35 Burst results for "Media Outlets"

Spotify Wants To Sell You CD-Quality Music

Business Wars Daily

04:25 min | 2 d ago

Spotify Wants To Sell You CD-Quality Music

"I'm happy to be in your earbuds because today we have a story about sound right now. You're listening to a podcast which means the audio you're hearing has been digitally compressed. The highest highs and the lowest lows of the range of sound. You're hearing have brought closer together. Compression generally make sound a little easier on the ears. Well one company. That deals heavily in sound says compressed audio is so out spotify announced last week that it would be adding an additional service to its music subscriptions lossless audio as in sound in its purest form not compressed which means music has more depth and clarity. If you're struggling to imagine what that sounds like just think back to a bygone era remember cds because they're not usually compressed cds deliver lossless audio naturally and spotify. Says it wants to return to that without you. Know making cds thing again spotify. Hi fi will be available to subscribers in select markets later this year. It'll cost more than the nine ninety nine per month users currently pay although spotify hasn't said how much more they say hi fi will let the most discerning listeners. Experienced the music the way artists intended it. The company is just the latest hop on the lossless audio train or i should say track in two thousand. Nineteen amazon rolled out amazon music. Hd for fifteen bucks a month or a little less for prime members and streaming service title offers lossless audio for twenty dollars a month reports the verge but neither rival comes close to spotify's user numbers spotify counts around one hundred fifty five million paid subscribers worldwide while amazon music. Expect to hit forty million this year and it's estimated that title only has around five million subscribers spotify says its users have been asking for higher quality audio so now that it has it it may spell trouble for spotify's smaller competitors but one big name is notably absent from the list of lossless audio providers. And that would be apple music apple. Subscriber numbers are inching up. They hit a little over seventy million subscribers last year and with roughly the same number of songs available as spotify. It would figure that spotify would wanna keep apple at arm's length hence spotify move towards something. Apple does not have and is reportedly not planning to have a paid tier for lossless music apple and spotify have been dealing for a few years in another space. Which you may be familiar with if you're listening to this right now. yes podcasts. While the term more than a decade ago a mix of its ipod and the word broadcast spotify is looking to be the latest dominant force in podcasting unclear at times exactly which companies doing more in the field. Some reports put apple on top in terms of podcast downloads and revenue others put spotify on top either way each companies looking for ways to edge away from the other when it comes to podcasting and for apple that means toying with the idea of a paid subscription service for its podcast library which has always been offered for free bloomberg reported the plans in january and says apple is also aiming to ramp up its creation of original podcasts spotify. Meanwhile plucked one of the country's top. Podcasts the joe rogan experience and made it a spotify exclusive at the beginning of this year. They also recently announced plans to roll out the spotify audience network which it calls a first of its kind audio. Advertising marketplace advertisers will be able to connect with listeners through quote a broad range of content. Spotify said in a statement. The company says the marketplace will allow creators to earn more for their work while delivering a greater impact for advertisers unquote. Podcast wars aside a lossless music tier four spotify seems to be the latest attempt to get the edge on apple for apple though lossless. Music doesn't seem to be on the horizon at least publicly. In fact apple enthusiasts media outlet apple insider said last week that during blind tests twenty fifteen listeners couldn't seem to discern lossless audio from compressed audio being played on an iphone that might mean lossless music might only be a boon for the most discerning listener. Which if you're listening to business daily as you right

Spotify Apple Amazon Joe Rogan Bloomberg
Facebook Takes A Hard Line Against Proposed Australian Law

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Facebook Takes A Hard Line Against Proposed Australian Law

"Facebook has abruptly cut off news to and from a continent. Facebook is blocking users in australia from sharing or reading news stories there several parts to this australian. Publishers cannot post links to their own stories. Ordinary citizens in australia cannot post links to any news stories and in fact people anywhere in the world cannot post news stories that come out of australia. The decision shocked australia news outlets in a huge change for social media in australia. Facebook has blocked news content from being shed on its platform from facebook has taken a stunning step of banning australian uses and publishes from viewing or sharing news articles on its website. What's going on here we've called. Npr tech correspondent shannon bond. I and before we begin we should note that facebook. It's a financial supporter of npr. We cover them like any other companies shannon. Good morning. good morning steve. What caused facebook's move well. Australia is weighing. This proposed law that would force tech companies like facebook to pay big publishers. For linking to their stories this law is trying to address this long running criticism from media companies you know that facebook and google. Npr sponsoring these big tech platforms. Have just sucked up so much of the advertising revenue media outlets around the world. Have these concerns that that's really hurt. The news business news websites just can't compete for advertising with tech giants which are so big so dominant and of course are an important channel to readers. I just wanna know what you're telling me. The law is not even law yet. It's something that's on. Its way to becoming law. And so it's almost a kind of negotiating tactic or lobbying effort. That facebook is said. We're gonna cut you off now right. I mean this fight has been brewing for months. This proposal is expected to become law soon and facebook is just saying it's not going to play with with the rules. Australia is setting which would require platforms to reach deals with publishers to pay for content facebook. Says this law quote fundamentally misunderstands. Its relationship with news outlets view. Is that news that lets choose to post on. Facebook and ultimately publishers benefit more than facebook does and we should say that as this is rolled out. Facebook has acted pretty broadly in terms of blocking things some australian government pages including a fire and rescue agency. Even the weather service had their swipe. Yesterday even facebook's own facebook page was blank in australia. Because it's restoring these pages that have gotten inadvertently caught in the filters are is facebook's response any different than other companies that might be affected by a rule requiring payment in order to to post links. We'll right so the other company could've crosshairs. Here is google which has taken a very different approach. Google had previously also threatened to shut down in australia. It's now reached deals with several big publishers. There most notably it three year global. Deal with newscorp which owns the wall street journal as well as several australian papers. I see. That's notable because newscorp is run by rupert murdoch. he is australian. He's a powerful force in media and politics there. He's been lobbying for years for the tech companies to pay for news content and he has thrown his considerable support behind this law once his companies to be any chance of a like this in the united states. Well i think that's the big concern here and why we're seeing facebook accident act like this. You know it doesn't want to capitulate australia fearing that. Could set a precedent elsewhere and we've heard from lawmakers in canada and europe who say they're open to this approach just last week another. Us tech giant microsoft said it supports version of the australian law and the us. And i think there is concerned that this is something that could we could see here. But you know even if it's just in australia this has big consequences when it comes to. We know that's a problem for facebook. You know it's talked about promoting accurate information. But now people in australia can't post you know. Reputable news stories to counter false claims

Facebook Australia Shannon Bond NPR Tech Giants Newscorp Google Shannon Steve Rupert Murdoch The Wall Street Journal United States Europe Canada Microsoft
More than 3.4 million Texas customers without power as extreme cold throttles electrical system

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

More than 3.4 million Texas customers without power as extreme cold throttles electrical system

"Of customers are still awaiting powers that state battle sub freezing temperatures some tax and suffered through a second straight night without heat and sub freezing temps. CBS News correspondent Omar Villafranca says the challenges of running a statewide state run grid are coming home to roost. The governor here in Texas actually called this storm. The winter version of Hurricane Harvey and one of the issues is that Texas is the on Lee State in the lower 48 that has its own grid. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas is responding to charges by liberals that fossil fuels are to blame for the outages, while conservative media outlets which are blaming the are blaming the outages on renewable energy sources, ERCOT says failures and natural gas, coal and nuclear energy systems are responsible for nearly twice as many outages as frozen wind turbines and solar panels. With millions of Texas residents still without power. This is an issue that's not going away. Stay with us here on Double

Omar Villafranca Electric Reliability Council O Cbs News Texas
"media outlets" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

07:51 min | 2 weeks ago

"media outlets" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"So we very interesting letter last week. But i wanted to check it out before i read it which we did and make sure legit so michael from oregon rights. Bill you asked. Andy know if police officers in the city of portland in the city of seattle despise antifa. I'm a senior police officer for the city of port. And we'll tell you and your viewers at portland. Police officer i know. Which is everybody less. Some newer officers despises antifa. Additionally almost all officers take issue with the anti police and marxist ideologies of the black lives matter movement. Please realize said most cops demoralized doodoo feckless leadership and the effects of a district attorney that dismisses victimized individuals and communities in preference of antifa and blm ideologies save communities are fewer and my interaction with community members. Lead me to believe that quality of life is on healthy in portland. Thank you michael frightening that that's absolutely true. Not only important but everywhere in the world everywhere in the united states particularly if you guys elect far left people hate the cops. People are going to get hurt and the cities are going to dramatically declined. That's it message. Boards mary lou. You are wrong bill. Donald trump did nothing to hurt his country. His supporters are responsible for their own actions resided over many rallies very patriotic. Fill to capacity and fun loving. I attended one myself in iowa. All right listen mary lou. I respect your opinion. I think i've laid out my case in a fairly strong way. Michelle concierge member she gets. Michelle gives direct access to me through email. Bill can you produce evidence if no one wants to investigate. That's a huge problem is true that in many blue states corruption of the election is not going to be investigated. It's true but the federal government could do. It could do it today now if it doesn't do it and we're still waiting for the dorm report. Remember it's almost two years for that then. People have to seriously consider changing the political climate and then by their vote. You want corrupt country. Keep voting for corrupt politicians. Anna concierge. remember. I don't understand why the lengthy comments of senator mcconnell after the acquittal. I explained it tonight. But i'll say mcconnell does not want any part of the trump populist movement jack sugar baker or teeing washington wise donald trump in so quiet. It's not like him because he has no access so social media shut them entirely down networks and most cables won't play anything he records fox news would and newsmax and one america would but you know he's taking a break. I don't think that's a bad thing. Tom milan court albuquerque. New mexico was fascinated by the no spin news last night. Your statement that information has to be given to authorities for them to investigate. Do you really believe that justice barham is interested in doing anything that helps conservatives. No i don't think justice department is doing anything to help any ideology. But you do have a lotta careerists who've been there forever and it's up to the attorney general and bar. I thought was pretty good. I don't know what happened at the end. I don't know what happened. But you gotta have a law enforcement agency again. Investigate can't be mike lindell. Rob shave kopechne new york on long island and he chance of a fair investigation into these nursing home deaths. Now there is now everybody's on it in new york laureate cold spring kentucky love the nose-to-nose faithfully watch you. Every i repeatedly to the organization on k. Street that distributes news to the media. What exactly is the name of organization. Why's it hold so much influence. The conference call most mornings monday to friday. Run often by bonner group b. o. n. n. e. r. but not exclusively so there are a dozen maybe fifteen political action groups paid for by democratic party dollars k. You donate money to the parties parties. Hire these people. These people have conference calls. They send out a message to the media daily. That's how it works. Doug blair on a lou hawaii. How can president biden do executive orders immigration. Going to law you can. That's why texas blocked the deportation order but it has to go to court the system. Edward bida mechanicsville virginia for everyone's consideration people that want single payer healthcare need to observe the vaccine distribution situation excellent point. Do you want to government. Run your health care. Take a look at the covid vaccine. Excellent point donna. Yonkers new york funny. I haven't heard anyone wanting to give up their day off for president state. That's right but if they you know it's like if the president's get marginalized i'll have something else in some other kookie thing martha excellent broadcast as usual. Bill love the killing books. Just finished killing england. It was simply chock full of information. These cancel culture. People need to read it. They'll never get it. They don't care about that. They don't want the truth about the united states. Martha understanding everybody watching. Tonight's understanding listening on the radio. People don't want the truth. They want to impose their ideology on everyone else. By order killing the mob at advance. And you're gonna like it. May fourth could fifty percent off killing crazy horse soy winter. Ebbs we still have terrible weather across the country curl up at a good buck all right when writing to us do not be species as i. Oh you s. I back with harry and david moment. So here's a final thought of the day told you last week that i give gifts to people who help out me or my news organization and that's a nice thing for everybody did now. You don't have to give gives you can write a little. Thank you note or something like that but if somebody is yes solid a big favor something. So i use harry and david they send all kinds of tasty treats and they have a little basket. It looks nice. I spent thousands and thousands of dollars on them this year or last year. So i ordered a basket to send somebody and it didn't get there. So i have my assists in the best in the world. Call harry and david. Cg you know we ordered this can get there and person said well too bad. We'll give you your money back. We away away away. We need an explanation now. Then we went to the pr person and a person pr person that to bed. Okay so then. I did the final thoughts and look when you order on the internet. Be very very careful because you get host is not hard hose much you walk into a store in your town. You order something. You're looking at somebody they.

Michelle Doug blair michael iowa Andy thousands mike lindell donald trump mary lou tonight Donald trump last year last week harry fifty percent Martha new york today May fourth this year
Pro-Navalny 'flashlight' protests light up Russian cities

Not Free America

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Pro-Navalny 'flashlight' protests light up Russian cities

"And Russia's imprisoned opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, urged supporters to use flashlights is a sign of unity. Boxes, Trey Yingst reports. We saw state media outlets running an interview with President Putin in the piece. He talks about how he believes the West is trying to contain his country. The Russian head of state was asked about the arrest of Alexey Navalny, who is still in jail after being taken into custody last month. Putin claimed international bodies who have demanded Navalny's release, are trying to isolate Russia as it succeeds in other areas. Thousands of protesters have been arrested parts of

Alexei Navalny Trey Yingst President Putin Alexey Navalny Russia Navalny Putin
A junta shuts down a nations data networks

The CyberWire

05:28 min | 3 weeks ago

A junta shuts down a nations data networks

"On saturday. Myanmar's ministry of transport and communications directed that all mobile operators serving the country blocked the nation's data network voice and sms. services will remain available tech crunch reports. The general interdiction of data services follows earlier decisions by the country's new military government to block. I facebook and instagram and twitter. The ruling junta has sought to tamp down opportunities for mobilization of dissent and opposition since it took power in a coup last month the grey zone podcast yesterday featured an interview with g h q director jeremy fleming and general sir patrick sanders head of the. Uk's strategic command also responsible for military cyber operations in which they described britain cyber operations against isis british cyber forces disrupted the terrorist groups drone operations denied their operators mobile service and interfered with online propaganda. The campaign by britain's national cyber forces most active in two thousand sixteen and twenty seventeen is sky. News says the. Uk's only publicly avowed offensive cyber operation to date the counter propaganda influence. Operation is in some ways the most interesting intrusive of the efforts fleming is quoted as saying we prevented their propaganda both through physical actions on the battlefield but also remotely getting to their servers getting to the places. They stored their material and quote the intrusion into isis networks extended to locking isis members. Out of accounts deleting or altering the group's information and taking down online posts and videos general sanders said quote. We wanted to ensure that when they tried to coordinate attacks on our forces their devices didn't work that they couldn't trust the orders that were coming to them their seniors and quote. He added that. Deception and misdirection were important ways of degrading isis combat power tactically british cyber operators said to have been working closely with allies including the us were able to block isis commanders orders from reaching subordinates. And we're also able to misdirect isis forces on the ground. In some cases sending their units into kill zones. It was general. Sanders explained a combined arms multi domain effort. The cyber operations didn't stand on their own. He said quote we wanted to deceive them and to misdirect them to make them less. Effective less cohesive and sap them morale. But you can't just do that in cyberspace. You have to coordinate and integrate that with activities that are going on on the ground whether it's from our own forces special forces and others and quote former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency. Chris crabs drew some press attention over the weekend with an interview. He gave the financial times the headline in the media outlet. Silicon is representative quote ex. Us cyber boss calls for military strikes on ransomware. Hackers it says which suggests a brace of thomas hawks prancing downtown to hit a gregor extortionists in their parents or maybe pre dawn vertical insertion of a ranger battalion to put paid to the ragnar locker gang in whatever tacky cybercafe. They're using but a close reading or actually a pretty casual reading of krebs remarks indicates that he's pretty much closer in his thinking to ghg cues fleming than he is to say. Curtis lemay or george patton. His point is that ransomware is sufficiently destructive and costly to make it worth governments wild to actively disrupt the gangs operations military cyber units like us cyber command. The uk's national cyber force have disruptive capabilities law enforcement organizations don't and it might be useful to think about how they might be used if at all there may be decisive legal objections to doing so on the other hand. There might be some legal models under which that kind of action might be legitimately organized. What if ransomware actors could be treated like pirates for example new post reports that kaspersky has discerned new activity by the crew using the silent fade. Malware silent fade is an online ad fraud operation that kaspersky has observed resurgent against victims in asia and europe. They'll be worth watching. The silent fade. Gang is thought to have been responsible for some four million dollars in fraud against facebook users. Twenty nineteen security firm checkpoints updates on iranian cyber threat actors domestic kitten and infield warns that both groups remain active mostly against dissident targets. Checkpoint calls them advanced and rights that they have a lot in common quote. Both groups have conducted long cyber attacks and intrusive surveillance campaigns which target both individuals mobile devices and personal computers. The operators of these campaigns are clearly active responsive and constantly seeking new attack vectors and techniques to ensure the longevity of their operations and quote

Ministry Of Transport And Comm Jeremy Fleming General Sir Patrick Sanders Britain UK Myanmar Instagram Us Cybersecurity And Infrastru Chris Crabs Fleming George Patton Facebook Sanders Twitter National Cyber Force Curtis Lemay Krebs United States Silicon
Building a Grassroots Movement From Scratch

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Building a Grassroots Movement From Scratch

"Two thousand and four memoir guidebook called looking for a few good mom's how one mom rallied a million others against the gun lobby earned her the could spoil award from oprah. The book was also cited by the atlantic in two thousand eight as one of the best books on female leadership in two thousand fifteen her daily beast essay. How to organize. The mother of all protests led to a nationwide grassroots effort. The following year called the concert across america to end gun violence in which she served as co chair also in two thousand sixteen co produced and co directed the award winning documentary five a week about the women of louisiana who reform the state's domestic violence laws by getting the nra to stand down over the years. She's promoted gun violence prevention and grassroots activism in hundreds of media outlets including meet the press face the nation the today show and the nbc nightly news in addition to her activism. Donna has spent most of her professional career in new york city at the cbs network. On its communications team. She has represented numerous high profile talent. Including dan rather david letterman and bob schieffer. I'm also joined by sheikha hamilton. She is currently the national organizing and chapter development manager for the brady campaign to prevent gun by violence. She's been working on the issue of gun violence prevention since the year. Two thousand one while living in detroit at the time she helped organize million mom march the largest protests against gun violence in the us history until two thousand eighteen in the march for our lives. She's worked on this issue every day. Since then held various roles from chapter leader the state chapter president to the first elected million mom march leader elected to the brady campaign board of trustees to the national spokesperson for the million mom march. Rally to renew the assault weapons ban. She has also appeared on cnn msnbc and a host of media outlets. She is a licensed attorney in california and michigan. Her boots are on the ground and she has worked for decades to pass gun control legislation in her home. State worth noting all of those credentials. Both of you donna. And she thank you for having to stone who anka joan. So we've all sat in front of tv news and seeing the horrors of gun violence. We can rattle off the names. Columbine sandy ok- oklahoma city. Pulse las vegas and those literally just came off the top of my head in a hot second. Some of us gas cry others write checks. Many don't do much of anything. I'd really like to hear what you believe. It takes to get off the couch and do something can start with donna. And then she got great well. I didn't really have foot. Spur right off the bat. It took me about a week to actually hall cap without police to get an application to march on washington i. I tried to volunteer of one of the many noble and fabulous gun violence prevention nonprofits in our existed. But what. I didn't realize at the time that they get death. Threats constantly get harassing phone calls and so there are a lot of. It's very hard to reach our back. Then you know one of these nonprofits. So i tried for about a week to volunteer and i got very frustrated or mike okay. Here's a problem. I know there must be lots of people just like me who wanna volunteer and they have nowhere to go. I did what i think. A lotta women. Do i picked up the phone. And i called women friends and i said i applied for permit to march on washington and i need of your help and get it was on a seven day says from being outraged by that shooting to actually plans to the permanent. So i i wanna put a pin in and come back to something. You said that. I want my listeners to really attend to. Which is that. Donna tried to reach out to nonprofit organization. Say hey i'm here. I'm outraged and i'm available and i wanna help and i'm not sure. The donna is the only person that has had an experience like that she got. What did it take for you to say. I've had enough. I want to do something about this. Well i i know i feel like it's a build up I grew up in california where there were a lot of shootings right back in the eighties and early nineties. And i didn't do anything about i. Stockton schoolyard shooting. There was a law firm shooting right across from where i worked. I didn't do anything. I was a young mom holding my baby when columbine happened at endure anything but then that mother instinct kicked in when i saw little blip on the news saying million moms are marching in dc. I called up my friend who worked for my congresswoman and said what are you going to do about it. And then i went to the million mom march website in. This is the key thing i went there. It was very simple. It said the problem and the solutions and how to get involved. I emailed the purse. I it just email. I emailed and would i don't know maybe in an hour i got a response and they asked me to come to a meeting. Me was like that i was

Cbs Network Sheikha Hamilton Anka Joan Columbine Sandy Donna Bob Schieffer NRA Oprah David Letterman Atlantic Mike Okay NBC Louisiana America New York City Msnbc DAN Detroit CNN
No charges recommended for officer who shot Ashli Babbitt during Capitol riot

Hammer and Nigel

03:41 min | Last month

No charges recommended for officer who shot Ashli Babbitt during Capitol riot

"Investigation into the fatal shooting of a protester during the January 6 capital riots has been completed. The capital officer has not been charged. The investigation found the shooting was quote an appropriate use of force. Remember unauthorized shot the 35 year old Air Force veteran Ashley Babbitt. She was trying to climb through a shattered window to reach the House chamber and she was gunned down. Um Listen, I'll be the bad guy here. I'm okay with that shooting. Now. I don't want anybody to die. Let's not get it twisted. But if you breach the capital where the most powerful people in the world are in there having some sort of session, you can't be shocked when something bad happens to you. There's a reason why these senators have security detail, right? It's Z the same thing, man with the police action shooting in any way, shape or form like across the country. Some of these police action shootings where People aren't complying. People aren't putting their hands up. People like kind of reach back into the car for something and the police are like, Look, I've got a gun. Don't you move and they don't comply. I don't think they deserved to die. But Give the chances increase exponentially. When you don't hate what the officer is saying, and she was unarmed, correct, Correct, But you're breaking into the nation's capital. You're breaking windows where members of the Congress could be still doing telling you man. The riots throughout this country every single night for weeks on end, police precincts burned to the ground in cities. If a police officer would have killed somebody trying to get into a precinct that was unarmed. There would be more rights and more demonstrations and more protests in that person's name would probably be on the back of professional athletes jersey If Ashley Babbitt were African American, Do you think you'd see the same thing? Because I do. Well, I think this is all e mean. You notice how the memorial for the Capitol police officers and you know the wall of thank you cards and that we support the Capitol police and thank you for doing your duty. Uh okay. That's fine. I'm glad there was support for the police officers and they were heroes there and some died. Um, but I didn't see the same outpouring. Of support for police officers that were defending cities across the nation. Some in some cases, they were hampered hands tied behind their backs, not getting the support they needed from from local administration running the show, including Indianapolis, So it's almost like certain sections of this Country as well as national media outlets. They're willing to say, OK, they got what they deserved when they think it's trump supporters. Yes, but when its members of the community or members of the Black lives matter movement, then it's a completely different ball game. It's a double standard. It's there. You're absolutely right. I wish you would have died. I wish you would have broken through that wall. I know the officers on the other side had no clue it was coming through, and they warned him. And I again I don't think she deserved to die. She was unarmed, but man, the chances of something very bad happening. Increase. I don't know what the percentage is a lot of the what the scientific number would be. But I would say something bad, including dying. If you don't comply with the police officer, you I mean, it's up in the air at that point, man, it's It's a coin flip whether you're coming out of there alive or not, If you don't comply.

Ashley Babbitt House Chamber Capitol Police Air Force Congress Indianapolis
Defamation Lawsuit: Dominion Voting Systems Sues Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani For $1.3 Billion

The Takeaway

00:54 sec | Last month

Defamation Lawsuit: Dominion Voting Systems Sues Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani For $1.3 Billion

"Dominion voting system says it's planning more defamation lawsuits against others who promoted Trump's baseless claims of election fraud that could include media outlets. Here's Colorado Public Radio's Bento Brookland. Dominion is seeking $1.3 billion in damages from former Trump attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell over their public claims that the company rates the election for President Joe Biden. Tom Claire is representing Dominion and says it's preparing other suits, and we're looking at everybody on what role they played in either making statements themselves about Dominion or perpetuating the false statements that were made. So at this stage, we have not ruled anyone else, Claire says. No amount of money can reverse the false IDs, he says. Millions of people now believe about the company. Or repair the reputational and financial damage to

Dominion Voting System Colorado Public Radio Donald Trump Sidney Powell President Joe Biden Tom Claire Rudy Giuliani Dominion Claire
What Went Wrong With Cyberpunk 2077?

Kinda Funny Games Daily

08:46 min | Last month

What Went Wrong With Cyberpunk 2077?

"Sarah twenty. Seventy seven was twenty. Twenty s hottest. Game in shaping up to be a good enough launch when reviews for the pc version began trickling out a few days before december. Twelve release date but once players got their hands on syrup. Twenty seventy seven especially the. Ps four and xbox one versions excitement turned into frustration as players encountered bugs glitches in more in a report from bloomberg's jason schreier developers. That city project red knew the game was not ready for launch in two thousand twenty according developer quote. They expected the game to you. Ready in twenty twenty. Two based on the progress team was making back in two thousand nineteen beyond just bugs and glitches. Sarah sarah overall performance in playability on consoles like the base. Ps four and xbox one reviled. I gave the concert versions of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven specifically a four in its review. One hurdle was that the developers tried to develop the engine and game simultaneously decision. One developer cyberpunk says was like quote trying to drive a train while the tracks are being laid in front of you at the same time. According to bloomberg. Sarah punk twenty-seven versions not the version have been hammered by players for for glitches and bugs. Some bugs which are game raking and ended up crashing the entire game or sometimes the system is being played on and we'll put a pause there because also acknowledge the pc version does have its fisher. Bugs also but the conservation is definitely have way more issues in the pc version back to the article developers seemingly pushed through challenges by believing they could overcome these obstacles themselves. Similar to the infamous. By where magic but sarah punk twenty seventy seven was developed through periods of intense crunch and a follow up to follow a tweet shire claims that despite promises from management that crunch would not be required. Some managers guilty employees into working more hours by saying other employees will work longer to pick up the slack. Salaries were also reportedly low with one junior programmer. Making around seven hundred dollars a month as for why early previews of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven demo to the public at events like e. three twenty nineteen look better than the final product. That's because the demo was entirely fake. According to the report neither code nor the gameplay was finalized when the demo was made in months spent working on a fake demo took away from developing the full game schrafft's report also references things like cultural challenges caused by language barriers There's this whole double dip release strategy that the studio wanted to go for where The game officers meant to come out in spring The reason why one reason why they wanted to come out. Spring was so that they could release on current. I guess now last gen consoles and then released again on next gen consoles and have that double dip having both those console versions out obviously game got delayed and so that didn't happen happen. The exact way they wanted to even though we still have next inversions coming scheduled later this year and then another thing that stri- report references and the fact that the game was announced in two thousand twelve but apparently full development didn't start until late two thousand sixteen. Tim where do you stand with all this. I mean look at this point. where do i stand with. Like one of the most complicated. Just like there's so many different facets that go into this right like at the end of the day. I stand against the project red and how this all went down like we. How many times do we need to say like this game should not have been released the way that it was just period outing times. Do we need to say that. Like crunch is bad and we need to fix all this stuff. All this is to me. Is we being now in. Twenty twenty one firmly in twenty twenty one developers. Publishers media outlets. Everybody they need to open their eyes to start paying a little bit more attention. Because if you make these mistakes constantly you do not change. You do not fix. Despite the countless flags that have went up for the last decade specifically the last couple of years. Jason is gonna get you. Jason tries to get in there and exposed the living. Fuck out of you and your the entire team and that it hits a point where there is no recovering from that. So it's like that fear alone should probably motivate you to make some changes on top of the you know human decency side of the whole thing right but this is inevitable. Of course shire was going to get in there and of course he was going to talk to people and of course that's going to crap narrative that is extremely not favorable to cd project red. For good reason. They made a lot of very very very poor choices. Yeah now reading this report like a lot of it is not surprising just given the context of how everything's gone down right like seeing the the game delayed multiple times like from this bring into september from september and november and then from november into december. I think that paints a clear picture of okay. Yeah like we know. This thing isn't ready yet but we think we can get there. Okay no like. It's not ready but we we think we can get there with the next delay and that combined with the idea of okay. Yeah no we want to release twice so that we can double dip on consoles And them having to delay into basically the next generation was still have the current gen versions only available. I think that speaks to the fact that they they understood that they weren't ready And it's very much seems like a shit or get off the pot situation for them. All right yeah. We got to put this thing because if we don't like we're not gonna make the money on it and we can't keep people waiting we'll this game everybody be ready. I feel like those questions get asked overall. This feels like a tale of a studio thinking that because they put out a successful project that means that they can't have a fail and that is very evident that specific quote from Jason's article where he talks about. How like people were challenging the timeframe of sarah pumpkin whether or not they could get on time and somebody basically answered back. We'll figure it out along the way because he made the winter three and that is not an acceptable answer right like that shouldn't be cause for complacency. Because you put out incredible project. Five years ago i forget if i mentioned this in the actual article but like there was also the reference of how quickly the team grew after the witcher. Three like basically. The team doubled in size between the wichita. Three and cd project red and they didn't necessarily account for that. And so when you have a team that grows like that. And you don't your your company culture and your pipelines and your processes don't grow alongside that to allow for that For for that ease of growth. Then yeah you're gonna have issues like you can't you can't you can't operate like a big company but also still behave like the small indie company in that. Seems like a lot of what they're what they're doing. Which is unfortunate. Because that's result in sarah twenty seventy seven. Yeah absolutely you know the. I think most shocking thing to come from this are the implications. That three was fake. Like that to be something that i struggled to fully believe or fully. Get behind this on so much. Believe as budgets. Get behind that statement. Because it's like all demos or fake demos to some extent. And i feel like that's this to me is a perfect example of when it rains it pours and it's like when you make dire mistakes you're going to get called out and then you get exposed for every single thing To levels that you wouldn't necessarily be criticized and everything else right you know But anyways like yeah the the each. I definitely want to know more about of him implying. It's fake or not. We do have more context on that. Because adam consider not consistent adam oh no it. Is adam barsky. Yeah from cd project. Red actually responded on twitter. Quote tweeted jason with a whole response. I'm gonna pull from adam. Bankers with adam. Bankers did a good write up on it. From aegean the response goes like this. Adebayo adebayo the steam ahead of cd project. Red has responded to a recent report regarding cyberpunk twenty seventy seven alleged fake three demo and development issues while it's hard for a trade show game demo not to be a test of vision or vertical slice two years before the game ships. But that doesn't mean it's fake but ask you wrote. Compare the demo with the game. Look at the at the other side. They're dum dum dum dum. I'm not sure how that's pronounced. But look at the dumdum seen or the car chase or the many other things with the people reading your article may not know is that games are not made in a linear fashion and start looking like the final product. Only a few months after launch or a few months before launched if you look at that demo now is different. Yes but that's what the work in progress watermark is for. Our final game looks implies way better than than what the demo ever was as for missing features that's part of the creation process features features. Come and go as we see if they worker not also car bush's exist in the final game almost verbatim to what we showed in the in the demo.

Sarah Twenty Jason Schreier Sarah Sarah Sarah Punk Bloomberg Schrafft Jason Fisher Sarah Pumpkin TIM Adam Adam Barsky Wichita Adebayo Adebayo Sarah Twitter Bush
House votes to more than triple coronavirus relief stimulus checks

Philadelphia's Morning Answer

01:34 min | 2 months ago

House votes to more than triple coronavirus relief stimulus checks

"Doubt. So again, 600 Bucks or $2000 House passed a stimulus check boost as Republicans splinter this from Politico House vetoed overwhelmingly Monday to roughly triple Pandemic related stimulus checks, but it may amount to more of a political maneuver than an effort. Who ultimately deliver additional relief. Mm. 2 75 to 1 34 the vote that came with a few dozen Republicans joining nearly all Democrats to back this increase, which was first demanded by President Donald Trump last week as he threatened to kill a massive aid package. So you love politico. Threatened to kill threatened to kill what the hell has Congress been doing for the last? 89 months Now we know Pelosi waited. This is what kills me. It takes the president to come out and be like guys. What is in this thing? This is stupid. This is what you've spent all this time on. So, yes, you tune into all the mainstream media outlets and, yes, They're killing Donald Trump and Republicans Now they're going to blame all of this on the turtle. This is this moving forward The turtle Mitch McConnell, you watch He's going to be blamed for completely falling flat. And not delivering coronavirus stimulus. For the well, Well, I guess maybe not 89 months we have the cares Act. Early in the year. So I guess we're looking at six months.

Politico House President Donald Trump Bucks House Pelosi Congress Donald Trump Mitch Mcconnell
Lawmakers pass bill to restrict websites that 'discriminate' against Russian media

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

Lawmakers pass bill to restrict websites that 'discriminate' against Russian media

"In russia have approved a bill that allows authorities to block foreign websites they deemed discriminatory to russian media. Npr's lucian kim reports from moscow russia's lower house of parliament. The duma passed a law as retaliation against american social media. Companies that explicitly label content produced by russian state media outlets under the legislation. Russian authorities will be able to block or slow. Down such sites kremlin critics like opposition leader alexei navalny have used twitter and youtube to reach millions of russians bypassing censorship on state television president vladimir putin has called for russia come up with its own social media platforms to gain greater control. Another law passed. Wednesday will let the government brand russian citizens as foreign agents if they have ties abroad and require news outlets to label them that way in their reports lucian kim. Npr news moscow.

Lucian Kim Russia House Of Parliament Alexei Navalny Duma NPR Moscow Vladimir Putin Youtube Twitter
Louisiana State University parts ways with Bo Pelini after one season as Tigers overhaul defensive coaching staff

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:31 min | 2 months ago

Louisiana State University parts ways with Bo Pelini after one season as Tigers overhaul defensive coaching staff

"There are multiple reports out there right now. That bo pollini is gone from. Lsu that Experiment did not work very well. So several media outlets reporting this hour. That bo pollini is not coming back on twenty one. That was certainly the most controversial decision that it owes. You're on made let's Welcome in stewart. Mandel to the program. Stuart thank you very much Before we even get to the ball situation. I'd like to get your thoughts on that Well paul i gue-. I guess i would say that. That's something that we've all expected. Since about the second game of the season it just a bad higher and you know it's interesting that a year ago Does ron was getting all the praise in the world for an inspired Higher joe brady the passing game coordinator. Who kinda helps And it was instrumental in joe burrow's rise and that national championship. And then you had some staff changes to make this after this past season and we hire both lean. He's a big name and he's had success before and i get that but it just seemed like it was just such a terrible fit. He tried to revamp their scheme entirely. And this was a program. That had success under dave randall. On defense it wasn't broken. Tried to completely revamp the scheme regardless of the personnel. They lost so many guys to the draft last year and then and then even more before the season. And i just wasn't a good fit and just just a historically bad defensively shoot this year.

Bo Pollini Joe Brady LSU Joe Burrow Mandel Stuart Stewart Paul RON Dave Randall
Organic Traffic Strategies To Grow Your Audience Quickly

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Organic Traffic Strategies To Grow Your Audience Quickly

"An excellent first. Date is kinda like attracting organic traffic. You wanna show up authentically so that your audience can you and if all goes well you want them to come back for more and if you show up time and time again and you build a relationship and hip hit things off in time you might want that person to commit to a long term relationship aka subscribe to your email list and eventually become a loyal customer so you see the connection right if you want to attract organic traffic. You've gotta show up authentically show up like yourself right from the get-go be real. Listen more than you talk and really make the time for your audience and then from there show up consistently build that relationship add value. Make your audience's lives better and well. I wish there was. There just isn't a magic bullet for growing your business with organic traffic instead. It all goes back to something. I've been preaching for as long as i can remember consistency. if you're not showing up consistently at least in one place. The strategies we talk about today won't work. I don't want this to discourage you. I say that to get you to commit to creating consistent content. I don't care if that's a blog or podcast or youtube video or facebook live or instagram live. It doesn't matter what matters is that every week. You're building that credibility and dependability. For new en- loyal followers. Because it's one thing to podcast weekly decree to lead magnet. That's enticing to your ideal customer but what if you're just starting now just because you're creating content consistently in you have an awesome free. Be to put out. There doesn't automatically mean your ideal customers are going to easily find you like that and magically jump onto your email list. I'm snapping emphasis there. I wish the old saying build it and they will come true but in the world of online marketing you have to go out there in capture attention. So commit to these three strategies. I'm going to share with you. Commit to showing up and commit to growing your business deal. Let's dive in the first strategy. Is all about hitching yourself to other experts publications or established influencers in your area of expertise. And don't you worry. I'm gonna give you an example of just how to go about pitching yourself even if you're just starting out now here's some ways you pick yourself as a guest. However this is not an exhaustive list and various for every industry. But it should give you an idea and get your creative juices flowing now. You could guess blog. You could be on someone else's podcast. You could join someone on their instagram or facebook. Lives or maybe you get featured in a media outlet. But here's the deal first step you wanna sit down and brainstorm all the possible businesses and experts that you could connect with depending on your niche. Maybe you want to spot in parenting magazine or maybe yoga lifestyle. Or perhaps you're a social media expert and you want to be interviewed by jasmin star on our podcast or you're in the finance industry and you want to join rachel cruze for facebook live. You get the point. I say big now to make this happen. We have to start with your pitch angle and how you'll position yourself. It's always important that you lead from a place of service and give a ton of value instead of making your pitch about yourself. Make sure to make it about their audience in terms of what their audience wants and what will resonate with their audience. The most but good news. If you come from a place of service right from the get go you will stand out. Among all the other pitches that they are getting on a daily basis. Now in addition you'll want to take your story or your expertise and make it specific to that publication or audience. So this is really important. Your pitch should be timely relevant. That means do your research take at least a week to do a full immersion. I don't mean the entire week. Just take some time throughout the week to do a full immersion into their content and into their audience. Get to know them on an intimate level. Here's how the pitch yourself and just know. I have a free resource with a pitch email. Template in the show notes. So go to amy dot online forward slash three five to amy dot online forward slash. Three five two. Now also. if you're nervous just remember that if you never ask it will never happen. The worst thing is that they could say no. And you're not gonna die. You're

Facebook Rachel Cruze Youtube Jasmin Amy Dot
Tahinis Restaurants Puts It's Entire Cash Reserves Into Bitcoin

The Cryptoverse

07:29 min | 3 months ago

Tahinis Restaurants Puts It's Entire Cash Reserves Into Bitcoin

"I think is this. Is chris coney speaking welcome back so you guys might have seen michael salo over the news media outlets recently. The ceo micro strategy You might be familiar with this already. So i'm not going to reiterate. The whole thing is about micro strategy put in most of that corporate cash reserves into bitcoin and then they make a business case for that so yes. We all familiar with that. We were just waiting for that first. Domino to start hitting and snowballing to other companies which is now happening. I was just browsing the old twitter as i do and chemicals this tweet from to heaney's restaurants who basically have just done the same thing and they have this tweet storms. I'm going to read out to you as to why they've done. What's microsoft's don as well now to heaney's restaurants. I've never headed them. But as far as i can tell. A canadian based company is a franchise of mediterranean restaurants. So that we go thus thus who. Who's talking here. So if you want to follow these guys check the tweets out. It's at the real to heaney's which ta h- h. I n i s to heaney's the real to heaney's that's the twitter handle so check this out. This is from the first of december. This was yesterday at five pm. Uk time so it says we converted our entire reserves to bitcoin in august. Twenty twenty. and since then we've been ridiculed and cold irresponsible fools in our community our reserves in dollah. Tam's doubled since then. Here's why we continue to buy bitcoin forever. Time for a threat. So festival says right that they did in august. Why is it took me this long to hear about it. Have you guys head about this already. Let me know if you already had about this book. This is the first. I've heard about it. And that's what august. September october november four five months ago. They did this. Maybe they just didn't say anything and didn't wanna say anything but it sounds like 'cause we've been ridiculed for it. Well they must've told somebody that follow is all the clients customers knew about it but i didn't say that we got so he goes the tweet storm the first thing they say is our current macroeconomic environment implies that there's going to be a ten to fifteen percent expansion twala monetary supply every year for the next three to five years in breakfast or more assets are going to inflate. Bitcoin is digital gold. And it's going to have the highest real yield because tween You can't pick any more of it old. The other investments are overvalued trades bonds our ethical stocks are grossly valued. Gold is a shitty says shitty store value that debases by two percent a year. Gold is a twenty twenty scam. You'll see governments and institutions pumping it to dump on retail investors who are misinformed because bitcoin is a thousand times better across all aspects. All these investments have some upside and more downside. In our opinion there is no way for the average person to get an etch. Bitcoin hasn't asymmetric proposition. You can get an edge here because it has a history that scared most people away. It hasn't been embraced by all the institutional community. That's changing fast. Now if you confront run this will this shift. Then you have an edge. It's being traditionally difficult to buy an old people can't pick up the phone and buy it if you go through the trouble of how to acquire insecure. It's that will give you an edge. It has all the technology upside of apple. Google facebook and amazon combined from a decade ago. And you saw what they did over the last decade. I get tweet namik says bitcoin is the so. That's a that's a combination. The fast fiber didn't i didn't segment in the b- go twenty six as they go on. Bitcoin is the successful successful digital monetary network. If you come into it right now you'll coming in at least so you're coming in at three hundred and fifty billion market cap. And it's unstoppable at this point so it makes sense to be at the ailey to this threat. Trend bowed pony trend. No threat as the price goes up. The value of the offering goes up because liquidity is the value proposition. This is an example of something where the higher the price the mo- value. We get the more people want to have it. And the more robust against this is not true with a stock as the price of a stock goes up it dilemma from its cash flow and it's p. price-to-earnings ratio goes from twenty to forty to sixty to a hundred as with many things as the price goes up. The risk gets higher with bitcoin. As the price goes up the gets lower. It's such a simple beautifully engineered. Winder that doesn't have all the competitive risks that so many other things have because it is so very simple is just twenty one million gold coins in cyberspace which divide all of the competitors. Bitcoin is the winner. They go on by one or a fraction of one and as people adopt the network value proposition increases as the technology gets better. The value proposition increases and his people like get more productive. They'll swap more cash flows into it and the value proposition increases. They go on to say and essential banks print more money. The value proposition increases again. That's just an elevator pitch. The bitcoin rabbit hole goes a lot deeper. If you're interested dilemma. Let us know we would like to thank the cyber hornets. The honey badges the huddle as the maximalists the developers and the good economists without them we would still be in the duck. Educate yourself look is when knowledge meets opportunity also followers for some amazing content. So they we got. They don't specify in this tweet stone. Exactly how much money into has millions of dollars they put into. Bitcoin as reserves micro strategy did actually say how much they put in. All this says in the fest we is. We've converted our entire reserves to bitcoin. So you know. One hundred percent of their reserves. So i suppose that means more doesn't it. What proportion of the company's assets will preserve the cash reserves. They put into bitcoin not the amount. 'cause if micro strategy said we've bought five hundred million dollars worth of bitcoin and that was only ten or twenty percent of their their reserves. It would make me less than putting all right. So i think that's a good metric. What proportion of the companies reserves not. How much money do they invest in it. Because that's more this objective risk that the company is taking rather than the objective value placed on the stack of money right so that we got restaurants the next company to put all of the business currency reserves into bitcoin. Who's going to be next. Who do you think's going to be next. Let me know.

Heaney Bitcoin Chris Coney Michael Salo Dollah Namik Domino TAM Gold Mediterranean Microsoft Twitter UK Winder Amazon
Boston - Rhode Island high schools to move to 25% capacity, sports canceled until Jan.

Ron St. Pierre

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Boston - Rhode Island high schools to move to 25% capacity, sports canceled until Jan.

"Rhode Island's high schools will shift a 25% capacity after Thanksgiving. According to a letter obtained by multiple media outlets from the state, a deputy education commissioner to school superintendents on November 30th high schools will transition to a restricted plan developed earlier this year. The plan includes remote learning for the majority of students organize schools. Sports will also be canceled until after the new year. Governor Gina Raimondo is expected to talk about the changes at her weekly coronavirus press briefing today.

Rhode Island Gina Raimondo
Radio France Internationale publishes obituaries of people still alive

Kottke Ride Home

02:30 min | 3 months ago

Radio France Internationale publishes obituaries of people still alive

"Radio france international accidentally published the obituaries of bunch of famous. And still very much alive people including the queen of england. The radio station has since apologized for what it said was a technical problem that occurred when they were moving their website over to a new content management system the bbc notes that media outlets will often pre right the obituaries of high profile individuals in order to have them on hand to publish quickly in the wake of someone's passing at whatever that the broadcaster accidentally published a hundred draft stories quote. Not just to its own site but to partner sites including google and yahoo end quote is fairly mortifying almost literally i suppose i mean while it may be a common occurrence to pre right these obituaries. It certainly doesn't help. Our climate of misinformation and fake celebrity deaths trending on twitter every other day. Quoting the bbc. French businessman bernie tabby seventy seven. Who was on the list of people who had their death notice published by f. I has had his obituary published on at least two occasions by other news outlets and quotes other living humans whose obituaries were published today. By radio france international include president. Jimmy carter ayatollah committee and clint eastwood in mansfield joked on twitter quote. Lots of outraged people writing in demanding to know why they aren't important. Enough to have a pre written obituary ready and quotes and as somebody else pointed out on twitter. This is a bit reminiscent of the case of romanian man. Constantine rail you whose wife ordered a death certificate for him after he'd been gone in turkey for a decade seeking employment in losing touch with his family upon returning to romania and finding out what had happened he tried to get the death certificate overturned but the courts said he showed up too late to appeal and the death certificate for the dude standing there in their office asking about it would remain. Valid really was officially deceased for two years. During which time he was unable to find employment since all of his paperwork was invalid before the country finally overturned his death certificate in two thousand eighteen. Fortunately for those prematurely mourned by radio. France international today returning to the land of the legal living will not require jumping through quite as many hoops

Bernie Tabby BBC Queen Of England France Jimmy Carter Ayatollah Twitter Constantine Rail Yahoo Clint Eastwood Mansfield Google Romania Turkey
Social-Media Companies Took an Aggressive Stance During the Election. Will It Continue?

C-SPAN Programming

07:20 min | 4 months ago

Social-Media Companies Took an Aggressive Stance During the Election. Will It Continue?

"We heard leading up to the election was the role of social media companies, particularly how they monitor political discourse. That's the subject of a story by Emily Glaser TECH In Politics reporter for The Wall Street Journal. She joins us now. Thanks for joining us. I'm having So the headline of your story talks about social media companies and the aggressive stance they took. Let's start with that. How would you characterize that? Companies have been doing more and more to regulate political content over the last year or so, but we really thought and pick it up. During election weakened right beforehand, Twitter took a couple of moves to limit the spread of viral content on this platform, and to stop the spread of misinformation on Facebook and Google, Very Facebook and Twitter have been looking more moved to Rabel Post that might be misreading a pulse and then YouTube ultimate for their platforms down, wearing content back of the building, But mental election week where we saw that happening, built throttle Twitter with Regularly labeling President Trump's tweet that had an accurate information about the election and that you've been picked down some groups. What was the justification for the stepped up effort? The air in a bit of a tough position because there isn't a lot of regulation on content, moderation. So the second they find themselves calling the moves in the shop, and they don't always do it consistently, but it because there was a sense that they really wanted to have accurate information out about the recollection and President Trump had been treating Herman thank the election was rigged Question of mail in ballots and other measures. There was an effort that these tech companies had to take matters into their own hands and effort to try to prevent the spread of misinformation, inaccurate information getting out to their hundreds of millions of users. One of the things you wrote, is that the companies are being put in a position to determine what they believe is true. And what is not, in a sense, how comfortable were these companies with that approach? Not very initially backed her shore. You know, they look, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been talking a lot about the free speech and how that's very important to him. He said that quite frequently, but we both him on. Other tech executives, including Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey consistently speak about the political content on their platforms as it got closer and closer to the U. S election, and I think it finally had a turning point in the election week. I'm certainly after The Associated Press and other media outlets called the presidential race for from the vice President Joe Biden, now president elect, and we've yet to see President Trump. Conceded the race. And so even though for some, the election is over on the social platforms, it is still happening, and they're still trying to trying to figure out what moves they need to make so that their users are getting accurate information. Well, thanks for the lead up to that, because what the process now I guess where do they go from here? Well, we've reported today that Facebook and Google plan to continue banning political ads under platforms several weeks to prevent confusion about election. Results. That's according to people familiar with the matter in an e mail that we reviewed. They actually told advertisers and email Wednesday morning that it would continue the postelection ban on political ads for another month, and I'll just quote they said quote, while multiple sources have protected presidential winner. We still believe it's important to help prevent confusion or abuse on our platform. I might also add that Twitter's measures to limit the spread of ire ality are so continuing and our understanding is with Brazil municipal elections coming up later this month there no plan to On teams those measures yet and what I think we're all waiting for How long these changes that you need the platform that means specifically around addressing her algorithms and pulling down spread of potentially viral information, and it doesn't look like anything is immediate from our reporting, but they're also Not necessarily permanent move because of the resources, the manpower and on the fact that usually these companies take global approach isn't and this isn't a global post right now. It's pretty specific to the US election. I was gonna ask you when you when these companies take a look at monitoring this type of content isn't a breakdown equally of human resource is and computer algorithms to one does one way outweigh the other Generally, how does that work? What a great question. I wish I had a perfect answer for that. But we actually don't know too much because the companies don't share a whole lot about exactly what they're doing on the back end. That's something that a lot of disinformation researchers who are eager to try to measure whether you know their labels have much impact or weather slowing down the fire ality or changing algorithms. You know how that works, and whether it's helpful or not. And we can't really peek under the hood. Yet we did see the book put out a post earlier this week where it actually said 6% of their users information political on their platform, and it was the first time folks have seen that so we got kind of drips and drabs. Every now and then. Twitter has a little it does share it. If the FBI's the researchers can be a little bit more there. But generally we don't know the specifics of the moves that they're taking and how they were precisely. And so there isn't that much out there for the public, or even researchers who specialized on this topic to see or measure So one of the trends stemming from the election in light of what you're talking about is a growth in the interests of the social media site parlor and similar types of sites. What's the interest there? Why is their attention being paid to these sites? Well. Parlor was started about two years ago. And I kind of picture of itself is a free speech platform. We saw folks that were Trump supporters move over there, including a number of Republican lawmakers like Senator has head crews and others earlier this year, and it got even more attention when there was some They're reporting that President Trump and his campaign had talked about whether they could shift over there, giving the additional move that Twitter has been making soon after they started labelling his post in the middle of this year. So recently, parlor was actually one of the top. Download the free app that pretty much exploded in the past couple days. And at one point a few days ago. The platform is actually down because so much usage and so we're seeing a number of people move over the parlour and other friends, social media networks who feel that they are either being censored or that there isn't a natural flow of speech, and they can't They want to be able to say what they want to say and do what they want to Dio. And find that they might be moving other popular to get their. However, I would note that these platforms yourself action of the size of Facebook and Twitter. They don't have the same security measures, and so there's a lot to be desired. But there's

President Trump Twitter Emily Glaser Rabel Facebook Ceo Mark Zuckerberg The Wall Street Journal Jack Dorsey Google Confusion Herman Joe Biden The Associated Press Youtube U. Brazil FBI Donald Trump United States
Gore: 2020 election ‘completely different’ than 2000

The KFBK Morning News

02:39 min | 4 months ago

Gore: 2020 election ‘completely different’ than 2000

"Al Gore did talk a little bit about that with NBC. About the difference between 2000 and this year, And here's what he had to say. Well, first of all, this is a completely different election fromthe 1 20 years ago. Uh, Joe Biden has multiple pathways to secure his victory. Of course I'm for him, and I'm hoping that will be the case very soon. But the most important principle that I defended 20 years ago that Joe Biden and many others air defending tonight is let's count every legally cast vote and obey the will of the American people. You know, I looked at the people standing in line to vote in the middle of a pandemic, some of them waiting in line 10 11 hours in some cases and The determination of the American people in spite of the what they were facing tohave, the largest turnout in the entire history of our country there, their heroes and their redeeming the promise of America. I know the one thing that Gore left out. Was this the right that he had and the right that President Trump has presuming that President Trump should lose. The vote count. Is the ability to go into court and settle this legally with litigation, And that's that's an honor and and and Gore and his team spent 30 plus days litigating. And we're what day three Right now. We'll try and you know if this had broken the other way, and it was president Trump on the verge of taking it by just a couple of electoral votes. Joe Biden's legal team would be on it. Of course they were. In fact, we had memorable had stories about how they had assembled legal team's months ahead of time in anticipation of something like this both camps, So you know, it just makes sense that each candidate is going to fight for every vote. And they shouldn't be demeaned for doing that. No, no, And he said, Okay, count all the votes. Yeah, count of all the legitimate votes. Let's countem. That's terrific. But if people weren't living in Nevada and voting in Nevada, we got an issue well, and the other difference between the Gore Bush. Run, and this one is the trust in the media and institutions so different. It's different. It's so different. I mean, there was nowhere near the bias that we're seeing the overt bias by reporters and corporate media outlets that we're seeing today, so people are mistrustful of what they're hearing. So of course, they want their candidate to fight whether it is Joe Biden or president Trump, right?

President Trump Joe Biden Gore Al Gore NBC America Nevada Bush
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"One. We're recording anyway. The He referred to us. I felt that of glibly as a substitute competitor. I don't really think that's the case. I think that we're a very different use. Case and You know book. Publishers have to want a lot more Out of their web presence in order to make the choice to to to jump over to lead Just because it's it's honestly it's a lot more work running in and running a website. That has you know a great deal. More functionality flexibility just in terms of layout and content options But i i. I do think that it's it's more work and probably only a good fit for these multi party newsrooms. How difficult is it to migrate off the subject platform without interrupting user experience for subscribers. Because they they were able to take their they're paying subscribers with them via stripe. How difficult is that i. It's not terribly difficult You know there are there. Are there at wrinkles on the in the process our colleagues at pico ran the site migration and we ran the data migration constant migration And i think between the two like it was. It was relatively smooth Certainly something that we would entertain doing again future. And so like the soup paying subscriber. They're just continuing getting e mails uninterrupted. But i i was looking at the announcement about the launched. The new launch the relaunch of descr discourse blog. But they wanna read the articles on the site that are behind the pay wall. They have to go and set up a account with pico or something like that right but grant so. That's a little bit more complicated a little bit more friction there. Yeah right there. There is definitely more friction in terms of the site itself. Because that's the that's the point is there is a there is a essentially membership section of the site that you have to pay in order to use although there being. You're just from a survey that they're being really generous about About how tree content at the moment. Yeah so do you think this will be a trend where once publisher because sub has been trying to kind of a beef up. Its publisher friendliness. In the sense of a creating multi author functionality. So that it's not just single author news sites where multiple bylines. But do you think there will be this trend. Where wants publishers. Reach a certain level success on a more rigid platform like sub stack. They'll want something more customized like they're just like okay now. We're pulling it enough money to where we could. We wanna make this jump. Start offering more bells and whistles and stuff like a. I don't know. I mean. I think that's i think that's a good question I i yeah. I'm honestly i don't know enough about some stack or how it works to To really comment substantively on that. I think Email email newsletters. There's a young there to translate. Want sort of like users. Paying for new subscription media the other newsletters email newsletters alsop And i think sub stack neatly captures the intersection of Of those trends I guess i'm a little i don't know. I'm i'm curious if i'm curious if email newsletters weren't popular because the like the web version of reading so much news with so cluttered and had so many ads and and suffered from lots of the Lots of issues that we spent a lot of time on on this podcast talking about already. In in terms of and just in terms of general bloat it might not have had to see says that a users will pick a A great website Over an email newsletter over a terrible website and. I think that it's going to depend a lot on the publisher. I think that there are some especially again. A smaller newsrooms Independent individuals were newsletter. Makes all the sense in the world because the cadence of the site is solid predictable. Right you sent if you sent you newsletters a week Then you're pushing to your users. Y your readers you know when when you publish. But if you're keynes's predicted like the factors and you can go a couple times a day a few times a day and be pretty sure you're going to see something new. I the newsletter b. m.'s. Less support of course detector does have a great newsletter discourse is going to continue to have a newsletter so these things aren't mutually exclusive. It's just that websites are by definition. Just much richer. So what do you see yourself five years from now with lead. Do you think about putting out a platform that a very basic platform that anyone can sign up for where they're not having to do as much customize stuff and then maybe if they want to sign up for a a bigger tier or something like or do you still want to be just working on the with these sites on them were case to case basis. Well right. I think that that question is more about like the the. What the industry's demanding from the internet Or at bhave interplay between changes in the internet and changes a news media impact businesses. Like this. i i right now. I would say i don't wanna i don't wanna have the turkey pot worm you know. There's so much out there that you could you. Could you could go to web flow you ghost. You can go to any number of different places on the internet and And have like a low code solution to building or lower no code solution to building a website. I don't think that market is super interesting and I i also think that That that folks that are starting enterprises like this are going to need help especially again especially with design and marketing and those are things that Those are things that you can't do and a truly turnkey sense One once it's turnkey it's you know it's no longer. It's no longer customs. This trade tradeoff is something that That that we definitely are probably going to wrestle with over the next five years but I i hope that five years from now we're not running a completely turnkey digital platform. I i that that doesn't make sense to me sitting here now i would like to be is with a You know a a large group of of really diverse publisher is doing lots of different kinds of journalism on on this platform And As i've said repeatedly i would love for more local news to be part of that really like even before defector came along and and inspired what we did on need You know we worked with the civil. I fleet a couple of years ago. to deliver a platform for them and the the sites that we continue work with The a r block lump chicago colorado sun and the river which is a new site and Hudson valley and And they're there. I think all great examples what we would love to replicate in war communities of You know really authentic locally owned news organizations in some cases they're drawn funding from Civic nonprofits community foundations and it's really important to us to find a way to work in that ecosystem to okay well. Those were all the questions i had for you. Work and people find you a month.

pico alsop bhave 's Hudson valley colorado chicago
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

08:15 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"That are competitive with local newspapers. And i'm not talking about markets like new york or dc like any any real paper and those markets that lays claim to the whole city that survived to this day as a national product at the new york. Times just new york's lens on on the entire world Same thing with the largely also true of the la times but you go you go into any sort of mid size market and the counter almost any midsize market country For the handful of papers that are owned by By exactly right single single billionaire owning the paper propping it up making it out making it work and you know there are instances like like boston and minneapolis where where that were that level of involvement Five years ago. I think has Say i hope for their sakes that it's it's saved a lot of heartburn during the pandemic you know all the work that That papers there did to build digital subscribers. That's d. for every market. That did that that did that. Well under under private ownership there are there. Six markets that are that are owned by big chains that are at the starting line and totally running out of time and it might be advantageous in the sense of like usually when their local news layoffs of set like a bunch of people will get off at once. You so think of a scenario like the richmond times dispatch to say. They lay off of their writers. There's those ten writers. Don't have a competing richmond newspaper to go to really But they also just note there really. They're beat really well in richmond. They happen to you. Know have a decent following among people live in rich men. They got quickly grouped together launch. Something with lead or sub stack or something like that and be up and running pretty quickly. Yeah and does does ten riders in in order to build a business a digital only business. I would guess that they would only need fifteen or twenty percent of the subscriber volume that the you know that the paper would need in order to in order to have a sustainable business. Yeah and so. are you building. Are you integrating ad tech for this or are these purely subscription businesses. Yeah that's a great question so to this point we're talking purely about subscription businesses and That that is sort of the industry Trend that our project tacking most closely defector launched with worby parker sponsorship And yeah we did that. Integration in to say that we would integrate ad tech. That might be a little bit of a jump. At this point we need to understand kind of what the scale of the platform looks like. And in a lot of cases. I think it would. It would come across as being Big off brand I you can ask the the team at the factor. That but the the i guess i would just say never say never sponsorships. I think absolutely. That's that's valuable Like native advertising stiffly. Well yeah and. I also think like there are especially in in sites where most of the readers are paid members. There are there are there are opportunities for for advertisers. That just don't exist anywhere else like You know like. I don't know just off the cuff send all of your subscribers some swag sponsored by miller lite or You know this some get a week. A week's three subscription to factor courtesy of merrill lynch and i i guess calc- throwing out real advertisers. But it's it's. It's stuff like that that we were more interested in exploring avenues like that versus You know throwing display units on the page and running programmatic scripts likewise with Content advertising out brain to boola. That stuff doesn't necessarily feel like nixon super well with With with with sobs the the one thing that we've talked about with a number of our You know sort of industry. Advisors is the This notion of monetize like high traffic pages so let's say that On factor drew mcgarry breaks breaks a story And they get a few hundred thousand page views to that individual story and we. We want to be able to do the math to figure out if the sort of like implicit implicit local advertising like. Hey you can't read the story. Why not why. Not sign up our mls. How many what percentage of people are going to do that. And then okay. You're our email list. Welcome to the defectors for email. And we're gonna we're gonna we're gonna ask you to subscribe is part of every email send you percentage of people are going to do that is is a return on that greater than the The return on having programmatic that's just turned on for traffic spikes and if if if not is there any interplay between those two things Like does the presence in programmatic make it less likely for people to sign up. These are questions that That we definitely want to answer And if you know if if if it turns out that the best thing that we can do in order to capture the value of traffic spikes is a little bit of programmatic i. I don't necessarily know that we would. We would fight too hard about it. Although although it's still it's it's it's never gonna be our first choice as i'm on visitation pathway. You built a site for the discourse blog and that one's interesting because that's also you know a spin off from a site that was part of the group that was formerly known as gawker media called splinter. They got laid off. I think instead of both. I think that was what it was. Then they launched a group blog on stub sub stack. It was free for a while. Then they turned on subscriptions. As far as i could tell the subscriptions were doing gangbusters. They were doing really well but then they decided to move office of stack onto your platform. So how did that conversation start. Why what was the kind of thinking of why they why even though they were already sort of success on They wanted to move over to you. Guys were doing a yeah. I mean i i think that you should. You should interview alex on on his podcasts. At some point. And ask him that question in brief. But i i think i think a lot of it is wanting Wanting control over and over the way things work over way things look the ability to have a like a much more kind of like blog. feel In in fact And i also feel like you know they were running up against some just general limitations in terms of now. Okay how do we do. We really market to on subscribers on some stack And i think for them. It just felt like a big next step into into being a standalone publication of their own And you know when when the new york times about sub stack when marchesi read about them three or four weeks ago as.

new york richmond times worby parker richmond la times minneapolis dc miller lite boston merrill lynch mcgarry nixon alex marchesi new york times
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

07:19 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"How that how that might be accomplished. And we You know. I would say probably add one or two conversations a month for probably six or seven months. Sometimes it would pick up a little bit as as they were getting closer to a decision and then finally in early july of this year You know sort of like okay. Nothing's changing the pandemic is changing. We know we need to do this. The world needs us to do this. were just going to do it and So there biggest tata's vp revenue operations. Jasper wang He and i work together. years and years ago when the new republic was a client of alleys and he he was on staff there and And so he he and i had had connected About his kind of growing involvement and deadspin exceeding worth. I'm sorry into factor exceeded work for deadspin He actually worked for For bain as a The the the Consulting company and investment group And and so his involvement picked up. You started talking about what we could do And and finally in july things kind of clicked and they said okay. Let's let's do this you know we're we're going to jump without a parachute and it works and So we we said that we we support you in this and we want to build you a website and we can. We can work everything else out later. and so that's what we did and it was tremendously successful. They got a great many paid subscriptions on day. One of of having a landing page and and that was a little bit of like a moment where We we realized that it was really just on the basis of The the reputations of both the group of reporters and the reputation of the collective is all that they were able to essentially build the business overnight. And that's cool. I think that's for one. It's a really awesome story. And i'm super happy to have been there to see it But for two is also an instructive model for for other publishers. That especially if you look. At the difference. In economics between a startup like the factor and a legacy company the percentage of their revenue. They can spend on you know on their core job. Their core editorial job is so much higher than any legacy media company. I've ever known It basically lets them do a lot more with a lot less because they're not like five hundred senior vice president and managing directors. And all that kind of stuff like skimming off with these like huge six figure incomes while each of the writers are actually producing the product are only making fifty thousand dollars a year or whatever however most companies are structured. Right and that is. That is a little bit like that. That what you're what you're sentences in a nutshell it's like the Ah spells for lots of different kinds of of publishers. You know it's it's impossible to shrink in a way that the market will accept right. If if you if you if you're a publicly traded media company new say to investors like hey bad news ever one. We're going to this year. We're a billion dollar media company but we're gonna we're gonna lose fifty million dollars a year and market cap until we are one hundred million obvious company and we're going to be a profitable hundred million media company but that's probably are are true scale. Nobody's going to accept that. So it forces. I think it it. It forces this endless cycle of you know essentially attempting to make bigger something Something that you know that internet advertising decided in about two thousand five that it wasn't going to be that bad. Yeah and so for the defector. Kinda was the perfect project of perfect kickoff project for you because like the each of these writers had their own personal brands check combined and drive allows subscriptions that way and obviously this was a super perfect going because they all happen to come from the same exact publications so that said there was a lot of kind of brand equity like people are just basically thinking of this deadspin too. So they got to kind of bring some brand equity. Is that kind of obviously. You're never going to get that perfect storm a lot of your future clients for lead But does that kind of what you're thinking in terms of like recruitment for future things is like. How do i get these. This group of writers may be right about a similar niche topic and get them to come together and do this kind of collective or however it structured in. That's that's the kind of thing you want to invest in as in terms of the as startup costs. Well he at yes. And no. I mean yes. We'd love to work with more groups of like minded writers and a lot of a lot of what's lined up for us to launch over. The next three months is along those lines. What we're not gonna do is try to you know. Try to make magic happen. Our own You know i for one. Think that I think that reporters and editors are like they know better than anyone who they want to work with who would complement their own output and and for to You know i. I don't think that's. I don't think that's going to be necessary in order to In order to build this into a sustainable business in its own right Just because this is so much where where things are heading What i would like to do is do a lot. More sort of evangelism this idea and local media just because i think that there are some big big changes in the offing currently and probably more changes that will come in two thousand twenty one in terms of the sort of the descru- destruction of local newspaper says Kind of fast. Slow fast story. And i think we're in a fast period right now and Yep accelerated like everything by the pandemic new. Look at the consolidation. That's happening you know the injection of private equity as a bailout for new owners. Effectively mcclatchy This is a. This is a pretty tough time. I think to To be in Is it of legacy local media on at least on the print side Because they lack the sort of economic fortress that that like tvs the house to to a large degree And that's a that's a little bit different of a different story than what we're doing overall with lead but my vision there for you know for digital only newsrooms.

Jasper wang bain tata mcclatchy
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

08:12 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"Product or something like that is that's kind of the idea. Yeah yeah and i. I think in a nutshell. That's that's that's right the the thing that we're doing that is is different. I think than a lot of the other players out there that are trying to address. This market really is on the design and marketing services side. saturday the we're essentially investing in upfront project to You know to to create a design build up build the whole website and make it You know ready for publishing on on day one. That doesn't necessarily look exactly like anything else out there So you know every medium site more or less the same every stack more or less the same but we're putting in a lot of like essentially like early effort to help. News organizations differentiate and to that to that extent really. We're a good fit for startup. newsrooms i don't. I don't really think that we're necessarily the right choice for For solo operators Which you know. I think i think has solo. Operatives have a A very important stake in the future of the media. Business for sure are. There are a lot of different. A lot of different things evolving that Can address the needs of those walks and because it's geared toward startups. Isn't it the the way that you design. It is like you actually charged very little or nothing upfront. Like you actually shoulder those costs and they are expected to pay back later once they start having a revenue stream. Is that correct. Yes it's it's designed as a as a wreck share and and yeah there are options that require no no cash upfront essentially And so that that turns the conversations with publishers into a discussion about you. Know it's it's more more like we're sort of like i would think low key friendly investors Versus know purely like a you know purely consultants because it's important to us that we have finite resources. We can only launch so many So many sites onto our platform each mont and we want to make sure that where To the best of our ability were picking winners. But you don't take on equity no. Yeah i know. And that's that's intentional. Because we're we're not set up to be a you know a traditional venture firm or an accelerator and philosophically i i. I don't know that that's a good approach for most of vom for most of our potential customer base Really you know what we're looking for is You know can can. We make an impact on their business and can they pay for it over time. versus like. We're going to eat at the table as long as they exist. I think the We're really trying to equip cooperatives no emerging newsrooms to own their own destiny The other piece of it is the. There's been a long series of Conversation to be a way to put it basically since the since the trial and the demise of of gawker dot com There's there's been sort of an emerging wisdom that it might be better not to connect all of these publications so tightly and I i don't. I don't really have a position on that. You know i'm not a media lawyer And i'm i'm not a journalist either but that rings true for me in in in a way You know we. We need some financial exposure to their success in order to In order to get paid for our work but we don't know we don't need to own any of it. We don't need a long-term The lie. I don't think we need to long-term upside in order to make our initial investment worth of so what makes it worth taking on the risk. Because like you could just choose to exclusively work with established companies that their checks are gonna clear right. Hey and they're paying up front and all that kind of stuff so what from your business calculation wise it worth to you to take on the upfront risk. Well yeah so that that's a really great question There are a number of reasons so for one. It is like this model. We found this model is faster for product development. Because we can. We can steer the conversation in a way that in a way that we can't with Publishers that are paying know paying us as as as we work It we can say like this decision not going to monetize very well or We can present them a set of options and say we think you should go with this one And and it's been. It's been very very smooth from that perspective. So far I hope that they the publishers. We've gotten live Thus far would set at their. They're they're happy with the results. I i pretty sure that they would I in terms of like the risk. You know it's it's it's it's pretty simple question can you. Can you generate enough subscribers to cover this initial little project and then you know the ongoing support maintenance and You know that that we have ideas about what that number is and we have ideas about You know who who is a good fit for it and You know we hope to be able to expand our Our our criteria over time essentially like as the on boarding process. It's easier for us than we can take on projects that were a little bit less shirt. The thing we don't know that we're not going to be in the business of it's sort of like deciding deciding on the basis of our own perspective of like The the societal value of a news organization Should we should. We support you or not. This is purely about your ability to To generate subscription revenue. So let's talk about some of the specific projects you've worked on first. Let's talk about defector so you know. Listeners are probably aware but there was a much beloved. A company are blog that was from started by the company formerly known as gawker media called deal it was extensively about sports but it really kind of covered all kinds of things like pop culture and a politics especially They had a major run in with their venture or private equity owners. Who major disagreements on how they running the company and last year earlier this year. i can't remember when they. They basically all resigned en masse and then they recently relaunched as a kind of writer owned collective called the defector you this. This is one of the first projects under this new venture for years lead. Tell me about how that project came. How did those discussions about. Yeah so gosh was. It was last november. I ended up getting pulled into a bridge really early conversations with Some folks that were that were involved at that point that And we're looking to start something new. I think it was it was on. Everyone's mind when they left They left desmond together that their ideal outcome would be to To work together at a at a new venture and it there were a lot of different ideas about.

gawker media desmond
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

06:05 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"Built. We built the site for them And then they were later acquired by politico and it became political new york. I think politico and some other states as part of their Their operation for a while So you know being being. I think early on on some of the the technology changes and And then we certainly are not like there are agencies that we knew back then are still around today that primarily to this day mostly work in drubel but our our motivation always was to really Really working in media technology and we knew that we would we would follow the The technology wherever it went in order to help publishers. And so there. So you're kinda pitched. Publishers is like sure there are tons of development firm out of there but we we specifically have been working with publishers. All this time we understand your needs. We understand the landscape to a degree that your average drubel developer wordpress developer whitten necessarily know we know subscriptions. We know attack all that kind of stuff. So that's why it's worth hiring us over some other you know generic development for yeah. That's i think that if you talk about just the technology jangle of it i. That's pretty accurate at this point. Yeah we did. We deliver most of our most of our content management solutions on top of wordpress But at this point for most media companies it's relatively far down the stack in terms of like yes the content management tool but when it actually comes to these. They're experienced are a lot of different things coming together to to make that work so you would definitely not want just a any wordpress developer to drop into a high traffic news website. I think it's it's way more important to know how news websites work and to know what the trade offs are especially in terms of user. Experience been it is to have like a really deep background in wordpress out. We've got lots of folks who are at both But that does really like. It's not something. That comes up. Very much i i would say And then and then our other advantages. Just you know the the rest of the package reich. Few unique to redesign or you need. You need something between a migration redesign We can help with all of that and Just because we work so free only with these organizations. We tend to fit into their Kind of cadence and existing infrastructure are pretty seamlessly and so kind of. What if i'm parsing. What you're saying is that like the late the modern day publishing company. The cms has just like. That's just the starting point because there's really a text acworth plugging in so many things. You're doing more sophisticated stuff with email marketing with pay gates analytics all ad tech marketing attack. All that kind of stuff where you're really cobbling together. A lot of a possibly some kind of crm software like just a lot of different stuff coming together and so you know it. Operate all those tech and how they integrate with each other. Yeah that's right and you know those. Those interactions get at the single most important thing to a news website. It's how rapidly the user experience loads we know from repeated data that That users will bounce off the side after some very low number of milliseconds of waiting for something load and like it's it's easy to cram all those things that you just listed you can cram them all onto a website and yeah. The website will look The trick the trick is orchestrating them. So that the most important things load. I and a low quickly And that's really like the i think that's the difference in a lot of case between successful media websites on successful ones and then recently launched what i think you would you would call like a spin off. Company that separate from your agency called leed. Led how is that different from your regular agents. I actually wouldn't wouldn't classify it as a spinoff i i would. I would classify as a like being separate from a the main course of consulting that we do. It is a platform and a program For especially for media startups But we think that we would also be a good fit for For news organizations that need to make a sort of more full pivot to a digital first revenue stream. You know it's it's an and what i mean by that is like in the pandemic like lots of print organizations have have seen their revenue. Take a hood And almost every one of them has a has a website at this point but the the the question is like is their website really the the the like candy survive on their website alone. And i think there are news organizations that are asking themselves like that question and and and deciding that they probably cannot So as far as echoes that we could be a good fit for some kinds of legacy news organizations. I'm talking specifically about lead. Almost every customer that we work with on the alley side is had a website for thirty years. Okay twenty five years but lead. You're trying to build like more turnkey product whereas like a normal client for allie co. You might be doing a lot of heavy lifting in terms of customization something but this is something. Where as you integrate new features and stuff you can then very easily as you take on new clients Just instead of reinventing the wheel every time you're just like here's the basic here's the basic.

politico whitten acworth reich wordpress new york allie co
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"Yeah we i i would say that we Our firm evolved along with that Sensibility about the revenue balance for these organizations. That early on this all adds all the time and the ad mix started to change and what used to work in programmatic. No longer work anymore wasn't enough to pay the bills So that that you know that led publishers to adopt out brain tula others others like it But you know into bullet even were not the the earliest Kind of onsite syndication providers. I don't know if you remember. But like a company called daylight and the mid two thousand was doing something very similar. Just without the sort of like Monetization package attached to it. Do you remember some kind of ad. Tech where would actually add like inbound links to the actual editorial itself like if you if like in business insider if you if if it used some kind of like word like cell phone or something like that it would create a sponsored hyper would underlie green. You'd hover over. Yeah yeah. I mean you name it. We've probably integrated point or another Although there was a point that i would say maybe twenty fifteen where where the you know. The ad stack was sort of taken out of the hands of Of like product development and just put into google tag manager and So that the monetization people could just do literally whatever they wanted without without being otherwise encumbered. The you know that. I like the crassness way to look at it but i certainly seen that before you remember like i was just during the era with like auto play video every site had it briefly and i remember like i don't know if it was like fortune magazine or something and i and i got hit by some auto play. I happen to know who the audience development person was for that and i tweeted kind of snorkeling. Atr like about how this is not great audience developer and she just tweeted back. She's not really my. It wasn't really my call which is kind of amazing when you're talking about like how you're talking about. It was taken out the hands of the the technical team. It's like these people who like this is their fulltime job is developed the audience and yet they can't to control these horrible things that are making it harder for their jobs to the actually you were so if you're looking at fortune dot com after two thousand fourteen fifteen You're looking at our work. We focus and it was absolutely not are are either and And and this is you know. I think one of the we haven't quite gotten to the set of recent shift in analogy one of one of the nicest things about twenty twenty in journalism is that the The editorial folks and the business folks have kind of run out of things like that the fight about And it it feels like there's a lot more consensus around where the industry needs to go from a revenue perspective. Yeah it seems like we're you know there are a few sites. It's still a lot of play. Weirdly enough cnn. Even though they're one of the few companies that actually produces good enough video. That doesn't need. You don't need a trick people to watching it but they still do it but Yeah it seems. Like there's like more alignment in twenty twenty between the revenue side in. What in the editorial in terms of serving readers definitely get into that. I'm so you said like two thousand ten or so. That's when you left your fulltime job in started your own agency. What was that. What was the kind of motivation there. But was the specialty of the agents. Yeah yeah so. We started alley in In two thousand ten to Really just to do what we had been doing internally and just take a lot more control over our our schedules and and to be able to scale what. We knew to more publishers. He really needed it Because there was a real dearth of of software developers in new york who neutral. Well enough to work at really high traffic and and we're willing to do so versus say i don't know Universities were adopting groupul Pretty rapidly at that time also so there was just there's a really like busy market for for triple developers and And we felt like we could. We could effectively serve more publishers By going out on our own and And starting to scale an agency versus just continuing either continuing where we were. I was at a time subsidiary and my co founder matt was at This a slate magazine. At that point. I think I don't remember exactly what he worked on the big money. Maybe the route Were were triple sites. And then he He and i had met at the observer where we both worked and it was sort of like the the combination of the housing crisis and Compliments of factors at the observer. That made it easy for us to say yes. We're going to take this jump because the the kushner's got hit pretty badly in the housing crisis they had like a pretty big hurry to refinance six six six six six th avenue which they just bought and Today dave cut. There is such a shame right. You're the that that address number was prophetic. But the The website where. I'm going with this. That heat like jared and and and his manage manage to like either layoff or induce every software developer. Who worked for them to quit and so there was a point where was like oh no. There's nobody here that knows how to operate our website so they ended up paying us. I don't know a couple of thousand bucks a month to Just keep the site alive nights and weekends sorta thing and as they kind of rebounded like that escalated and needed more and and then they wanted to redesign the the political site that That they were working on Which is an interesting side story of its own because the editor of that site. It's david wild. You is a pretty massively implicated. Bridge gate The so we felt like we felt pretty confident that we'd be able to piece together enough initial clients that That that we could we could have done that. And the we One of the second clients are working for was capital new york which was founded by friends of ours from the observer. Tomah governed josh benson and jillian zamora jillian reagan. Now actually work for alley and runs arlene popcorn Day started capital. And i think it was in twenty ten and And.

fortune magazine google cnn new york matt david wild jared dave Tomah josh benson jillian zamora jillian reagan arlene
"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

The Business of Content

07:58 min | 4 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on The Business of Content

"Deadspin resigned and mass after butting heads with the private equity executives who owned the website. After they left there was lots of speculation about where those writers turn up would simply get new jobs or would they band together to create their own site and then in july twenty twenty. We got her answer. They launched defector an employee owned publication that would-be monetize mostly through paid subscriptions to build the site. They turned to a guy named austin smith. Austin is the founder of an agency called ali interactive and over the past decade. He's helped build and maintain the websites of many of the most well known news publishers in the world i sat down and interviewed austin about his career in media. What goes into building a good publishing platform and why he's recently begun working with new startups like defector to help them get off the ground before we jump into the interview. I wanna talk about my sub stack newsletter. Look i know. It seems like everyone has substate newsletter these days but there's a reason mine has an open rate. That's nearly twice the industry average there simply nowhere else. You can go to get this level of in-depth analysis of the media business. I get emails every week from readers who tell me that my case studies make them better at their jobs. If you listen to my podcast but ours subscribed my newsletter. Then you're missing out to subscribe. Go to simon owen. Sought subset dot com that simon owen substance dot com. Or just google the word. Simon owens and newsletter. Okay onto my interview with austin. Hey awesome thanks for joining us. So you have a pretty exhaustive. An extensive background in media Even though you're relatively young up but you kinda fell into it sideways right like how did you initially start working for media companies. Yeah one of my first jobs as a a Developer was For minnesota public radio american public media in minneapolis. I was gosh twenty one. Twenty two I growing up by I would say. I was a big fan of media. My parents subscribe to A a large number of magazines newspapers for comparison and And my mom worked in in in media for a while. But it wasn't something that i really thought that i would do until i was kind of in the midst of it and i moved to new york in in two thousand seven to take a job at the new york was and i've i've not done anything really anything but journalism and media technologies since. Then yeah you were hired by. Jared kushner odette right. That's right we don't have to say his name to too frequently That that's correct It was the end of the peter kaplan era and we When i started my company in two thousand ten the observer was actually an early client of ours They they ended up at for a time there. They had no one on staff to do any sort of like technology management or software development So we went after them I think until two thousand thirteen it. Did you also work for the economist group or it was just a later client. Once you started your no. I had three full-time employers in new york city of kind of in quick succession about a year. At a time. The first is the Observer the second was the economist. And then the third was the new york times company and subsidiary the near constant work on their product directly and all these media companies. Were you helping to build. Cms from the ground up or was kind of the era where they were mostly focusing on the platforms like wordpress and just kinda modifying those. Yeah yeah that's that's exactly right in and my co founder. Matt and i were very lucky to be on a wave of adoption of ripple in in newsrooms and the observer was kind of a poster child for for using drubel in in media so it was it was an easy transition for me to go from the observer to the economists. You know this thing has been done on a small-scale at the observer and now we're going to do on our largest at the economist and a lot of the people that came to that project at the economists were Had had on various pieces of it and were forming a brief little bit of a drubel supergroup and actually a lot like a lot came out of that project. I think a lot of really important pieces certainly to dribble and and its evolution it's immediate. Cms came came out of that project. and And my company alley. Actually we started Essentially we started asdrubal consultants. Have you know have since switched our our technology preference to wordpress. But i think way more important than we broadened our focus Substantially include lots of other parts of other parts of media technology but also other parts of digital media product development user research design strategic consulting It really the full gamut of product development services Newsroom might need and when you were at this company are when you were working fulltime if these companies this was kind of the era when they still thought maybe they could put the toothpaste back in the tube and if they could just have the right ad tack on the right targeting and everything like that then they could get these great. Cpm's is a true like were you working with like a lot of maturing ad tech companies while all this was kind of evolving civil tenuously while the rise of social media was starting to shift where traffic was coming from and stuff like that. Yeah yeah you know. I think that we were actually witnesses to the earliest part of that at the observer. I remember the audience. Development manager is is still a good friend of mine We we would sit in the office together and he would be sending instant messages on. Aol messenger to matt. Drudge like feeding drudge. These you know these articles political commentary And when he got a hit you know it was sort of like all hands on deck. The site's going to experience a bunch of traffic for for a little while And yeah your your point about ad. Tech i think is is really a good one There are still certainly media companies and you know beyond that of course ad tech companies that are Furiously looking for new ways to Reverse engineer the tube of toothpaste and and We i would say. I would say that that. That saga has not as not ended foley. Yeah yeah funny that you tell that story about the drudge shake like i worked at. Us report around the same time and they were constantly Publishing like drudge. What i would call drudge bait. And then sending him links and then whenever he would link to one of the articles then it was like all hands on deck because they would go into the article and start optimizing it to drive that traffic elsewhere like putting in links to other articles between the paragraphs and all this kind of stuff because they were trying to capitalize on all all that judge traffic. Yeah that's absolutely right I i I think news organizations. We're doing that. And to some extent they still do that around. It's like traffic destination pages. Gosh i forgot the publication but there is one that actually took a lot of heat for. Oh yeah i was like inbound links from two boola would would have just like you know four times as many display ads as as normal might have been i i i could be wrong about that. But yeah like that. That kind of practice At least like immediately before the pandemic was still was still really prevalent And and..

simon owen austin smith Simon owens minnesota public radio america Jared kushner peter kaplan odette new york Austin austin minneapolis the observer google new york times new york city Matt Aol matt foley
"media outlets" Discussed on Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

05:48 min | 5 months ago

"media outlets" Discussed on Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

"News ecosystem, reduce polarization, and maybe save democracy and important and noble cause and funny enough. That's what we're trying to do here on this podcast as well. So welcome to the show Vanessa thanks for being with us today. Dan Thank you so much for the introduction. It's a pleasure to be with you today as well. Was it at all. Oh, totally you. Okay Vanessa. Tell me would tell us. Can you just give us the elevator pitch on? On what you're doing with Ad Fonterra's. Adventists media. What we do is we rate news for bias and reliability on our our mission is to make news consumer smarter to make news media. And that's a that's a tall task because there are a lot of us that contribute to the state of our news ecosystem right now, which many people rightly consider a quite broken There are a lot of different stakeholders in that system from individual news consumers to the publishers, themselves, social media, companies, brands, and an educator. So we all have a role to play in improving the immediate ecosystem and solutions in that space will require all of us to get creative. I think a big part of that can be news ratings. Okay. So can you talk to us about the end product here? How does it work? So. What the core of what we do is content analysis of new sources. The name Ad Fontes is Latin for to the source. Because, we're looking at the source of the the stuff itself to rate it that's different from doing opinion polls about do people trust in the news air looking at or not? So, if you have something like you know Fox News or MSNBC or if you ask a left leaning person if they trust box news, they'll say, no, you ask right leaning person if they stocks news, they'll say, yes and that just tells you more about the person than it does about the source it's self, and so we do some pretty hard labor intensive work of actually reading each article and using those article ratings to come up with an overall. The source score and display on the media bias shirt, and we use a non-partisan We we is a non-partisan methodology and a balanced panel analyst to do that. So for every article that we're putting ratings out on a left leaning percent, rightly person in the senator leaning person has looked at it and given their rating and a scores, the average, and how do you get the left leaning Person Right Lynn Burson. Centrist to how do you know that that's what they are. So when they apply for for our analysts positions. We have them fill out just a self rating spreadsheet on a number of different political issues and. Twenty issues right now because most people aren't just a monolith, some certainly are just like all after all right on on various things, but a lot of our analysts tend to. have. Nuanced views, which is, which is nice. You know that we get into the detail so we'll have them put themselves as very left. skews laughed Santer excuse right or very right on things like everything from abortion to gun rights to lgbt simple rights, taxes, etc, and then we come up with an overall score and put them and we.

Vanessa Fox News Ad Fontes Fonterra Dan Santer MSNBC Lynn Burson analyst senator
"media outlets" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"media outlets" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Some of the same media outlets they lied to your parents and grandparents about the Holocaust some of them saying media outlets that were propagandists for Stalin as he was slaughtering ten million Ukrainians some of the same media outlets to lie to you for almost three years about trump in Russia collusion they were connecting dots secret indictments legal analysts the host the anchors the guests the contributors the professor is the former federal prosecutors all liars all frauds all deceitful all dishonest they're back throwback all of them spinning the Ukraine matter they have no credibility whatsoever there's a tremendous disconnect what these media corporations are doing to this country the propaganda that they're spewing because they like mass of big government they're very comfortable with mass of big government they use it against their competitors the user to empower themselves and of course the social activists progressives that they call hosts and journalists they like it too because they're able to push their agenda while pretending pretending to be those people I'll be right back yeah ask any a mac member what they like most about belonging to the conservative alternative to the a a RP and I'll tell you how much they love reading a Max magazine the a mac advantage a mac is pleased to announce that they're now publishing a mac advantage six times a year that's six issues of a Max.

Stalin professor Max magazine Russia Ukraine three years
"media outlets" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Were named as the to media outlets that are challenging deposition subpoenas they have been served as part of the case you baram's lawyers are trying to figure out who gave buzzfeed the infamous dossier which the website published too much controversy on january tenth the dossier written by former british spy christopher steal claims that goo bear evan his company's xp t holdings and webs della used spam viruses and porn bonds to hack into dnc computer systems these allegations have been strongly denied by goovar any of the lawyers representing good bar nef say than identifying buzzfeed source could shed light on whether the news outlet was warned that information in the dossier could be false publishing the dossier your despite such warnings would show reckless disregard for the truth or falsity of the information published according to the attorneys buzzfeed has stood by its decision to publish the dossier which was financed by the clinton campaign ended dnc the publication has also refused to identify its dossier or source on the grounds that it would violated first amendment protections as a newsgathering organization despite demands from guber nasr lawyers for them to do so goovar nasr lawyers have issued deposition subpoenas to the new york times the wall street journal the new yorker mother jones magazine cnn and yahoo news it has also issued a subpoena to william fbo riley a republican consultant and newsday columnist the who wrote about buzzfeed's decision to publish the dossier mccain has previously denied giving a copy of the subpoena to buzzfeed gubor never attorneys have said that though the depositions for the news outlets are scheduled to occur throughout november the journal in the times have indicated their intend to fight the deposition subpoenas by arguing that are protected as journalists from discussing the issue what do you think about this letter.

dnc consultant william fbo riley yahoo cnn new yorker goovar nasr guber nasr first amendment christopher steal clinton baram media outlets mccain jones magazine wall street journal new york times buzzfeed
"media outlets" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on Super Station 101

"I was going to go after media outlet for telling something was untrue is difficult if the media outlet with them is easier if the media outlets says chris redid this but if the media said chris read remembers doing this creates read remembers this happening chris re and they say remembers or recalls multiple times in the article i got the feeling there was a little bit of arms length from the washington post anwar store with what were the things that you've seen because you may have seen stuff that i have makes you believe the truthful nature of that story well one i think the washington post is garbage i don't trust the rise him everything print is alive they are that bad and i have i doubt that the timing of the release of this was a political hit job i don't denials they way they if they had leslie had it before absolutely but in this case it looks like wolf remember though the end of that story there actually was a wolf in and that's the same thing we're dealing with here so i will just say this without violating people i've talked to don't want to say i talk to people independently who are no that situation who i trust completely who have good character although i do not doubt they have told me more things that and they told me stuff that isn't even the media that and the things that they're told me a few days ago i said this happened this happened that's been confirmed so obviously they've pruned they've proven to be truthful and so but the point but even from a practical political standpoint and i want our listeners here this guy's let's just say that you know i've been wrong before i could be wrong you know i'm i'm personally convinced that doesn't mean i'm right i i'll say that but guys do you really think that the democrats are not going to absolutely crush us live just by using this story in 20th they will run against every one of the swing state republicans.

media outlets chris washington post leslie washington anwar wolf
"media outlets" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Media outlets across the asiapacific orders for the iphone eight and eight plus are reportedly being reduced by roughly fifty percent this would be for the november and december periods taipeibased economic daily news is saying shipments are now seen at between five million to six million a month now this report goes on to say that apple is going to focus instead on the iphone tan and that i found 10 production will directly benefit hon hai precision industry g e will reportedly announced it's going to cut thousands of jobs at the corporate level next month now the wall street journal saying this is part of a strategic review that is going to include shutting down research centers in shanghai munich and rio de janeiro this would leave g e with just two global sites for research one here in new york state the other in banglore india and china has become the most attractive wine exporting destination in the world this is according to a major wine exporter and professional survey that was conducted at us seminar this past week in shangdong province xinhua is saying they are actually quoting chile's ambassador to china saying that china has surpassed the us to become chile's largest export market and that happened as a result or did in 2014 now more than two hundred wineries are exporting products from chile to china and at the same time the south african premium wineries association as saying that wine exports from south africa to china have registered a sharp jump since about 2013 so more vino for everyone on the mainland and she overdue change now i think stack i you know it's not wine in china it by now and perhaps who was a lotta clinking glasses add to discuss the most significant takeaways from the opening speech to china's 19th by congress by seizing paint new see if end occurring agrees if he in the west of the world should be in a cellar between mood which owing in our hong kong katya right now by enter current i mean china i no doubt feeling pretty good about like easing paying is putting forth back how should we be taking it good morning angie obviously is extremely important that significant say peace speech by chun's leadership and.

chun hong kong south africa south african shangdong new york rio de janeiro munich shanghai Media outlets angie congress chile china india wall street journal apple iphone fifty percent
"media outlets" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"In it's still present so i think it when poor went so some of that soon tori has over here go for and then i'm going to grab the very non moustachioed zia burkheart that's right i liked your in your burning main stories i like doing this review by the way this is this is different man it's fun i think we need to kind of keep it on top equip the big man harassed is out of the sake of time what people want to hear gas and also time we can definitely talk about it though at the premier tonight or yet for the rest of the week over here yes so there's going to be a lot of different people in the building for the premier i know brandon invited on a lot of media outlets that aren't even necessarily veteran media outlets that are going to be checked this out for the first time yep and i'm i'm looking forward to the amount of on it sweet okay so we got two two guys who grabez to the arctic it one here so uh yeah like furthest out to be there so ago as an and he has a guinness share in china lien in and get closer the mic so people can here over those listing we we have like a rough playing that were gone with the but we figured or eight will get two different guys in here so afflicted both want to introduce yourselves and and your military background but make sure you're both a you know get on mike when it when you speak so whichever you want us once worked or started as a gay kind of closed closer get right ozone layer him anyway so.

tori media outlets mike brandon china
"media outlets" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News services from his campaign it was shut the gates desperately this above abruptly russia today and sputnik have not behaved as media outlets and journalists but behaved as organs of influence and propaganda and false propoganda president putin kept a straight face compromised managed democracy nonlinear were and post modern propaganda influence russia plus historian nicholas called on the us propaganda agencies of his tree it's truth politics and power after the news lie from npr news in washington on janine herbst president trump plans to travel to texas tuesday to see the areas ravaged by flooding from what was hurricane harvey npr scott horsely reports the white house says it's coordinating the visit with state and local officials president trump is back at the white house after a weekend with his family at camp david while he was at the presidential retreat trump continued to monitor rescue and recovery efforts in texas he and vice president pence held teleconferences both saturday and sunday with cabinet members and emergency man andrews trump tweeted that the federal relief effort is all out and going well he added he was taking care not to let his upcoming visit to texas disrupt recovery efforts the focus the president said must be life and safety scott horsely npr news washington and in houston officials say they've received more than six thousand calls for rescue many from people trapped on their roofs from the flooding texas governor greg abbott was important is that everybody work together to ensure that we are going to first save lives and then second help people across the state reveal added activated three thousand now national and steak our troops to help at least two people have died in this storm already more than two dozen inches of rain have fallen on houston.

david cabinet vice president scott horsely harvey npr houston greg abbott president pence russia trump white house texas washington us nicholas putin media outlets
"media outlets" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Person or these media outlets they are homophobes or were they are four pollution water pollution air pollution things like that that's the way that they work this thing and then he had a second portion of all of this the second portion of this is that by the time these people who were on whom the rules have been dropped by the time the case that they bring forward gets to a conclusion then the rule will be in effect and they will all be immediately be punished because they will not have been under the guidelines that the federal government had put out there which is interesting because it that's been upheld in at least east once in the past but then what about the things that are reverse and that's what the the the obama administration didn't care if they reverse because they just kept on pushing forward they were pushing fordham little searchers the poor even after the supreme court said no stop your religious test as i mean you can't do that you cannot do that they pushed back on them no matter what because that's what they wanted to do that was their thing that was their idea they what a just push route people they wanted to make sure that they wanted to make sure that the people around business owners farmers anybody like that anybody across the united states they wanted to make sure that there was how do you say um they were going to move forward with these ideas whether the date whether anybody said they could should or not because they are just going to push him they you were talking about being using the government t'boli that's exactly the whole thing being mean really this is the using the the opportunity to to be to t'boli everybody and it's just absolutely not necessary rod rosenstein while he's at the senate appropriations committee is not just one trick pony about their he testified spoke.

media outlets federal government obama administration united states rod rosenstein fordham senate
"media outlets" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"media outlets" Discussed on WJR 760

"Intelligence gathering it mirror and and administrator shouldn't that's serve three times as many reporters and media outlets that any previous administration oh yes yes mark nothing here move well you're a little no i'm not when along i am not who went along and i don't need be paid for it he'll logically left media telling me to move along and i don't care how they characterize this or you my beloved audience or maybe or the president they can go to how it's amazing two years ago this administrator was caught redhanded so isn't rice was the national security advisor james clap are was the directive national intelligence john brando was the caa director of them you did testify under also under penalty a perder eat and our friend evelyn farkus the former defense department deputy assistant secretary for russia ukraine in your asia basically underscore what was in the new york times which i read do you owe weren't over and over again five weeks ago then on the weekend that weekend and on the monday don't have any read.

administrator president james clap john brando director deputy assistant secretary russia ukraine asia new york times media outlets redhanded advisor evelyn farkus five weeks two years