36 Burst results for "Medicaid"

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Steve Trevelise

Steve Trevelise

02:07 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Steve Trevelise

"So I'm thinking that, um Kidney sale should be perfectly legal. What made them illegal Was Al Gore in 1984 the national organ transplant, and there's absolutely no logic to it because the biggest crime of all is 13 people a day die waiting for kidneys. Rich, poor black white. They all die waiting for kidneys. And the last caller didn't seem to understand that if more kidneys are available because they're for sale, rather than for donation. Insurance would cover it. Medicaid recovered Medicare would cover it, and it's far cheaper in the long run. Tau have kidney sales because people who wait You know, for 34 years to get a donated kidney Well, they have to undergo dialysis and medication and hospitalizations, so it's very, very expensive. If So you're saying it be cheaper for the insurance company to get the kid? They then to keep paying for all that? I got it. Okay, Absolutely. And another thing is it infringes on your liberty? So you know, the liberals love to say that it's my body. My choice when you're talking about killing a baby in the womb, But when it really is your body, your choice with a piece of your body that you want to sell. How can you make a law that says, I can't sell a portion of my body. If I want you. It's my body. And right now there's a thriving market for hair. Right. Women get Herrick engines and wigs and things. There you go, right? And you could sell that Same thing with blood. Same thing with sperm. Same thing with eggs. You can rent the room. So, yeah, I mean, it's it should be your decision, and I'll see why the government or what? Right. The government has to tell you that you can't do it, Greg. Thanks for the call to New Jersey one a 1.51 802 831 on 1.5 Should New Jersey residents Be allowed to sell their organs for profit. There's a man in Oakland was suing the federal government to be able to do it. You've got 4000 people in New Jersey the desperately need transplants. This is national Donate Life month. I think it should happen. Where you Theresa. Jason, I got room for you..

Greg Jason Oakland Theresa 34 Years 1984 Al Gore 4000 People New Jersey 1.51 802 831 13 People A Day Medicaid Medicare 1.5
Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

Outcomes Rocket

02:25 min | 22 hrs ago

Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

"Today i have the privilege of hosting the fantastic josh commander. He's a co founder and ceo and president of ao. He's just doing an phenomenal job. At the company it's a full-service non emergency medical transportation brokerage designed specifically for healthcare vail uses technology to better manage and emt which is the the non emergency medical transportation and emt benefits for medicaid and medicare programs state governments and managed care organizations today. We're going to be covering this in doing some good learning with josh so suggests such a pleasure to have you here on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much. Beat your soul. Appreciate it absolutely josh. Before we get into baeau near company. Talk to us a little bit about why you're inspired to work. In healthcare. i started. I can walk with cla. Health really healthcare family. My my dad was a family. Physicians now retired out a registered nurse. And that was older brother going into medicine while but definitely was part of it was kind of part of my family's culture going up and you know really part of our core values in to the people that i respect the most roller my parents. My dad's asser never ending cluster desired. Really improve the human condition and show compassion. I personally was drawn to. The clinical aspects of health care is always been more of attack nerd and i love technology and inventing things. When i was a kid ended up going into computer engineering studying software design but always wanted to figure out how to prevent things to make the world a better place and as it happens by career really took me in this direction to really build a better any md at her a healthcare logistics system to really improve the healthcare system or work to improve a part of the healthcare system. Statically and so. I'm just thrilled that this company point my career in thinking about how we make the healthcare system work smarter proved human condition. improve lives. proud comes on. I think also systemically. I'm just excited Run this collision course of healthcare costs in our country. And i think more. I've learned about it and studied it and i think really the only way out of it has to make our system work more efficiently work smarter and i think this is one area in will be called population health or social determinants. That that really inspires me to make the system work better for

Josh Medicaid CLA Medicare
Vaccine withheld from hospital that gave Trump Tower shots

Chicago Tonight

03:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Vaccine withheld from hospital that gave Trump Tower shots

"Have to move on to this bombshell story. That blocked club first reported this week. Loretto hospital in austin before we get into all the impropriety here today. They said that they are reprimanding their coo and their ceo for these improper. Vaccinations kelly bauer. Do we know what reprimand means. In this case. I have to to politicians who are on the hospital's board of directors. And all they would say at the time was that we put out this statement. We're not going to elaborate on rep. What it means to reprimand so we are still trying to figure that out and see what could be happening to the ceo coo. Okay so the first story that you published here was that they the coo. Dr notion med has an apartment in trump tower about two and a half million dollar apartment and the hospital. That has these vaccinations for folks on the west side. Improperly administered vaccinations to trump tower employees. Is there any evidence of some sort of trade-off or exchange or how how this came to be well. We spoke to leto hospital and their ceo. George miller says that it was actually him who helped set up this event but what we found is that right or workers at trump tower told residents that it was loretto hospital that reached out to them now. Loretto hospital is saying that its workers who reached out to them. So it's very much a. He said she said situation. But the city's department said they are looking into it and investigating why these ineligible workers were able to get shots. Before other people and also ineligible were cook. County judges and guest preach judge that also got vaccinated. And there's some different answers onto how that happened. Even though those were not allowed in the current phase as well amanda vindicated. You look at the board of this hospital. As kelly mentioned there's to state lawmakers that sit on the board There's a state lawmaker. Camille lilly that works for the hospital. This is a hospital that gets tens of millions of dollars in reimbursements from the state's medicaid program. Is there a conflict of interest. Here that there can be this much clout on a hospital board. I mean those are certainly questions that were all asking. What sort of favors might members of the war getting terms of the vaccines employment whatnot. We're we're not saying that there is merely that these are the questions to ask in. This gets to something that we've talked about a lot as there's been a lot of corruption of course in springfield and that is that there are really lax economic interests statements conflict of interest rules in then again to place. Where have devil's advocate there. There are those who say it. Is it positive when you have. For example he state legislator employed by hospital because that brings along a expertise. This is a citizen legislature. It is technically a part time job and the reason for that being was because you want to bring in farmers dentists doctors people with all different sorts of knowledge so there are certainly two sides to that point but given kelly's reporting the trump tower. I think that's what it is. It's just it's it's the who got it because these are. There's a lot to look into here and kelly bars. You mentioned that the city's health department is investigating. They've halted vaccinations to that hospital. What do you anticipate. They're going to uncover in their probe. Well we've heard from multiple sources and people questioning why workers at trump tower who are able to get vaccinated and not other hotel workers now. We've also seen that. The ceo's church was able to get vaccinated. This doctor arwady. The head of the city's health department said today that they are investigating they will not be sending doses to loretto hospital until they are confident. Those doses are going to be appropriately.

Trump Tower Loretto Hospital Kelly Bauer Dr Notion Med Leto Hospital Camille Lilly George Miller Austin West Side Kelly Amanda Springfield Health Department
Medicaid incentive so far not enough to sway holdout states

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Medicaid incentive so far not enough to sway holdout states

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting states that chose not to expand Medicaid don't seem swayed by incentives of the new coronavirus relief package and enticement included in the new coronavirus relief bill passed by Congress and signed by president Joe Biden offers an increase in the federal government share of costs in the regular Medicaid program the bump would last two years for states joining Medicaid expansion but an Associated Press survey of top Republican lawmakers in the twelve states that have held out fines they aren't changing course Medicaid which is jointly funded by the federal government and the states provides health care coverage for low income Americans according to the Kaiser family foundation in the twelve states that haven't expanded Medicaid there are about two point two million people whose incomes fall below the poverty line Mike Crossey out Washington

Mike Rossi President Joe Biden Federal Government Congress Associated Press Kaiser Family Foundation Mike Crossey Washington
Making broadband more affordable

Talking Tech

01:55 min | Last month

Making broadband more affordable

"If you're listening to this you likely know that broadband has played a major part in your life last year amid the coronavirus pandemic people went to work online school online and visited relatives. Remotely that is true but there is some good news congressman fcc. The federal communications commission have recognized that broadband access equal across the country. Whether it's having the funds to pay for connectivity or just lack of high speed access period right now the fcc creating a program called the emergency broadband benefit program which offers a fifty dollar monthly discount for broadband services. So you get the discount off your bill. And that goes up to seventy five dollars if you live on tribal lands and also i one time discount of up to one hundred dollars for a computer. A tablet purchased through a participating provider. There's one discount per eligible household. What's ineligible household. You might ask. Well includes those who are currently on the lifeline program which helps low income. Americans purchase cell phone and broadband access and others. Like those on medicaid or usher assistance program or the school lunch program. You can find out more about eligibility and the program in my story on tech usa today dot com or you can go to fcc dot gov and search for emergency broadband benefit program. People are supposed to be able to apply for that next month. In the meantime congress look into extend the funding for that program and also attack. What's called the digital divide by expanding high speed broadband access to currently unserved and underserved areas in the us. It's part of a ninety four billion dollars proposal. That democratic sponsors congressman. Jim clyburn of south carolina and senator amy klobuchar of minnesota they hope will become part of president biden's infrastructure plan. It's called the accessible affordable internet for all act and we'll be tracking its progress in the days to come on tech dot. Usa today dot com.

FCC Jim Clyburn Senator Amy Klobuchar Congress President Biden South Carolina Minnesota United States Usa Today
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo again refuses to resign

The Young Turks

08:37 min | Last month

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo again refuses to resign

"Have been moving fast. In governor cuomo's ever expanding set of scandals of the past forty eight hours from the news that his office apparently reached out to a number of different former employees to see if they'd spoken to The first accuser which seems weird an intimidating and it turns out that a former aide says that it was in fact intimidating and she felt bewildered by it to yesterday during an emergency meeting and state assembly announcing is going to be Starting an impeachment inquiry involving both the allegations of sexual harassment and assault as well as the nursing death scandal to about forty percent of his entire parties members in the assembly in the senate signing on asking for him to immediately resign and then there was this morning when representative alexandria ocasio. Cortez tweeted that after two accounts of sexual assault four counts of harassment. The attorney general's investigation. Finding the governor's admitted nursing home data from the legislature in public saying we agree with the fifty five plus members of new york state legislature. That the governor must resign. There was a letter that she put out with congressman bowman then at least eleven of the democratic house representatives from new york called for him to resign and just including jerry nadler button adler by the way and then just as we were going live. Senators schumer and gillibrand both also said that. His time for the governor to resign. As of this afternoon he said that he would would not which is what they always say until they do but he seems like a fighter jank for. What do you think is he. Is he gonna stick around no matter how many people tell them if biden gets involved yeah. I'm really curious what you think. Francesca there's one part of this tournament so that's already interesting of they. There's nothing that i'm talking about. In regards to andrew cuomo he's establishment democrat extraordinary. and he. he's been wrong on so many issues. and he's attacked progressives and good meaning people in behind the scenes a thousand different ways and a he's a political apparatchik extraordinarily now he's claiming like oh i'm just a regular joe. Your name is cuomo governor governor. Don't pretend you're one of us okay. You're an ultimate insider. Any use insider system to attack all of your opponents. You've done it for decades and and as anna keeps pointing out rightfully so the guy caught four hundred million dollars for medicaid actually overall customer is slated to be two and a half billion dollars to talk about of doing it in the middle of the pandemic delayed for after the pandemic but some of the cuts had already that he had done was the reason why they didn't have enough hospital beds and that's why he then took. Two people from the hospital was put in in the nursing homes and then everybody died nursing homes and so for all those reasons he already was a terrible governor from a perspective of people who i was gonna say progresses but really anybody critique of him is correct is my point sexual harassment issue. The only thing i have here is that. And that's why i'm curious. Were both of you guys. Think about it part of me thinks okay yes. Let's go through. The process like seles. Allegation is groping. If that's if that's true that's he should be gone within the minute right. So that's not an that's not a question. The question is how are these. Six six is a lot on the other hand. If you remember al franken it had piled up to be a big number but every one of them was like a fake picture. We took her picture once and put his hand around my shoulder and they were like. Oh levitin mike though. That's not eleven right. That's let's have an investigation so there is a part of me that says is you know. Do we have a. We sure that these are all true. One hundred percent. We can act on it and i get the other point. Which is they all. Have to be one hundred percent true. There's six of them. It looks like we've got an obvious pattern here. So francesca what are you. Oh yeah no. There's when this first broke weeks ago. I was like i've never been more sure that there was a giant iceberg underneath this very very tiny little tip that we're seeing sticking out of the water. You knew the goal and just it's it's his. I don't know. I'm not trying to be anti talion as someone like. Don't don't go to the mafias a brand new things but like the guy in clearly in exactly all the reason that you said in the ways it. He's bullied around his political opponents for years in the ways that he is so trump being in that he's got an gotten everything from his father and then also in the cavalier ways because some of these incidents were while he was rising to stardom. Which i gotta say man. It's been real fun to watch him fall as someone who was never on board for the rise who was look. It's a doing the absolute bare minimum the absolute bare minimum thing. You should do believing in science locking locking things down even though. I don't even think he did that. Amazing of a job. Yes i said it like. It's been nice to watch like. Oh here's the real cuomo and and like it's funny to me that there are so many cuomo's around this country there are so many sort of middling mediocre like kind legacy politicians dynastic politicians. who escaped by they. They assault a couple people. They bully their opponents but they kind of then. Then they get applauded. They come out with a book and they're fine. But i feel like the meteoric rise that he had under covert and the way that he laid into it so much just set him. He set himself up. It's like you could have just the way that trump could have been absolutely fine. Just doing cameos on home alone. Five or whatever it was and then he had to go and run for president And now we're looking at his taxes. So look here's my thing about resignation. I feel like it's a little bit of an escape hatch. And i think for when it comes to actually having investigation actually and as painful it as it is like having the people came forward to testify or discuss it absolutely like not or at least have an investigation. I don't know what it would look like. it feels. There would be more accountability. And i think that so many creeps and so many predators getaway in the workplace because there's no accountability to begin with so i'm not even sure if immediate resignation is accountability. Do do you know what i'm saying. Yeah i actually francesca. I love that point in that gets the another problem in the political system. So cuomo keep saying. I you know i wanted attorney general to do. Finish the investigation as letitia james and if we all believed that our democracy was on the level and politicians warn politicians. I'd say definitely finished investigation. Because i wanted to if he did it and we get it then that gives us closure as opposed to well. He's resigning you to deny it forever. Because then they won't bother finishing the investigation et cetera. Right but the problem is i. Don't trust politicians so is cuomo part of the reason cuomo's doing because he wants to delay it and then he thinks if i can just delayed thousand other political maneuvers to avoid it and the and then he keeps saying he wants so much that i a wonder is fisher. James doesn't look like a political ally of cuomo based on her previous experience right but one if she is something we don't and then they a bs investigation. Those women took you know suffer a second injustice so you think yeah and i just think it's important to mention though that like the investigation of sexual assault or harassment claim. Is it so hard because it is always a. He said she said type of situation. Which is why we have. Things like the slogan survivors right And believe women which because you have predators who will always deny it. I do not foresee a future in which andrew cuomo admits. Anything that i can be sure of. We might hear more about the stories from the from the staffers and the and the people who were he victimized but i do not foresee him being. I guess i remember doing that. No it's not gonna happen so again. I just want set that up that it's not a fair you're never gonna get to the truth kind of thing.

Cuomo Alexandria Ocasio Congressman Bowman Democratic House Jerry Nadler Legislature Assembly Levitin Gillibrand Andrew Cuomo New York Cortez Schumer Adler Francesca Biden
 'Obamacare' boost easy for some, but others face paperwork

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last month

'Obamacare' boost easy for some, but others face paperwork

"The new code relief bill signed by the president will bring changes to the affordable Care Act but many subscribers will have to submit new paperwork to get the benefits a summary released by the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services says president Biden's obamacare expansion will reduce costs for new customers those already enrolled in the program people who become unemployed this year and it may help many whose incomes were too high to previously qualify for subsidies starting April first under a special enrollment period people who sign up will automatically get the benefit of higher subsidies authorized by Congress with the reduction of about fifty dollars a month per person for the nine million plus already getting subsidies they'll have to log on to health care dot gov after April first to get their discounts or wait until tax time twenty twenty two to claim a bigger tax credits Jackie Quinn Washington

President Biden Centers For Medicare And Medic Congress Jackie Quinn Washington
Justices call off arguments over Medicaid work requirements

Sean Hannity

00:22 sec | Last month

Justices call off arguments over Medicaid work requirements

"Arguments over a Trump administration plan to remake Medicaid by requiring recipients to work. Agreeing to a request from the Biden administration. The court had been scheduled to take up the issue on March 29th. But the Biden administration already has decided preliminarily that work requirements do not fit with Medicaid's goal of providing health care to lower income people. On Wall Street that

Biden Administration Trump Administration Medicaid
Federal officials say most indoor nursing home visits can resume

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Federal officials say most indoor nursing home visits can resume

"It's another sign that the nation might be just turning the corner here during the pandemic roughly AH, year after it started the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, relaxing guidelines on nursing home visits. The new guidance says outdoor visits are still preferred, even when a resident and love one or fully vaccinated, But it encourages such facilities to allow indoor visits at all times and for all residents, except in a few circumstances Now, those circumstances include when a resident has not Been immunized and lives in a facility were fewer than 70% of residents are fully vaccinated. And when the nursing home is in an area with high

Centers For Medicare And Medic
Inside Biden’s $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Bill

Quick News Daily Podcast

03:31 min | Last month

Inside Biden’s $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Bill

"Start right there with a pass of that. Covid stimulus bill in the senate on saturday night. I do need to preface this by saying it does have to pass the house again because there were some changes made by the senate so it's not passed into law just yet but we'll go for what this bill will include when it goes through the house and i'm going to try my best to sound like i'm not rattling off just a bunch of dollar amounts but there's a danger. It might sound like that but just bear with me. There might be something in there that would be useful for you. Your family someone. So for helping the unemployed it extends that three hundred dollars a week plus the state unemployment end it makes the first ten thousand two hundred dollars of that non taxable for households making less than a hundred and fifty thousand dollars it also fully funds cobra. Health insurance premiums so that employees who have been laid off can remain on their employer plan for free. There's also going to be another round of checks fourteen hundred dollars for a single taxpayer. Twenty eight hundred couples indy. Get fourteen hundred dollars per dependent now the starts to taper off at seventy five thousand for individuals or one hundred and fifty thousand dollars for couples ended completely gets phased out at eighty thousand dollars for a single tax payer and one hundred and sixty thousand dollars for a couple it gives state and local governments three hundred fifty billion dollars to cover expenses related to covid through twenty twenty four gives schools one hundred and thirty billion for k. Through twelve in forty billion dollars for colleges and that's to help them reopen safely so parents can get back to work for businesses. they'll be twenty five billion dollars going to restaurants and bars. This max out at ten million dollars per company in five million dollars per location additionally there will be seven point two five billion for the paycheck protection program once again forty. Six billion dollars will be going to state local and federal governments to help with testing and contact tracing as well as fourteen billion dollars to help speed up. The vaccine distribution for healthcare there will be financial assistance for aca affordable care act premiums and this is just looking to get the number of people covered by insurance to increase into further incentivize. The south to expand medicaid since they're sort of the holdouts town there. The republicans are blocking that there are also increases in tax breaks to parents who have kids up to three thousand dollars per kid if their age six to seventeen and thirty six hundred dollars per kid if they're under six years old and that spread out over the twelve months according to analysis this plus the fourteen hundred dollar check would cut the number of kids in poverty by more than half. In addition there's changes to the earned income tax credit for this year in extends to people without children. And if you're looking for how much that would be for low to moderate income folks. It'll be somewhere between five hundred and forty three dollars in one thousand five hundred and two dollars. Lastly in the rental and homeowner category it gives thirty billion dollars to help low income and unemployed folks afford rent and utilities and at the state level states and tribes get ten billion dollars per homeowners. So all in all. I think thing that really struck me. Was this tweet that i saw saying that. Isn't it kind of crazy. That biden asked for a one point nine trillion dollar stimulus deal and he got a one point nine trillion dollar stimulus deal like i think that makes biden a pretty good politician. One of the main criticisms of obama was at he started out by compromising with republicans and gave them the compromise offer in the first place instead of starting out high. You can't say that for biden so far in this could be a sign of good things to come but like. I said they're hoping that this gets signed into law by the end of the week after the house passes it sometime this week.

Senate ACA
Obamacare would get a big (and quiet) overhaul in the Covid relief bill

5 Things

02:38 min | Last month

Obamacare would get a big (and quiet) overhaul in the Covid relief bill

"The covid nineteen relief bill. That passed the house on saturday and is now making its way through. The senate includes an expansion of the affordable care act health care legislation. It would be the first significant expansion of the aca also known as obamacare since it passed in two thousand ten white house correspondent marine groppy reports. This would primarily helped people in two ways. One is for the first time people who are making more than four times. The federal poverty level will become eligible for help paying their premiums so for example if a sixty four year old woman is making fifty thousand dollars. Right now she's not eligible for help but under the law for the next two years she could get subsidies that could make her premium dropped from about thirteen thousand dollars a year to just about five thousand dollars a year. Secondly people who make one hundred and fifty percent of the federal poverty line could get additional subsidy help they already qualify now but the extra help would allow them to buy plans without premiums that have much lower deductibles than what they can afford right. Now there's also incentives in the bill to For the twelve states that have not expanded medicaid under the aca to give them extra money in hopes that they will do so to cover people below poverty in their states who don't currently qualify for medicaid. These changes that are in. The bill are expected to stay in the question for whether they become law is whether the entire bill passes. It's not expect to get much. If any republican support. The democrats need to stay united in order to pass the legislation and get it to president biden's desk and these are provisions that he has promised he has supported and once in there and he's expected to sign the bill into law go relief plan which also includes fourteen hundred dollar checks too many americans and more could enter. Its final stretch on wednesday. Senators may begin. Twenty hours of debate on the measure. That's expected to come to a vote later in the week. Majority leader senator chuck schumer said tuesday. That democrats have sorted through disagreements and now have their eyes set on the deals. Final details senate. Democrats are committed to passing the american rescue plan to crush the virus. Recover our economy and deliver help to americans who need it the most. We're on track to send the american rescue plan to the president's desk before the expiration of the enhanced unemployment benefit which occurs on march fourteenth. I expect a hardy debate. I expect some late nights on the floor. The bill could become law as soon as next week

Marine Groppy ACA Senate President Biden White House Senator Chuck Schumer
Democrats Are Committed To Increasing the Federal Minimum Wage

WBZ Midday News

00:23 sec | Last month

Democrats Are Committed To Increasing the Federal Minimum Wage

"Democrats are committed to increasing the federal minimum wage. The House speaker says a current lowest legal wage amounts to quote an exploitation of the American worker, and it is a cost to taxpayers because the minimum wage workers Need food and housing assistance, and many are on Medicaid. This is corporate welfare. The nearly $2 trillion covert

House
New enrollment window opens for health insurance shoppers

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

New enrollment window opens for health insurance shoppers

"I'm Julie Walker a sign up window is now open for government health insurance markets and runs through may fifteenth in most states it's available for anyone uninsured or even those stuck in a bad plan after taking office president Biden ordered government health insurance markets that ended in Roman in December to re open people can get help from the government to buy coverage depending on their income however those who have lost their jobs and have no income may qualify for Medicaid remember the culvert vaccines are free so no matter what you don't need insurance for that but coverage could offer protection against medical bills that stem from cove a treatment or any other illness or injury

Julie Walker Biden
Biden administration to undo Medicaid work requirements

Pacifica Evening News

01:16 min | 2 months ago

Biden administration to undo Medicaid work requirements

"They Biden administration is moving to roll back Medicaid work requirements in this latest effort to undo a controversial trump era policy. Federal health officials plan today to inform 10 states that they would revote permissions granted by the Trump administration to impose such requirements. That's according to a Biden official is spoke on condition of anonymity. Officials were also set to withdraw the past administrations invitation for states. To apply for approval for work requirements. The move, which was first reported by the Wall Street general, follows an executive order Biden signed last month that directed officials to review and remove barriers to Medicaid coverage. Medicaid is, say $600 billion federal state program that covers about 70 million people from pregnant women and newborns to disabled people and elderly nursing home residents. Under the Obama era Affordable Care Act, states gained the option of expanding the program. Too many low income adults previously ineligible. More than 12. Million people have gained coverage. As a

Biden Administration Trump Administration Biden Barack Obama
Jonathan Metzl on what's driving polarization in a post-Trump America  and how to fix it

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

03:47 min | 2 months ago

Jonathan Metzl on what's driving polarization in a post-Trump America and how to fix it

"Jonathan mezzo welcome. Back to the podcast. Third time i'm a regular honored to be back so the second time you're on it was to put the response to covid into context and why people were not taking the please wearing masks seriously. Now we're after the election. When eighty one million people voted for joe biden and seventy four million people voted for donald trump. ten million more than voted for him in two thousand sixteen. And so i've been dying to talk to you. Because there's there's a conversation to be had in this country right now About how do we move forward when we have a split like this in our country. And i want to start the conversation by actually going backwards for those who have not listened to the first our first conversation about your book dying of whiteness. Just in a thumbnail. Because i know you know how you can do it. Talk about why wrote dying of whiteness. And the important message that you're getting across in that book sure absolutely will. Dying of whiteness is a book that i started actually before trump became president and kind of tracks the the rise of of trump in in in where i live tennessee kentucky. I'm also from kansas city so kansas and missouri and what i saw was the rise of kind of politics on one hand promised to make america great again but did so on the billy on the lifespans of everybody including its own supporters. So what i did in the book. Is i just tracked the rise of kind of anti immigrant anti government pro gun politics in in the rural midwest. And i'm a. I'm a physician also so i applied to public health plans and i asked the question. What happens if the politicians you vote for block for example medicaid expansion in your own state or undermine the on the public school system that your kids go to or make it very easy for anybody to get again with no background check and i really just tell the story of how the policies that were supposed to make america great again and did in some ideological ways ended up being as dangerous for rural white people in the in the midwest and south as best as or not wearing seatbelts in their car or secondhand smoke they literally became disease risk factors the actual policies that shortened lifespans of many lower income people including white supporters. So in the book. I talk about how those particular politics and up shortening white lifespans by anywhere from a month to a couple of years in some instances and i go around and really ask people why is it. Why are you supporting policies. That are so bad for your health and your lifespan. And i come up with a bunch of different answers but one is that the investment in this idea of what it means to be white as being on top of a particular hierarchy that has to keep everybody else down ends up being a kind of Siren call for people that causes them to really forget all the other tenants of of what we might. Otherwise think of as so interest and creates kind polarizing rhetoric of us versus them that propels support for these politics even when they're killing their own supporters.

Jonathan Mezzo Joe Biden Donald Trump Midwest America Kansas City Kentucky Tennessee Missouri Kansas
Biden’s Health Care Moves

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Biden’s Health Care Moves

"Making moves to shore up Obamacare story in the affordable Care act and restoring the Medicaid to the way it was before Trump became president, he says, access to affordable health care is critical is the pandemic continues because of

Donald Trump
Biden executive action reopens Affordable Care Act enrollment amid pandemic

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Biden executive action reopens Affordable Care Act enrollment amid pandemic

"To sign two executive orders basically the best way to describe it to undo the damage Trump has done President Joe Biden today, opening a special window so more Americans who want to get healthcare coverage can do so through the affordable care act. And the president also ended another trump order relating to Medicaid. ABC is Andy Field joins us on the co Moh news line with details of these new executive orders and Andy. They might be new orders. But the president saying that he's not doing anything new, explain what he means by that? Yeah, it's exactly what was in place when he and President Obama left office. What he basically said in the sound that you just played. Is that he's undoing What President Trump did, which was make things a lot harder. For example, with the affordable Care act, President Trump Shrunk this down to six weeks that you could sign up for these health care. Cooperatives that you could get into and then buy insurance. But in this case, Joe Biden is now expanding it Now from February, 15 to May 15th. It's gonna be a three month enrollment plan for healthcare dot gov. Go on there and sign up just like you used to. It means more to people now because a lot of folks who had insurance through their employer no longer have any insurance at all. And what the Trump administration did was Preclude you from getting it even from healthcare dot gov because they shrunk the enrollment time, so President Biden is just basically bringing that back. He's taking steps. To undo some of the things that Trump administration did with Medicaid sign ups to make it tougher for you to do that. There's also some health care information and this really doesn't affect Americans as much as it does for people overseas. In terms of federal money going to organizations that may have some connection with reproductive health and abortion funding overseas, and he's cutting rid of those restrictions as well. So These are things that basically it's almost bookkeeping for President Biden to get things back to when he was vice president. Certainly, things

President Joe Biden Andy Field President Trump Trump Administration President Biden ABC Andy President Obama Joe Biden
Biden opens sign-up window for uninsured in time of COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Biden opens sign-up window for uninsured in time of COVID-19

"As the virus pandemic rages president Biden has ordered government health insurance markets to reopen for a special sign up window the president says he's simply undoing the damage done by his predecessor who had refused to direct the health care dot gov insurance markets to take new applications from uninsured Americans for subsidized benefits that we're doing here other than restoring the affordable Care Act and restoring the Medicaid to the way it was before trump became president under the executive order at the three month enrollment period will open next month the president signed another order reversing a policy that bars taxpayer funding for international health care nonprofits that promote or provide abortions Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Sager Mag Ani Washington
Biden reopening Obamacare enrollment during pandemic

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Biden reopening Obamacare enrollment during pandemic

"Ago, President Biden today you signing an executive order to strengthen the Affordable Care act and Medicaid in particular by opening Ah special enrollment period amid the pandemic under the order The Department of Health and Human Services will open a three month enrollment period on healthcare dot gov. That let more Americans sign up for

President Biden Department Of Health And Human
"medicaid" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"She is trying to make sure that this program persists and is available for those really vulnerable Americans people who can't go out and get jobs or people who may be joined the program when they could have shopped around for private insurance instead and her belief is that to save Medicaid. Some people should be off Medicaid. So there's this other storyline that runs alongside a lot of these policy. Changes THAT SEEMA. Verma is trying to enact and it's really about power when we heard that policy rule out it was announced by Verma but she was on stage with her boss. Alex as are the head of HHS How would you describe the two of their relationship? What what is a synonym for frosty Or cordial on the surface and Stabbing knives behind the scenes. Politico wrote a story my my colleagues and I Adam Cancun and Russian proton rose to a couple of months ago about the seething tensions behind the scenes in trump's health department alexy's our he's the he'll secretary. He's the cabinet official. He is nominally. The boss but Seema Verma. She has her own giant portfolio her own one trillion dollar budget and while she technically reports as she has her own relationships in the White House and the two of them spent a good portion of last year. Trying to unseat the other trying to win favor with the president and that meant one of them. Owning PART OF DONALD TRUMP'S HEALTHCARE PORTFOLIO. Trying trying to deliver on his drug pricing agenda. That's what Alex as really leading. And then Seema Verma took on the Obamacare repeal effort but booth Verma and as our didn't necessarily support the other one's efforts and instead looked for ways to get the other person out of office she's also had a few bumps of her own Would you reported on some stories broke about Spending and spending on consultants or trying to get tax payer reimbursements for things. Tell me about that about a year ago. My colleague Adam Cameron and I broke the story. That Seema Verma had spent a couple of million dollars on publicity consultants. It's not unusual for the federal government to hire consultants government. Does it all the time? And the government does hire people to do ads their ads for obamacare their ads for Medicare you might see them on. Tv on the side of a bus. That's not unusual but was unusual. Was that Seema. Verma had brought in either people that she had tried to hire in the federal government but hadn't been able to so instead they became consultants working with her at highly paid salaries and she also brought in people who worked on her personal. Pr COMING UP WITH A campaign to get her invited to high profile events in healthcare Get her featured in magazines like Glamour. These are things that I can't remember it all my time covering healthcare for a decade. I can't remember another government official having a personal. Pr Team paid for by taxpayers. And some of these things would have happened anyway. I mean she is one of the most important people in healthcare. You don't need a personal. Pr Team to get you invited to healthcare events but some of the things that she was seeking like these high-profile speaking opportunities outside healthcare. That might have been where. Pr Campaign could have been helpful. The irony is also not lost lizzy that that even as Seema Verma has pushed new requirements on low income patients. She commissioned publicity campaign using taxpayer money and sought government insurance for her own. Needs to the reason I'm asking you. This is not just sort of about other stories and what you've reported but also her political viability. This is a president after all who likes to see. His officials look effective. Look strong not be hit repeatedly in the press as as he would say it so I guess I think about her political capital. Where does she stand in the trump administration? Now that's a fascinating question. President trump from from all of our understanding like Seema Verma. He thinks she's tough. She has taken blows in public in closed. Door meetings and push back. He likes that. He likes fighters he also likes that frankly. She's a woman of color in a Republican administration that lacks people of both. She's arguably one of one of two or three most prominent women of color that the trump administration has hired so she has her champions inside the administration. I think her scandals of last year. This publicity campaign Which led to Congressional Investigations? And there's an ongoing inspector general probe That weakened her position there was some fear that Inspector General Will still come back in the in the next couple of weeks and say. Seema Verma was an honest Congress about how she was spending taxpayer money on on publicity and there were also rivals of hers people who supported her boss. Alex as our and thought that she was trying to undermine him and that she should go because she's insubordinate it's a volatile situation but I would say that as of February of an election year it would be very difficult for the trump administration to ouster and have someone ready to replace her. Where do you see her? Push to change Medicaid going from here. Her two biggest initiatives were work requirements. Which have been blocked by the courts and this new block grant initiative. That is going to be blocked by the courts so there is still an effort to see those through but a realistic understanding that. It's not going to happen this year. This first term of President Trump Seema Verma has done a lot of other things around Medicaid. They get less attention but might end up being even more impactful. She's talked a lot about Medicaid spending too much money on ineligible and rules. That people shouldn't be getting Medicaid are signing up in states like California. New York aren't doing enough to screen. Who's getting coverage? She wants to crack down on that. That could lead to a lot of people in those states losing coverage she also has proposed. Something wonky I I will be honest. It's it's Wonky even for me. But called the Medicaid Fiscal Accountability Rule. And that complicated policy could really constrain. How states are spending money and could lead to further tightening of the Medicaid purse-strings. So a program that that really grew under the Obama Administration Medicaid has has shrunk in different ways under trump and under Seema Verma. There's this politically tricky thing though. About what Verma. And the trump administration are trying to do on the one hand trying to scale back. Medicaid is a longtime conservative goal. Something the administration's allies really want but on the other hand Medicaid is popular. It's a program that polls extremely well not only in blue states but with the passing of the affordable care act in red states to it has been extremely popular in states. That expanded the Medicaid Program. Governor John Bel Edwards in Louisiana. He's a democrat. He ran on a promise to expand Medicaid. Four hundred thousand people signed up within the first year so closer to home in Virginia was a major issue in the most. Recent governor's race there so yes. Medicaid is driving people to the polls major issue in these purple states or even red states at the same time. Donald Trump has walked away from a promise he made during his presidential campaign back in two thousand fifteen twenty. Sixteen a promise. He made to protect Medicaid. The most recent state of the Union Donald Trump did not say he was gonNA protect Medicaid. Yeah singled out. Social Security and Medicare did not mention Medicaid similarly the moves that Seema Verma has made and allowed for these are moves that objectively would be interpreted as cutting Medicaid and while I think the trump administration is is conscious of this challenge. They are going to message it by saying look we. We have stabilized the broader healthcare market. And we're letting states do what they want for their programs were getting the federal government out of calling the shots and if a republican state wants to change its Medicaid program. More power to them. Is there any worry? On the part of the trump administration or National Republicans that these moves to go after reshape Medicaid could push voters toward Democrats. There's so much fear that Donald Trump is going to lose on the healthcare issue. This fall I. It's an fear that that he shared. We wrote a story a couple of weeks ago about president trump seeing some polling that he's behind Democrats on healthcare. He was in the middle of a meeting called up health secretary. Alex Cesar to yell at him about. Are they doing everything they can to make him a stronger candidate on healthcare issues and Republicans are calculating? Is If if they talk less about obamacare and less about Medicaid and less about Medicare but more about things like donald trump is fighting opioids. Donald Trump is spending a lot of money to fight. Hiv to change. How people with kidney disease get cared for like all of these public health initiatives if donald trump can seem strong on that they will win some share of the healthcare vote. I think that remains to be seen through a lot of Americans who like those things but they're really worried about losing their health. Insurance and Democrats completely have that issue on their side.

President Trump Seema Verma Medicaid DONALD TRUMP Medicaid Program Alex Cesar Seema president President official secretary Politico HHS White House Medicare National Republicans Obama Administration Adam Cancun
"medicaid" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on What A Day

"The trump administration is proposing something called a healthy adults opportunity. We're going to get into what that is but I can. We reflect on the name for a second year. I feel like the more positive adverbs or adjectives are in a name the more you I need to be worried that if you would actually click on a link that had that name you would wind up in a bathtub full of ice with no kidneys a few days later. Oh definitely definitely. This was one of the phrases that was sent in that. NBS Jeff bezos group chat before he got hacked exactly you you will get hacked either literally or figuratively. Yeah but in all seriousness. This is a new Medicaid plan unveiled by the trump administration yesterday. Gideon can you tell us more about it. Yeah so the new plan. It doesn't mention hacking hacking but it is effectively. Another effort from the administration to Rollback Medicaid benefits. That's the top line on it. And we pointed this out on a recent episode on Social Security Security but President trump promised not to do any of this as he campaign for the presidency that he was an Orthodox. Republican candidate wasn't going to touch any of these benefits. Fits that people like. Here's an example of that. In Two thousand fifteen save Medicare Medicaid and social security without cuts have have to do it. Get rid of the fraud. Get rid of the waste and abuse but save it. People have been paying for years and now many of these candidates want to cut it. Wow a man who has cheated on three wives and broken. Every promise he's ever made is breaking a promise. I mean you know. Color me shocked but it besides the the hypocrisy angle. I mean the the broader thing is what this plan is actually allowing to happen and it involves accepting accepting applications from states that want to set up a Medicaid block grant now that has been a long held conservative goal in theory it was applied for welfare benefits in the one thousand nine hundred and the result could be giving states the option of reducing healthcare benefits for people who gained their coverage from the affordable. Care Act now now once this is the first state actually takes the plunge on this. It's probably going to prompt legal challenges. So this is basically the Republican Mo at this point. They're going to keep trying trying to give people something they don't want over and over and over again until they get it. Can you explain how this particular bad idea works. Yeah I can but I I wanted to explain how how Medicaid currently works or funded historically Medicaid has provided unlimited matching payments from the federal government to states based on what they spend providing for for the poor so states receive as much federal funding as it takes to cover fifty to seventy seven percent of the cost of the Medicaid population that includes pregnant women and kids the elderly disabled and then for those that are covered under expansion which is through the ACA the federal government contributes about ninety percent so under who that framework states can also choose to add additional benefits and as enrollment rises or spending rises naturally. Things that would change. Under these circumstances the federal government can match the money that they are giving as those things occur. Okay so matching for every good tweet. I get from a nicest area listener. I get another tweet from a man who is displeased with me and by extension all women the duality of humanity right there in a very insular reference. But I think it works under this new plan though. According to New York Times a state would use a formula to figure out in advance. How much plans to spend on its adult or expansion Medicaid population poppulation in a year? Then they would get a fixed federal share that is based on said formula. Now the problem becomes what if more people people become eligible for Medicaid because of an economic downturn or recession or something else of that sort what happens if costs go up because some people in the state have more expensive medicine and so on and so forth but Seema Verma the head of Medicaid and Medicare so that the program would quote allow adjustments if this is the case but on space advocates think that the plan has serious issues giving states an option to participate in a program that might result in people getting less healthcare. Yeah who's the craven puppy kicker. That's GonNa take them up on that. The winner of that puppy kicking prize is governor. Kevin still the Republican of Oklahoma. He said that he wanted to do it. And he was there for the announcement of this plan. And the interesting thing that has happened with Medicaid and typically red states recently Oklahoma's an example main main Idaho Utah and Nebraska others is that ballot measures have passed with voters saying they want to expand medicaid. Like this is a popular thing and they see other other states doing it and they're like why are leaders in the state not taking them up on it so this new program could be a way out of that scenario for people people like me who don't want to follow the measure and a block grant basically is allowing these states much more leeway on how they WANNA use federal dollars in who they want to give them to so the Republican argument on all. This is while it'll it'll get rid of wasteful spending. Do not worry like we're GONNA cut down on all of this but what ends up happening bening when you create these sort of conditions for things like Medicaid is you impose burdensome requirements that could end up kicking people off and examples of that hat or like the work requirement. That was in Arkansas in places like Oklahoma where they didn't expand medicaid. If they take this block grant option they actually could inevitably ably end up with more people covered under Medicaid. Ironically because they were starting at such a low point and then they're gonNA turn around people like sit and say this is a huge win for us us look like all the people that didn't have healthcare are now insured but at the end of the day it is still less than what they would have gotten under Medicaid expansion and the big big question in all of that is how the states are actually going to end up spending these Medicaid dollars when they get them. You know. I'm maybe a town simpleton. A feckless farmhand cheese-eating eating country mouse so negative. I've got a bad brain but even I understand the messaging differences that could result here in an election year. Democrats like healthcare and want to give more of it two more people and Republicans are saying if you're poor proved to me why you deserve that insulin. That's basically it I mean that's in a nutshell when you take what people have said stack it against each other. Those are the two sides of of this conversation and the block grant plans specifically was a feature feature of those ACA repeal efforts that failed in Congress and like the beginning of the trump administration so after that happens now now the administration is trying to make this happen in an executive format and it's already getting pushback of course from members of Congress like House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for one so yeah in essence that what what else are we supposed to surmise from. These continued efforts other than that is what Republicans are trying to do so. This effort will likely face legal challenges. And we'll keep you updated on those as well as anything else administration is doing to try and sabotage healthcare..

Medicaid Jeff bezos federal government Oklahoma ACA Gideon New York Times trump fraud Congress Nancy Pelosi President bening Arkansas Kevin Seema Verma Idaho
"medicaid" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Me and now that this is not necessarily helping Fixed the cost Medicaid. which is you know to be fair? A huge burden on on the system educated isn't working properly. It's very expensive to maintain pain but this isn't a solution to me at least one. That's working. Well I'm in the same boat as you which I don't understand the government's motive for doing this. This doesn't seem to make families safer. It doesn't seem to make families stronger and it seems like the people who are most impacted by this. Are People like you said who are. I'm doing everything right. They've worked hard enough to get that little piece of the middle-class American dream and the effects like the word that you used there. The effects of this seemed to be very punitive. Is there a solution to any of this. Do you have any ideas on how we can get ourselves out of this. Because I can't Imagine Agean anybody listening to this as like well. This sounds like a good system. I think most people are going to be like. Oh yeah this is not this is not okay. Yeah I think it spiraled out of control even from what it was initially intended to do. I think states have gotten more and more aggressive in terms of what they collect during after more and more and I think we've lost touch with even what was originally intended to be in even that wouldn't agree with but I wonder if the solution will be less about overturning. The particular law in this policy more about reforming the healthcare system overall. I'm not sure that some states have had success in reforming this law. For Example Sixteen California passed really important legislation that dramatically reduced what the government can recoup from PA families on Medicaid and they can only recover very limited set of assets now so it can work state by State Minnesota also had some legislation nations some people after the ACA was passed in Medicaid expanded. Some state said that will will no longer stay. Recovery's reads for people who are on the expanded medications. Many of them didn't know when they were getting on at. This was a was a policy but in terms of the future. I think the Democrats aren't really talking about Democrats are talking about expanding the ACA or between Medicare for all I think Bernie Sanders is the only candidate who who has a with explicitly said in his Medicare for all plan that he would abolish state recovery as part of his plan. I knew that it was warranted. Also against recovery. Although I don't know if she mentioned explicitly in her Medicare for all plan I think if there actually was medicare for all this would be rendered moot because it wouldn't and have medicaid anymore short of that if we go into more of an expanded eighth. EA or we don't know we don't know whether this would be someone. One would have to kind of abolish this mandate and I'm not sure people are really talking about that on the federal level at this point. It's incredible it's just absolutely incredible. You've you have taught me so much and I'm positive that our listeners are going to get a lot out of it one of the things. I think they're going to get out of it is that they need to talk to their elected elected officials and find out how this impacts them how they can protect themselves and how we can get rid of this nonsense altogether because I think visiting this on on poor people people regardless of the intention as you said the effect is is not good and the fact that it's only recovering one percent just shows that it's not even working. Yeah what the government actually would coops. Compared to what they spend on Medicaid and compared to what they spend on a lot of other things frankly that benefit wealthier wealthier groups of individuals. You know so for the federal government is not a lot of people. The family that affects it can be like changing. I couldn't agree more. Thank you so much for agreeing to be on the show. Where can our listeners find you? What's your website? I understand that you have a book out. Please tell us where to learn more about Rachel. Yeah well I have a book very different subject about the artist Rodin and in the poet writer Maria Rilke but if you have any listen is interested in art there. They definitely find that. It's called me maintains your life and I have a website. It's Rachel he'll Dash Corbett dot com again. Thank you so much for being here. It has been enlightening. You're very welcome and thank you to our listeners. Who are here remember? Please like us on social media shares everywhere. Give us as many stars hearts bullets as you can and use your words and tell people while you like the show and remember you can get one week of free convenient affordable private online counseling anytime.

federal government Medicaid Rachel Bernie Sanders ACA Maria Rilke Rodin Medicare California PA Minnesota writer
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Primarily read zooey can't be there's no the universe in which your livelihood is like getting medicaid right and i think that's part of the reason that during the late nineties during who knows <hes> economic reform period medicaid was actually kind of divorced from <hes> the other you know assistance programs <hes> <hes> that helps low income families and so you know i always view medicaid as its health insurance and we should treat it as such <hes> and you you know imposing work requirements <hes> it was unprecedented. <hes> you know actually during the last year of the obama administration <hes> carr's the federal agency that oversees medicaid <hes> denied work requirements in arizona and new hampshire saying going back to the to the beginning that work requirements don't further the objectives of the medicaid program which is the standard under which you know the feds have to review medicaid waiver proposals muscles but so then this is even if it doesn't generate extra employment it does save money right. I mean if if if if eighteen thousand people in arkansas wind up losing medicaid benefits <hes> whether that's because they're not working because paperwork problems because of whatever ride like that's a that's a savings on the state budget yes but that's eighteen thousand people that no longer have coverage and so when you talk to maybe hospitals and doctors. They're now having to treat people that no longer have insurance so they're uncompensated. Care costs are going to rise so it's just going somewhere else. The system meaning that the hospitals and doctors are going to have to eat it because no one has coverage anymore and just to just to be clear on this because we were starting my talking. What about the sort of benny universes of medicaid. This is four adults set the set the stage here this is for the expansion adults also those adults without kids <hes> that make up to seventeen thousand dollars a year and so and that helps explain like what is this list of states right these he is our <hes> kentucky arkansas in particular right are very politically conservative states that unlike many of the other conservative states actually did the medicaid expansion right because i think sometimes you know you can hear oh..

arkansas zooey obama benny carr new hampshire arizona kentucky seventeen thousand dollars
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Women. You're saying a more progressive state will have a higher income cutoff to try to make sure that you have fewest possible uninsured children right. I mean there's also really good evidence that shows that kids covered by medicaid when they're in during childhood are more likely to graduate high school more likely to graduate college. <hes> have better health as adults <hes> more likely to have a better paying king job pay more in taxes so there's benefits into as you were saying making sure that kids in pregnant women have the coverage. They need as one of the sort of stylized facts. It's about health insurance in the universe is that covering children is on average relatively cheap bright. Obviously there are some children with very very serious in healthcare needs but typically when we talk about giving healthcare coverage to a child we're talking about doing and you'll check up send vaccines and giving them vision tasks ask and it's stuff that it has a lot of benefits but isn't necessarily a like super cost right. It's kind of a cheap investment if you if you will you make sure kids have the vaccine so they're not getting you know measles. <hes> have the glasses that they need so they can read and <hes> and that's just gonna make them healthier <hes> adults that are able to go to college and get a good paying job and so it's kind of a cheap investment in their long-term development development but that's not what the expansion debate is about. That's about a child. I guess it doesn't matter if you have the child or not. It's just you're an adult. I mean so many benefits right like housing assistance food assistance. If you wanna help children you have to give it out family level but medical care care where you can actually pay for the kids doctor visits but not mom and dad right exactly and so. I think that's what was so amazing with. The affordable care act act is that it was actually if you wanna think about it the first kind of step towards universal coverage we were laying down the framework for covering <hes> you know every low low-income american through medicaid <hes> and unfortunately you know we still have a little ways to go with those fourteen states that need to expand to it's fourteen states and that includes texas and florida are the big strike that's right and so that's like a how do you know how much of the uninsured population in the u._s. is accounted for by the survey lack of medicaid expansion with those scissors two million people that would gain coverage <hes> if states would <hes> <hes> expand medicaid and <hes> florida and texas make up the majority of those folks routed so so that's the the the big thing there okay <hes> so then what's this the peace with the elderly and long-term care because so far we're describing. It's a program program for low income. People covers more children in some states. It's now covering for adults but like what's what's up with the old folk. Yeah i think just to kind of take a step. Ah also a should've mentioned earlier. The way i think about medicaid is it's <hes> provides coverage at every stage of life right. We talked about kids. You know when you're pregnant when you get coverage..

texas florida
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"<hes> you get eligible for it by being old and it's the same where we you go right right so medicaid is not like the whole point of this waivers conversations. Medicaid is not like that so how how's it setup yeah. There's an <hes> an average around around in the medicaid <hes> walks fear is <hes> saying that <hes> if you've seen one medicaid program you've seen one medicaid program so there's two guarantees with medicaid. I'm you mentioned that it's a joint federal state partnership. I'm the i guarantee is coverage. So if you're eligible for it you get it <hes> for states <hes> they're guaranteed federal dollars so that's kind of the the to guarantee prong if you will with medicaid the fence set up a core standard word benefit package and a standard eligiblity kind of rubric that states have to follow okay <hes> but within that states have a lot of options to design <hes> there are programs that best fits the needs of their state so you can be more or less generous in terms of your benefits also more or less generous in terms of your eligibility right but there is a floor and that's the that's what you have to meet in order to get your your what we call the federal match which is a portion of medicaid spending that the fed's kicking butt on but the reason you might be i mean i guess there's more than one reason you might be more generous than the minimum but like you would get more matching federal dollars if you contributed more state dollars not necessarily i mean the way that the formula set annually in space is get between fifty and seventy six percent of the of the costs <hes> but what you would get more is if you covered more people like medicaid expansion athena. You'd see more more federal dollars if you added a new eligibility group for example okay. So what kind of variants like do we see in in in practice like what's a what's a generous state looking like in terms of coverage right like like who who is eligible in a in a sort of a big expansion stayed versus narrow one sheriff so <hes> you know in now with the affordable care act <hes> every state has the option to expand medicaid to adults. It's up to one hundred and thirty eight percent poverty in plain english that seventeen thousand dollars a year. Unfortunately you know there's fourteen states. That haven't taken that up. I'm a district resident so i'm going to say that include d._c. And my count here so if you're counting there's fifty one states so thirty seven states have expanded medicaid indicate so far so since the enactment of the affordable care act i think when you look at a more progressive state that's expanded eligibility. You have to look at the kids and pregnant women and generally they are are at a higher income level than <hes>. You know kind of like the moderate level income commodore okay so so this is like classic u._s. Welfare policy design children are maybe held blameless for the economic circumstances in which they i find themselves so the program has traditionally covered a wider scope of of children than it has of adults and then pregnant women are at a sort of. I don't know how you want to put it but you know it's it's like an interface between children and adults right. There's like understanding that if you wanna take care of kids you have to take take care of their mothers while they're pregnant. That's right so what kind of <hes> like what was the what was the history of how how did that come in well as you said when the program started in nineteen sixty five it really focused on you know kids <hes> low income families like moms but then expanded to to pregnant women in higher income pregnant women is kind of over the years how things have have progressed <hes> and you know they get.

medicaid fed seventeen thousand dollars thirty eight percent seventy six percent
"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Boys mondays at nine pm only h._b._o. Sarah cliff is no no longer with us on the weeds. So i've been really missing the opportunity to sort of monk out about healthcare. I was really excited to sit down with jessica shoot from the center on budget and policy priorities. She's an expert on medicaid a really important weeds friendly healthcare program that there are a lot of changes happening to a in the pera really great conversation. I think you could learn a lot. Ah hello welcome to episode of the weeds on the blacks media podcast network. I'm too lazy as my guest. Today is jessica. She is a senior policy. Analyst at the center on budget and policy priorities favorite thing tank mine a lot of great stuff out there and <hes> doesn't go focuses on medicaid <hes> which is a a very important program and is going to explain it all to us. It's been big. You know the the trump administration has done a lot on medicaid waivers things things like that. That's what i want to talk about but i think it's important for people to understand like what. What are we even talking about here. So i'm going to ask like it like a really basic question a book. What is medicaid. I'm happy to answer that so just to make sure everybody knows. Medicaid is the health insurance program for low income mm people so i run establish that right off the gecko. It's different from medicare which is the program for the elderly and so- medicaid covers over seventy five million people. I don't think people realize that half of half of the population is actually kids. <hes> and another important <hes> factoid of medicaid is that it's the primary payer for long term services and supports so when your grandparents are in the nursing home they are on medicaid <hes> i'm as i was talking a little bit earlier when my grandmother was in the nursing home as she swore up and down that she wasn't on medicaid but <hes> actually medicaid covers as long term care and that's that's what's called the dual eligible population right. That's right yeah for yeah you for the elderly folks folks can be both medicare eligible also medicaid eligible but so so medicaid <hes> comes into existence in the mid six at the same time as medicare. They don't just have some more names. That's right. They share the same birthday which actually we celebrated last year. They're fifty four years old <hes> and <hes> initially it was created on really. They targeted for low income americans. I'm and as we've seen over the course of its history. There's been kind of mini coverage expansions along along the way <hes> you know kids coverage in medicaid was slightly expanded then we went to pregnant women parents and then with the affordable care act now adults else right so so the way medicare works. It's like there's a federal program..

Medicaid medicare Sarah cliff jessica Analyst fifty four years
"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Reimbursement methodologies for drugs, pretty high cost drugs hepatitis C, the things that are really driving state budgets, to get to make the, they're going to have to pay the price. Right. But to be able to build a value based system to build a system, that's based on outcomes to allow them to manage a small way. What is in ever increasing share of their budget? And the last thing I would say and you know, lot of conversation about flexibility in this administration, not as much talked about, or at least reported on, I would say is the opposite side of that which is the accountability that the administration and CMS has been building around Medicaid. Whether it's the guidance that has been issued around and the drive toward. Requiring states to have more robust evaluations of their eleven fifteen waiver demonstrations and using that information as we make decisions on renewals going forward or things like the Medicaid scorecard, which sort of is in its infancy. It was one eight A ration-. It's going to continue to grow, but much like the nursing home, compare hospital compare becomes a way for stakeholders to understand how states are operating their, their programs, given that CMS does so much. And there are so many different policies. You just mentioned a few. Do you ever feel like the policies are in conflict? So, for instance, rural health, I heard Seema Verma your former boss about a week ago, talk about rural health and maternal mortality and the importance of lowering maternal deaths after pregnancy. There's a lot of evidence that coverage and access to coverage helps save lives. And yet this administration is pulling back on coverage. How do you reconcile when the policies are seemingly in conflict? Well, I. In that in that respect. Right. The coverage aspects of Medicaid are, are Terry. Right. The, the way the supreme court decision came down in the way, the Affordable Care Act is now interpreted states, have the, the ability to make termination as to whether or not they're going to expand coverage under Medicaid. And this administration has made it very clear that they're going to defer to states decisions and states decisions about what's best for their states. And so in that case, I think managing through understanding that those are mature, there are issues with maternal mortality that can be addressed on a whole number of fronts..

Medicaid Seema Verma Terry
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"What's interesting about this is that from an ideological speck of perspective that liberals want to create a safety net, Medicaid is an important liberal institution. It was the biggest accomplishment. It seems to me the expansion of Medicaid was probably the single biggest achievement by the Obama administration specifically within the context of of the ACA that Medicaid expansion was probably the the most important part of it. Although I think there's an argument about the patient protections broadly speaking, but that is at Sittard a liberal solution to this problem, right? We're going to have a we're gonna we're gonna make sure that that we have a a safety net for people, but the efficacy of that safety net is. Inhibited by that perspective and not making it a universal program. Right. Because the idea is almost like the way it's I mean, I hate to use this as an analogy. But it's the way they hid bad mortgages right ones that we're were had more had more risk, which is you put it in bigger tranches, and it's harder to get at those. So if the idea is that, you know, Medicaid was setup specifically as a separate program for Medicare. So that you could cut it really, right and diminish the the the benefits for essentially, people of color and bra and more broadly people living in poverty, the ideas, you make a universal program, and those people are made safer that the the the the liberal the liberal agenda is more fulfilled with a more socialistic for lack of a better word universal program. Right. I mean, this is the best. Argument for universal healthcare. It seems to me in terms of the poor because it protects that that that portion of the population as much if not more than any because they're more susceptible to getting their their their benefits cut. Yeah. I mean, this is a classic bait. I'm on people who are trying to figure out how to help the most needy with social policy target to them, which often is much more politically feasible because it's less costly. Or do we try to create universal programs that cover everyone, which is more politically sustainable because you can't isolate the the poor people's programs and try to, you know, pick them off one by one, and it's a classic and difficult dilemma, you know, I think that a kind of universal approach to health policy is is preferred is better. And is you know, it's a more sort of effective for filming of of the kind of liberal vision. It's one way of thinking about it. But it's it's be more. You know, a more effective and more compelling fulfillment of what should be everyone's vision for Americans. We have to be as healthy as poss-. People on that are equitable. You know, a lot of people just don't realize that. What state you live in? What race you are how much money you make these are things that will determine your access to benefits that essentially decide whether you could live or die. I don't actually think that even people who understand those many at least to be Republicans with would say that. That's right. Could actually think of a moral grounding for that sort of policy designed I can't fathom what the moral grounding is there are kind of fiscal and practical grounds, right? We don't want to you know, spend this much money, but the moral grounds for the arbitrariness of the whole system, even for many people who are doing everything, right and working hard just happen to live in the wrong state. And so I think that there's a liberal case to make I think that there's a human case to make and I focus on Medicaid in my research because Medicaid is the institution we have. And so let's think about how. To make it the best. We can. But you know, in the in the sort of backdrop for me as always let's think about how to build new institutions that are more inclusive more equitable and more politically, and economically sustainable, and that that will mean looking beyond Medicaid and looking to universal system Jamila mission or the book is fragmented democracy, Medicaid, federalism, and unequal politics. Thanks so much for your time today. Really? Appreciate it. Thank you Sam. All right, folks..

Medicaid ACA Obama administration Medicare
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"But that's not the way that that. That it appears to work when it comes to Medicaid part of the reason because you know, people get alienated they get discouraged, and they get sent very specific messages that they then listen to this. Right. I mean, if you're poor you deserve to be poor, you're irrelevant. And here is we're going to cut your Medicaid, just to remind you of all those things that we've been trying to signal to you for decades if not longer, and so how much do you think how much do you think? Well, I guess I have two questions about about about your date at one is how much you think there have been politicians who are aware of this dynamic, if not, you know, so specifically in terms of qualitative sense, but they had a an intuition, or they had anecdotal sort of evidence of this, a how much do you think that the case be are you worried that you know, I'm running for governor in Kentucky. This is I know what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna I'm gonna you know, or or, you know, running for reelect the way for me to do that cut benefits that's going to work for me to different ways. Right. It's going to suppress the vote in some areas. And it's going to probably I'm going to get. I'm gonna get you know, appreciation from from people who don't like people of color, you know, getting, you know, Medicaid phones, or whatever it is that they think that they're getting I mean, how much do you worry about those dynamics? Obviously the second one. You're an academic. You're you're I understand the mission is to is to bring out the truth. But I just wonder how much you think this information has been or or will be weaponized. I I do about that. I think two things I think the two questions are related. I don't think that some too many sort of political folks. This is anything new right? I think that there's an intuition about these sorts of things that comes from the the the clear evidence, right? That for example, they could kick hundreds of thousands of people off, Medicaid in Tennessee and the next election that governor stays in power. Right. And so we, you know, there's lots of evidence over time that people can take pretty kinda harsh turn against programs like, Medicaid and not necessarily suffer any consequences politically. And so I think in to this -ly or in some way, a lot of elected officials probably suspect this, right? I also think that that the folks who wanna take these benefits away would wanna take them away whether or not it was going to be a political. Bust or boon for them. Right. So they're likely going to behave the same way, whether they know this or not it makes them a little bit more glee knowing this, right? But what I focused on more and one of the things that I try to think about as I you know, when I think about who to take this research to disseminate it to is focused on the way, we can use information. Like this for good, right? I think for any research that is produced there are people who can misuse it. Who can weaponize it? And there are people who can use it for good. And I think part of what I try to do is think about you know, what does this mean they're organizations out there that that mobilize and support Medicaid beneficiaries? It's great for them to know this and to have a sense that one of the ways they can be supporting Medicaid beneficiaries is politically right. Not just providing them with economic resources, but thinking about helping them registered to vote and helping them to be aware of political issues. I've talked to you know, and spoken with hospital association. Primary. Care providers, all sorts of folks who say, wow, we never thought about Medicaid in these political terms, and this shapes the way that we want to approach our patients or clients going forward. So I try to think about who can use this for good to offset the efforts that are already going to be made to to dampen these folks voices. No is it seems to me the answer to how I mean..

Medicaid Kentucky Tennessee
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"To me are folks who are living in poverty, and they're just we know from lots of research from decades research that they're less likely to participate in the political process because there are all sorts of barriers. And so I wasn't terribly surprised about that. But there was a part of me that also wanted to know Medicated self has anything to do with it is it about that that nature and the characteristics of the people who are on Medicaid things like poverty, or is there more to it. And what I found was that there were more to there was more to it. And and I found that by both by looking beeper into quantitative date into survey data and thinking about how to control for things like poverty, and lots of the things that we know are with it. And one of the things that I did. For example, is that I looked at a survey called the fragile families and child wellbeing survey that has nearly ten thousand people and many of them over fifty percent of them are Medicare beneficiaries. So I have lots of a sort of large sample to consider. And I looked at people who who took that survey who are Medicaid beneficiaries and people who were not, but who were very similar to each other in many other ways, they were similar in terms of their level of poverty. They were similar in terms of their race similar in terms of many aspects of their life circumstance, and what I found was that this relationship between Medicaid and not participating in politics as much not voting and not engaging and other ways, you know, didn't go away, right? As a result of so, you know, the the folks who were Medicaid beneficiaries when compared to their counterparts who were similar. And many many other ways we're still less likely to vote even though the only observable difference between them was being a Medicaid beneficiary. Then what I did was I started talking to a lot of Medicaid beneficiaries, check out lie with this D is something about Medicaid, and what they told me again, and again in many different ways, and I talked to beneficiaries from across the country is that there may give experiences with Medicaid did affect the way that they thought about government and politics and their willingness and desire to participate in politics. One of the things that the kind of fragmented nature of Medicaid, like we've been talking about that it's different in different places, you know, Medicare beneficiaries know this very well. They're the ones who told this in and brought the sort of the the theme of this book to light from me because they talk about how, you know, their parents and other states or their brothers and other states on Medicaid had one thing and they had another. Or they talked about how much Medicaid changed over time that five years ago, they make they were able to get benefits that they couldn't get now or they talked about how they went across. They moved a lightly across the border to a different state and figured out. They couldn't get something that was hugely important or that they thought about moving and when they research to make sure they'd be able to get life saving benefits in other states. They found out it wouldn't. And this sends a really clear message. It sends a message that says your value is not your value in your needs aren't anything that will be responded to on account of you being a member of this broader political community, or is it a citizen of the country. It depends on what state you live in and on how that state feels like treating you. And sometimes the pencil county you live in what neighborhood you live in the kind of experience you have with the program, the kind of access you have to hospitals doctors benefits, and this kind of motley mix. Of contingencies people feel it in their everyday life. And they know what it means. They know that they're the kind of people who aren't guaranteed anything who aren't protected even for this most basic set of health benefit and people read those messages, and they feed those messages into their calculations about whether they should bother taking part in the political system whether their voices are important, and we'll be heard in responded to and for.

Medicaid Medicare fifty percent five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"So, you know, it's it's impossible even for me to out all of the the kind of racial threats that that can be woven when we think about, Medicaid and health policy more generally is just ubiquitous it's always there. We've talked on this program decent amount with with folks who have written extensively on just the the the premises. Social security also being highly racial. Is. And so yeah. Thirty five years later, I guess when they're doing Medicare and Medicaid. It's you know, what was old is new again. And and so on in fact, also I'm also struck that when we often talk about Medicaid, and we talk about Medicaid cuts. The most salient political rhetoric is usually the one that gets the most traction is often the statistic that two thirds of our elderly who are in nursing homes are there because of Medicaid, so people spend, you know, as you get older, obviously, you have less assets you at one point run out of money, and you must go into a nursing home you become eligible for Medicaid. You get sort of like shuttled from Medicare, Medicaid, and then you're in a nursing home and Medicaid is paying for it. And that ends up being a big political talking point because. You know of the the way that we have a structure around the narrative around I guess the morality of of being poor in this country or living in poverty, I should say. So all right. Well, let's talk about to research that you've done. What are the implications? From a on the for for this fragmentation on its recipients perspective on government because one of the things that we also have heard is if you are on Medicaid. And one would think it would be different. But it's not you are less likely to vote part of that is a function of poverty makes it harder to though in many respects. But is there more to it? And that. Yes. There's there's more to it than that. So when I first started looking at some data, initially, it was it was quantitative data was survey data, and I saw this large pattern Medicaid beneficiaries being less likely to vote. And it makes perfect sense..

Medicaid Medicare Thirty five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"If you have a dental problem because those things proprietary vision, those are optional and states can decide whether they want to offer those things to any of their Medicaid beneficiaries, or whether they want to offer them to all of them, and they have lots and lots of leeway of discretion. Now, there are some states that haven't expanded, Medicaid, and in those non-expansion states, they're still fourteen states that haven't adopted the expansion in those states, you can be very very poor many of those states and not qualify for Medicaid. If for example, you're childless adult. Or even if you're an adult with children, in some cases in the states that have expanded Medicaid to the other thirty seven speech, everyone who lives at one thirty three or below the poverty line eligible. But even those states, whether you've expanded are not state still get to make really specific choices about what they'll cover and what they'll not they won't all states have to cover some basic suite of of things. But then all states also have a ton more choice in terms of what they provide. And what they don't know. My understanding has always been that that the reason why we would not want from the perspective of someone who wants as many people as possible covered by health insurance. The reason why we would not want the federal government to block grant money to the states would be that it would there that that one the the? Rate in which the increase of healthcare would not be covered. And that to the state could use it could could redirect money like how what what is the relationship between the money that the federal government makes available and the state. So when you say the state says like we will not cover podiatrist, for instance, is that are they are they getting the same amount of money per potential recipient as another state that may offer dietary, and they simply decide we're gonna we're gonna put it on respiratory stuff as opposed to podiatrist. I mean, how does that work? How how does the money what how does the state restrict in that fashion? Yes. So you know, what? Medicaid in terms of the funding, you know, the federal government allocates, our matches a certain amount of money, and it varies across states that it depends on how much the state spending. It also depends on on the states themselves, for example, in high how high poverty is in the states in a number of other factors, but the federal government essentially will cover there's a kind of it's called the federal medical assistance percentage, the s map multiplier, but it's the kind of the percentage that the federal government uses and determines that they will match and cover of all that this needs spend. So, you know, states have to make decisions because it is true. True that the more that they spend the more that the federal government will cover for them. But then they're last covering the remaining percentage of the cost for Medicaid beneficiaries. So that, you know, the less they spend total less their leftover percentages. And you know, how much that percentages varies from state to state, and so has to make pretty complicated decisions about how much they can afford to spend and how much they're currently spending. You know, the thing about about the real challenge with block grants is that you know, states right now, you know, treat, Medicaid as Medicaid is. It's really an entitlement. So states have a lot of decisions to make about who's eligible and who's not. But once they make decisions about who's eligible every single person in that state who's eligible gets the benefit. And that's because no matter how much the state spend, the state can decide everybody's l. Eligible below this certain amount. And right now that amount is one thirty three. So even the states that have the most generous eligible eligibility requirements. They decide we're going to be generous. The federal government will match that up until the place where they say they will which is one thirty three. And so those states can be really generous, and they can count on the federal government to to match their share to cover the share that they said that they will..

federal government Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"When someone's in the nursing home, the payout cannot be longer than your life expectancy. Oh, so that it can be shorter but not longer. So in this case, if it's already paying out, and it's going to continue to pay out for his entire life. Can't do it. Okay. It's gotta be a term certain amount of time to pay out in that term certain amount is dictated based on a table equal to the age in which you buy the annuity at that time. In the nursing home, right again, you have to be the nursing. In the nursing home. But we also know that this is another way you'll know that it's not a Medicaid annuity because you're buying it one. You're not in the nursing home in to paying out, right? It can't possibly figure out an any unless they picked the term certain to equal the life expectancy of the individual, then fine. But even then it wouldn't work because it's gotta be termed certain based on the life expectancy on the day. You go into the nursing home got it. That's why you know, you can't do it. So whether it pays out for the wife or doesn't pay for the wife has no bearing on whether it's Medicaid annuity or not. But, but I I guess I can tell you that that when you do have Medicaid annuity, usually the state is the next in line after a spouse. But right, assuming the state is next in line, and then the kids so I don't think it would be able to pay out to the spouse. And first of all you would never as a community spouse by Medicaid annuity. I'm sorry. As a six spouse. She would never buy the Medicaid annuity. You would always have your healthy spouse by the name. Yeah. So this would never work. This is definitely not a Medicaid annuity. Okay. Good advice there folks, if you are in a situation where you have someone going the nursing home. Maybe they're already in there. And you're writing those giant checks every month. Please pick up the phone and get some advice because.

Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Can't get out of the station despite all of the policy support that you just mentioned has a hip lost juice on capitol hill i don't think so i don't think so i mean i we are as relevant today as we've ever been in terms of representing the entirety of the industry we represent whether it's people in the commercial market medicaid managed care we do more in medicaid in particular and we think about you know the repeal and replace effort our our efforts around medicaid medicare advantage i mean people come to us because they want to know what the insurers think and that's as true today as it's ever been a hip just a few weeks ago put out a report counting the benefits of medicaid and saying that some of the literature medicaid is not helpful coverage program is is misleading and kind of back story if you were in my seat reading that report i was thinking gosh this has been a talking point against the aca for years that some people think some conservatives think medicaid is worse than being uninsured why is a hip waiting into issuing a report on the positives of medicaid is it because you've captured more business more members in the in the medicaid space i think medicaid is a more important program than it's ever been in certainly seventy million plus americans in the program fifty five million in medicaid managed care plans and some of the most innovative things happening in the health insurance space are happening in medicaid as plans are trying to address social determinants of health and how do we address needs related to transportation food you know access to care and i think the report really drives home that medicaid is working for a lot of people and they're actually getting more care access to preventive treatments certainly way more than if you're uninsured and we think that that's a good thing and it's on the same level as the commercial market and there has been this long perception that medicaid is inferior and.

medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Look guys i know there are some good v eight facilities out there but in general the quality of care at the va is way below par way below that then than what the average a civilian out there with any means can get me think about that we get l look government run health care guys all right i want you to imagine i want you to envision a country full of va facilities what's that look like to you is that what you want america eight five five six four to fifty six hundred is that what you want 'cause 'cause i can tell you assure i'm standing here this is where we're headed va quality of care for everybody medicaid quality of care new study what new study came out today the study out of oregon people on medicaid have similar health income a outcomes then people who are completely uninsured so people who have no coverage it all their health outcomes are every bit as good as people on medicaid or majan everybody in america on medicaid i mean medicaid corrupt medicaid 's broke medicaid dangerous your odds of dying on medicaid are a hell of.

america medicaid oregon
"medicaid" Discussed on Decode DC

Decode DC

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Decode DC

"Okayokayso to wrap up i mean it seems to me that this is like from a big picture perspective this is sort of the republican point of view and they're trying to implement that the question is a ami right in beaconthey do it sure so i do think that's fair and in the two to take that 30000' view something that's important understand about this bill is you know it didn't have to make all the changes to medicaid that it did you know this was supposed to be an obamacare repeal and replace bill and really the only thing in obamacare that affects medicaid is medicaid expansion which admittedly is a a big part of the law like i said at the outset it's covered about half the people who have gotten coverage through obamacare but the the the additional things you know those provisions that we just ran through um the spending caps on the program those are much more about a a kind of conservative vision of what the federal government should do andyouknowrepublicans would argue that medicaid is not sustainable financially over the long term and so these changes that they want to make would reduce costs and make the programme more viable financially over the next few decades and they just you know they they they don't want out of control entitlement programs that's obviously you know just sort of an overarching republican and conservative belief and medicaid is one of our largest entitlement programs and so they have taken this opportunity in this healthcare bill that kind of originated out of a desire to repeal and replace obamacare to also make all these other changes to medicaid to make the programme more in line with just how they think government programs should operate so yeah ii do think there is a it's interesting youknowthemedicaid piece of this bill while you know opponents would argue it's it's sort of unnecessary thisisa lot of these things have nothing to do with obamacare they're also kind of the most kennettum philosophically coherent pieces of the bill from a conservative perspective because these are changes that republicans have wanted to make medicaid for a long time and they saw this legislation as their chance.

beaconthey obamacare federal government andyouknowrepublicans medicaid coherent 30000