type mismatch will kill him. You don't know that even if he lives only a few hours if the new heartbeats will have done it the first human heart transplant. I'm sorry David I know you WANNA BE I. I do too but not like this as chief of Surgery. I order you to perform this operation. Lower is already walking away. Lower lower. Get back here. The other Surgeons Watch stunned as lower leaves and hume in. A rage clings patient charts on the floor. He sees the room full of eyes staring at him over there. Surgical masks and takes a deep breath. Somebody tell the medical examiner transplant is off. Its furious with lower. But he can't afford to fire him. Dick glower is one of the best cardiac surgeons in the world is performed more experimental heart transplants on dogs than anyone else in the field if anyone's going to do the first human heart transplant. It's him and hume desperately wants his program to be the first. He already feels cheated out of his rightful place in medical history for performing the first successful kidney transplant. He doesn't want to get left behind again.

Dr David Hume Dick Lower Medical College Of Virginia Ho Richmond Virginia Dick Glower David I Director Donahue
Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

Tara Brach

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

"We are discussing tonight. The second part of what's now a three part series on working wisely with desire addiction and I start with Buddhism because the Buddhist talk about the Middle Path as many of you know in approaching desire and it's to me desire with without any grasping but living at fully living fully what our hearts are experiencing with an open heart and wide open hand. I mean I love the cartoon of a dog and the caption is Zenda dreaming of a medium-sized bone. So this is our opening to exploring Some more work with desire and addiction and in the Buddhist cosmology one of the universal psychic domains is called the realm of the Hungry Ghost and the hungry ghosts are being who are drawn pictured with these narrow necks in these large bellies and it represents the fact that the riddled with desire but they're unable to satisfy themselves and really this refers to the universal way that we human suffer that we we all experienced to a degree that sense of something's missing. Now's not enough. I need something more. There's a kind of leaning forward so that the next moment contains with this moment does not and when it's intense it leads to craving and to addiction so whatever the degree of wanting mine that you may discover in yourself grasping when you investigate will take you from the one place where love and awareness and realizations actually possible. It takes us from French. Any amount of wanting and we're not really fully here to contact what we truly long for. I remember a long time ago. I heard a little story of a conversation between a man and God and the man said to God. How long's a million years to and God said a million years to me is one second and then the man said how much is a million dollars to God said well? A million dollars is one penny so the man screwed up his courage he said God. Can I have one of your pennies and we know it that when we're caught in wanting mind we lose sight of what truly matters to our hearts so the key inquiry and we'll explore this in in this class is what drives. Montaigne grasping an addiction and when we examine what we find. Is that under all of them? There's the stress of unmet needs in other words when our needs for belonging for love refueling seen when they aren't met more wired to grasp after some substitutes give us a sense of reward. And we get just enough reward from the substitutes to keep us hooked now some grasping an addiction substitutes are culturally accepted. My for instance. The unmet needs for feeling loved and respected and secured fixate on accumulating wealth or a. Hologram ARE ON POWERING OVER PEOPLE. Control and dominance are maybe in deceptions spinning things. It's assume will happen. Our maybe our substitute is exercise and we over exercise addicted to exercise. I can speak personally that over the years. Jonathan my husband and I've kind of tracked where we go for substitutes and the paired substitute we both end up going towards our combination of caffeine and then over work I mean there's some soothing and and pleasure reward from fuelling productive and we have shifted our caffeine and take over the years. We're both now during Macci which has in many ways as a as a very healthy green tea and it's still a addiction. It's not for us because if I stopped. Let's say tomorrow I'd have headache and I'm attached to it. I wouldn't be as productive so Jonathan because of different challenges of sleeping has decided. He's GonNa try to wean himself an experiment for a month without the Macho. Not so I thought I'd share with you. I just sent him something I encountered. It's a cartoon and it's got these two homeless guys that are sitting on a park bench. One sang to the other. I USED TO BE A. Ceo of a multinational had three homes private jet and then I switched to decaff. So here's the deal with substitutes and substitute gratifications. That are condone. We can still be hooked and we're hooked for good reason. We're afraid of being without them. They satisfy something. But some substitutes as we know are considered bad they're not societally condoned and they cause more obvious harm and this is where we're talking about the addiction to substances to gambling to sex violence to anger and when an addiction to a substitute is not condoned not only. Is there the suffering of the addiction? But then there's the added suffering of social condemnation and self condemnation and we're going to spend some time with this piece here because you might consider if the cause of addiction is UNMET NEEDS. How do you imagine condemnation impacts the addictive patterning? What we find is that it intensifies it it intensifies our needs for feeling worth and value and belonging and then it just drives the cycle of addiction the single most crucial part of healing addiction that I have found in my life and working with others is removing condemnation. I can speak for myself that probably the most challenging addiction for me In My late teens and early twenty s was overeating binge eating at times and really through the years. The single factor that most unhooked me was learning truly the process of self compassion. So that'll be. The focus of this talk is how do we bring compassion to ourselves when we're caught in addiction and it begins for some people are maybe let's say it's most helpful. When there's some understanding about how biologically and psychologically compelling addiction is beyond any sense of our own control. Read you a quote this is Robert Freedman and he's from Cornell Medical College as a psychiatrist I have yet to meet a patient who enjoys being. Addicted to drugs are compulsive overeating. Then it goes on to say we now have a body of research that makes the connection between stress an addiction definitive neuro. Scientists have found that food recreational drugs have a common target in the reward circuitry of the brain and that the brains of humans and other animals who are stressed undergo biological changes that makes them more susceptible to addiction now. Stress is a kind of a vague big word. So let's let's anchor this little bit. What happens when the brain is stressed by UNMET NEEDS? So let's say as a young child. You've been neglected or abused and what that does is it creates biological changes in the brain that the animal make you more susceptible to addiction and the way it happens. Is that that stress. As a young child creates fewer dopamine receptors. At means that you then become more driven to seek substitute rewards to compensate rewards like Saxon Food and money and drugs because they release dopamine and they have a sense of pleasure so craving fixate on behaviors that will light up the pleasure centers in the brain. And here's what happens. After that. In time the brain rewires and the use of the substitutes further decreased the number of receptor. So it takes more and more to get a reward and the craving gets stronger. In other words this less sensitivity to the rewards also and I didn't know this 'til recently with less dopamine receptors due to that stress. There's less activity in the prefrontal. Cortex which means that impairs critical thinking and the capacity for restraint

Dopamine Caffeine Zenda Saxon Food Montaigne Macci CEO Jonathan Robert Freedman Cornell Medical College
Edmondo Robinson, Associate Professor of Medicine at Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Outcomes Rocket

09:22 min | 2 years ago

Edmondo Robinson, Associate Professor of Medicine at Sidney Kimmel Medical College

"We are hyper focused. On on value based care and consumerism and healthcare some super excited for a doctor Robinson's perspectives. In addition to to his previous roles he's also an associate professor of medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University Sidney Kimmel Medical College and he's also a practicing physician so It is truly a privilege to have him as not only a health industry leader but also a practicing physician to talk about some of these trends and healthcare with that at Mondo. I WanNa give you a warm welcome. Thanks for joining us being over me. So what is it that got you inspired to do the work that you do that Robinson and had as you said I'm reading my bio a little bit? I had a few different roles and my inspiration has always been consistent. It's I truly want to make a difference. I knew it seems Corny. But you know it's it's one of the drivers I think there's so much opportunity in healthcare to affecting improve people's lives in one of his. Why continue to practice that one on one interaction where you are truly little hospital so literally? Saving someone's life that is inspiring and then even as I think about digital in the opportunity to improve affect people's health across steeled across a large population continues to inspire me. It's it's the the one on one. Interactions the interactions as well as the N. Equals many interactions To me they inspire me in different ways but at the end of the day. We actually truly helping people in that. That's a good reason to get out of bed morning. Totally agree with you and my head and heart are in the same place. I don't think it's Corny. I think it's a great thing to be moved by. And and so I'm curious. Now you know with the work that you're doing there at the cancer center however you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. What's different and better about what you guys are doing is interesting the goals here at MCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Center or nothing less than curing cancer. It's not a ambiguous. Goal is to Jimmy to the provincial tour of cancer. So you know when you when everyone has is is lockstep with that that focus. It's very refreshing right. You know what your goal is my job on the digital side say how do I leverage digital for that same goal right? So what does that look like? And we all have the same goal I bring in digital so you start thinking about those areas like how do I improve outcomes? How do I use things like machine learning and hey I to improve clinical outcomes of those folks that we that we serve? How do I use digital to drive? Cost drive down cost. We can cure cancer cheaper And make it more accessible thinking about robotic process automation. Those kinds of things improving operations. And how do I do all of that? With an even better experience for patients it had delivered digital to skill that improved experience Across the entire population that we serve. So those are those. That's how we how we approach from a digital perspective the opportunity to contribute to the provision cure cancer. I love it and so as as we wrap our heads around this digital theme. How does that translate into? Say The work that you've done in consumerism. And and and you know. How does that translate to the physician level? That's providing care all the way down to the the patients that you guys are taking care of interesting. I like to. It's great great question. I'd like to start with the patients in and go back or go the other way. And actually you mentioned consumer and so there's different ways of defining who we serve honestly even though I've had the title consumer may not be the most comfortable for me but there needs to be some acknowledgement that there are people who are engaging in health and health behaviors and improving their health. They don't see themselves as patients and so we have to figure out. How do we how do we want? How do we engage with them? And then and then what do we call them? So right now the best definition that they have we have the best kind of description that we have is consumer twice until I hear something better than people as a new people so people have said okay. Let's just people which I did but it's a little it's a little loose um so I think I like consumer healthcare to me feels a little bit better than just. Kinda brought people that being said. Now how do you engage with consumers? Well the way everyone else. Every other extreme these consumer digitally right. That's that's the way you engage with them whether it's online or SMS text or or it's mobile APPS and so we're that's how you engage with people it's not complicated conceptually. It's complicated in execution in so anyone disagrees with the idea that you engage with consumers Digitally that's certainly how you skill. Now there's certainly aspects of what we do in healthcare and other industries as well where you need a physical need a physical component to that so now we start talking about the operation talking about the physicians and so forth. So how do you then convert you know? It's almost clicks to bricks. How do you convert those digital interactions into those physical interactions with necessary? And it's not always necessary and you think about things like virtual care and so now he's saying well. How do we optimize our operations so streamline that we can focus on those physical interactions when necessary into a really good job at that and then? How do we bring everyone along? Who's been a traditional healthcare system for decades right? How do we bring those folks along to this digital age? So that's part of that's part of the work that's the work of digital and if you ignore as a digital person as a as a digital innovator ignore the people part of the operations and the clinical piece you will fail Absolutely must focus on those people. Whether it's the frontline staff back the operations and certainly the clinicians physicians nurses pharmacists and so forth that needs to be a high focus. And so you know there's this title of digital in this time of innovation but at the end of the day is it's about people about people and it's about people love it it's a it's a great call out. And and what do you believe makes what you do and what? The Cancer Center does better than what's available today. There are many opportunities to leverage on digital. You think broadly about how do you leverage digital? We've got some really really talented people that are working in the digital realm. And when I when I called JOE FROM FOR MOFFITT IN. Our team includes the entire. It shop Includes Informatics and includes data in here as well as the war to things that people think about digital in terms of you know virtual care and an absence so forth so think about informatics thinking about the opportunity to refine the way that clinicians interact with the electronic medical record. I mean you can have a whole separate broadcasts. I'm a podcast about the electronic medical record the pros and cons and you'll spend more time on the cons by the way and so that's a whole so. Don't just refining right. So you're familiar with his right. I just. We're finding that in Iran finding that interaction and so that you can actually focus on the people Both who are delivering the chairs for the people who are receiving here in receiving those. Those interactions In so there's that piece there's also you know how you leverage data to optimize outcomes whether it's refining your your interaction so you know you have a list of people who potentially could have some kind of intervention. But you're leveraging data big data in this way to say it but it's really this subset of those people who are truly going to benefit can. That's leveraging use use machine learning and in some cases around around that you can do that as well in imaging as well where you actually have a algorithms that are that are looking at your films in supporting the radiologists in optimizing that outcome in you know so. The operations clinical operations. The wins this is interact with the electronic medical record. And then against the way that patients and consumers engage with the system itself whether it's through Piece of portals which I'm not saying by the way so I think I think about the way we engage much more broadly than that you know everyone starts with Dr Google Right. So so what are you doing around that when you're doing an online search what are you doing around our? Seo Sem and all those kinds of concepts as well that entire package right of digital web going from the interactions with a patient and consumers all the way through the clinical operations and operations all the way through to the to the hardcore kind of big data components data. Tighter action is the value that we bring by leveraging digital to improve the ultimately improve outcomes.

Cancer Center Robinson Thomas Jefferson University Si Associate Professor Of Medicin Comprehensive Cancer Center Mondo Iran MCI Jimmy JOE
All About Endorphins

20 Minute Fitness

03:47 min | 2 years ago

All About Endorphins

"People have been told in the past. That exercise been said to be an aid. Finale everything from depression. Obesity helps reduce stress helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. And so on. But what is really going on in our bodies that gives us this empowering feeling so of course helps that it could be due to the fight that we've gone out and progress towards health and fitness goal. Is that sense of pride against all odds more so than that is due to the release of endorphins so in Dolphins on Anura Chemicals. which get their name from? The word indulgence. Which you've heard before which means coming from within the body and morphine? Which is an opiate pain reliever On Dolphins got the name because they are not true pain relievers. They Act has John. Jesus like pain relievers. So dolphins consists of a large group of peptides the produced by the central nervous system and the pressure tree land so since dolphins act on the opiate receptors. Not Brains they reduce pain and boost pleasure. which results in a feeling of well big saw she happens is the endorphins are released. In response to brain chemicals Kohl's neurotransmitters is and the neuron receptors that dolphins bind to are the same ones certain kinds of medicines by two as well and dolphins. Aw as I said the painkillers produced in response to physical discomfort. The improved self esteem that we do feel otherwise known. As runner's high is a result Zolt of these endorphins being released so it wasn't actually until two thousand eight that measuring endorphins in humans was actually possible because we ain't got some new imaging technology becoming available so researchers used positron emission tomography or pet scans to view at brain in both before and after exercise. And after doing this they found the increase in the release of endorphins after exercise. And that's why it's medical medical professionals prescribe regular exercise as a treatment for mild to moderate depression and anxiety because exercise boosts your mood a Walston endorphins. Get all the attention. You'll body also pumps out and the kind of annoyed switch. All a naturally synthesized version of THC. which is the chemical responsible for the feeling that marijuana produces and the most examine that new? Talamante produced in the body is known as Anandamide and this is believed to it. Creates a feeling of calmness. Jim Research is actually found. That's the end of cannabinoid system could be involved in the runner's high because they observed that's endorphins com pass rooted the blood brain barrier whilst the lipid soluble end cannabinoid found at high levels in people's blood off the running so they can travel from the blood into the brain where it can trigger a high. And what's interesting is that Celia Hillard who has HD director of the Neuroscience Research Center. The Medical College of Wisconsin has found that people need eight hours of sleep for optimal ended kind of annoyed production. So this gesture. Although there's no scientific proof a morning homerun is more likely to produce a runner's high than an evening or after noon runs I didn't want endorphins to get all the glory about why we feel so great author director cise. This is of course after we recovered breath back from whatever exercise. It may be a new kind of annoyed. Also have a part in this as well. They're still trying to evaluate wait now which has more of an impact. But hopefully that's given you some science behind wiig sizing can make you feel great. Not only my feeling of pride you've got you've gone out and Don some workouts despite your busy schedule but also because of the neurochemical was ended kind of annoys that are being released as

Director Obesity Anura Chemicals. Depression Medical College Of Wisconsin Morphine Painkillers Celia Hillard Wiig Marijuana DON Jim Research Talamante Anandamide Neuroscience Research Center
Bouncing Back After the Holidays

20 Minute Fitness

05:25 min | 2 years ago

Bouncing Back After the Holidays

"To kick this off by echoing. What I just mentioned? Dead no doubt we had other priorities the holiday period from seeing family and friends from cooking preparing various meals. And so on. So it's okay to have other priorities confidence in health. You'll health con- always Saturday come first in your life obviously mentioned in a previous episode as well that we should still try to avoid overindulgence just because fitnesses and tall prior to that time doesn't mean when complete one eighty and disregard lifestyle choices. Either one I'm guilty for this. There's there's times where you know you're going to be eating body or drinking more when you do a regular basis so you all of your principles and say Saudi own a crazy. I WANNA eat what I want but this really isn't necessary. Enjoy yourself but overindulge for the sake overindulging. Anyway that's a solid as you may already over-indulged like I have. It's now time to think about how to get back into it on on the first thing to do is to accept the decisions you already made. You can't change the past actions but you can get back on track. Just move on those decisions. Don't pity about the action on the past with regards to your food choices for example and focus on the days ahead. The next thing I'd say is to panic and jump into extreme crash diet hoping this will repair all the damage that you've done on the holiday period such as the fire to the Paleo Diet camera of a numerous people but the key is that we need to readopt a lifestyle big more health and fitness conscious. We we candidate is but it's more about rewiring mindset going back to eating balanced amounts of the food groups do regular exercise making health decisions until again on mindset join set changes at least conscious choices in making trying to rewire mindset become sub-conscious extreme. Dieting can actually cause more problems on is worth Jeff Yoyo diets. Detox programs will is different. Cleanses out they do. How serious consequences research suggests that rapid weight loss can slow? Louis Metabolism leading to future weight gain and the pride of your body of essential nutrients was more crash. Diet can actually weaken your immune system and increase your risk of dehydration hall palpitations and Cardiac Stress. Obviously certain Salamat worth it so fall and according to Dot Rosenfeld all the professor of clinical medicine at well Cornell Medical College in New York City repeatedly following crushed is actually increases your risk of heart attacks. So that's the second tip no crash. Diets rewire mindset. As Brian. Keyed would say next up. We have some words from psychologist. Susan Albers with the The New York Times bestselling author E. Q.. She says the exercise can help activate serotonin which is a field. Chemical will help regulate your mood. So when you're feeling unhappier you'll actually make more conscious healthier choices later on the day. So when you're sitting down to breakfast eat mindfully potentially do a workout in the morning and this will have positive benefits for the rest of the day and you'll be in a better mindset. When she first gets up another thing I suggest as few to go grocery shopping in the coming weeks but plan out some healthy meals? Make list of the ingredients for these meals and then this way when you go at the store you hopefully won't buy anything you didn't plan any unhealthy traits through and find a few weeks time. They have some snacks in the cupboard. Because you were tough botany. I'm a super effective if I buy. It often was interred. Eat it again. This isn't to say that you should really have anything healthy but seeds the treat treat for getting back on track donors by an unanticipated. That you'll want something it's better to you as I said plow into weeks ahead so you have a path to success. Ask as you try and get back on track. So the first school I find thinking thoughts me to change your mindset except you've had these binges prime new meals void by anymore unhealthy food and this will set your compulsive. Success Dose for the next tip is to not wail self. And I'm going to say from around the first two weeks because I think this will do nothing but get you upset about where you all of your physique and honestly where as bad as the scale hidden shot. It's not like me too in Cobb's on this would have led to increase water retention. So this way it's actually the first thing that's going to be lost as you start getting back on track for your health and fitness and they will drop off quite quickly indeed accurate representation away. You Actually Act. It's not all body has been put on say avoid weighing yourself the the first two weeks or so and the fall for this episode the drink lots of water fluids are so key since all the alcohol extra salts and sugars dehydrate ritual body says start your morning with glass of water and keep drinking throughout the day wars at age or energy levels and brain function on drinking was before meals heels can actually help you will feel more full before they eat so they often restrict the amount of calories they intake during that meal say. hydration is careful numerous other reasons as well. But these are actionable tips bouncing back after the holiday period. I hope this has helped.

Jeff Yoyo Susan Albers Louis Metabolism New York City Water Retention Keyed Dot Rosenfeld Cobb The New York Times Cardiac Stress Brian Cornell Medical College Salamat Professor
"medical college" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Medical College, Wisconsin, health network, Dr king, first of all, thanks for being here. What are some of the most common causes of back and neck pain, so common things that we see our things like sprain strain injuries? That might happen in an auto accident overuse injuries. But then also we see physical inactivity as being a very common cause of back pain, but that was gonna be my next question. We all experience this at some point in time when should somebody care for that pain. So when the pain is starting to exceed that time period of four to six weeks, where the pain significantly impact on your quality of life. They're having to miss work for this or. If they're starting to notice that neck or back pain is creeping into an arm or a leg. It'd be a good time for somebody to come in and see care. What are some of the various treatment options that are available to somebody who presents with a chronic Becker, neck pain? Yeah. So one of the most effective treatments, especially for chronic pain is, again, that regular physical activity and so coming into see somebody, we have a very comprehensive team of healthcare providers have freighter in the Medical College. It was consonant includes chiropractors, of course, physical therapists in the meal, so have physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians and surgeons when they may be necessary that ties into something. We talk about a lot that team approach that you have at freighter vision number of different disciplines that all come together to figure out what a patient, really needs, of course. So whoever you see, I within our system. One of their primary goal is to figure out. Am I the right person for you to be seeing maybe valuate them? Maybe they don't necessarily need me, and so I can get them over to one of my colleagues, and we can make that transition, very smoothly with very little effort on part of the patient. Conversely, maybe they need me, but they also need some other health from someone else. And then we can bring in that team aspect of care. Couldn't have Dr king. Thanks so much for being with us today. It's been a pleasure. Find a doctor who is right for you by visiting freighter dot com slash spine care or calling one eight hundred doctors when.

neck pain Dr king Medical College Wisconsin Becker six weeks
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"I agree with her. If you notice that your symptoms are not improving with medication and you're really struggling with your lifestyle and being able to eat, and you just can't take the pain that you're having please consult with gastroenterologist and seek the different types of procedures and options that are out there for you. We'll thank you, both so much for sharing your stream. So glad your symptoms better than you can eat. Normally again. What a great great experience for both visa. Thank you for sharing your stories and join us shortly for a few minutes of wrap up. Thank you. Can change everything. A single life. An entire community. The future as we know it. That knowledge starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. NCW teams spot. The ideas. Inspire the research. Driving discoveries. Which lead to the treatments. Eventually. Everything. What we do at M C W today rewrites someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. Can change everything. A single life. Entire community. The future as we know it. That knowledge starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. NCW teams spot. Inspire the research. Discoveries. Which lead to the tweet. Eventually. Everything. What we do at M C W today rewrites someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. Talking about innovative medicine with top experts. The word on medicine on NewsTalk eleven thirty w. Both back in today's final few minutes. I would like to ask Dr Patrick, and Vanson, and John Gould to join me for some closing comments. So doctors advanced can you just talk a bit about what is the advantage for a patient to come to MC w and what services, do you provide in the care of gastric? Soft, Jill reflux disease..

Medical College of Wisconsin John Gould MC w Dr Patrick Vanson eleven thirty w
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Eventually. Everything. What we do at MC w today rewrite someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. New night can change everything. A single life. Tire community. The future as we know it. That knowledge starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Emcee w teams spot the ideas. Inspire the research. Trying discoveries. To the tweet. Eventually. Everything. What we do at M C W today rewrites someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. You're listening to the word on medicine if you'd like more information about something you heard today. Call four one four eight oh five thirty six sixty six now huge more of the word on medicine on news talk eleven thirty. You are listening to the word on medicine on WFAN where the doctors and scientists from the Medical College of Wisconsin are making advances in medicine every week before beginning our final segment. I want to remind all of you to listen to the latest word on medicine every Friday afternoon at two pm, a short program, which provides background and explanation for something that made the news that week, for example, recent programs have included expert comments on how t causes the SAFA GIO cancer and Mick Jagger's recent heart valve repair. We cover everything from the common cold to epilepsy cancer, and much more all by an expert in the field from the Medical College of Wisconsin. If you have a specific topic you would like us to cover please send us an Email at surgery on air at MC w dot EDU. In our final segment of this program. We welcome back, Dr John Gould, and Andrew casted Meyer, who will be joined by two very grateful patients Jose Gonzalez VERA, junior and Joyce on Jose's from south Milwaukee, he unfortunately, experienced heartburn symptoms on a daily basis for the past eight years, despite antacid, medications and lifestyle changes. He underwent a laproscopy placement of a magnetic finger, augmentation device or links with Dr Casten Meyer in December of two thousand eighteen Jose has now been enjoying life free of all heartburn symptoms off of his aunt medications..

Medical College of Wisconsin Jose Gonzalez VERA Dr Casten Meyer MC heartburn MC w Mick Jagger Dr John Gould Milwaukee WFAN heart valve Joyce Andrew eight years
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Can change everything. A single life. Ain't tire community. The future as we know it. That knowledge starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Emcee w teams spot. Inspire the research. Discoveries. To the tweet. Eventually. Everything. What we do at MC w today rewrite someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. Whether you live in a quiet town, the heart of the city or somewhere in between one thing we all have in common is the freighter in the Medical College of Wisconsin health network. We're extending our reach and multiplying. Our impact with more ways for you to access the highest standard of care right in your own community with virtual visits urgent care hospitals, health centers and pharmacies. More people can connect with our network than ever before. Our convenient hours plus services nearby make access care even easier and our primary care physicians do everything possible to keep you healthy by seeing things differently. So if you have a serious health problem specialist at the forefront of innovation are here. The freighter in the Medical College of Wisconsin health network harnessing the power of academic medicine. Now, there are so many places in ways to access our care. Learn more about what is possible, freighter dot com. Can change everything. A single life. Entire community. The future as we know it. That knowledge starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. NCW teams spot. The ideas. Inspire the research. Discoveries. To the treatments. Eventually. Everything. What we do at C w today rewrite someone's tomorrow. The Medical College of Wisconsin now changing. Listen to the word on medicine, presented by Seelig, Lucy on news talk eleven thirty w I. Welcome back. This is Dr Anna Higgins, from the Medical College of Wisconsin, and you're listening to the word on medicine on WFAN. For those of you who may be new to our program, I want to be sure, you know, about the many podcasts of previous programs, which can.

Medical College of Wisconsin Dr Anna Higgins MC Seelig WFAN Lucy eleven thirty w
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Then that becomes tricky. If someone has a lot of symptoms from their deceased itself, then I think it makes sense to pursue treatment that can get the symptoms under control and provide them quality of life, at least for as long as the treatments are working on the other hand, if someone has a very low burden of disease, then I think they need to engage in dialogue with physician about what is the lifetime to actively start treatment to give that season to control, and that needs to be personalized and that needs to be an active discussion between the patient and the doctor depending on the burden of disease and the goals of treatment. Perfect. Well, that's a that's a perfect end. The segment we'll be back with the short wrap up in a moment. New. Change everything. A single life. Tire community. Future as we know it. Starts here at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Emcee w teams. The research. Discoveries. Everything..

Medical College of Wisconsin
"medical college" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"You don't for Medical College? But I don't know how what the next step is for me to to have my own business. And when do I start planning on that? So we'll let me ask you first. What is the actual? I know it's in the beauties. But is it is it a hair salon? What is the idea of business? It's a hair salon. I don't want to open a full hair salon. I would be either renting suites for people. But I I'm I'm also wanna be on the floor. You know, doing it with them. That's what I thought that was my next question is going to be cutting hair and doing hair, and so so here's a until they do it on the side. Currently. Oh, good. Good. And how how often do you do that per week? How many hours is very I mean, it's very seldom. I probably do it. Maybe twice a month. I'm not very actively doing it. Because what my full time job. Okay. And got why you got a husband kids all that at home husband dog and step kid. Okay. Got it. Well, the answer to the question specifically is you launched the business when you are financially able to now what that means is you've got all your expenses, you know. So if you're talking about first of all, I don't want you to launch into opening up your own space where you then lease out chairs, I want you next steps are moving from once or twice or month to can you start doing ten to fifteen hours a week, cutting hair. You have to have some gradual move you. Unless unless you've already got the money. Do you have the money set aside to go out and lease space, and then sub-lease all these chairs now? Okay. So that's the answer. It my job. I understand. So the answer to your question is specifically you've got to have the cash you to be in a cash situation where you've got enough coming in from you, actually, cutting hair yourself, plus money, you've saved to be able to open up your own place. I think your next step is I've got a find margin in my life that I build my own clientele to where I can step out of the admin assistant role into just having my own chair. So I'm the person that I eventually want to serve so you go rent a chair from somebody and get your personal business built up and you're saving cash. So you already get this. There's there's nothing nothing nothing difficult about this. Now, here's what's great about you doing it this way, you're gonna learn about. What really works. See all this time. You're renting from somebody else. You're taking notes here's what I do differently. Boy, if he or she did this. I think they make more money. They'd have happier people, you know. So you get to kind of go to school on how to run the business by being a customer of of the actual business. You eventually want to launch. So this is you're going to ease into this is the big point easing into this..

Medical College fifteen hours
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Event like this. How long did did it take before you thought before you start to see a little bit of a rainbow and things started to improve about a year end? I was a little down for the first year. You are starting to get used to your own new personality traits. Like, you think oh, I can go out to eat. And then you start to take a step out the door on your way. And you start to think about it going. What about the door? What about the at the exits? What about the people surrounding you, and you fear in? So you back up. Well, Terry, would you like to offer your your perspective on this? Absolutely. I think everybody has a different level of what they can cope with and deal with and one person's ability to cope is different than another. And we never can predict who's going to be able to respond and how they're going to be able to respond to a life threatening event. But I think what's amazing to see with the trauma patients that we get at freighter in the Medical College is the individual's ability to work, really, hard and recover and get back to life, and you know, with what Courtney's been through. I have honestly never seen a patient work so hard at getting back to a life that gives her meaning and purpose and allows her to reach the goals that she had before and were. According to what what where did you? Find your strengths to be able to do this other. Clearly, the your story is is going to be so important to the countless numbers of people who listen to this show. But are there also some things that you may have discovered along along the way that that helped you that that even maybe Dr.

Courtney Terry Medical College
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The faculty of the Medical College of Wisconsin are making tomorrow better than yesterday in our final segment of today's show doctors damore Golay and Jan. Which will be joined by Dr Terry Darren Cassini, and one of her patients who has recovered from trauma and has offered to share her experience with us. Dr Darren Cassini is a graduate of Marquette university where she received her PHD in clinical psychology. She has been on our faculty since two thousand eleven and is a national authority in post traumatic stress disorders, which is the focus of clinical and research work, all of which is funded by the national institutes of health. Many of you may have heard doctors room Cassini speak on PTSD at various public. Forums on this topic? The perspective of the patient and their family is so important as after all it is their opinion of the effectiveness of any healthcare intervention than is really important to provide that important viewpoint which many of you listening can easily relate to we are fortunate to have Courtney join us today. Thank you Courtney for coming in. And we'll get to your. Story momentarily. I wanted to start this segment off, however with Dr Damola, and Mark I you've been on TV recently talking about ways that all of us can impact the trauma problem and how to stop bleeding if we witness a traumatic event. Sure. So there's a national campaign that was started in two thousand fifteen that actually came about as a result of the sandy hook elementary school. Massacre. And that's as a result of that basically developed this program that empowers the public to act when they find somebody who's bleeding, and it could be from anything it's much bigger than just like a mass casualty type of thing. It's everyday types of things where you have a lot of bleeding from an accident of some sort, and and we go out into the community, and we train people lay people students teachers, everybody, not just medical people and by telling them and showing them how to stop the bleeding by by three simple things after calling nine one one putting pressure on the wound number two sometimes having to pack the wound with something even as simple as a shirt and number three learning how to apply attorney kit in the proper way if they might be might have access to one. And so we go through that process. It's about forty five minutes. Lesson and it's really great in. It's very empowering. And it's meant to be just like CPR everybody really should know how to do these basic skills, and we're trying to train the three hundred twenty million people in the United States how to do it. So it'll be it's a big project, and we're really proud to lead it here in Wisconsin. Oh, that's fantastic. That's also a perfect segue into into Terry's area of expertise, namely, the psychology of of.

Dr Terry Darren Cassini Courtney Medical College of Wisconsin damore Golay traumatic stress disorders Wisconsin sandy hook elementary school Marquette university United States Dr Damola PTSD attorney Mark forty five minutes
"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"medical college" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The issues from the past week the NFL playoffs star tomorrow. Unfortunately, the Green Bay Packers won't be plane. We did see them last Sunday against the lions when Aaron Rodgers got a concussion in the meaningless game talk a little bit about concussions. We welcome in Dr Kevin Walter who received his medical degree from the university of Illinois in additional training in pediatrics at MC w and sports medicine at Akron children's hospital in northeastern Ohio, he returned to the Medical College of Wisconsin two thousand seven the start the sports medicine cussin' programs at children's hospital, Wisconsin, reiterated elementary school through professional athletes. He's also the co author of the two thousand ten in two thousand eighteen American Academy of pediatrics reports on sports concussions in youth. And he currently serves as the chair for the w a sportsman. Listen advisory committee, Dr Walter joins us on the phone. Hello, dr. Hello. Thank you for having me. Most sports fans know that concussions or something. You don't want to have an athlete experience. But if it were to happen, what does it exactly due to their brain concussion is a brain injury. So when they get a concussion, basically simplistically, you think of it as a head impact he had hit helmet-to-helmet or had to ground your brain shakes inside your skull. But it doesn't cause bleeding bruising, your brain damage, basically throws off how your brain works. The nerves of your brain don't communicate well in your brain burns through energy, really quickly. And then it makes you feel bad as you use it, and you say athlete so many times we associate concussions with football. But it can happen in any sport at any time. Oh, of course, they can I've I've seen him in my clinic in track, but you know, soccer football lacrosse, wrestling, ice hockey are the big ones. But it also happens in car accidents, playground slip and fall. On the ice gym class things like that. So then how do we apply treatment is a different based on age or the severity of the concussion? Treatment is is is pretty similar across the board. But it's unique because everyone's injury is going to be a little bit different. So the first step in treatment is reporting the injury right away. And if you can recognize, hey, I hit my head. I don't feel right avid concussion. Raise your hand report it to the coach or the athletic trainer or your gym teacher and then stop activity immediately. Dr Kevin Walter from the Medical College of Wisconsin here on wwl ESN MC w was well known for its inclusion program. Yes. So we've got a it's a multi-disciplinary program. We've built it up with their stocks athletic trainers. Neuro psychologists that basically from a simple point of view kinda look at brain function testing. We have psychologists because it's it's tough on kids to be out of their sport and be taken out of school or. Be taken out of work and things along those lines as we wrap up doctor are concussion something that are are here to stay. There's never going to be a cure for a concussion. I would assume. Correct. It's here to stay. I don't think there's going to be anything to prevent it helmets, etc. I applaud people for looking at things to reduce that risk, but people are always gonna hit their heads. And what we need to do is just make sure that they realize they report the injury right away. We get them into appropriate treatment. And and we need to work on continuing to get them better faster, making sure they're fully recovered before they go back there. Kevin Walter from the Medical College of Wisconsin here on NewsTalk eleven thirty w I s and thank you for your time. Doctor. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it. The latest word I- medicine is now heard every Friday afternoon at two and is made possible by a grant from the we care fund in the department of surgery of the Medical College of Wisconsin,.

Dr Kevin Walter Medical College of Wisconsin American Academy of pediatrics Green Bay Packers Wisconsin NFL Aaron Rodgers lions bruising Akron children's hospital university of Illinois Ohio soccer football eleven thirty w