39 Burst results for "Medicaid"

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:41 min | 49 min ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

"Lakefront There were 1471 new confirmed cases of Corona virus disease in Illinois. Over the past 24 hours, 19 people have died. The statewide positivity rate dropped 1/10 of a 190.23 point 9%. Meantime, Puerto Rico has been added to Chicago's emergency travel order. Starting Friday. Travelers from Puerto Rico coming to the city should self quarantine for 14 days, and a federal appeals court says the judge correctly struck down a new Trump administration rule denying green cards to illegal immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps or other forms of public assistance. Second U. S. Court of Appeals upheld the judge's decision but narrowed the effective it to just three states rather than the entire nation. WG and sports white socks are in Milwaukee tonight to take on the Brewers pregame at 6 30 Andy Maser and Darrin Jackson have the call at 7 10 Right here on 7 20 WG and Cubs continue their homestand. They're home against the Royals on Wall Street. The Dow's of 94 points the NASDAQ up nine and the S and P 500 up for I'm Steve Bertrand on Chicago's very own 7 20 w g n individual results. Very exclusions apply. Imagine feeling the freedom of 2020 vision without the hassle.

Puerto Rico Chicago U. S. Court Of Appeals Brewers Illinois Steve Bertrand Andy Maser Darrin Jackson Milwaukee Royals Cubs
Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

The World

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

"A federal court has blocked the Trump administration from implementing its controversial public charge rule that denies legal status to an immigrant if they use any public benefits. NPR's John Burnett reports. The judge said the government should not do anything to deter the foreign born from seeking testing and treatment for covert 19 The White House rule had said that any immigrant who receives government assistance such as Medicaid, food stamps for public housing vouchers can be disqualified from getting lawful status. In an updated noticed the government said that seeking treatment for covert symptoms would not count as a federal benefit. A federal judge George Daniels in the Southern District of New York was unmoved. He ruled Wednesday that as the pandemic worsens, such a rule could discourage an immigrant from seeking medical care. And quote risks infecting another person

George Daniels John Burnett NPR White House Medicaid New York
Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:43 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Losses projected to result from. Even economy that remains stable at may levels will cost another one point five, million to two point five, million jobs as hospitals, doctors, offices, clinics lose money they have to lay off staff, and that hurts the surrounding local economies is. The I mean couldn't people who lose their job sponsored health insurance get Medicaid or something under the affordable care act sure at many. Well but not all will lots of folks qualify for help won't sign up that's happened before we know it's going to happen again you're to changes one fewer patients will have insurance of any kind in to patients who do have insurance. We'll have it in a form that pays last to healthcare providers Medicaid, for example, a lot less than private health insurance. Standard is a senior fellow families USA. Thank you so much damn. Oh. My pleasure. Thanks for having me. In New York. I'm Sabrina. Sure with the marketplace morning report. For maybe M American public media..

Medicaid Senior Fellow New York M American Usa.
Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

All of It

00:26 sec | 5 d ago

Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

"A federal judge in Manhattan has temporarily blocked the Trump administration from applying its wealth test to legal immigrants seeking to become permanent residents. The judge cited the pandemic and said the irreparable harm of what's known as the public charge rule warrants a national injunction. The rule went into effect February It denied Green cards. Too many immigrants who've received public benefits, including Medicaid, food stamps and

Manhattan Medicaid
Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Charlie Brennan

Charlie Brennan

01:04 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Charlie Brennan

"Struggling to compromise on a new Corona virus relief legislation, days after a federal unemployment aid and a moratorium on evictions expired. CBS NEWS correspondent Jurika Duncan is following President Trump says he may take executive action if the White House and congressional Democrats cannot work out a new Corona virus stimulus bill. Negotiators say they're making slow progress and more talks are scheduled for today. Its primary day in Missouri. Poles will be Open until seven PM expansion of Medicaid coverage for lower and middle income. Missourians is one of the biggest issues on the statewide ballot. Today, it's been an issue off deep partisan divide four years, with many Republicans opposing expansion Democrats supporting it. This partisan divides gone so far that the Republican controlled legislature inserted into this year's budget signed by the Republican governor, Ah, ban on any appropriated state funds being spent for Medicaid expansion. Put the proposal before Missouri voters is a constitutional amendment that could override any budget restriction the Democratic state auditor attached to the ballot issue an estimate. That ultimately might cost the state government $200 million per year or that it could save the state a whopping $1 billion per year. From the state Capitol. Phil Brooks Lewis's news radio KMOX help prevent the spread of covert 19 During today's primary election door monitors will be handing out mass in ST Louis County polling places the county election board hire the monitors to help enforce the county's indoor mask rule. There's a similar ordinance in ST Louis City, where polling workers will also be enforcing the requirement by handing out masks. For anyone who cannot, or refuses to wear a mask. Curbside voting will be available in the city and the county from the Jefferson Bank and trust business desk. The Boeing 7 37 Max, which has been grounded for close to 18 months, after two fatal crashes that took the lives of more than 340 people, maybe back in the air by early next year. The FAA calls it a milestone Monday, The agency published its final list of requirements that Boeing must meet before the 7 37 max Conf Lion again. The design changes include new software for the flight control system that was implicated in two deadly crashes. There are also changes for Operation maintenance and pilot training aviation analyst Scott Hamilton. Now in writing. It's now a proposed order by the F A. A Going is on the downhill side of this long tragedy, he says. The max could be re certified by the end of the year and back in service in January. Heather Bosch for CBS News, Seattle, The Dow from Steve fill up five points to 6 26,069 The NASDAQ is up 19. The S and P 500 up a point now Roger Brand in the steeple traffic.

St Louis City Missouri Donald Trump CBS Scott Hamilton St Louis County Medicaid Jurika Duncan Roger Brand Phil Brooks Lewis Boeing Cbs News White House Heather Bosch FAA President Trump Executive Seattle Auditor
Judge Orders Trump to Halt Immigration Wealth Test During National Coronavirus Emergency

Brian Lehrer

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Judge Orders Trump to Halt Immigration Wealth Test During National Coronavirus Emergency

"A federal judge in Manhattan has temporarily blocked the Trump administration from applying its wealth test to legal immigrants seeking to become permanent residents. The judge cited the pandemic and said the irreparable harm of what's known as the public charge rule. Warrants and national injunction. The rule went into effect in February. It denied Green cards too many immigrants who have received public benefits, including Medicaid, food stamps and housing vouchers. The Trump Administration argued the rule would prevent immigrants from becoming a burden on taxpayers. But New York State Attorney General Leticia James and sand that it would make the covert crisis worse by discouraging immigrants from seeking. Vital

Trump Administration Leticia James Manhattan Medicaid New York Attorney
Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Total Information AM

Total Information AM

01:30 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Total Information AM

"An administration with postal service at their disposal. You can bet there will be an effort to tamp down on voter turnout in mail and voting place, says he has no proof at this point, but if Democrats get it, they will go to court. Kevin Colleen said. Lewis's news radio came away. The Postal Service released a statement saying some ballots in ST Louis City were delayed but have now been deliver. Also, it says the Postal Service is not slowing down the mail on purpose and does not take direction from the White House registered nurse Corey Bushes, challenging Congressman Clay in that closely watched House race, Bush says she's got a good chance of winning. Feel amazing. I'm at so much peace right now. People are coming into the office. More people are getting find more people are asking. What can they do? Cannot work the pole can I help Can I donate so it's just people are galvanized Play has held the first District seat in Congress since 2001. The seat has been in the clay family since 1969. Expansion of Medicaid coverage for lower and middle income. Missourians is one of the biggest issues on the statewide ballot. Today, it's been an issue off deep partisan divide four years with many Republicans. Supposing expansion Democrats supporting it. This partisan divides gone so far that the Republican controlled legislature inserted into this year's budget signed by the Republican governor. Ah, ban on any appropriated state funds being spent for Medicaid expansion. Put the proposal before Missouri voters is a constitutional amendment that could override any budget restriction the Democratic state auditor attached to the ballot issue an estimate. That ultimately might cost the state government $200 million per year or that it could save the state a whopping $1 billion per year. From the state Capitol. Phil Brooks LOSSES news radio KMOX help prevent the spread of covert 19 During today's primary election door monitors will be handing out masks at ST Louis County Polling Places County Election Board hired the monitors to help enforce the county's indoor mask rule. There's a similar ordinance in ST Louis City, where polling workers will also be enforcing the requirement by handing out masks. For anyone who cannot, or refuses to wear a mask. Curbside voting will be available in the city and the county Camel X News time. 806 follow up this morning of a six Police officers shot in ST Louis City within two months came, Alexis Marie Akina tells us The ST Louis Police Officers Association is calling this open season on officers and beyond. I don't know what's going on. It's insanity right.

St Louis City Postal Service St Louis County Polling Places Louis Police Officers Associat Kevin Colleen Alexis Marie Akina Congress Medicaid Missouri Lewis Bush Corey Bushes Congressman Clay Phil Brooks White House Auditor
Census Workers Going Door-To-Door

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | Last week

Census Workers Going Door-To-Door

"U. S Census Bureau is sending workers into more areas of the country. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang says they'll be knocking on doors of households that did not complete a 2020 census form either online by mail or over the phone. Roughly four out of 10 households nationwide have not yet participated in a constitutionally mandated headcount. Masked workers from the Census Bureau are heading out to neighborhoods in eastern Connecticut, southern Indiana, Bosa Kansas, Central, Pennsylvania and Northern Virginia, plus in and around Tacoma, Washington. Results of the count help determined amount of federal tax dollars each community gets for Medicare, Medicaid and other public services. Door knocking is set to start nationwide on August 11th But some census advocates are worried the Corona virus outbreaks could stop door knockers from making in person visits. That could result in major undercounts and affect federal funding and local representation over the next decade Long

U. S Census Bureau Hansi Lo Wang NPR Tacoma Medicare Connecticut Medicaid Northern Virginia Indiana Washington Pennsylvania Kansas
Dems: Nursing home virus effort  'chronicle of deadly delay'

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Dems: Nursing home virus effort 'chronicle of deadly delay'

"The trump administration was slow to comprehend the scale covert nineteen Jim back to nursing homes and a disjointed federal response is only compounded the devastating toll according to a report due out today from Senate Democrats the report was provided to the Associated Press senator Bob Casey the ranking Democrat on the aging committee says unfortunately for the nation it is a chronicle of deadly delays and a lack of urgency and strategy the head of the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services defended the administration's record saying the report is disingenuous and that the agency is at a historic and unprecedented response and should be commended for its efforts an AP calc that includes nursing homes and other long term care facilities finds nearly fifty two thousand five hundred deaths combining residents and staff I'm Julie Walker

Bob Casey Julie Walker JIM Associated Press Senator Medicare
Dems: Nursing home virus effort  'chronicle of deadly delay'

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Dems: Nursing home virus effort 'chronicle of deadly delay'

"A report due out today from Senate Democrats finds the trump administration was slow to comprehend the scale of covert nineties impact on nursing homes and a disjointed federal response only compounded the devastating toll the report obtained by the Associated Press finds a lack of coordination among government agencies that has had ongoing consequences such as issues with access to corona virus testing and protective equipment senator Bob Casey says the findings amount to a chronicle of deadly delay the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services strongly defends its record an AP count that includes nursing homes and other long term care facilities finds nearly fifty two thousand five hundred deaths combining residents and staff I'm Julie Walker

Associated Press Bob Casey Julie Walker Senator Medicare
Dems: Nursing home virus effort  'chronicle of deadly delay'

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Dems: Nursing home virus effort 'chronicle of deadly delay'

"A report due out today from Senate Democrats finds the trump administration was slow to comprehend the scale of covert nineties impact on nursing homes and a disjointed federal response only compounded the devastating toll the report obtained by the Associated Press finds a lack of coordination among government agencies that has had ongoing consequences such as issues with access to corona virus testing and protective equipment senator Bob Casey says the findings amount to a chronicle of deadly delay the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services strongly defends its record an AP count that includes nursing homes and other long term care facilities finds nearly fifty two thousand five hundred deaths combining residents and staff I'm Julie Walker

Associated Press Bob Casey Julie Walker Senator Medicare
What Is a Jobs Guarantee—and Can It Work?

Brian Lehrer

07:19 min | Last month

What Is a Jobs Guarantee—and Can It Work?

"Is spreading because of a virus. My next guest says Unemployment can spread like a virus. And she's got a solution of federal jobs guarantee. Many economists consider unemployment natural, unavoidable, even necessary to a certain degree. For the economy to function. But Pavlina Channa, who specializes in what's known as Modern monetary theory, disagrees the virus theory well as economic downturns. Cause layoffs. The recently unemployed have less money to spend, leading to a second wave of unemployment in the industries, they could no longer support. But what if the government could guarantee a living wage stop to any American Who wants one. It's an economic policy idea that some of you may know has gained traction not only as Corona virus unemployment has spread, but from well known progressive political figures recently before this, Bernie Sanders Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. Cory Booker have back versions of this idea, or at least believe it should be considered as a response to Income inequality in America generally and toe automation and toe. Other things that cause structural unemployment. It's part of the green new deal the federal jobs guarantee. So joining us now is Bard College economics professor Pavlina Chan of Ah, Who's got a new book called the Case for a job guarantee. Professor Chernova? Welcome to WNYC. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me, Brian. Good morning. Let's start in the present because you wrote this book before the pandemic when official unemployment was down around 3%. Now comes this historically weird emergency where the economy shuts down voluntarily, and tens of millions of people lose their jobs all at once. The government responds with a patchwork of enhanced unemployment benefits and pay cheque loans to employ yours intended to keep A lot of that money passing through to some workers, plus the other kinds of pre existing government aid, like Medicaid and food stamps and more with the guaranteed job program, replace all of that. Under current circumstances. No, it will not replace. Any other measures measures that that might might be be considered considered necessary, necessary, But But it it is is The The most most straightforward straightforward solution solution to to providing providing jobs jobs for for people people who who need need it. it. I I mean, mean, in in the the current current crisis, crisis, we should have focused on protecting jobs. And preventing the layoffs that would have made the task of dealing with this avalanche of layoff much easier. I think we can look to some countries in Europe who have used again the public purse government budgets. To essentially guarantee a payroll for folks whose jobs are threatened from Cove. It's so unemployment rates did spike in some of those countries, but not nearly as much as they did in the United States. So Onda budget that we pass the cares act was so large, it was enough to pay the entire wage bill in the U. S economy for three straight months. So we could have protected Lee off jobs. We could have prevented layoffs, but the damage is done and unemployment. As I argue in the book is it's kind of a perennial teacher and the economy. So the way to inoculate against that is just to create jobs directly. How much would the living wage B? And a guaranteed federal jobs program. The proposal in my book is for $15 an hour, and that is really to help with the fight for 15 of that has You know, has had captured the interest and policymakers with the state level, but it might be, But 15 will not be enough sooner. You know very, very recently, so in in in a truck Order rather so maybe 17. But this is a policy. This is a policy question. The point here is to ensure that it's a living wage floor and that no person Works in a poverty paying jobs with a firm. A living wage for the economy as a whole. The minimum wages you know, is 7 25 and it is not a living wage is poverty paying wage, so it represents about a doubling of the minimum wage. Significantly elevated the floor. Yes, And that's the federal minimum wage, which might be shocking to some of our listeners since the minimum wage. Around here is $15 an hour, but federally and therefore in some states that don't have the same politics, say New York and New Jersey. It's still down around that poverty wage. As you know. Other progressives proposed what they call a universal basic income rather than a guaranteed job. Andrew Gang, for example. Ran for president on $1000 a month Universal basic income proposal, But I don't believe there is a work requirement, just the money as a universal basic income. Sent to every American Do you argue that a guaranteed job solves the same problem, but in a different way? No, I think the job guarantee souls more problems. So $1000 a month. While very nice doesn't really lift people out of poverty. It helps But the job guarantee guarantees a living wage. And so when a person needs work, and they go into the unemployment office, which by the way is called the American job Center. They can find a lot of other assistance that they can't find a job. And that's what the job he does. It insures that there's a public service. Hollis option employment options for those who need work, and we know from basic income experiments that people who even get the income assistance still looking for jobs. So the problem with the job guarantee salt is this. Basically cruel game of musical chairs that people play in the labor market, and they're looking for four jobs, but they're not enough employment opportunities for all, even in the best of times. Forget about Cove it even when the economy is humming near full employment. We're still talking about millions and millions who don't have employment and The unemployment problem is there It's as you were saying in the introduction, ending a lot of social health, economic cost. It's paid for innocent and so we can do things better. By using the public purse to employ the unemployed. But I want to say that it's not. It's not a week requirement. The job guarantee doesn't provide a requirement for the benefits that people might be receiving. It's an additional program so You could have the choice of getting unemployment insurance and the various other income assistance provided out there. But if we gave people one more choice To pick up a living wage job offer. Then that provides stronger economic security.

Government Pavlina Channa American Job Center Cory Booker Bard College Pavlina Chan Professor Chernova Europe New York Bernie Sanders Alexandria United States New Jersey Brian Official LEE Professor Ocasio Cortez
What if Medicaid paid for trees?

Climate Connections

01:11 min | Last month

What if Medicaid paid for trees?

"Trees Absorb Carbon Soak up storm stormwater. Help clean the air, but planting trees is not only good for the environment. Research shows treason. Greenspace can also help prevent health problems for example they reduce the risk of heat, related illness by providing cooling and shade. If we've got the science that shows that more trees, equal better health, and we're spending eighteen percent of our gross domestic product on health. Will. What if Medicaid could pay for trees? And that's actually not that crazy. Bobby Cochran is with the Willamette Partnership and environmental nonprofit based in Portland Oregon. He says there's a precedent for using healthcare dollars on preventive measures that can reduce healthcare costs for example to help minimize emergency room visits for heat related illness. We have the Authority Oregon for Medicaid to pay for air conditioners. He says paying to plant shade trees, which are proven a cool neighborhoods and homes could be a logical next step, so he says investing in trees and greenspace could be a way to protect people from extreme heat reduce healthcare costs and improve the environment all at the same time.

Bobby Cochran Medicaid Oregon Willamette Partnership Portland
Trump administration asks Supreme Court to strike down Obamacare amid pandemic

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:54 sec | Last month

Trump administration asks Supreme Court to strike down Obamacare amid pandemic

"One the trump White House is backing the effort of attorneys general from Republican states to end obamacare out right that's part of the case that the Supreme Court will hear in the fall but Constantina reports on what is actually a case of GOP attorneys general versus Democrat attorneys general the trump administration wants obamacare thrown out entirely making a friend of the court filing last night to the Supreme Court Republican controlled states are seeking to end the program designed to provide health coverage to those who may not get it through work but you make too much money to qualify for Medicaid the justices will hear arguments in their next term but any ruling would be after the election the state is seeking to end obamacare say if there is no penalty for not having insurance which was part of the GOP tax cuts planned then the individual mandate is unconstitutional Democrats accused the president and Republicans of having alternative and warning to wipe out coverage protections for pre existing

White House Supreme Court Obamacare President Trump Constantina GOP
Despite pandemic, Trump administration urges end to ACA

WBZ Midday News

00:54 sec | Last month

Despite pandemic, Trump administration urges end to ACA

"On Capitol Hill house Democrats introduced a bill designed to counter the trump administration's efforts to do away with obamacare the affordable Care Act attorneys for the administration are preparing to present arguments before the Supreme Court the patient protection and affordable Care enhancement act is set to be filed on Monday house speaker Nancy Pelosi talks about the significance of prior court will hear the brief from the book trump administration as to taking down the affordable Care Act right in the heart of the time of the end of the pandemic it was wrong any time now it's beyond stupid the legislation would strengthen protections for pre existing conditions it would expand Medicaid and lower the cost of prescription

Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi
Nadler says Attorney General Barr deserves to be impeached but that it would be a 'waste of time'

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

00:43 sec | Last month

Nadler says Attorney General Barr deserves to be impeached but that it would be a 'waste of time'

"Know powerful if your you freezers leave democratic crime it just lawmaker full of it tasty house starts Judiciary treats to develop Committee they're all packed these chairman nutrients with Jerrold entrepreneurship Nadler says like Attorney that's related General fellow right William entrepreneurship Barr ought come to back be the impeached next year you probably he or told two can't years CNN taste time the business wow even though ethics bar I fired think for it's the not decision a federal blooming making prosecutor and or it's the kind people who was of like skills investigating that you know the Aaron president's become an lawyer amateur again it every if would you like be single pointless mouthful I didn't to try mind every time they are but you wasted eat time what's at in this the my box point voice because is we still because learned fresh how we to know think that we outside have a corrupt which of it means so Republican raise that the a medical glass majority release of milk in the Senate and raise which will our not it's chances consider not to reach impeachment our potential no matter what the evidence change and the no mayor matter for example what the facts in T. the nine Nadler achingly says poignant he hopes conversation former prosecutor between Geoffrey father Berman and son will show seven he'll up at I'm still a hearing Hannah young this week we I'm are Giuliana having that's a your hearing fault on called Wednesday I'm a livia in which the we have the a tracks number of were recorded I'm so fine whistle fifty you blowers years from the department apart of justice find will testify a good the girl scout cookie a we program settle have invited down think that outside Berman and the I'm box sure he will if you I walk started my and adventure both versions as I'm an are aerospace perfect sure you medical I don't in know technicians that their Wednesday own way but like I'm sure Medicaid he look will at the me airforce reserves testify finally

Nadler Attorney William Entrepreneurship Barr CNN Prosecutor President Trump Senate Geoffrey Father Berman Hannah Giuliana Chairman
Nursing homes represent more than 1 in 4 COVID-19 deaths

AP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | Last month

Nursing homes represent more than 1 in 4 COVID-19 deaths

"Nursing homes represent more than one in four corona virus deaths you federal data shows the told the corona virus has exacted on nursing homes around the nation an Associated Press analysis of data from the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services find nursing home residents account for nearly one in ten of all coronavirus cases in the United States as of June seventh about one in five facilities nationally reported deaths the latest figures account for about ninety five percent of all nursing homes they report nearly one hundred seventy nine thousand suspected or confirmed cases among residents and twenty nine thousand four hundred eighty seven

United States Associated Press Medicare
Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

Native America Calling

04:00 min | Last month

Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in south, Dakota has regained accreditation and can now bill Medicare for services. Jackie Henry has more the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. Services ended its provider agreement with the Pine Ridge IHS facility in two thousand, seventeen, citing the facilities failure to meet care standards. Losing that agreement meant the facility couldn't reimburse treatments through those programs by November of last year. A CMS survey team reported the hospital to be one hundred percent compliant with standards. Last month. The Joint Commission awarded the hospital full accreditation after a virtual survey. James Driving Hawk is the Great Plains area director for Indian Health Services? Services he says the Pine Ridge team has demonstrated, it can consistently meets standards. We have expanded leadership oversight from the office to the hospital and improve staffing levels, and we have increased requirements for medical staff, credentialing education of our staff were quality standards and implemented new checks and balances to ensure new issues that arise are addressed promptly. He says the agreement with CMS will help. The facility maintained and expanded services going forward now that all of our visits that we have a with our our patients are are able to be reimbursed, fully reimbursed now and so those the hospitals will receive that additional revenue, and then we take that revenue investment back into to. Into Services Driving Hawk says one of those investments planned renovation of the Pine Ridge IHS Emergency Department I'm Jacky, Henry in Sioux Falls South Dakota native people, their allies and city officials took part in a celebration in Santa Fe. New Mexico Thursday after a statue a Spanish governor Don. Vargas was taken down. They also called for the removal of a war monument, bearing racist inscription. The celebration followed demonstrations earlier this week in Albuquerque and Rio Arriba. County were statues of Spanish. One day on Yati were removed autumn. Roseville a CO founder of three sisters collective spoke to the crowd about the atrocities. Committed against Tacoma people in the late fifteen hundreds, hundreds of people passed away dirty, not massacre, and the men who survived the were enslaved, and had the right foot amputated. And that's why you saw the statue. In the late nineteen ninety S, Donlon Yahtzee with his right foot cutoff. Because we still remember native people say the removal of statues of colonizers in new. Mexico is a long time coming including tribal leaders who've worked with politics on removing the stone pillar, honoring military actions Jorge Rivera former governor of a Pueblo and has been involved in talks about its removal. MONUMENT CARVED IN MARBLE We're referred to as savages and savage has a lot of meaning both legally and culturally. Has a lot of meaning, and it was not appropriate for it to be used. In describing are people. I. Think are people are. the public people touch people now hope people create the image of the southwest, and everybody knows that you know that tribes are still alive and vibrant in this area. The mayor of Santa Fe Ellen Weber spoke at Thursday's event, calling the removal of statues part of healing and justice. He did not mention if for when the monument would be taken down or a statue of Soldier Kit Carson. The Hilo River Indian community has closed its casinos for two weeks due to recent spikes of covid nineteen in Arizona. The tribe halted gaming operations in March due to Cova nineteen and reopened in May after the state lifted stay at home orders. The second closure comes after a casino employee reportedly died recently due to complications of Covid nineteen I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Pine Ridge Indian Health Servi Indian Health Services James Driving Hawk Pine Ridge Ihs Antonio Gonzalez New Mexico Santa Fe Pine Ridge Ihs Emergency Depar Jackie Henry Dakota Hilo River Indian Community Joint Commission Medicare Covid Tacoma Cova Sioux Falls South Dakota Vargas Albuquerque
US warns 3 companies over illegal at-home COVID-19 tests

Larry Elder

00:42 sec | Last month

US warns 3 companies over illegal at-home COVID-19 tests

"Free speech rights the ruling said the administration overstepped its legal authority by requiring disclosure under the umbrella of its stewardship of Medicare and Medicaid health and Human Services spokesman Michael Caputo tweeted if the drug companies are embarrassed by their prices or afraid the prices will scare patients away they should lower them at Donahue Washington U. S. health regulators are issuing warnings that three companies selling at home blood tests for the corona virus the food and drug administration says the tests are illegal because they haven't been federally reviewed to safely and accurately detect cobit nineteen on Wall Street the Dow by a hundred seventy points but the nasdaq rose fourteen the S. and P. declined eleven crude

Medicare Michael Caputo Medicaid Washington
Pennsylvania's Brighton Rehab Center Facing Federal Fines

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

00:35 sec | Last month

Pennsylvania's Brighton Rehab Center Facing Federal Fines

"More than sixty two thousand dollars in fines against Brighton rehab and wellness center in Beaver County we're AT residents have died from Kobe in nineteen KDKA radio's Jody Steele reports of fines come from the federal centers for Medicare and Medicaid services which conducted a three day inspection of the home in the middle of may U. S. congressman Conor lamb had requested the investigation I C. M. S. official sites problems with infection control a statement from Brighton says in part we remain committed to working hand in hand with all local state and federal authorities the state has hired a temporary manager to assistant

Conor Lamb Brighton Beaver County Jody Steele Medicare U. S. Congressman C. M. S. Official
Outcry as some nursing homes try to grab stimulus checks

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | Last month

Outcry as some nursing homes try to grab stimulus checks

"Quinn some lawmakers are warning nursing homes they cannot force low income residents to surrender their twelve hundred dollar economic stimulus checks the attempt to grab stimulus money from residents on Medicaid was reported by the elder justice office of the Federal Trade Commission which received complaints from a number of states some lawmakers in Congress are calling on federal watchdogs to issue a warning to nursing homes and assisted living facilities that relief money from Congress is a tax credit not income that they can claim to defray the cost of care and any funds that were taken should be returned meanwhile nursing homes account for about one third of the deaths in the corona virus

Medicaid Federal Trade Commission Congress Quinn
Outcry as some nursing homes try to grab stimulus checks

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Outcry as some nursing homes try to grab stimulus checks

"One some of lawmakers the nation's are military warning nursing services homes will have they cannot a black force officer low in charge income residents for the to first surrender time their twelve on the hundred Senate dollar floor economic the ETS stimulus are ninety checks eight the nays the attempt are zero to grab vice stimulus president money Mike from pence residents took the on unusual Medicaid step was of presiding reported by over the the elder vote confirming justice general office Charles of the Federal brown Trade junior Commission as which Air received Force chief complaints of staff from a number that of makes states brown the some first lawmakers black in Congress member of the are joint calling chiefs on federal since watchdogs Colin Powell to was issue chairman a warning nearly to nursing thirty homes years and ago assisted brown living facilities is one of just two that black relief four star money from officers Congress in the entire is a tax military credit not and in a video income message that last they can week claim described to defray the struggle the cost of of feeding care in and a thing about any wearing funds the same that flight were taken suit should be with returned the same wings on my meanwhile chest as my nursing peers homes account for in about the main question one by third another military of member the deaths are you in a pilot the corona brownie virus is pandemic a fighter pilots Jackie Quinn and most recently Washington was the air force's top Pacific commander Sager made Donnie Washington

Officer Mike Federal Brown Trade Junior Com Colin Powell Chairman Congress Jackie Quinn Washington Commander Sager Donnie Washington President Trump Pence
"medicaid" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

09:59 min | 6 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"She is trying to make sure that this program persists and is available for those really vulnerable Americans people who can't go out and get jobs or people who may be joined the program when they could have shopped around for private insurance instead and her belief is that to save Medicaid. Some people should be off Medicaid. So there's this other storyline that runs alongside a lot of these policy. Changes THAT SEEMA. Verma is trying to enact and it's really about power when we heard that policy rule out it was announced by Verma but she was on stage with her boss. Alex as are the head of HHS How would you describe the two of their relationship? What what is a synonym for frosty Or cordial on the surface and Stabbing knives behind the scenes. Politico wrote a story my my colleagues and I Adam Cancun and Russian proton rose to a couple of months ago about the seething tensions behind the scenes in trump's health department alexy's our he's the he'll secretary. He's the cabinet official. He is nominally. The boss but Seema Verma. She has her own giant portfolio her own one trillion dollar budget and while she technically reports as she has her own relationships in the White House and the two of them spent a good portion of last year. Trying to unseat the other trying to win favor with the president and that meant one of them. Owning PART OF DONALD TRUMP'S HEALTHCARE PORTFOLIO. Trying trying to deliver on his drug pricing agenda. That's what Alex as really leading. And then Seema Verma took on the Obamacare repeal effort but booth Verma and as our didn't necessarily support the other one's efforts and instead looked for ways to get the other person out of office she's also had a few bumps of her own Would you reported on some stories broke about Spending and spending on consultants or trying to get tax payer reimbursements for things. Tell me about that about a year ago. My colleague Adam Cameron and I broke the story. That Seema Verma had spent a couple of million dollars on publicity consultants. It's not unusual for the federal government to hire consultants government. Does it all the time? And the government does hire people to do ads their ads for obamacare their ads for Medicare you might see them on. Tv on the side of a bus. That's not unusual but was unusual. Was that Seema. Verma had brought in either people that she had tried to hire in the federal government but hadn't been able to so instead they became consultants working with her at highly paid salaries and she also brought in people who worked on her personal. Pr COMING UP WITH A campaign to get her invited to high profile events in healthcare Get her featured in magazines like Glamour. These are things that I can't remember it all my time covering healthcare for a decade. I can't remember another government official having a personal. Pr Team paid for by taxpayers. And some of these things would have happened anyway. I mean she is one of the most important people in healthcare. You don't need a personal. Pr Team to get you invited to healthcare events but some of the things that she was seeking like these high-profile speaking opportunities outside healthcare. That might have been where. Pr Campaign could have been helpful. The irony is also not lost lizzy that that even as Seema Verma has pushed new requirements on low income patients. She commissioned publicity campaign using taxpayer money and sought government insurance for her own. Needs to the reason I'm asking you. This is not just sort of about other stories and what you've reported but also her political viability. This is a president after all who likes to see. His officials look effective. Look strong not be hit repeatedly in the press as as he would say it so I guess I think about her political capital. Where does she stand in the trump administration? Now that's a fascinating question. President trump from from all of our understanding like Seema Verma. He thinks she's tough. She has taken blows in public in closed. Door meetings and push back. He likes that. He likes fighters he also likes that frankly. She's a woman of color in a Republican administration that lacks people of both. She's arguably one of one of two or three most prominent women of color that the trump administration has hired so she has her champions inside the administration. I think her scandals of last year. This publicity campaign Which led to Congressional Investigations? And there's an ongoing inspector general probe That weakened her position there was some fear that Inspector General Will still come back in the in the next couple of weeks and say. Seema Verma was an honest Congress about how she was spending taxpayer money on on publicity and there were also rivals of hers people who supported her boss. Alex as our and thought that she was trying to undermine him and that she should go because she's insubordinate it's a volatile situation but I would say that as of February of an election year it would be very difficult for the trump administration to ouster and have someone ready to replace her. Where do you see her? Push to change Medicaid going from here. Her two biggest initiatives were work requirements. Which have been blocked by the courts and this new block grant initiative. That is going to be blocked by the courts so there is still an effort to see those through but a realistic understanding that. It's not going to happen this year. This first term of President Trump Seema Verma has done a lot of other things around Medicaid. They get less attention but might end up being even more impactful. She's talked a lot about Medicaid spending too much money on ineligible and rules. That people shouldn't be getting Medicaid are signing up in states like California. New York aren't doing enough to screen. Who's getting coverage? She wants to crack down on that. That could lead to a lot of people in those states losing coverage she also has proposed. Something wonky I I will be honest. It's it's Wonky even for me. But called the Medicaid Fiscal Accountability Rule. And that complicated policy could really constrain. How states are spending money and could lead to further tightening of the Medicaid purse-strings. So a program that that really grew under the Obama Administration Medicaid has has shrunk in different ways under trump and under Seema Verma. There's this politically tricky thing though. About what Verma. And the trump administration are trying to do on the one hand trying to scale back. Medicaid is a longtime conservative goal. Something the administration's allies really want but on the other hand Medicaid is popular. It's a program that polls extremely well not only in blue states but with the passing of the affordable care act in red states to it has been extremely popular in states. That expanded the Medicaid Program. Governor John Bel Edwards in Louisiana. He's a democrat. He ran on a promise to expand Medicaid. Four hundred thousand people signed up within the first year so closer to home in Virginia was a major issue in the most. Recent governor's race there so yes. Medicaid is driving people to the polls major issue in these purple states or even red states at the same time. Donald Trump has walked away from a promise he made during his presidential campaign back in two thousand fifteen twenty. Sixteen a promise. He made to protect Medicaid. The most recent state of the Union Donald Trump did not say he was gonNA protect Medicaid. Yeah singled out. Social Security and Medicare did not mention Medicaid similarly the moves that Seema Verma has made and allowed for these are moves that objectively would be interpreted as cutting Medicaid and while I think the trump administration is is conscious of this challenge. They are going to message it by saying look we. We have stabilized the broader healthcare market. And we're letting states do what they want for their programs were getting the federal government out of calling the shots and if a republican state wants to change its Medicaid program. More power to them. Is there any worry? On the part of the trump administration or National Republicans that these moves to go after reshape Medicaid could push voters toward Democrats. There's so much fear that Donald Trump is going to lose on the healthcare issue. This fall I. It's an fear that that he shared. We wrote a story a couple of weeks ago about president trump seeing some polling that he's behind Democrats on healthcare. He was in the middle of a meeting called up health secretary. Alex Cesar to yell at him about. Are they doing everything they can to make him a stronger candidate on healthcare issues and Republicans are calculating? Is If if they talk less about obamacare and less about Medicaid and less about Medicare but more about things like donald trump is fighting opioids. Donald Trump is spending a lot of money to fight. Hiv to change. How people with kidney disease get cared for like all of these public health initiatives if donald trump can seem strong on that they will win some share of the healthcare vote. I think that remains to be seen through a lot of Americans who like those things but they're really worried about losing their health. Insurance and Democrats completely have that issue on their side.

President Trump Seema Verma Medicaid DONALD TRUMP Medicaid Program Alex Cesar Seema president President official secretary Politico HHS White House Medicare National Republicans Obama Administration Adam Cancun
"medicaid" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

07:13 min | 6 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on What A Day

"The trump administration is proposing something called a healthy adults opportunity. We're going to get into what that is but I can. We reflect on the name for a second year. I feel like the more positive adverbs or adjectives are in a name the more you I need to be worried that if you would actually click on a link that had that name you would wind up in a bathtub full of ice with no kidneys a few days later. Oh definitely definitely. This was one of the phrases that was sent in that. NBS Jeff bezos group chat before he got hacked exactly you you will get hacked either literally or figuratively. Yeah but in all seriousness. This is a new Medicaid plan unveiled by the trump administration yesterday. Gideon can you tell us more about it. Yeah so the new plan. It doesn't mention hacking hacking but it is effectively. Another effort from the administration to Rollback Medicaid benefits. That's the top line on it. And we pointed this out on a recent episode on Social Security Security but President trump promised not to do any of this as he campaign for the presidency that he was an Orthodox. Republican candidate wasn't going to touch any of these benefits. Fits that people like. Here's an example of that. In Two thousand fifteen save Medicare Medicaid and social security without cuts have have to do it. Get rid of the fraud. Get rid of the waste and abuse but save it. People have been paying for years and now many of these candidates want to cut it. Wow a man who has cheated on three wives and broken. Every promise he's ever made is breaking a promise. I mean you know. Color me shocked but it besides the the hypocrisy angle. I mean the the broader thing is what this plan is actually allowing to happen and it involves accepting accepting applications from states that want to set up a Medicaid block grant now that has been a long held conservative goal in theory it was applied for welfare benefits in the one thousand nine hundred and the result could be giving states the option of reducing healthcare benefits for people who gained their coverage from the affordable. Care Act now now once this is the first state actually takes the plunge on this. It's probably going to prompt legal challenges. So this is basically the Republican Mo at this point. They're going to keep trying trying to give people something they don't want over and over and over again until they get it. Can you explain how this particular bad idea works. Yeah I can but I I wanted to explain how how Medicaid currently works or funded historically Medicaid has provided unlimited matching payments from the federal government to states based on what they spend providing for for the poor so states receive as much federal funding as it takes to cover fifty to seventy seven percent of the cost of the Medicaid population that includes pregnant women and kids the elderly disabled and then for those that are covered under expansion which is through the ACA the federal government contributes about ninety percent so under who that framework states can also choose to add additional benefits and as enrollment rises or spending rises naturally. Things that would change. Under these circumstances the federal government can match the money that they are giving as those things occur. Okay so matching for every good tweet. I get from a nicest area listener. I get another tweet from a man who is displeased with me and by extension all women the duality of humanity right there in a very insular reference. But I think it works under this new plan though. According to New York Times a state would use a formula to figure out in advance. How much plans to spend on its adult or expansion Medicaid population poppulation in a year? Then they would get a fixed federal share that is based on said formula. Now the problem becomes what if more people people become eligible for Medicaid because of an economic downturn or recession or something else of that sort what happens if costs go up because some people in the state have more expensive medicine and so on and so forth but Seema Verma the head of Medicaid and Medicare so that the program would quote allow adjustments if this is the case but on space advocates think that the plan has serious issues giving states an option to participate in a program that might result in people getting less healthcare. Yeah who's the craven puppy kicker. That's GonNa take them up on that. The winner of that puppy kicking prize is governor. Kevin still the Republican of Oklahoma. He said that he wanted to do it. And he was there for the announcement of this plan. And the interesting thing that has happened with Medicaid and typically red states recently Oklahoma's an example main main Idaho Utah and Nebraska others is that ballot measures have passed with voters saying they want to expand medicaid. Like this is a popular thing and they see other other states doing it and they're like why are leaders in the state not taking them up on it so this new program could be a way out of that scenario for people people like me who don't want to follow the measure and a block grant basically is allowing these states much more leeway on how they WANNA use federal dollars in who they want to give them to so the Republican argument on all. This is while it'll it'll get rid of wasteful spending. Do not worry like we're GONNA cut down on all of this but what ends up happening bening when you create these sort of conditions for things like Medicaid is you impose burdensome requirements that could end up kicking people off and examples of that hat or like the work requirement. That was in Arkansas in places like Oklahoma where they didn't expand medicaid. If they take this block grant option they actually could inevitably ably end up with more people covered under Medicaid. Ironically because they were starting at such a low point and then they're gonNA turn around people like sit and say this is a huge win for us us look like all the people that didn't have healthcare are now insured but at the end of the day it is still less than what they would have gotten under Medicaid expansion and the big big question in all of that is how the states are actually going to end up spending these Medicaid dollars when they get them. You know. I'm maybe a town simpleton. A feckless farmhand cheese-eating eating country mouse so negative. I've got a bad brain but even I understand the messaging differences that could result here in an election year. Democrats like healthcare and want to give more of it two more people and Republicans are saying if you're poor proved to me why you deserve that insulin. That's basically it I mean that's in a nutshell when you take what people have said stack it against each other. Those are the two sides of of this conversation and the block grant plans specifically was a feature feature of those ACA repeal efforts that failed in Congress and like the beginning of the trump administration so after that happens now now the administration is trying to make this happen in an executive format and it's already getting pushback of course from members of Congress like House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for one so yeah in essence that what what else are we supposed to surmise from. These continued efforts other than that is what Republicans are trying to do so. This effort will likely face legal challenges. And we'll keep you updated on those as well as anything else administration is doing to try and sabotage healthcare..

Medicaid Jeff bezos federal government Oklahoma ACA Gideon New York Times trump fraud Congress Nancy Pelosi President bening Arkansas Kevin Seema Verma Idaho
"medicaid" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

06:06 min | 8 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"I'm if it were me personally I would I would take a look at the two nursing homes in McKee's port for your father they charge more than a couple thousand dollars a lot more in fact yeah I know however because we're talking about Medicaid when you get him into the Medicaid program everything's covered he will have enormous bills like senior care okay on level are I don't think they they didn't Medicaid everybody to Medicare no they do not they are not a nursing home in the key supporters riverside in K. so Denise if you if your dad goes to seek what is called skilled nursing care at a at a traditional nursing home then you could apply for Medicaid or medical assistance and that would cover the cost of his care but if you so it's really important to know if you're looking at places for him what what type of facility that that particular facility is and if they do if it is a nursing home you know make sure that you understand you know that they a nursing home accepts Medicaid personal care you can't you can't get Medicaid for personal care so you want to make sure and like Karl said I mean if if you're if you're in the position where you're really not sure where he should be and your with his so with his limited assets to I mean you don't want to go somewhere and just have all of his money just be spent on care over a year period of time in any as nothing left so if you were right I mean he would be proud you know I an ideal candidate for applying FOR medical assistance because his spend down be pretty minimal and and he was so if he it becomes you know eligible for medical assistance Medicaid will cover the full cost of his care in a nursing home at nursing dinner singer is saying like riverside like riverside right we get about reverse that and I've been in there I don't yeah but I didn't I've been having this conversation with clients recently and I think a lot of people get confused as to I think a lot of people just call any type of facility right a nursing home and they're not all the same so you have to make sure you know where where what you're looking at because if you're going if you're looking at personal care for example the you know you're typically probably gonna be private paying for that so in you're not getting Medicare will not cover the cost of his care and in personal care okay I said I didn't know that right there you still deny sales accepted but I knew senior care to okay yeah that's your your your your the prime case frankly I mean I have been a that's fine as he is and what she of the could give the office a call call Jen baby too March he's out of that office most of the time you have the phone number for our yeah Hillsborough right yeah I like I like I said I was already there a couple years ago how how can I forget who I talked with well I didn't know how to help in the store thank you Tyson is get in touch with them all right explain the difference what what does Medicare cover what DO first let's go ahead and get real real remedial for me what's the difference between Medicaid and Medicare so Medicaid is what we're helping clients typically apply for that is the Medicaid as the primary payer of long term care services in Pennsylvania and Medicare is health insurance for your older pop population right how do I know if the facility takes Medicaid what what determines yes because you just said yes that one does know that one doesn't well perhaps if he if you come and see us and ask us for us will tell you because we know which was doing do not okay otherwise you have to ask them and the a a good barometer is how much do they charge if it's over seven thousand dollars a month it's probably a nursing home and the averages was it just one up for January ten thousand seven hundred and eighty dollars a month why you've to hear you say that's a simple by down spend down your spend down and it's forty thousand dollars and I thought well that doesn't sound like a really easy spend down until Carl what you just said if a month this ten thousand four hundred dollars now actually wouldn't be spending on the nursing a very little of what an envelope what would you do with it well I think in that case we would probably do give some of the pre pay funeral on on some of it probably pay some taxes that might come back in the form of a refund next year okay Hey done any credit card bills and that's it may have those sorts of things so there are ways to get right it's so weird to say you're ahead by getting rid of money but that's what you're saying that that's what it's all going to but I guess I mean you can there's a lot of different things you can spend down or not just telling people to go out and buy you know you can go on by fancy car I guess if you want but because one vehicle is is exam for Medicaid purposes so you have to be careful don't go on my ten cars but but basically what we're saying is you don't you know there's a lot of things you can spend your money on that will put you in your family in a better situation than you were before like if you have credit card debt that ends up becoming dead of your state when you pass away so if you're if you need to spend on the money to get someone eligible for medical assistance so that you don't have to pay ten thousand dollars out of pocket every month might make a really good it might make a lot of sense to pay off that person's credit card debt get them eligible they don't spend any money on the cost of their care and they're and they're probably in a really great facility getting good care so the key is if you're gonna get one car it should be a Ferrari or a blue got a year I will do so it just depends but the the the the the questions for Carl questions regarding elder law for Jan yeah one more segment so get him in right now I don't want to run at a time eight six six three nine one ten twenty to call or two text and I get a text here for you will do it after this is Pittsburgh works on KDKA when.

Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:45 min | 8 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Me and now that this is not necessarily helping Fixed the cost Medicaid. which is you know to be fair? A huge burden on on the system educated isn't working properly. It's very expensive to maintain pain but this isn't a solution to me at least one. That's working. Well I'm in the same boat as you which I don't understand the government's motive for doing this. This doesn't seem to make families safer. It doesn't seem to make families stronger and it seems like the people who are most impacted by this. Are People like you said who are. I'm doing everything right. They've worked hard enough to get that little piece of the middle-class American dream and the effects like the word that you used there. The effects of this seemed to be very punitive. Is there a solution to any of this. Do you have any ideas on how we can get ourselves out of this. Because I can't Imagine Agean anybody listening to this as like well. This sounds like a good system. I think most people are going to be like. Oh yeah this is not this is not okay. Yeah I think it spiraled out of control even from what it was initially intended to do. I think states have gotten more and more aggressive in terms of what they collect during after more and more and I think we've lost touch with even what was originally intended to be in even that wouldn't agree with but I wonder if the solution will be less about overturning. The particular law in this policy more about reforming the healthcare system overall. I'm not sure that some states have had success in reforming this law. For Example Sixteen California passed really important legislation that dramatically reduced what the government can recoup from PA families on Medicaid and they can only recover very limited set of assets now so it can work state by State Minnesota also had some legislation nations some people after the ACA was passed in Medicaid expanded. Some state said that will will no longer stay. Recovery's reads for people who are on the expanded medications. Many of them didn't know when they were getting on at. This was a was a policy but in terms of the future. I think the Democrats aren't really talking about Democrats are talking about expanding the ACA or between Medicare for all I think Bernie Sanders is the only candidate who who has a with explicitly said in his Medicare for all plan that he would abolish state recovery as part of his plan. I knew that it was warranted. Also against recovery. Although I don't know if she mentioned explicitly in her Medicare for all plan I think if there actually was medicare for all this would be rendered moot because it wouldn't and have medicaid anymore short of that if we go into more of an expanded eighth. EA or we don't know we don't know whether this would be someone. One would have to kind of abolish this mandate and I'm not sure people are really talking about that on the federal level at this point. It's incredible it's just absolutely incredible. You've you have taught me so much and I'm positive that our listeners are going to get a lot out of it one of the things. I think they're going to get out of it is that they need to talk to their elected elected officials and find out how this impacts them how they can protect themselves and how we can get rid of this nonsense altogether because I think visiting this on on poor people people regardless of the intention as you said the effect is is not good and the fact that it's only recovering one percent just shows that it's not even working. Yeah what the government actually would coops. Compared to what they spend on Medicaid and compared to what they spend on a lot of other things frankly that benefit wealthier wealthier groups of individuals. You know so for the federal government is not a lot of people. The family that affects it can be like changing. I couldn't agree more. Thank you so much for agreeing to be on the show. Where can our listeners find you? What's your website? I understand that you have a book out. Please tell us where to learn more about Rachel. Yeah well I have a book very different subject about the artist Rodin and in the poet writer Maria Rilke but if you have any listen is interested in art there. They definitely find that. It's called me maintains your life and I have a website. It's Rachel he'll Dash Corbett dot com again. Thank you so much for being here. It has been enlightening. You're very welcome and thank you to our listeners. Who are here remember? Please like us on social media shares everywhere. Give us as many stars hearts bullets as you can and use your words and tell people while you like the show and remember you can get one week of free convenient affordable private online counseling anytime.

federal government Medicaid Rachel Bernie Sanders ACA Maria Rilke Rodin Medicare California PA Minnesota writer
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Do i pay my rent or do i pay for my kids. You know prescription right. I mean this has been like a big. I i feel like it's kind of like back and forth in the thinking on this sound like where people over consuming healthcare or you know should ability to thanks to expansion. We now get to compare right health outcomes in arkansas verses texas texas. Yes those are bordering during staples louisiana versus alabama right and so and so what what what are what are we. What are we see on that that you would really point people to it. Yeah you brought up louisiana louisiana. They have this really great dashboard and each month they update and show how many people got cancer screenings and how many <hes> averted averted deaths that you know they projected because of these <hes> cancer treatment of screenings how many people now have access to you know blood pressure medicine to lower their their <unk> their hypertension so it's we're seeing that coverage matters and coverage is actually helping people <hes> and improving their health uh-huh so that's been sort of <hes>. I mean there's again a big. It's a political issue in louisiana because again. This conservative state has a democratic governor. He's like trying to run for reelection wants to sort of do it but also what what does it do to state finances. I assume like always with you know oh programs right. It's like it sounds nice but this costs a lot of money to yeah. We'll as we started off the show here we talked about how it's a joint federal and state program so the feds kick in a portion of the medicaid funding for medicaid <hes> an expansion is a really great deal for states dates because the feds kick in ninety percent much higher than like the regular rate in which they they chip in <hes> so states are just on the hook ten percent percent of of cross which is not to say that it's not you know a meaningful amount of money for states but i think what's really interesting is that we've seen expansion. Help state budgets and <hes> one example is that <hes> states are able to offset costs from steep programs that you know were treated behavioral mental health <hes> issues or the criminal justice system for example so we're in schools as i was talking about earlier so we're seeing that medicaid medicaid and medicaid expansion are really helped is helping state budgets in kind of moving the money around. Hey i'm i'm jason delray and i'm hosting a new podcast called land of the giants in it. We examined the most powerful tech companies of our time. Season one's called the rise of amazon. How about how jeff bezos turn what was just an online bookseller into one of the biggest companies in the world and how transform the way we shop live and work. We'll explore how amazon prime is the key to the company's success and how it's something you'll never quit. We'll see what happens when amazon builds a warehouse in a small al- kansas town and then also what happens when it decides to leave and we'll ask why is amazon building microwaves powered by alexa and what is with all the robots it's built and of course we'll tackle. The biggest question of our time is amazon tubek.

amazon louisiana medicaid jeff bezos texas al- kansas town jason delray arkansas alabama ninety percent ten percent
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Primarily read zooey can't be there's no the universe in which your livelihood is like getting medicaid right and i think that's part of the reason that during the late nineties during who knows <hes> economic reform period medicaid was actually kind of divorced from <hes> the other you know assistance programs <hes> <hes> that helps low income families and so you know i always view medicaid as its health insurance and we should treat it as such <hes> and you you know imposing work requirements <hes> it was unprecedented. <hes> you know actually during the last year of the obama administration <hes> carr's the federal agency that oversees medicaid <hes> denied work requirements in arizona and new hampshire saying going back to the to the beginning that work requirements don't further the objectives of the medicaid program which is the standard under which you know the feds have to review medicaid waiver proposals muscles but so then this is even if it doesn't generate extra employment it does save money right. I mean if if if if eighteen thousand people in arkansas wind up losing medicaid benefits <hes> whether that's because they're not working because paperwork problems because of whatever ride like that's a that's a savings on the state budget yes but that's eighteen thousand people that no longer have coverage and so when you talk to maybe hospitals and doctors. They're now having to treat people that no longer have insurance so they're uncompensated. Care costs are going to rise so it's just going somewhere else. The system meaning that the hospitals and doctors are going to have to eat it because no one has coverage anymore and just to just to be clear on this because we were starting my talking. What about the sort of benny universes of medicaid. This is four adults set the set the stage here this is for the expansion adults also those adults without kids <hes> that make up to seventeen thousand dollars a year and so and that helps explain like what is this list of states right these he is our <hes> kentucky arkansas in particular right are very politically conservative states that unlike many of the other conservative states actually did the medicaid expansion right because i think sometimes you know you can hear oh..

arkansas zooey obama benny carr new hampshire arizona kentucky seventeen thousand dollars
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Women. You're saying a more progressive state will have a higher income cutoff to try to make sure that you have fewest possible uninsured children right. I mean there's also really good evidence that shows that kids covered by medicaid when they're in during childhood are more likely to graduate high school more likely to graduate college. <hes> have better health as adults <hes> more likely to have a better paying king job pay more in taxes so there's benefits into as you were saying making sure that kids in pregnant women have the coverage. They need as one of the sort of stylized facts. It's about health insurance in the universe is that covering children is on average relatively cheap bright. Obviously there are some children with very very serious in healthcare needs but typically when we talk about giving healthcare coverage to a child we're talking about doing and you'll check up send vaccines and giving them vision tasks ask and it's stuff that it has a lot of benefits but isn't necessarily a like super cost right. It's kind of a cheap investment if you if you will you make sure kids have the vaccine so they're not getting you know measles. <hes> have the glasses that they need so they can read and <hes> and that's just gonna make them healthier <hes> adults that are able to go to college and get a good paying job and so it's kind of a cheap investment in their long-term development development but that's not what the expansion debate is about. That's about a child. I guess it doesn't matter if you have the child or not. It's just you're an adult. I mean so many benefits right like housing assistance food assistance. If you wanna help children you have to give it out family level but medical care care where you can actually pay for the kids doctor visits but not mom and dad right exactly and so. I think that's what was so amazing with. The affordable care act act is that it was actually if you wanna think about it the first kind of step towards universal coverage we were laying down the framework for covering <hes> you know every low low-income american through medicaid <hes> and unfortunately you know we still have a little ways to go with those fourteen states that need to expand to it's fourteen states and that includes texas and florida are the big strike that's right and so that's like a how do you know how much of the uninsured population in the u._s. is accounted for by the survey lack of medicaid expansion with those scissors two million people that would gain coverage <hes> if states would <hes> <hes> expand medicaid and <hes> florida and texas make up the majority of those folks routed so so that's the the the big thing there okay <hes> so then what's this the peace with the elderly and long-term care because so far we're describing. It's a program program for low income. People covers more children in some states. It's now covering for adults but like what's what's up with the old folk. Yeah i think just to kind of take a step. Ah also a should've mentioned earlier. The way i think about medicaid is it's <hes> provides coverage at every stage of life right. We talked about kids. You know when you're pregnant when you get coverage..

texas florida
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Boys mondays at nine pm only h._b._o. Sarah cliff is no no longer with us on the weeds. So i've been really missing the opportunity to sort of monk out about healthcare. I was really excited to sit down with jessica shoot from the center on budget and policy priorities. She's an expert on medicaid a really important weeds friendly healthcare program that there are a lot of changes happening to a in the pera really great conversation. I think you could learn a lot. Ah hello welcome to episode of the weeds on the blacks media podcast network. I'm too lazy as my guest. Today is jessica. She is a senior policy. Analyst at the center on budget and policy priorities favorite thing tank mine a lot of great stuff out there and <hes> doesn't go focuses on medicaid <hes> which is a a very important program and is going to explain it all to us. It's been big. You know the the trump administration has done a lot on medicaid waivers things things like that. That's what i want to talk about but i think it's important for people to understand like what. What are we even talking about here. So i'm going to ask like it like a really basic question a book. What is medicaid. I'm happy to answer that so just to make sure everybody knows. Medicaid is the health insurance program for low income mm people so i run establish that right off the gecko. It's different from medicare which is the program for the elderly and so- medicaid covers over seventy five million people. I don't think people realize that half of half of the population is actually kids. <hes> and another important <hes> factoid of medicaid is that it's the primary payer for long term services and supports so when your grandparents are in the nursing home they are on medicaid <hes> i'm as i was talking a little bit earlier when my grandmother was in the nursing home as she swore up and down that she wasn't on medicaid but <hes> actually medicaid covers as long term care and that's that's what's called the dual eligible population right. That's right yeah for yeah you for the elderly folks folks can be both medicare eligible also medicaid eligible but so so medicaid <hes> comes into existence in the mid six at the same time as medicare. They don't just have some more names. That's right. They share the same birthday which actually we celebrated last year. They're fifty four years old <hes> and <hes> initially it was created on really. They targeted for low income americans. I'm and as we've seen over the course of its history. There's been kind of mini coverage expansions along along the way <hes> you know kids coverage in medicaid was slightly expanded then we went to pregnant women parents and then with the affordable care act now adults else right so so the way medicare works. It's like there's a federal program..

Medicaid medicare Sarah cliff jessica Analyst fifty four years
"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Reimbursement methodologies for drugs, pretty high cost drugs hepatitis C, the things that are really driving state budgets, to get to make the, they're going to have to pay the price. Right. But to be able to build a value based system to build a system, that's based on outcomes to allow them to manage a small way. What is in ever increasing share of their budget? And the last thing I would say and you know, lot of conversation about flexibility in this administration, not as much talked about, or at least reported on, I would say is the opposite side of that which is the accountability that the administration and CMS has been building around Medicaid. Whether it's the guidance that has been issued around and the drive toward. Requiring states to have more robust evaluations of their eleven fifteen waiver demonstrations and using that information as we make decisions on renewals going forward or things like the Medicaid scorecard, which sort of is in its infancy. It was one eight A ration-. It's going to continue to grow, but much like the nursing home, compare hospital compare becomes a way for stakeholders to understand how states are operating their, their programs, given that CMS does so much. And there are so many different policies. You just mentioned a few. Do you ever feel like the policies are in conflict? So, for instance, rural health, I heard Seema Verma your former boss about a week ago, talk about rural health and maternal mortality and the importance of lowering maternal deaths after pregnancy. There's a lot of evidence that coverage and access to coverage helps save lives. And yet this administration is pulling back on coverage. How do you reconcile when the policies are seemingly in conflict? Well, I. In that in that respect. Right. The coverage aspects of Medicaid are, are Terry. Right. The, the way the supreme court decision came down in the way, the Affordable Care Act is now interpreted states, have the, the ability to make termination as to whether or not they're going to expand coverage under Medicaid. And this administration has made it very clear that they're going to defer to states decisions and states decisions about what's best for their states. And so in that case, I think managing through understanding that those are mature, there are issues with maternal mortality that can be addressed on a whole number of fronts..

Medicaid Seema Verma Terry
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"What's interesting about this is that from an ideological speck of perspective that liberals want to create a safety net, Medicaid is an important liberal institution. It was the biggest accomplishment. It seems to me the expansion of Medicaid was probably the single biggest achievement by the Obama administration specifically within the context of of the ACA that Medicaid expansion was probably the the most important part of it. Although I think there's an argument about the patient protections broadly speaking, but that is at Sittard a liberal solution to this problem, right? We're going to have a we're gonna we're gonna make sure that that we have a a safety net for people, but the efficacy of that safety net is. Inhibited by that perspective and not making it a universal program. Right. Because the idea is almost like the way it's I mean, I hate to use this as an analogy. But it's the way they hid bad mortgages right ones that we're were had more had more risk, which is you put it in bigger tranches, and it's harder to get at those. So if the idea is that, you know, Medicaid was setup specifically as a separate program for Medicare. So that you could cut it really, right and diminish the the the benefits for essentially, people of color and bra and more broadly people living in poverty, the ideas, you make a universal program, and those people are made safer that the the the the liberal the liberal agenda is more fulfilled with a more socialistic for lack of a better word universal program. Right. I mean, this is the best. Argument for universal healthcare. It seems to me in terms of the poor because it protects that that that portion of the population as much if not more than any because they're more susceptible to getting their their their benefits cut. Yeah. I mean, this is a classic bait. I'm on people who are trying to figure out how to help the most needy with social policy target to them, which often is much more politically feasible because it's less costly. Or do we try to create universal programs that cover everyone, which is more politically sustainable because you can't isolate the the poor people's programs and try to, you know, pick them off one by one, and it's a classic and difficult dilemma, you know, I think that a kind of universal approach to health policy is is preferred is better. And is you know, it's a more sort of effective for filming of of the kind of liberal vision. It's one way of thinking about it. But it's it's be more. You know, a more effective and more compelling fulfillment of what should be everyone's vision for Americans. We have to be as healthy as poss-. People on that are equitable. You know, a lot of people just don't realize that. What state you live in? What race you are how much money you make these are things that will determine your access to benefits that essentially decide whether you could live or die. I don't actually think that even people who understand those many at least to be Republicans with would say that. That's right. Could actually think of a moral grounding for that sort of policy designed I can't fathom what the moral grounding is there are kind of fiscal and practical grounds, right? We don't want to you know, spend this much money, but the moral grounds for the arbitrariness of the whole system, even for many people who are doing everything, right and working hard just happen to live in the wrong state. And so I think that there's a liberal case to make I think that there's a human case to make and I focus on Medicaid in my research because Medicaid is the institution we have. And so let's think about how. To make it the best. We can. But you know, in the in the sort of backdrop for me as always let's think about how to build new institutions that are more inclusive more equitable and more politically, and economically sustainable, and that that will mean looking beyond Medicaid and looking to universal system Jamila mission or the book is fragmented democracy, Medicaid, federalism, and unequal politics. Thanks so much for your time today. Really? Appreciate it. Thank you Sam. All right, folks..

Medicaid ACA Obama administration Medicare
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"But that's not the way that that. That it appears to work when it comes to Medicaid part of the reason because you know, people get alienated they get discouraged, and they get sent very specific messages that they then listen to this. Right. I mean, if you're poor you deserve to be poor, you're irrelevant. And here is we're going to cut your Medicaid, just to remind you of all those things that we've been trying to signal to you for decades if not longer, and so how much do you think how much do you think? Well, I guess I have two questions about about about your date at one is how much you think there have been politicians who are aware of this dynamic, if not, you know, so specifically in terms of qualitative sense, but they had a an intuition, or they had anecdotal sort of evidence of this, a how much do you think that the case be are you worried that you know, I'm running for governor in Kentucky. This is I know what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna I'm gonna you know, or or, you know, running for reelect the way for me to do that cut benefits that's going to work for me to different ways. Right. It's going to suppress the vote in some areas. And it's going to probably I'm going to get. I'm gonna get you know, appreciation from from people who don't like people of color, you know, getting, you know, Medicaid phones, or whatever it is that they think that they're getting I mean, how much do you worry about those dynamics? Obviously the second one. You're an academic. You're you're I understand the mission is to is to bring out the truth. But I just wonder how much you think this information has been or or will be weaponized. I I do about that. I think two things I think the two questions are related. I don't think that some too many sort of political folks. This is anything new right? I think that there's an intuition about these sorts of things that comes from the the the clear evidence, right? That for example, they could kick hundreds of thousands of people off, Medicaid in Tennessee and the next election that governor stays in power. Right. And so we, you know, there's lots of evidence over time that people can take pretty kinda harsh turn against programs like, Medicaid and not necessarily suffer any consequences politically. And so I think in to this -ly or in some way, a lot of elected officials probably suspect this, right? I also think that that the folks who wanna take these benefits away would wanna take them away whether or not it was going to be a political. Bust or boon for them. Right. So they're likely going to behave the same way, whether they know this or not it makes them a little bit more glee knowing this, right? But what I focused on more and one of the things that I try to think about as I you know, when I think about who to take this research to disseminate it to is focused on the way, we can use information. Like this for good, right? I think for any research that is produced there are people who can misuse it. Who can weaponize it? And there are people who can use it for good. And I think part of what I try to do is think about you know, what does this mean they're organizations out there that that mobilize and support Medicaid beneficiaries? It's great for them to know this and to have a sense that one of the ways they can be supporting Medicaid beneficiaries is politically right. Not just providing them with economic resources, but thinking about helping them registered to vote and helping them to be aware of political issues. I've talked to you know, and spoken with hospital association. Primary. Care providers, all sorts of folks who say, wow, we never thought about Medicaid in these political terms, and this shapes the way that we want to approach our patients or clients going forward. So I try to think about who can use this for good to offset the efforts that are already going to be made to to dampen these folks voices. No is it seems to me the answer to how I mean..

Medicaid Kentucky Tennessee
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"To me are folks who are living in poverty, and they're just we know from lots of research from decades research that they're less likely to participate in the political process because there are all sorts of barriers. And so I wasn't terribly surprised about that. But there was a part of me that also wanted to know Medicated self has anything to do with it is it about that that nature and the characteristics of the people who are on Medicaid things like poverty, or is there more to it. And what I found was that there were more to there was more to it. And and I found that by both by looking beeper into quantitative date into survey data and thinking about how to control for things like poverty, and lots of the things that we know are with it. And one of the things that I did. For example, is that I looked at a survey called the fragile families and child wellbeing survey that has nearly ten thousand people and many of them over fifty percent of them are Medicare beneficiaries. So I have lots of a sort of large sample to consider. And I looked at people who who took that survey who are Medicaid beneficiaries and people who were not, but who were very similar to each other in many other ways, they were similar in terms of their level of poverty. They were similar in terms of their race similar in terms of many aspects of their life circumstance, and what I found was that this relationship between Medicaid and not participating in politics as much not voting and not engaging and other ways, you know, didn't go away, right? As a result of so, you know, the the folks who were Medicaid beneficiaries when compared to their counterparts who were similar. And many many other ways we're still less likely to vote even though the only observable difference between them was being a Medicaid beneficiary. Then what I did was I started talking to a lot of Medicaid beneficiaries, check out lie with this D is something about Medicaid, and what they told me again, and again in many different ways, and I talked to beneficiaries from across the country is that there may give experiences with Medicaid did affect the way that they thought about government and politics and their willingness and desire to participate in politics. One of the things that the kind of fragmented nature of Medicaid, like we've been talking about that it's different in different places, you know, Medicare beneficiaries know this very well. They're the ones who told this in and brought the sort of the the theme of this book to light from me because they talk about how, you know, their parents and other states or their brothers and other states on Medicaid had one thing and they had another. Or they talked about how much Medicaid changed over time that five years ago, they make they were able to get benefits that they couldn't get now or they talked about how they went across. They moved a lightly across the border to a different state and figured out. They couldn't get something that was hugely important or that they thought about moving and when they research to make sure they'd be able to get life saving benefits in other states. They found out it wouldn't. And this sends a really clear message. It sends a message that says your value is not your value in your needs aren't anything that will be responded to on account of you being a member of this broader political community, or is it a citizen of the country. It depends on what state you live in and on how that state feels like treating you. And sometimes the pencil county you live in what neighborhood you live in the kind of experience you have with the program, the kind of access you have to hospitals doctors benefits, and this kind of motley mix. Of contingencies people feel it in their everyday life. And they know what it means. They know that they're the kind of people who aren't guaranteed anything who aren't protected even for this most basic set of health benefit and people read those messages, and they feed those messages into their calculations about whether they should bother taking part in the political system whether their voices are important, and we'll be heard in responded to and for.

Medicaid Medicare fifty percent five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"So, you know, it's it's impossible even for me to out all of the the kind of racial threats that that can be woven when we think about, Medicaid and health policy more generally is just ubiquitous it's always there. We've talked on this program decent amount with with folks who have written extensively on just the the the premises. Social security also being highly racial. Is. And so yeah. Thirty five years later, I guess when they're doing Medicare and Medicaid. It's you know, what was old is new again. And and so on in fact, also I'm also struck that when we often talk about Medicaid, and we talk about Medicaid cuts. The most salient political rhetoric is usually the one that gets the most traction is often the statistic that two thirds of our elderly who are in nursing homes are there because of Medicaid, so people spend, you know, as you get older, obviously, you have less assets you at one point run out of money, and you must go into a nursing home you become eligible for Medicaid. You get sort of like shuttled from Medicare, Medicaid, and then you're in a nursing home and Medicaid is paying for it. And that ends up being a big political talking point because. You know of the the way that we have a structure around the narrative around I guess the morality of of being poor in this country or living in poverty, I should say. So all right. Well, let's talk about to research that you've done. What are the implications? From a on the for for this fragmentation on its recipients perspective on government because one of the things that we also have heard is if you are on Medicaid. And one would think it would be different. But it's not you are less likely to vote part of that is a function of poverty makes it harder to though in many respects. But is there more to it? And that. Yes. There's there's more to it than that. So when I first started looking at some data, initially, it was it was quantitative data was survey data, and I saw this large pattern Medicaid beneficiaries being less likely to vote. And it makes perfect sense..

Medicaid Medicare Thirty five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"If you have a dental problem because those things proprietary vision, those are optional and states can decide whether they want to offer those things to any of their Medicaid beneficiaries, or whether they want to offer them to all of them, and they have lots and lots of leeway of discretion. Now, there are some states that haven't expanded, Medicaid, and in those non-expansion states, they're still fourteen states that haven't adopted the expansion in those states, you can be very very poor many of those states and not qualify for Medicaid. If for example, you're childless adult. Or even if you're an adult with children, in some cases in the states that have expanded Medicaid to the other thirty seven speech, everyone who lives at one thirty three or below the poverty line eligible. But even those states, whether you've expanded are not state still get to make really specific choices about what they'll cover and what they'll not they won't all states have to cover some basic suite of of things. But then all states also have a ton more choice in terms of what they provide. And what they don't know. My understanding has always been that that the reason why we would not want from the perspective of someone who wants as many people as possible covered by health insurance. The reason why we would not want the federal government to block grant money to the states would be that it would there that that one the the? Rate in which the increase of healthcare would not be covered. And that to the state could use it could could redirect money like how what what is the relationship between the money that the federal government makes available and the state. So when you say the state says like we will not cover podiatrist, for instance, is that are they are they getting the same amount of money per potential recipient as another state that may offer dietary, and they simply decide we're gonna we're gonna put it on respiratory stuff as opposed to podiatrist. I mean, how does that work? How how does the money what how does the state restrict in that fashion? Yes. So you know, what? Medicaid in terms of the funding, you know, the federal government allocates, our matches a certain amount of money, and it varies across states that it depends on how much the state spending. It also depends on on the states themselves, for example, in high how high poverty is in the states in a number of other factors, but the federal government essentially will cover there's a kind of it's called the federal medical assistance percentage, the s map multiplier, but it's the kind of the percentage that the federal government uses and determines that they will match and cover of all that this needs spend. So, you know, states have to make decisions because it is true. True that the more that they spend the more that the federal government will cover for them. But then they're last covering the remaining percentage of the cost for Medicaid beneficiaries. So that, you know, the less they spend total less their leftover percentages. And you know, how much that percentages varies from state to state, and so has to make pretty complicated decisions about how much they can afford to spend and how much they're currently spending. You know, the thing about about the real challenge with block grants is that you know, states right now, you know, treat, Medicaid as Medicaid is. It's really an entitlement. So states have a lot of decisions to make about who's eligible and who's not. But once they make decisions about who's eligible every single person in that state who's eligible gets the benefit. And that's because no matter how much the state spend, the state can decide everybody's l. Eligible below this certain amount. And right now that amount is one thirty three. So even the states that have the most generous eligible eligibility requirements. They decide we're going to be generous. The federal government will match that up until the place where they say they will which is one thirty three. And so those states can be really generous, and they can count on the federal government to to match their share to cover the share that they said that they will..

federal government Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"When someone's in the nursing home, the payout cannot be longer than your life expectancy. Oh, so that it can be shorter but not longer. So in this case, if it's already paying out, and it's going to continue to pay out for his entire life. Can't do it. Okay. It's gotta be a term certain amount of time to pay out in that term certain amount is dictated based on a table equal to the age in which you buy the annuity at that time. In the nursing home, right again, you have to be the nursing. In the nursing home. But we also know that this is another way you'll know that it's not a Medicaid annuity because you're buying it one. You're not in the nursing home in to paying out, right? It can't possibly figure out an any unless they picked the term certain to equal the life expectancy of the individual, then fine. But even then it wouldn't work because it's gotta be termed certain based on the life expectancy on the day. You go into the nursing home got it. That's why you know, you can't do it. So whether it pays out for the wife or doesn't pay for the wife has no bearing on whether it's Medicaid annuity or not. But, but I I guess I can tell you that that when you do have Medicaid annuity, usually the state is the next in line after a spouse. But right, assuming the state is next in line, and then the kids so I don't think it would be able to pay out to the spouse. And first of all you would never as a community spouse by Medicaid annuity. I'm sorry. As a six spouse. She would never buy the Medicaid annuity. You would always have your healthy spouse by the name. Yeah. So this would never work. This is definitely not a Medicaid annuity. Okay. Good advice there folks, if you are in a situation where you have someone going the nursing home. Maybe they're already in there. And you're writing those giant checks every month. Please pick up the phone and get some advice because.

Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Can't get out of the station despite all of the policy support that you just mentioned has a hip lost juice on capitol hill i don't think so i don't think so i mean i we are as relevant today as we've ever been in terms of representing the entirety of the industry we represent whether it's people in the commercial market medicaid managed care we do more in medicaid in particular and we think about you know the repeal and replace effort our our efforts around medicaid medicare advantage i mean people come to us because they want to know what the insurers think and that's as true today as it's ever been a hip just a few weeks ago put out a report counting the benefits of medicaid and saying that some of the literature medicaid is not helpful coverage program is is misleading and kind of back story if you were in my seat reading that report i was thinking gosh this has been a talking point against the aca for years that some people think some conservatives think medicaid is worse than being uninsured why is a hip waiting into issuing a report on the positives of medicaid is it because you've captured more business more members in the in the medicaid space i think medicaid is a more important program than it's ever been in certainly seventy million plus americans in the program fifty five million in medicaid managed care plans and some of the most innovative things happening in the health insurance space are happening in medicaid as plans are trying to address social determinants of health and how do we address needs related to transportation food you know access to care and i think the report really drives home that medicaid is working for a lot of people and they're actually getting more care access to preventive treatments certainly way more than if you're uninsured and we think that that's a good thing and it's on the same level as the commercial market and there has been this long perception that medicaid is inferior and.

medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Look guys i know there are some good v eight facilities out there but in general the quality of care at the va is way below par way below that then than what the average a civilian out there with any means can get me think about that we get l look government run health care guys all right i want you to imagine i want you to envision a country full of va facilities what's that look like to you is that what you want america eight five five six four to fifty six hundred is that what you want 'cause 'cause i can tell you assure i'm standing here this is where we're headed va quality of care for everybody medicaid quality of care new study what new study came out today the study out of oregon people on medicaid have similar health income a outcomes then people who are completely uninsured so people who have no coverage it all their health outcomes are every bit as good as people on medicaid or majan everybody in america on medicaid i mean medicaid corrupt medicaid 's broke medicaid dangerous your odds of dying on medicaid are a hell of.

america medicaid oregon