36 Burst results for "Medicaid"

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

Thom Hartmann Program

00:46 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "medicaid" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

"Taking your calls on a national progressive town hall meeting Stephanie and Kankakee Illinois you are on the air with representative comment Look I got a specific thing I want to bring up my husband just passed away this Tuesday I'm sorry to hear that Stephanie I'm on a fish income It's kind of cost me almost $2000 just for a basic relation Is there any way that we can put in Medicare for people to pay money as people are dying from COVID People are dying because they can't get to the hospital because hospitals are full And when people are saying you know let's sacrifice grandma for the economy They're not understanding that I got to pay for grandma's funeral We got children losing both parents So I gotta pay for those shows And a lot of people are out of work or they can even $15 an hour it's not gonna take care of any family So what can we do to have Medicaid Medicare or some type of benefit to help people pay for people who have die And with that how does that even gonna be more death because of COVID and people not wanting to you know listen Thank you Steven.

Stephanie Kankakee Illinois Medicare Medicaid Medicare Grandma Steven
Nursing homes can now lift most COVID restrictions on visits

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nursing homes can now lift most COVID restrictions on visits

"Government regulators are now telling nursing homes to allow visitors in easing many of the pandemic restrictions on one hand families and staff members are being told to keep up their guard against future cobit outbreaks but new guidance from the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services is instructing nursing homes to allow visits at all times for all residents facilities will no longer be able to limit the frequency or length of visits were required vamps scheduling the only exception is if a visitor has Kobe at nineteen or is under a quarantine order the pandemic took a mighty told a nursing home residents who accounted for roughly three in ten deaths and those who suffered from being isolated Jackie Quinn Washington

Centers For Medicare And Medic Kobe Jackie Quinn Washington
 States challenge Biden's vaccine mandate for health workers

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

States challenge Biden's vaccine mandate for health workers

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting states challenge of federal vaccine mandate for health workers ten states have filed a lawsuit against the federal government to try to block a covert nineteen vaccine requirement for health care workers that scheduled to take effect January fourth the lawsuit was filed in federal court in Missouri it contends the vaccine requirement from the federal centers for Medicare and Medicaid services is unprecedented and unreasonably broad last week CMS issued a rule requiring coal bid nineteen vaccinations for more than seventeen million workers in about seventy six thousand healthcare facilities and home health care providers that get funding from federal health programs hi Mike

Mike Rossi Federal Centers For Medicare A Federal Government Missouri CMS Mike
US mandates vaccines or tests for big companies by Jan. 4

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

US mandates vaccines or tests for big companies by Jan. 4

"Tens of millions of Americans are now facing a deadline for either being vaccinated against Kobe nineteen or getting weekly tests new government rules are now in effect for companies with one hundred or more employees covering about eighty four million people they must get vaccinated by January fourth warface weekly tests the occupational safety and health administration says companies that do not comply could be fined nearly fourteen thousand dollars per violation another seventeen million people who work in nursing homes hospitals and facilities getting money from Medicare and Medicaid have no testing option they must be vaccinated more than two dozen GOP state officials have already said they will challenge the rules Sager made Connie Washington

Occupational Safety And Health Medicare And Medicaid GOP Sager Connie Washington
Pollster Richard Baris Answers Our Virginia Questions Ahead of the Razor Tight Tuesday Election

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Pollster Richard Baris Answers Our Virginia Questions Ahead of the Razor Tight Tuesday Election

"So Richard, you are your smart, much smarter than Nate silver. I say that every time you come on and you get things right, you do a terrific job and you're the best with polling and political predictions that I've seen, and so let's talk about what's happening in Virginia. Let's just kind of let's take this piece by piece. We got about ten minutes to go through this. Where was this race 6 months ago and how and why did it develop into the tight race it is today? Yeah, I mean, even a month ago, Charlie, you know, McCall, he was former democratic governor who left supposedly with an approval rating around 54%. This should really not have been a race of Virginia is even with the current climate, Virginia is, you know, had Joe Biden one at ten points, 54 44. What really is going on in the last 8 months or so 6 months, Democrats began to erode support in Virginia and it's coming from independence. The democratic base is a little leakage there, but it really is coming from independence in third party voters who supported Democrats last November. And at the end of the day, Glenn young turned the page almost at the perfect time. And it wasn't only him he had help, but the public education issues soared to the forefront and Democrats, the whole time throughout these last few months, wanted this to be about Medicare, expansion, Medicaid expansion. Trump, amazingly. And of course, about the pandemic response. And instead, Charlie, three out of the four top issues are Republican environment issues. So jobs in the economy is number one. Taxes inflation, cost of living is number two, and now three is public education. And four is coronavirus. So it just turned up a call of all the perfect storm. You know, I turned all the political stars aligned for junk and we see he's got to lead now. He

Virginia Nate Silver Glenn Young Mccall Charlie Richard Joe Biden Medicare
Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | Last month

Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

"So you want Medicare for All. Yeah. Yet HHS is the largest civilian branch of our government. So as we have expanded Medicare as we've expanded Medicaid, it hasn't been means tested as you want. We have hundreds of thousands of desk workers that are doing the means testing. Are you qualified Medicare reimbursements? And so under your example idealistic the point is that Medicaid is a test can not have a generous social program without a massive bureaucratic and dare I say corrupt administrative state. Well, I think Woodrow Wilson would even say that. Well, you need the industry. You think I like Woodrow Wilson? The guy who probably got college professors. Well, okay. And a college president. So he's kind of in your truck world. Okay, trust me, neither of those things weren't any points for me. But I think that. That's fair. But I did Woodrow Wilson as the guy who resegregated the federal law at the federal bureaucracy after trust me. Integrated speech. Dabs in jail, nobody on the left is going to say Woodrow Wilson is a hero. Liberals. Nobody on the left. But I was just going to say I know plenty of people that would, but that's fine. I don't think you're going to find a lot of LBJ. All these people believed in a strong administration. Well, maybe you're rattled off a bunch of liberals, but that's okay. We don't need to argue about historical figures. Let's just say this. If you're talking about administrative state, bureaucracy. Well, your example is Medicaid, which is a means tested program. And even at that, even despite the means testing, which is the part that gives the bureaucrats their power, which is also the part of objected to, even despite that, we're talking about bureaucracies as I think you mentioned earlier, bureaucracy, the government has no monopoly of bureaucracy as plenty of bureaucracies in the private sector. And if you want to know which programs have the smallest overhead, right? Even Medicaid, even despite the needs tested, Medicaid, Medicare, all of those have much smaller administrative overhead that any of the private insurance companies because the private insurance companies one, they have to plan out their strategy for competing with each other. And two, the private insurance companies have a vast bureaucracy that is dedicated to finding ways to deny people's claims because they've always got one eye on the bottom line for

Woodrow Wilson Medicare HHS Dabs Government
Rep. Jim Clyburn Pushes Trillion Dollar Spending, Ignorant of Long-Term Implications

Mark Levin

01:46 min | Last month

Rep. Jim Clyburn Pushes Trillion Dollar Spending, Ignorant of Long-Term Implications

"The number three Democrat in the house was on MSL with the morning schmoe And he basically said what I've been saying he gave it up Take a listen cut 12 go So what do we need to do We need to have the child tax credit for the players We need to expand Medicaid So that people can get the help that they need And of course we need to do something about expanding Medicare But we should not do one at the expense of the other And then the other thing we need to do as I've heard on your show this morning We need to stop talking about these ten year numbers That's what got people to either whack They don't realize that when you use that 3.5 number you're talking about ten years People think in terms of budget then one two three sometimes 5 years Well let's say your house markets you don't think in terms beyond that So if you can get this discussion the focus on exactly who will be trying to do to get people back to work with our economy and moving again I think that we will get through a good place So in other words do exactly what I said they would do last week and what I've said today Play with the numbers Get these programs in place don't talk about the out ears what they're going to cost Don't even look at them do one three 5 years max just get them in place Get them in place and that way we can show a lower number So what I was talking about last week a couple of times and I'm talking about now Monday And I sure as hell hope people don't fall for this I hope mansion doesn't fall for

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona: Parents Are Not Primary Stakeholders in Children's Education

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona: Parents Are Not Primary Stakeholders in Children's Education

"The case I've been making the entire time here is that the default argument by liberals when they argue about government programs we've got to do this program We got to do tarp We have to do snap We have to do social security Medicare Medicaid expansion The default argument is that government somehow is competent and therefore it should do things you can't do yourself educate your kids take care of your own healthcare And you need to ask your liberal Friends like we're going to ask today what is the basis for that argument Do you have any evidence whatsoever government does anything right We've already demonstrated on the law enforcement front they fail here on the education front I want you to listen to education secretary cardona As he gets shredded in the inner senator Mike Braun ask them the question Hey who's primarily responsible for kids education The parents are the teachers and I want you to listen to cardona subjugate the parents to the teachers wishes Despite the fact that the public education system has entirely failed the United States for decades Check this out Do you think parents should be in charge of their child's education as the primary stakeholder I believe parents are important stakeholders but I also believe our educators have a role in determining educational programming And I think that's going to be a little out of focus what I think you're going to find across all elements of education since they pay the bills They raise the kids They probably need to be the primary spokespeople for their own kids good education Well bronze being a little more diplomatic And good for him but I'm not I don't need to be diplomatic and I don't care about being diplomatic He should have turned around and told cardona wait wait wait did you just tell me that parents aren't the primary stakeholders here responsible for their kids education

Cardona Senator Mike Braun United States
Stafford Leads Rams to Late Scores in  27-24 Win Over Colts

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Stafford Leads Rams to Late Scores in 27-24 Win Over Colts

"Matthew Stafford led two late scoring drives in Medicaid drilled the tiebreaking field goal with two twenty three remaining giving the rams a twenty seven twenty four win over the colts Stafford finished nineteen of thirty for two hundred seventy eight yards two touchdowns and one interception Cooper Kupp caught nine passes for one hundred sixty two yards and two scores for the rams indie trailed seventeen to six but went ahead twenty one seventeen on a blocked punt that was recovered by Ashton doing in the end zone colts quarterback Carson Wentz left with a right ankle injury midway through the fourth quarter and did not return I'm Dave Ferrie

Matthew Stafford Rams Cooper Kupp Colts Stafford Carson Wentz Ashton Dave Ferrie
White House Warns That Debt Limit Showdown Could Hurt States

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

White House Warns That Debt Limit Showdown Could Hurt States

"The White House is a listing states to help ratchet up pressure on Congress to increase the cap on the U. S. debt limit a White House fact sheet for state and local officials obtained by the Associated Press is warning about severe cuts to disaster relief Medicaid infrastructure grants school money and other programs president Biden has been insisting on bipartisan backing to increase the cap on the debt limit that was a crude mostly before he took office but Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has been unmoved and repeatedly says the Democrats must act on their own the nation's debt load stands at twenty eight point four trillion dollars that six trillion over the suspended debt limit that was reinstated in August the treasury department's extraordinary measures to keep the government running will be exhausted by October Jennifer king Washington

White House U. The Associated Press Congress Biden Mitch Mcconnell Senate Treasury Department Jennifer King Washington
Biden on Pace to Bring 10 Million Illegal Aliens With Open Borders

Mark Levin

01:31 min | 2 months ago

Biden on Pace to Bring 10 Million Illegal Aliens With Open Borders

"Now I want you to think about this. If Joe Biden for four years is able to keep those borders open, we're gonna have 10 million illegal aliens and four years on top of another, probably 2025 million illegal aliens. At the same time, while we're massively expanding the welfare state. Free community college, which will lead to free college. Trust me. 12 weeks of family leave. 12 weeks. Massive expansion of Medicare both the numbers of people And the benefits which is going broke in 2 to 4 years, according to the trustees, not me. What do I know? According to them Where is that going to come from? Medicaid is on its last leg. Social Security is when its last leg and we're like right now, Fox News has shown A drone. With 10,000 Haitians who have come into the country illegally under the international bridge. On the border with Texas. And there under the bridge because they have nowhere to go there in the United States. Luckily, there are Cubans. Are they thrown to the sharks in the ocean? Right, Mr Busy? If they come from Haiti. Which is half of an island. Arms wide open if you come from Cuba. You go back. Anyway, that just shows you the They disgusting cynicism of this whole thing.

Free Community College Joe Biden Medicare Fox News Mr Busy Texas United States Haiti Cuba
Can Biden Really Mandate COVID-19 Vaccines?

Can He Do That?

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Can Biden Really Mandate COVID-19 Vaccines?

"This was the most sweeping set of mandates that we've seen so far from the biden administration. This was really a step up. And the administration's fight against the pandemic. Yes mean buthe lab is a health policy reporter here at the post the most consequential one is probably his executive order telling companies with more than one hundred employees to mandate vaccines for their employees. Or else make them submit to regular testing and that rules still being crafted but the companies would be subject to some kind of fine fourteen thousand dollars per violation. It's not quite clear what that would mean yet. For whoever is not vaccinated. The other one is a stricter enforcement of his order requiring all federal employees to get vaccinated so when he first announced this at the end of july employees could either get vaccinated or do regular testing. He took that a step further and said all federal employees have to be vaccinated. There's no opt out for testing. And then the last one is requiring health care facilities that receive medicare and medicaid funding to require their workers to be vaccinated so this impacts a huge swath of the population. And i think the administration feels like this is their best shot yet to reach a bunch of the people who have still resisted vaccines now of course because this show is called. Can he do that. I have to ask you this question straightaway. How can he do this. He's using executive orders. But how much power does that really give him. So the government does seem to have this authority and most legal experts think. They're likely to prevail in any legal challenges. This executive order will face which we already know are likely to

Biden Administration Buthe Medicaid Medicare Government
Biden: Nearly 3M Get Health Coverage During COVID-19 Sign-Up

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Biden: Nearly 3M Get Health Coverage During COVID-19 Sign-Up

"The White House is touting an increase in the number of people who signed up for health care insurance over the summer president Biden says an all time high of twelve point two million people are now covered under the affordable Care Act and the Kaiser family foundation says that with most states expanding Medicaid for low income adults the two components cover about twenty seven million people by denounce the two point eight million consumers took advantage of a special six month period to sign up for private health insurance that was made more affordable under the covert nineteen relief law subsidies that kicked in an April help trim premiums by about sixty seven dollars a month by the called on Congress to do more to lower healthcare costs the next regular season sign up with the health care doc of market place starts on November first Jennifer king Washington

Kaiser Family Foundation Biden White House Congress Jennifer King Washington
Biden's Business Vaccine Mandate and the Legal Challenges It May Face

The World and Everything In It

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Biden's Business Vaccine Mandate and the Legal Challenges It May Face

"Last thursday president biden announced sweeping vaccine mandates for four categories of americans workers in private companies. That have a one hundred or more employees. Most federal workers and federal contractors teachers and staff at federal programs related to education and finally healthcare workers at facilities that receive money from medicare or medicaid. All in all the mandates cover about one hundred million american workers. If they don't comply they could face getting fired. World's sarah weinsberg reports in some respects. Rebecca wasn't all that surprised by the binding administration's new vaccine mandate she figured the government would require federal employees and maybe even medical workers to get back sedated. But she was surprised. Her company got caught up in the requirements. Rebecca works for an appliance repair business in washington state. It has about one hundred thirty employees. Were not using her last name to protect her job. I don't think anybody thought that it would be mandated for private employers. Especially see i think. I am a little surprised on that. Rebecca doesn't want to get the vaccine. She and her husband had been struggling with infertility for the past two years. She's concerned about how it could affect her hormones. she also doesn't want to get it for religious and political reasons. I don't feel like the government should be telling us what her husband works at a hospital. So he's also affected by the mandate if the federal government is able to implement its vaccine requirements. They could both lose their jobs. So life is up in the air. But that's a big if says jonathan inward. He's an attorney who specializes in health law. Claims he says the biden administration mandates violate the constitution as well as federal law for those who have natural immunity. This likely violates the protection clause of the constitution it likely violates the tenth amendment and as applied to the states that would violate what's called the anti commandeering doctrine

President Biden Sarah Weinsberg Rebecca Medicaid Medicare Jonathan Inward Washington Biden Administration Federal Government
Biden Steps Into Legal Fight With Vaccine Mandates

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

02:07 min | 2 months ago

Biden Steps Into Legal Fight With Vaccine Mandates

"The president returns the white house this week to address what may be the greatest threat to our country since nine eleven for eighteen months the covert pandemic has consumed our country and now even though seventy five percent of american adults are vaccinated. it's become a pandemic of the unvaccinated with more than one hundred thousand cases a day for four weeks last week. Roughly quarter million new cases reported among children. The highest total yet but biden's plan to mandate vaccinations at workplaces across. America is facing swift and severe resistance drawing attacks and threats of legal action from at least nineteen republican governors. We're going to begin there this morning with surgeon. General vivek murthy dr murthy. Thank you for joining us this morning. You know the president resisted issuing mandates for months thank you the president resisted issuing mandates for months and the administration repeatedly explained that he lacked the legal authority for sweeping mandates. So what changed george. Let's talk about where we are. And what the president announced Fortunately we have made a tremendous amount of progress over the last eight months. I want to remind people of this because they can get lost in the in the news about the delta varying delone but because we have two hundred million people george with at least one shot of the vaccine. We are in a much better place than we otherwise would have been with that. Said delta is a tough foe. It's throw curveballs at us. And we have to be prepared to respond and that is why. The president announced a ambitious and thoughtful plan. that he nfl earlier this lab past week which is intended to help us get through the next phase of this variant now to be clear requirements that he announced or not sweeping requirements for the entire nation. These are focused on areas where the federal government has legal authority to act so seventeen million healthcare workers. Who do we were operating. Institutions which work with medicare medicaid will now be required To get vaccines we also know that the workplace requirements. He put in place for workplaces. That have one hundred plus You know workers that those will affect about eighty million americans. Here's finally what we know. George we know that these kind of requirements actually work to improve our vaccination

Vivek Murthy Dr Murthy White House Biden George America NFL Federal Government Medicare
"medicaid" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on WTVN

"Medicaid must also vaccinate their workers. Andy Field, ABC NEWS, Washington and a special session. Republicans running Kentucky's legislature scrap the statewide school mask mandate. The Los Angeles School board is making that district the largest in the nation to mandate that all students aged 12 and be vaccinated if they want to attend class in person. School Superintendent Megan Riley eligible students who do not have proof of vaccination against Covid 19. Or an exemption or conditional admission will not be permitted on a school campus and will be referred to the districts Independent Study Program. President Biden in China's Leader XI talked by phone on Thursday, the White House said they agreed to engage on issues on which they agree and don't agree. The administration is suing Texas over its fetal heartbeat. Abortion law, Attorney General Merrick Garland said the law is unconstitutional on a number of fronts. SP eight is invalid under the supremacy clause. And the 14th amendment. Is preempted by federal law and violates the doctrine of intergovernmental immunity, and Garland said they'll sue any other state that tries to impose a similar law. East ST. LOUIS, Illinois date line for the latest mass shooting six people, one of them a juvenile or hospitalized after the shooting. Police are not saying if it's related but shortly after the shootings of vehicle collided with a commuter rail train in East ST Louis You're listening to ABC news. Covid 19 is hitting Ohio Hard. The average number of new cases of covid in Ohio for the last three weeks is now at 5000 Day, just under 8000 new infections Thursday and once again new hospitalizations and new ICU admissions are higher than their average is We are very busy and that we are very high capacity, especially when it comes to taking care of patients. And, more importantly, not having enough staff to take care of patients. Dr Joseph Castaldo with Ohio health in Columbus, there are now more than 3000 people hospitalized across Ohio with covid 800 of them in the ICU. I'm Jack Crumley. Dr. Bruce Vanderhof, The director of the Ohio Department of Health, says Ohio is seeing that surge in Covid cases in early July. We were seeing daily case rates of 200. And 300. Okay? We're seeing 20 times that right now, 3000 people are in Ohio hospitals with the virus. Nearly all unvaccinated in 800 people are in intensive care fighting for their lives. Masks are coming back to Ohio's largest city. Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther says he plans to issue an executive order requiring people to wear masks in public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status. A citing rising covid cases as the reason the order will go into effect when it signed tomorrow. And meanwhile, in Cincinnati, there will be no mask mandate. As the mayor of Cincinnati, you will not follow the lead of Andrew get through the require mask mandates in the city of Cincinnati. I respect his right to do what he thinks is best for the people of Columbus. I think it's too impractical to do here. Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, who wants to be Ohio's next governor today on the Bill Cunningham show. I'm Sandy Collins. From around town and around the world. Your next headline update happens at the bottom of the hour on news radio, 6 10 w T V N. Hey, this.

Sandy Collins Andy Field Jack Crumley Bruce Vanderhof Thursday 20 times Joseph Castaldo Bill Cunningham Columbus Ginther tomorrow Ohio 3000 people East ST Louis White House 800 six people Republicans Cincinnati 800 people
White House Announces Sweeping New COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

NBC Nightly News

02:05 min | 2 months ago

White House Announces Sweeping New COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

"Biden tonight is trading out the velvet glove for a hammer unveiling a broad and largely new covert strategy heavily grounded in vaccine mandates meant to compel millions of american workers to be vaccinated the proposed rules targeting both large businesses and federal employees. Tonight just over fifty. Three percent of americans are fully vaccinated the president's plan affecting everything from cova testing and booster shots to flying and new steps to better protect children from the virus. Promising to confront leaders. He says her undermining those efforts in an address late today. The president saying we are in a tough stretch. Peter alexander is at the white house with late details with cova cases surging and deaths now five times higher than just a month ago. President biden is requiring tens of millions more americans to get back sonate. You've been patient when our patience is wearing thin and you refusal has cost all of us. This is not about freedom for personal choice about protecting yourself and those around you. The president is ordering nearly all federal workers and employees have contractors that do business with the federal government get vaccinated within seventy five days eliminating their option to be tested instead of getting shots employees. Who refuse could be punished even fired. If you want to work with the federal government and do business get vaccinated while initially reluctant to issue mandates. The president's aggressive new plan requires vaccinations for seventeen million healthcare workers at hospitals and other sites that receive medicare or medicaid funding president. Biden's now pressuring private companies to directing the labor department to require businesses with one hundred or more employees ensure their workers are fully vaccinated or provide a negative test. Each week a move. The white house estimates will impact eighty million americans companies that do not comply could face fines. The white house anticipating lawsuits regarding to protect vaccinated workers some unvaccinated

President Biden Peter Alexander Biden Cova Federal Government White House Labor Department Medicaid Medicare
Sweeping New Vaccine Mandates for 100 Million Americans

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Sweeping New Vaccine Mandates for 100 Million Americans

"President Biden is announcing sweeping new vaccine mandates that'll affect as many as one hundred million Americans the rules will mandate that all employers with more than one hundred workers require them to be vaccinated for covert nineteen or get tested weekly that'll affect about eighty million people roughly seventeen million workers at health facilities getting Medicare or Medicaid will also have to be vaccinated as will all federal workers and contractors the president said to lay out his plans this afternoon a series of bold and ambitious steps with what spokeswoman Jen Psaki calls an overarching goal of vaccinating more people blaming a virus Sir John the roughly eighty million not fully vaccinated the nation seeing about three hundred percent more new infections a day compared to this time last year Sager bag on me at the White House

President Biden Jen Psaki Sir John Sager White House
Study: Nursing Home Deaths in 2020 Much Higher

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Study: Nursing Home Deaths in 2020 Much Higher

"Nursing home deaths were much higher in twenty twenty official numbers from the CDC or missing about twelve percent of covert cases among nursing home residents and fourteen percent of deaths that's according to new estimates published in the journal of the American medical association network open by a Harvard researcher and her team it translates to thousands of missing data points suggesting more than one hundred and eighteen thousand nursing home residents died of covert nineteen last year the researchers attributed the data holes to the federal centers for Medicare and Medicaid services not asking nursing homes to report cases and deaths until may twenty twenty actually after

CDC Journal Of The American Medica Harvard Federal Centers For Medicare A
California Looking to Pay Drug Addicts to Stay Sober

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

California Looking to Pay Drug Addicts to Stay Sober

"To stay sober Treatment program is known as contingency management. Here's how it works. Addicts are in small incentives or payments for every negative drug test. If they have no positive drug tests, they can earn a few $100 over 12 weeks. Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom wants to pay for the program through Medicaid. The federal government has actually been doing contingency management for years with military veterans and research shows It works to get addicts to stop using Drugs. However, research also shows the effect doesn't last much beyond six months after treatment concludes the state of Illinois issues, a statewide indoor mask, mandate and vaccination

Gavin Newsom Federal Government Illinois
"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"We have to take off from a different terminal. How do we hit in do that. In a timely fashion. So that's you know that's been allowed time working collaboratively with With with our our our federal partners to make sure that at all. And then i think so long a long answer your other point though was how did this dynamic between medicaid enrollment in reimburses base and. I mean this is this. This is a challenge that has been funded medicaid for a long time right. You know he was created as an afterthought to medicare in nineteen sixty five. It is now bigger than medicare terms of total number people. Served old dollars medicaid could afford to. You know pay health care safety net prices when it was a small safety net program but as it rose and as you know as we edge up north of eighty five one in four americans It becomes increasingly difficult to sustain This the provision of chair At those rates and so ironically neeley saw this a little bit been with the medicaid expansion back in in twenty fourteen part of the aca You know when you when you expand medicaid coverage you generally have to increase rates as well to to to make up for the fact that any given providers book of business is now going to be larger in medicare larger share of medicaid. And you know we've been doing this kind of piecemeal. Little bits two steps forward to after decades And it's been slow enough that you know that you put the frog in the in the water and kind of slowly. Turn up the right right. We've never really hit that boiling point of only got the whole system's broken But i think it's a very very real question that is probably the subject of completely server. Podcasts bridges how big can or should medicate right now medicaid is like i said one in four americans it is covered near covering forty percent of all kids. We pay for fifty percent of the births. We are the nation's long-term care system and despite your around behavioral.

medicare neeley medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Medicare it's gonna happen in a uniform way across every state in this country and that's the way that you're really engrained itself as second nature in the dna of providers when they start to learn this stuff in med school. That's when we know megan so to me. It's it's this marriage between you know. Harnessing the innovation and the excitement and slowing on in medicaid translating that maybe you know and of narrowing it dumbing it down if you will for broad translate ability genetic care and that's how you get this because there's no. There's no question that Every state medicaid director and think everyone working In health policy general looks at what happens in a healthcare system. Where the financial incentives and the care delivery. Incentives are missile. If they're misaligned were never gonna make anything. We have got to bring them together. We got to stop paying for volume and start paying for value. And it's really really easy and simplistic to say that. It's extraordinarily hard to do it. Because again it's not just medicaid is not just medicare it's healthcare and healthcare is just about twenty percent of the nation's gdp and so we're talking about changing the dna of twenty percent of our judy. That's not a trivial tests. So that's that's really important and that's what we're building right. Not an easy left as they would say At four trillion dollars a year. Right on the gp. I wasn't gonna ask this question but it's it's sort of related or it is related or maybe the flip side here And that is there have been some discussion so most states. In fact you would know better. Maybe all states apply for an eleven fifteen waiver. Basically meaning they could customize serve medicaid benefit program to make best the particular or unique needs of their state medicaid beneficiaries But these waivers to be approved by the feds need to be budget neutral. Many change delivery provide different services or products but it has to be Comparatively budget neutral There is some discussion at the federal level about dropping the prerequisite of budget neutrality. Course how that would work. The one suggestion is while you you you do that. Bud if there's additional projected cost Who pay who's on the hook for that that gets debated of course immediately. But what's your take on a and this would be a substantial formative medicaid program this one technical change on accepting or rejecting eleven fifteen waivers. What's what's your sense of that That's a great question. I a couple of those one of which is interestingly enough. I don't know how much of a radical change. That might actually. And i say that because you know budget neutrality which is nowhere really stand out of a regulatory thing out for really have come out of a deep-seated distrust of states from the vote and the sense that well if you don't do this don't put some parameters stay just going to go and just spend federal dollars like drunken phase which okay But there's a lot of state dollars tunes insensitive..

medicaid megan medicare Bud
"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"This is a pulse. And so i think that the fat you know to compared to the appreciation this is yes medicare could certainly spend four hundred billion dollars improving what we do. But don't the people in this country deserve a more of a first dollar coverage a more of a as you said less than a catastrophic and more a front end benefit and you know. I think our folks state medicaid directors. Pretty agnostic about. That looks like is that you know is it. Creating a medicare part. E not a maybe. Is it creating some kind of Cafeteria plan long term. Care insurance at as meaningful Navy or is it something. I it can be a lot of things but i think what we what we owe it to ourselves as a country is to say we should be thinking about. How do we provide people with the services that they clearly need without in poverty. I that's asking to be trickier one figure had. Yeah absolutely they They and their families. I will say not surprisingly to make certain there are weightless for To be recipient oklahoma cuny based service benefit In some states these are tens of thousands of people on these wait lists particularly texas. I know ohio amongst others. And i will say to one last point. Because of the long term care benefit is structured as a medicaid benefit really it constitutes segregated care and that points been made particularly context of biden administration's interested in health equity Racial equality And we we do know from The supreme court separate is not equal. And i'm sure everyone knows that court case. Let's move on so odd. Yeah act plays. I would like to add another another point on that you brought up the you know the guy or the inequities disparities angle on this. And i think that's a really important one. I just throw out one one aspect of this of this policy discussion. That i think is glossed over. So part and parcel of medicaid history of being you know obviously a low-income be tested program but also provided all of the lawn care is that there are provisions in place. You know things mistake. Recove- where individual or or a couple who you know utilize a lot of long term care services in that at no point. Does anyone you know. Takes the house away from them while.

medicare biden administration medicaid oklahoma ohio texas supreme court
"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Parents had plenty of assets to take care of my mom. We had plenty of assets to take care of her and she lived much longer than she did. So, you know, this is why I don't know anything about it cuz I did not have to go through this process. So maybe can we like walk through and a typical process is not something that exists but like the basic, you know, I'm a spouse and my 80s my my other spouse needs to be moved someplace. I can't continue age. Do it, you know my health and physical and mental health is breaking down. They need to they need to go to a nursing home or someplace anywhere or do they have to specifically go to a nursing home or does Medicaid pay for in-home care to get so in some states Medicaid does pay for long-term care and long-term care Medicaid pays for in-home Medicaid. It's in some states. It's considered. It's called like a different waiver program just the names fluctuate but.

80s Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Fading memories today with my name is Sylvia green, and she is going to be talking to us about a topic that I know nothing about. This is a good one to chat about all things Medicaid and I told her I remember to call Medicaid and Medi-Cal, so thank you for coming on and filling this on in on everything. We need to know about Medicaid. Thank you Jennifer for having me on excited. So you have a company that deals specifically in Medicaid services. So you want to start there or I'm not even sure where's a good place to start definitely wage? Yeah. Yeah. So sensible senior planning. We are a Medicaid planning service and we assist individuals and seniors and their loved ones with the Medicaid planning process and the actual Medicaid application process. So as soon as heard the process can be quite challenging. Yes it is, you know, definitely a lot of documentation that's required a lot of money that's required so that you know, what documentation is required and you know what to do with assets what you can do what you should do. You know what your options are so dead it is it is a process that is very daunting, especially when you're not a professional at it or like dealing with people like I just I don't deal well with banks off. Service companies any of those regulated type things. It's just I don't know what it is. I have like a visceral reaction to minutes on hold and I'm just like losing my mind off that stuff up to my husband, which is much better. Yeah, so I know a lot of people get to a position where they're taking care of a parent and the parent needs to go into a care home for one reason or another and they have some assets but not a lot or I know for example, there's a gal in my support group who feels that her husband would benefit for a care home, but they can't afford it and she obviously would like to continue living in her home. So these are kind of I'm sure things that you deal with every single day. I don't know if that's a good place to start the conversation is Lee. Definitely so there is a big misconception that if you know for someone to get onto Medicaid Medicaid is going to take off. All of their money and that's not the case. The case is in order to be eligible for Medicaid. Of course the numbers that I'm going to throw out are different and every state but will say Most states need in order to be eligible for Medicaid your assets. So liquidated assets non-liquid assets, you know can't exceed $2,000. Now, there are exceptions in many states you a lot of own a one car and you're allowed to own a house if you're anticipating to return so that's you know, when everyone hears and you know again, it's it's well then Medicaid is going to take a lot of money..

Jennifer Sylvia green $2,000 Lee today Medicaid one car a lot of money one reason Medi-Cal single day Medicaid Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:40 min | 7 months ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Today with me is sylvia green and she is going to be talking to us about a kick. I know nothing about this is a good one. To chat about things medicaid. I told her. I have to remember to call medicated. Not medical so thank you for coming on and philly lewis in on everything. We need to know about medicaid. Thank you jennifer for. Having me on excited atom you have a company that deals specifically in medicaid services. So they want to start there. Or i'm not even sure where it's a good place to start. Definitely yes yes. So tenable senior planning. We are medicaid planning service and we assist individuals and seniors and their loved ones with the medicaid planning process and the actual medicaid application process. So senator the process can be quite challenging. Yes it is. You know definitely a lot of documentation that's required on a lot of knowledge that's required so that you know what documentations wired and you know what to do with assets what you can do what you should do. You know what your options are so definitely it is. It is a process. That is very daunting. Especially when you're not a professional at it or like dealing with people like i just i don't deal well with banks insurance companies any of those regulated type. Things is just what it is. I have like a visceral reaction two minutes on hold. And i'm just like losing my mind that stuff up to my husband which is much better.

sylvia green today jennifer two thousand dollars philly lewis one car two minutes one reason single day
"medicaid" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Fill in for Russian on the last day of two thousand nineteen so rush sits at the cutting edge of societal evolution and because I live on the west coast I am surrounded by society this devolving but that provides me one advantage which is to be able to warn you all don't live on the west coast things that are coming your way in twenty twenty and on this some battles that we're gonna have to fight in some things that that are just not not talked about enough first thing is this Medicaid for all is sold miss understood by establishment Republicans obviously rush gets this other people get this but the status of Republican sick it's all it's it's just the medical takeover it's just their attempt to to to gain more power it doesn't stop there it's a form of totalitarian is it truly is gonna give an example there's an article in vice are dot com that says that's Medicaid should cover what they call gender treatments for trans youth in every state thank this is built upon true core lice they call it a life saving treatments to give kids are two hundred times the amount of cross sex hormone so whatever appear in their body to get to operate on them in ways that are profoundly damaging to the body that that gets you show that you need to have full of surgeries for the rest of your life this in light of the fact that eighty five to ninety five percent of kids who at one time or another experience gender dysphoria or gender confusion at cetera overcome this they are pushing this soul hard on people that they want Medicaid to cover it they say it's life saving but the data on that is is absolutely the reverse it's it's not like say they want your kids your grandkids to have the choice at the age of three to decide to be a boy or girl and they want you to be moved out of the way right they want kids to have access to this as their minds are still developing and Medicaid for all can get them there this is an example of a battle we have to fight because Planned Parenthood they're handing out cross sex hormones they're just handing amounts we know about Planned Parenthood we know they're tie in to to to lobbyists cetera we know about big pharma's tie.

Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"What's interesting about this is that from an ideological speck of perspective that liberals want to create a safety net, Medicaid is an important liberal institution. It was the biggest accomplishment. It seems to me the expansion of Medicaid was probably the single biggest achievement by the Obama administration specifically within the context of of the ACA that Medicaid expansion was probably the the most important part of it. Although I think there's an argument about the patient protections broadly speaking, but that is at Sittard a liberal solution to this problem, right? We're going to have a we're gonna we're gonna make sure that that we have a a safety net for people, but the efficacy of that safety net is. Inhibited by that perspective and not making it a universal program. Right. Because the idea is almost like the way it's I mean, I hate to use this as an analogy. But it's the way they hid bad mortgages right ones that we're were had more had more risk, which is you put it in bigger tranches, and it's harder to get at those. So if the idea is that, you know, Medicaid was setup specifically as a separate program for Medicare. So that you could cut it really, right and diminish the the the benefits for essentially, people of color and bra and more broadly people living in poverty, the ideas, you make a universal program, and those people are made safer that the the the the liberal the liberal agenda is more fulfilled with a more socialistic for lack of a better word universal program. Right. I mean, this is the best. Argument for universal healthcare. It seems to me in terms of the poor because it protects that that that portion of the population as much if not more than any because they're more susceptible to getting their their their benefits cut. Yeah. I mean, this is a classic bait. I'm on people who are trying to figure out how to help the most needy with social policy target to them, which often is much more politically feasible because it's less costly. Or do we try to create universal programs that cover everyone, which is more politically sustainable because you can't isolate the the poor people's programs and try to, you know, pick them off one by one, and it's a classic and difficult dilemma, you know, I think that a kind of universal approach to health policy is is preferred is better. And is you know, it's a more sort of effective for filming of of the kind of liberal vision. It's one way of thinking about it. But it's it's be more. You know, a more effective and more compelling fulfillment of what should be everyone's vision for Americans. We have to be as healthy as poss-. People on that are equitable. You know, a lot of people just don't realize that. What state you live in? What race you are how much money you make these are things that will determine your access to benefits that essentially decide whether you could live or die. I don't actually think that even people who understand those many at least to be Republicans with would say that. That's right. Could actually think of a moral grounding for that sort of policy designed I can't fathom what the moral grounding is there are kind of fiscal and practical grounds, right? We don't want to you know, spend this much money, but the moral grounds for the arbitrariness of the whole system, even for many people who are doing everything, right and working hard just happen to live in the wrong state. And so I think that there's a liberal case to make I think that there's a human case to make and I focus on Medicaid in my research because Medicaid is the institution we have. And so let's think about how. To make it the best. We can. But you know, in the in the sort of backdrop for me as always let's think about how to build new institutions that are more inclusive more equitable and more politically, and economically sustainable, and that that will mean looking beyond Medicaid and looking to universal system Jamila mission or the book is fragmented democracy, Medicaid, federalism, and unequal politics. Thanks so much for your time today. Really? Appreciate it. Thank you Sam. All right, folks..

Medicaid ACA Obama administration Medicare
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"But that's not the way that that. That it appears to work when it comes to Medicaid part of the reason because you know, people get alienated they get discouraged, and they get sent very specific messages that they then listen to this. Right. I mean, if you're poor you deserve to be poor, you're irrelevant. And here is we're going to cut your Medicaid, just to remind you of all those things that we've been trying to signal to you for decades if not longer, and so how much do you think how much do you think? Well, I guess I have two questions about about about your date at one is how much you think there have been politicians who are aware of this dynamic, if not, you know, so specifically in terms of qualitative sense, but they had a an intuition, or they had anecdotal sort of evidence of this, a how much do you think that the case be are you worried that you know, I'm running for governor in Kentucky. This is I know what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna I'm gonna you know, or or, you know, running for reelect the way for me to do that cut benefits that's going to work for me to different ways. Right. It's going to suppress the vote in some areas. And it's going to probably I'm going to get. I'm gonna get you know, appreciation from from people who don't like people of color, you know, getting, you know, Medicaid phones, or whatever it is that they think that they're getting I mean, how much do you worry about those dynamics? Obviously the second one. You're an academic. You're you're I understand the mission is to is to bring out the truth. But I just wonder how much you think this information has been or or will be weaponized. I I do about that. I think two things I think the two questions are related. I don't think that some too many sort of political folks. This is anything new right? I think that there's an intuition about these sorts of things that comes from the the the clear evidence, right? That for example, they could kick hundreds of thousands of people off, Medicaid in Tennessee and the next election that governor stays in power. Right. And so we, you know, there's lots of evidence over time that people can take pretty kinda harsh turn against programs like, Medicaid and not necessarily suffer any consequences politically. And so I think in to this -ly or in some way, a lot of elected officials probably suspect this, right? I also think that that the folks who wanna take these benefits away would wanna take them away whether or not it was going to be a political. Bust or boon for them. Right. So they're likely going to behave the same way, whether they know this or not it makes them a little bit more glee knowing this, right? But what I focused on more and one of the things that I try to think about as I you know, when I think about who to take this research to disseminate it to is focused on the way, we can use information. Like this for good, right? I think for any research that is produced there are people who can misuse it. Who can weaponize it? And there are people who can use it for good. And I think part of what I try to do is think about you know, what does this mean they're organizations out there that that mobilize and support Medicaid beneficiaries? It's great for them to know this and to have a sense that one of the ways they can be supporting Medicaid beneficiaries is politically right. Not just providing them with economic resources, but thinking about helping them registered to vote and helping them to be aware of political issues. I've talked to you know, and spoken with hospital association. Primary. Care providers, all sorts of folks who say, wow, we never thought about Medicaid in these political terms, and this shapes the way that we want to approach our patients or clients going forward. So I try to think about who can use this for good to offset the efforts that are already going to be made to to dampen these folks voices. No is it seems to me the answer to how I mean..

Medicaid Kentucky Tennessee
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Make can affect our democracy can affect whether the voices of those folks are hurt. Do we see a difference in their their for those folks, particularly ones who are? I guess states more or less generous. I guess do we see a any distinction between their voting patterns in federal versus state elections. Some data. I have I couldn't distinguish between for most of the day. I couldn't thing was between federal and state elections. I did I could however the thing wish between stadium several elections and local elections. And and what I found is that, you know, the the decreased likelihood to participate spans across all of those different kinds of elections. So it's not sort of limited to what's happening at the national level. So it's not as though people are are thinking while my negative experience with Medicaid, I won't participate in national politics. Right. You know, instead, it affects the way people think about politics across the board part of it is that some of what's going on is really local and people are thinking about this in terms of both in terms of their states. And in terms of you know, the federal government and sometimes even more local than that. And so it affects what people are doing across the board and even beyond voting like even whether or not people will participate in the local political. Group or a ten local political meeting just the even the basics of democratic engagement are sort of eroded when people are alienated from the government on account of experiences with getting a very basic benefit, which is healthcare. Right. It's a lot of people think I'm not asking you to pay my bills or to give me food. I wanna be able to go see a doctor. And if the government doesn't see me as important enough to provide that, then why would I be important enough to participate in politics into think that that would matter at all that anyone at any level of government would listen to my voice. I mean, it is a little bit counterintuitive, but the more that you cut Medicaid, the last likely it's recipients are going to respond politically in some ways. Right. I mean, that's the that's the message being sent to some of these. That's that answers. The question why we have fourteen states that don't have an expanded Medicaid. Yeah. I mean, the the research record on this is growing stronger every day. So there are few studies that came out last year that showed that states that expanded Medicaid in the wake of the Affordable Care Act that people were more likely to vote immediately in the wake of the expansions. Right. So we know that expansion boost voting and loose voting, especially in places, for example, that have high concentrations of poor people. So we have reason to believe that the boost is coming from the very people who are getting the benefit and the opposite is also true when you retract benefits when you take things away people are less likely to vote I show this in the book. And then I also have another paper, I wrote recently wrote with a colleague that will be published soon that looks at a specific as looks at Tennessee because they made huge cuts in the mid two thousand and kicked hundreds of thousands of people off of Medicaid program pretty quickly and. Pretty with pretty quickly without much warning. So we look at the election before the election right after to try to see if they'll be any differences that aren't accounted for by lots of other things that we can measure in control for what we find is. In the wake of big set of cuts. People are significantly the aggregate voting rates are significantly lower. Right. So, you know, there's more and more evidence in more and more forms. Whether it's from talking to people about their experience are looking at different kinds of big quantitative data that shows that you have people are less likely to vote when you take away their benefits, and we would hope for the opposite. That people see that they're losing something important to them, and they get out there, and they pushed back and the and they punish their elected officials. And we we think that's how the moccasins should work that when you take things away from your constituents that haunt Ben that those constituents will will push back, and that that will end up harming you politically..

Medicaid federal government Ben Tennessee
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"To me are folks who are living in poverty, and they're just we know from lots of research from decades research that they're less likely to participate in the political process because there are all sorts of barriers. And so I wasn't terribly surprised about that. But there was a part of me that also wanted to know Medicated self has anything to do with it is it about that that nature and the characteristics of the people who are on Medicaid things like poverty, or is there more to it. And what I found was that there were more to there was more to it. And and I found that by both by looking beeper into quantitative date into survey data and thinking about how to control for things like poverty, and lots of the things that we know are with it. And one of the things that I did. For example, is that I looked at a survey called the fragile families and child wellbeing survey that has nearly ten thousand people and many of them over fifty percent of them are Medicare beneficiaries. So I have lots of a sort of large sample to consider. And I looked at people who who took that survey who are Medicaid beneficiaries and people who were not, but who were very similar to each other in many other ways, they were similar in terms of their level of poverty. They were similar in terms of their race similar in terms of many aspects of their life circumstance, and what I found was that this relationship between Medicaid and not participating in politics as much not voting and not engaging and other ways, you know, didn't go away, right? As a result of so, you know, the the folks who were Medicaid beneficiaries when compared to their counterparts who were similar. And many many other ways we're still less likely to vote even though the only observable difference between them was being a Medicaid beneficiary. Then what I did was I started talking to a lot of Medicaid beneficiaries, check out lie with this D is something about Medicaid, and what they told me again, and again in many different ways, and I talked to beneficiaries from across the country is that there may give experiences with Medicaid did affect the way that they thought about government and politics and their willingness and desire to participate in politics. One of the things that the kind of fragmented nature of Medicaid, like we've been talking about that it's different in different places, you know, Medicare beneficiaries know this very well. They're the ones who told this in and brought the sort of the the theme of this book to light from me because they talk about how, you know, their parents and other states or their brothers and other states on Medicaid had one thing and they had another. Or they talked about how much Medicaid changed over time that five years ago, they make they were able to get benefits that they couldn't get now or they talked about how they went across. They moved a lightly across the border to a different state and figured out. They couldn't get something that was hugely important or that they thought about moving and when they research to make sure they'd be able to get life saving benefits in other states. They found out it wouldn't. And this sends a really clear message. It sends a message that says your value is not your value in your needs aren't anything that will be responded to on account of you being a member of this broader political community, or is it a citizen of the country. It depends on what state you live in and on how that state feels like treating you. And sometimes the pencil county you live in what neighborhood you live in the kind of experience you have with the program, the kind of access you have to hospitals doctors benefits, and this kind of motley mix. Of contingencies people feel it in their everyday life. And they know what it means. They know that they're the kind of people who aren't guaranteed anything who aren't protected even for this most basic set of health benefit and people read those messages, and they feed those messages into their calculations about whether they should bother taking part in the political system whether their voices are important, and we'll be heard in responded to and for.

Medicaid Medicare fifty percent five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"So, you know, it's it's impossible even for me to out all of the the kind of racial threats that that can be woven when we think about, Medicaid and health policy more generally is just ubiquitous it's always there. We've talked on this program decent amount with with folks who have written extensively on just the the the premises. Social security also being highly racial. Is. And so yeah. Thirty five years later, I guess when they're doing Medicare and Medicaid. It's you know, what was old is new again. And and so on in fact, also I'm also struck that when we often talk about Medicaid, and we talk about Medicaid cuts. The most salient political rhetoric is usually the one that gets the most traction is often the statistic that two thirds of our elderly who are in nursing homes are there because of Medicaid, so people spend, you know, as you get older, obviously, you have less assets you at one point run out of money, and you must go into a nursing home you become eligible for Medicaid. You get sort of like shuttled from Medicare, Medicaid, and then you're in a nursing home and Medicaid is paying for it. And that ends up being a big political talking point because. You know of the the way that we have a structure around the narrative around I guess the morality of of being poor in this country or living in poverty, I should say. So all right. Well, let's talk about to research that you've done. What are the implications? From a on the for for this fragmentation on its recipients perspective on government because one of the things that we also have heard is if you are on Medicaid. And one would think it would be different. But it's not you are less likely to vote part of that is a function of poverty makes it harder to though in many respects. But is there more to it? And that. Yes. There's there's more to it than that. So when I first started looking at some data, initially, it was it was quantitative data was survey data, and I saw this large pattern Medicaid beneficiaries being less likely to vote. And it makes perfect sense..

Medicaid Medicare Thirty five years
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And they have to cover the rest, but everyone in that state who qualifies based on those eligible criteria. We'll get Medicaid. That's what really an entitlement means. It doesn't mean anybody feels like they're titled to anyone anything. It just means everyone who fits the criteria gets the benefit if we were to block grant, Medicaid states would have a cap amount. Right. And and that cap amount would increase overtime, but it wouldn't increase at the rate of cost. And it would mean that Lynn states run out of money like when they. Ran out of the money that the federal government gave them may ran out, and there's no more money left. And so one of the things that happened under those circumstances is that people stopped getting the benefit. It's not something that you get because you're eligible anymore. You get it. If you're lucky enough to get it before the state runs out of the bundle of money that the federal government has given them. And so that often will will mean that states have to pull back that they have to offer less. They have to cover fewer people. And then there's the big problem right now, you know, states get compensated based on what they spent, but it's. It's. Just get a fix the mount. And it's given to them, right? There's an incentive there will. Now. We know that we're getting you know, whatever the amount is, you know, we're getting a billion dollars from the federal government. Let's try to find ways of spending less right now, we have a surplus, and maybe we can do some other things with it. Maybe we can redirected we know. That's what happened with tennis with the temporary assistance when he families when it got block granted now states just get a big old power of money. And they start getting creative about how they use that money, and they use less and less of it for the core purpose of the program. So that we know now states using tennis funds to do all sorts of things to fund scholarships from college scholarships for middle class and upper middle class students. You know, they just make up reasons to spend the money on things that they want to because block grants give them even more flexibility than they already have fewer resources fewer resources to help people with but more flexibility to misuse those resources. Okay. And so we should. So so I mean in some respects just to restate I in in in some ways right now, Medicaid.

federal government Medicaid Lynn tennis billion dollars
"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"If you have a dental problem because those things proprietary vision, those are optional and states can decide whether they want to offer those things to any of their Medicaid beneficiaries, or whether they want to offer them to all of them, and they have lots and lots of leeway of discretion. Now, there are some states that haven't expanded, Medicaid, and in those non-expansion states, they're still fourteen states that haven't adopted the expansion in those states, you can be very very poor many of those states and not qualify for Medicaid. If for example, you're childless adult. Or even if you're an adult with children, in some cases in the states that have expanded Medicaid to the other thirty seven speech, everyone who lives at one thirty three or below the poverty line eligible. But even those states, whether you've expanded are not state still get to make really specific choices about what they'll cover and what they'll not they won't all states have to cover some basic suite of of things. But then all states also have a ton more choice in terms of what they provide. And what they don't know. My understanding has always been that that the reason why we would not want from the perspective of someone who wants as many people as possible covered by health insurance. The reason why we would not want the federal government to block grant money to the states would be that it would there that that one the the? Rate in which the increase of healthcare would not be covered. And that to the state could use it could could redirect money like how what what is the relationship between the money that the federal government makes available and the state. So when you say the state says like we will not cover podiatrist, for instance, is that are they are they getting the same amount of money per potential recipient as another state that may offer dietary, and they simply decide we're gonna we're gonna put it on respiratory stuff as opposed to podiatrist. I mean, how does that work? How how does the money what how does the state restrict in that fashion? Yes. So you know, what? Medicaid in terms of the funding, you know, the federal government allocates, our matches a certain amount of money, and it varies across states that it depends on how much the state spending. It also depends on on the states themselves, for example, in high how high poverty is in the states in a number of other factors, but the federal government essentially will cover there's a kind of it's called the federal medical assistance percentage, the s map multiplier, but it's the kind of the percentage that the federal government uses and determines that they will match and cover of all that this needs spend. So, you know, states have to make decisions because it is true. True that the more that they spend the more that the federal government will cover for them. But then they're last covering the remaining percentage of the cost for Medicaid beneficiaries. So that, you know, the less they spend total less their leftover percentages. And you know, how much that percentages varies from state to state, and so has to make pretty complicated decisions about how much they can afford to spend and how much they're currently spending. You know, the thing about about the real challenge with block grants is that you know, states right now, you know, treat, Medicaid as Medicaid is. It's really an entitlement. So states have a lot of decisions to make about who's eligible and who's not. But once they make decisions about who's eligible every single person in that state who's eligible gets the benefit. And that's because no matter how much the state spend, the state can decide everybody's l. Eligible below this certain amount. And right now that amount is one thirty three. So even the states that have the most generous eligible eligibility requirements. They decide we're going to be generous. The federal government will match that up until the place where they say they will which is one thirty three. And so those states can be really generous, and they can count on the federal government to to match their share to cover the share that they said that they will..

federal government Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"When someone's in the nursing home, the payout cannot be longer than your life expectancy. Oh, so that it can be shorter but not longer. So in this case, if it's already paying out, and it's going to continue to pay out for his entire life. Can't do it. Okay. It's gotta be a term certain amount of time to pay out in that term certain amount is dictated based on a table equal to the age in which you buy the annuity at that time. In the nursing home, right again, you have to be the nursing. In the nursing home. But we also know that this is another way you'll know that it's not a Medicaid annuity because you're buying it one. You're not in the nursing home in to paying out, right? It can't possibly figure out an any unless they picked the term certain to equal the life expectancy of the individual, then fine. But even then it wouldn't work because it's gotta be termed certain based on the life expectancy on the day. You go into the nursing home got it. That's why you know, you can't do it. So whether it pays out for the wife or doesn't pay for the wife has no bearing on whether it's Medicaid annuity or not. But, but I I guess I can tell you that that when you do have Medicaid annuity, usually the state is the next in line after a spouse. But right, assuming the state is next in line, and then the kids so I don't think it would be able to pay out to the spouse. And first of all you would never as a community spouse by Medicaid annuity. I'm sorry. As a six spouse. She would never buy the Medicaid annuity. You would always have your healthy spouse by the name. Yeah. So this would never work. This is definitely not a Medicaid annuity. Okay. Good advice there folks, if you are in a situation where you have someone going the nursing home. Maybe they're already in there. And you're writing those giant checks every month. Please pick up the phone and get some advice because.

Medicaid
"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"medicaid" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"It's time for. The segment we're time. We'll answer your questions about anything and everything that's included in the estate planning process. Once again, here's Todd Lutsky and Susan powers. Welcome back Todd of a few questions from listeners. First question comes from Mike and Attleboro mass in Mike writes, I was told by my advisor that the annuity that I currently own will protect my IRA from the nursing home. But this seems contradictory to what I've heard you say recently on the radio when people quote me. That means they're listening. If I am receiving income from an annuity, and I go into the nursing home. Well, they get that income, and when I die will my wife continued to get the income or will that go to the nursing home as well. So it was first of all like, I say, always you can't believe everything you hear on the radio, right? But you can in this case because I have said that and I'm going to support it right now. Bottom line is that that this annuity that Mike is describing. Mike is obviously not in a nursing home. Right. I'm guessing from this. Thanks. So if you if any of you listening have an annuity went to your financial advisor and one of the investments that you purchased was an annuity. It's just that. It's an investment. I'm not saying whether it's good bad or in different. It's just an investment. It is not a Medicaid annuity that is very different. And here's how here's how I know. And here's how your going to know that it's not a Medicaid annuity. Meaning when he says it's going to protect me. If I go to the nursing home part of this, right example. The r- the reason, you know, it's not is because Medicaid and newest these can only be purchased by either the individual who's healthy. So this community spouse or the six spouse or the sick individual. Once one of them is in the nursing home. Okay. So again, if you have a.

Mike advisor Todd Lutsky Medicaid Susan powers