28 Burst results for "Media Agency"

Israeli Strike Destroys Gaza Building With AP, Other Media

Consumer Estate Services with host Marty Nevel

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

Israeli Strike Destroys Gaza Building With AP, Other Media

"High rise building that housed The Associated Press and other media agencies in the Gaza Strip was destroyed by an Israeli air strike today. People were told to evacuate the building ahead of time, Hamas continued to launch rockets towards Israel, which has continued with its own air strikes. ABC is Matt government is in Israel with more hundreds of thousands forced from their homes in Gaza, including seven year old Diana. Artie met her in Gaza, she says. Once they bombed our home, we ran to hide in the bathroom. And when we thought it was over, then the sound was boom again and kept shooting. It didn't quit. Palestinian authorities say over 130 Palestinians have died in six

Matt Government Gaza Strip The Associated Press Israel Gaza Hamas ABC Artie Diana
Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

Esports Network Podcast

04:59 min | 10 months ago

Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

"Any of these Sports networks other properties on this episode of the E Sports Network podcast for bringing back a gasp from about a year ago wage a little more bonetti. He's the co-founder and CEO of on zoo in a more. Welcome back to the Shelf. Hey meets great to be here tomorrow is on the show back in February of 2020 where we discussed the growth of in-game advertising age people who miss that show or too many of our new listeners since then on to his a platform that makes it easier for braids to get into video game worlds and for developers to open up more potential White spaces in their games for Grants Pass. I'll do is work with Publishers like Ubisoft at lide Castle to deliver Brayden moments for major. It's like Samsung Pepsi American Eagle and many more Esports. We've seen it gave ads take Auto larger role especially patiently League of Legends open up space in summoner's Rift and it was filled by MasterCard an Alienware among other partners and just this morning as a record this on Wednesday, February 10th, 2021 rocket League announced that Ford is going to take over there it gave Billboards for the upcoming which are major on zoo also had a big adults with this what the platform recently raised nine million dollars in additional capital in around Kool-Aid buyback Fetchers and hbse Ventures. There is participation by plenty more investors, of course, including Mark Merrill, one of the two founders of Riot games, this follows two other funny raises of three and five million. So in Mark Gratz of the race, first of all, what are the plans for this capital? Yeah, thank you Mitch. So as you said we raised 9 million dollars beatcraft is one of our previous investors are still leading gaming Esports v c. B c is a new VC which comes from the sport world and a lot of touchpoints around gaming and then other investors are wpp the biggest advertising group in the world, which is also like in the existing investor and Sony Innovation fund, you know, Sony is one of the biggest gaming groups in the world and the owner of PlayStation. So that's a privilege to have them on board Mark Romero the founder and chairman of road games on League of Legends. As you mentioned didn't call ins the founder and CEO of super awesome that recently got acquired by epic games and the Chicago Cubs. Yeah, the baseball team go Ventures and gainesville's and illumine Adventures. So a very crowded and exciting structure of invest investors to have on board. I'm a Cardinals fan so we'll let the dog So invested things slide, I guess but grats on all the different people who came together you mentioned before we started recording you were in the position that every founder kind of hopes. They find themselves in which is we have a few people. We have a different options for Capital so we can pick the people that make the most strategic sense for us going forward. What did you find from the mobile the different investors? What were you looking for? Especially as guiding parts of the company to push it Forward? Sure. So I mean, you know what this round was not about it was not about as fast as we could have fine as it like very very fast as what it was about bringing the best structure. Number one number two, it was about, you know to maximize shareholder value. We could raise almost double the amount but we didn't want to make sense. This is the amount of cash we need for next stage Rose and then in the future if it's a year from now or two years from now we can do another round off. For that makes sense. So we were not looking at at you know, these things it was more about we have a lot of confidence in him. Advertising is going to become a major business model for game divorce across all platforms, through PC Mobile and an important ads category four Brands media agencies and the ESPYs and and the question is how fast can that happen or more sneaking about big Brands big Publishers not easy companies to convince them to do something new. So when we meet partners that can help us to make this happen faster than wages. Are we get excited one form to partner is again investment one is a strategic partnership and they can elaborate more of some of the Partnerships we have in place and some of them is people who join our team. So that was what was guiding us and looking at the different, you know buckets of we are investors came from there is some you know, some like VCS and financial institutions. There is advertising and groups. There is game. Groups and there is a sports organizations that have a lot of touch point in going to become an important overlap in my opinion the next two years. And of course there is like with the values that we want to group represents and communicate us companies gauges as the leading investor for equal opportunity and Which choice for us an important to him and announcement to basically said if the world that was how we were looking at it that's a great place to be at

Bonetti Lide Castle Hbse Ventures Mark Merrill Mark Gratz Sony Innovation Mark Romero Road Games On League Of Legend Brayden Ubisoft Alienware WPP Mastercard Samsung Mitch Chicago Cubs Ford Gainesville
Digital identity in the UK in 2021 with TrueProfile.ios Rene Seifert

Let's Talk About Digital Identity

06:06 min | 11 months ago

Digital identity in the UK in 2021 with TrueProfile.ios Rene Seifert

"Thank you for joining today. I be sought in this new year. Twenty twenty one. We're going to discuss. Especially now they did identity in the uk for these new year. Twenty twenty one. How a super special guest. Today with rene effort he says cereal enterpreneur and co head of through profile dot. Co the industry leader in documentation power by the data flow group through profiled odoyo provides these services in a modern environment via the adoption of eat theory on blockchain prior to this rene was co founder and cozy your venture eight a. g. across the platform allowing regular people to embraced side by side would experience business angels in addition. He has been involved in founding. Several internet take immediate combines. Amande husband eat lab house. German in house gration began his career hosting radio shows in running an advertising agency parallel to his studies. He was kid of marketing in percenter at a radio station byron three during the new economy. He hid they determine department at lycos europe. Hello renee welcome. I also my pleasure for this. Podcast is great talking with you. Thank you hope. You're having a great start of the new year and twenty one fed. Who like to hear more about. Would you particularly how you doing media in order very interesting things about technology. Your life ended in this world of the identity. If i knew that myself. I think it's quite unlikely scenario that panned out spent. Maybe you also heard that famous. Commencement speech from steve jobs. In haver that you only can connect the dots in hindsight. You can't connect them living your life. Forward and limited tried to connect these dots and you mentioned a couple of things how they volved in my life. Indeed in my first life as i tend to say i was sitting on the other side of our conversation i was a radio. Presenter was a journalist by tim my highlight. There was a war correspondent for german public radio in macedonia during the kosovo. Nine hundred ninety nine. I did this kind of on the side of my university education for economic management and then post graduation. I was more focusing on the media management side of things. And as you're right they said. I was head of marketing of anti by on three one of the top ten german radio stations. After that's the new economy came. If you might recall that time the boom and the bust very was Director entertainment at that time famous and infamous search engine with a variety of other services lycos europe and really saw a lot of this bust of this new economy which maybe take a year off in two thousand two and spent a year traveling the world in a sabbatical during all sorts of things. I always wanted to do from doing a pilot's license motorbike licence mode license. Learning languages like russian spanish during my tie and then i came back to munich and well. This was my first immigration then. Going to bangalore india. And that's very in fact i thought it. By entrepreneurial journey in businesses like e commerce selling jewelry on ebay then moving into an outsourcing consultancy for bangolo has been very instill is very famous for and then starting in detroit angel invest in into indian companies with these angel andrew a cold mumbai angels so an imperative is lots of back and falls into you mentioned that also. I helped build an echo beta in munich. Owned by a hot spring publisher called spring except where we created some thirteen companies in the span of four years. Then i really truly moved back to munich for a short period of time. Very co founded a social media agency and that crowd funding platform venture ag which we then sold a year later to a publicly listed company. Then came i second immigration. This time with my family to bangkok and then kind of opportunity presented itself better typical soon network connections to join the data flow group at that time it was headquartered in hong kong meanwhile headquartered in dubai and data flow is doing esp primary source verification. Since two thousand six. And i was given a quite broad mandate look at. How can this be more digitized. And let's face it. I'd say verification is not the most sexy topic on the face of this earth but maybe it's also reason why nobody has looked at that. So i tried to exactly that so i kind of became a co founder of true profile. I oh really put the individual and implement into the center so we launched the first version of something called data flow plus dot org some four years ago and that subsequently into a troop profile. I o which. I'm now running in a shared responsibility with my esteemed koha alejandro coca from spain. Who is focusing on the commercial business part while i focus on the product and tech parts so in hindsight maybe it is possible to the dotes. I'd say my personal motivation here in the common thread has been never stop being curious. Never stop learning and never stop willing to make a move into a new uncharted territory. I can see. I can see many changes in geography and also in the business. If i may just add. I think it's really interesting. Because listen to some eighty percent of your podcast. I learned a hell of a lot. And i think what you're doing. You're doing a great service of building. This industry of digital identity from identity for people identity for technical system like api is than also what our policies locations or. What is the identity of a legal entity. So i found this area's always very separate and you're kind of bringing them under one umbrella where they belong. And i hope that maybe today. I can contribute. Another facets around verified credentials which are useful in particular in an hr context into your realm of digital

Odoyo Rene Amande Gration Munich Bangolo Lycos Angel Andrew Europe Very Co Renee Steve Jobs Macedonia Kosovo UK TIM Bangalore Alejandro Coca Mumbai Detroit
Interview With Travis Believes

The Cam Roberts Business Marketing Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Travis Believes

"Roberts., everyone Kim Roberts me. Thanks for tuning to the show this episode. I'm very excited to have a very special guest. His name is Travis believes and Travis is an entrepreneur and CEO of a company called winter light media. And that is the Premier social media agency for influences and brands with positive and life-affirming affirming messages inspiring the everyday person to reach their Max potential Travis beliefs. Thank you very much for coming on the show. Thank you so much for having me. Really appreciate it. Let's start off by talking about inter light media. How did you how did you get into a slight media? What's the back story there of of how you become who you are today? Yes. So, um, Ten years ago. I saw used to live in St. Louis, Missouri. That's where I'm from. Yeah, and there was a young man named Prince a lot of people know him. Yeah viral video creator and he was a rapper at the time and yeah, he was a rapper at the time and you know, I was very heavily into music and I met up with them because we live in the same city and along the same things and he had a brand called make smart cool which was all about collaboration, you know, spreading a positive messages, you know, things like that, right, but he wanted to do it through hip-hop. And so if you can if you can if you got a notice there's spoken word and Hip-Hop is very parallel anyway, right? Yeah. So yeah. Yeah. So but anyway, so I met up with him and you know, we became really good friends and the whole entire idea. I never forget he used to tell me cuz I used to try to get him to do shows like yep. Front of people like in clubs and things like that you punch out and he would be like why should I do a show in front of a thousand people when I can make a video and put on the internet suck really impact a hundred thousand people. Yeah that really like Changed My Mind Set On how to tackle the internet world. So anyway, long story short, we spent the next four years, you know trying to go viral which we had some some minor success, you know back with a million views was a lot of views on YouTube. We we had a few videos hit that but it wasn't in 2014 until he took off. And basically it was around 2016 I decided to because a lot of people started to hit this up and say hey, you know, what did you guys do to go viral like you guys are life. And at the time there was really nobody what this I like to call. I like to call the knowledge entertainment space. Yeah, where we are entertaining people through knowledge. The really wasn't a lot of jobs there were, you know, a couple of viral videos here and there, you know people creating spoken word, but it wasn't really kind of like an industry. You know what I'm saying? Yeah, and so, you know, once you know princy was been going viral for a couple of years 2016 now you have a lot of people like wanting to do the same thing. So bunch of people was reaching out to us and Prince. He was just doing his own thing, but then I decided to see I should probably start to open some of these people started helping some of these people and you know, one of the people I hope was Jay Shetty. Yeah, and he blew up then I started helping other people and they started blowing home. You know what? I mean? Let me create a company. But yeah, and and the thing is one of the things that really for me that truly made me want to create this a company wasn't even the fact that I knew I needed to help more people was more. So along the lines that when I was younger, I didn't have anybody giving me these messages. It was nobody I grew up without a dad without nobody was giving me these messages that I could be anything. I want or you know, I have a gift or you know anything to inspire me because it doesn't matter what occupation you have is it requires a court of inspiration? Yeah, whatever you do require some sort of inspiration and I wanted to kind of be the vehicle for that for other people around the world to try to help people be inspired to do whatever it is their gift is calling them to do so, that's how I started in line media. That's exciting. And what a great backstory that is Travis for a good so you talked about viral videos. Social media like what? What are some of the keys to making a video go viral? So the absolute number one key to make an any video go viral is emotion. Draw. What do you want people to feel a lot of times? I would say probably the most complicated thing Wednesday is when it's when you're when you're talking to people that are trying to replicate the process that's never really done this before as they they know information, you know, they know how to regurgitate what they know, It's about higher you going to make some money feel. It doesn't matter how good the information you have is if you can't make somebody relate to your story, then it's not going to go anywhere. You can have the Hope Diamond ring. But you know, if you're not telling somebody in a compelling way like hey, this is what it is. They're not going to they're not going to see the value in it and so once you connect with people and this is the thing every month, it doesn't matter and this is kind of like the key thing. It doesn't matter where you from what part of the world you from what culture you're from. We all literally have the same emotions.

Travis Kim Roberts Youtube CEO Missouri Prince Roberts. St. Louis Jay Shetty
"media agency" Discussed on The Cam Roberts Business Marketing Podcast

The Cam Roberts Business Marketing Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on The Cam Roberts Business Marketing Podcast

"Everyone camera thanks for treating to the show this episode on very excited to have a very special guest. His name is travis. Believes and travis is an entrepreneur and ceo of a company called into light media and that is the premier social media agency for influences and brains with positive and lots of earning affirming messages. Inspiring the everyday person to reach the max potential travis beliefs. Thank you very much for coming on the shot. Thank you so much for having me really appreciate it. Let's start off by talking about light media how did you. How did you get into each light. Maybe what's the backstory there of how you become who you want to die. Yes so Ten years ago I used to live in saint louis missouri. That's from and there was a young man named prince e. a lot of people know him Yeah by viral video creator and he was a rapper at the time. And yeah he's and You know i was very heavily into music and amid up with him because we live in the same city and along the same things and he had a brand called make smart cool which was all about collaboration You know a positive message. You know things like that right But he wanted to do it through hip hop. And so you can if you can if you kind of notice there's spoken word and hip hop was very parallel anyway. Oh yeah yeah so but anyway So i met up with him and you know we became really good friends and the whole entire the. I'll never forget. He used to tell me. 'cause i used to try to get him to do shows like you know in front of people like in clubs and show ya and it will be like. Why should i do a show. In front of a thousand people. When i can make a video and put on the internet and potentially impact one hundred thousand people that really like changed my mindset on how to tackle the internet world so anyway long story show spent the next four years you know trying to go viral which we had some some minor success you know back with a million views was a lot of views on youtube. We we had a few videos. Hit bet But it wasn't since doesn't fourteen until he took off and Basically it was around twenty sixteen..

travis premier social media agency fo saint louis missouri youtube
ReKTGlobal Secures $35M Financing Round to Support Its Growth

The Esports Minute

01:09 min | 1 year ago

ReKTGlobal Secures $35M Financing Round to Support Its Growth

"Wreck global defunding around a thirty five million dollars wrecked has quickly become. One of the largest eastwards operators in the world has been acquiring companies all over. He's for over the last few years on the team side. Wreck is the parent company of Rogue Atop Eastwards Organization best known for its League of Legends Europe team who qualified for worlds this year, they also have good rocket league apex rousers as well. They also have Dr Lupo incredibly Popular Streamer Roster for content creators. In addition to those teams and Lupo wrecked also owns the London Royal Ravens in the call of duty league outside of just those competitive teams though his also acquired green lit content, it content studio, full cube of Fan engagement platform, and fearless media a media agency. It's one of the most expansive companies, all of these sports at this point they also have a wide variety of celebrity investors. Those include musical artists like imagine, dragons, Steve, Aoki's Nicky, Romero as. well as athletes, Rudy Gobert Landon Collins and Taylor Fritz. They also brought on the founder of top dog, the rap group top artists like Kendrick Lamar schoolboy q Jay Rock Ciza, and I was shot personally my favorite label out there. So how'd had to give him a shout-out according to wreck CEO? They are also profitable. One of very few eastwards teams who can say that that's likely thanks to the wide variety of other companies they have under their belt. Investment was a debt capital raise meaning the money more. So alone than it is equity in the company and it came from summit partners. Summit is leaving private equity firm overseeing about twenty one billion dollars in total assets. It'll be interesting to see what rex intentions are with this debt capital raise. If I had to guess I would assume they're gonNA use it to acquire more companies in and around. East sports not necessarily to expand more games they already have a big president quite a few of the top games as it stands right now.

Dr Lupo Rogue Atop Eastwards Organizat Jay Rock Ciza League Of Legends Europe Rudy Gobert Landon Collins Kendrick Lamar London Royal Ravens President Trump Founder CEO Taylor Fritz Steve Romero Aoki Nicky
"media agency" Discussed on She's THE Boss Chats

She's THE Boss Chats

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on She's THE Boss Chats

"Was very small and it was run by a father and son get a guys and they were really really helpful actually and they just said I think you can do it. I'd been there a couple of months underpinning or you know under studying the person log. Heading and then he left part suddenly and then they said okay, you know it. Wow, and will you sort of quite thrilled and nervous or I mean I was suppose, you know, I was absolutely terrified. I think most of the time and I kept thinking well, I used to work, you know, like every weekend as well because at least one down the weekend because I thought I'm going to miss something, you know, because she was spending somebody else's money and that was really quite alarming and making sure everything was right. So yeah, and I guess the big thing with media buying and working in the media agency is you know, something goes wrong or you've chosen the wrong one or whatever that you're going to feel really bad. So what do you do? What did you do after that? How did you get out of there or was the next book? I just kept going on because the the next thing that happened was that they got a guy in another guy who was very ambitious and he was sort of edging into my space..

"media agency" Discussed on She's THE Boss Chats

She's THE Boss Chats

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on She's THE Boss Chats

"Was very small and it was run by a father and son get a guys and they were really really helpful actually and they just said I think you can do it. I'd been there a couple of months underpinning or you know under studying the person log. Heading and then he left part suddenly and then they said okay, you know it. Wow, and will you sort of quite thrilled and nervous or I mean I was suppose, you know, I was absolutely terrified. I think most of the time and I kept thinking well, I used to work, you know, like every weekend as well because at least one down the weekend because I thought I'm going to miss something, you know, because she was spending somebody else's money and that was really quite alarming and making sure everything was right. So yeah, and I guess the big thing with media buying and working in the media agency is you know, something goes wrong or you've chosen the wrong one or whatever that you're going to feel really bad. So what do you do? What did you do after that? How did you get out of there or was the next book? I just kept going on because the the next thing that happened was that they got a guy in another guy who was very ambitious and he was sort of edging into my space..

CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

The Daily 202's Big Idea

04:19 min | 1 year ago

CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention removed language on Monday from its website that said, the coronavirus spreads via airborne transmission. It's the latest example, the agency backtracking from its own guidance. The agency says the guidance that went up on Friday and largely went without notice until Sunday should not have been posted because it was an early draft they hadn't been approved evidence that the virus floats in the air has. been mounting for months with an increasingly loud chorus of Aerosol Biologists pointing to super spreading events in choirs at churches on buses in bars, and another poorly ventilated spaces. They cheered when the CDC seem to join them in green the coronavirus airborne although CDC officials maintain Fridays post was a mistake Democratic lawmakers on Capitol Hill are incredulous and promised subpoenas an investigation to figure out what's really going on behind the scenes. This change on the website on Monday is the third time that trump's CDC has posted significant coronavirus guidance only to quickly reverse stance. It's also the latest disorienting turn in a significant scientific debate with enormous public consequences for how we returned to schools and offices the debate over whether the extreme infectiousness tenacity of the virus is due to its ability to spread well over six feet especially indoors and small particles that result from talking shouting singing you're just breathing many experts outside the agency say the pathogen can waft over considerably longer distances than six feet to be inhaled into our respiratory systems especially, if we're indoors and air flow conditions or stagnant. What's clear from such cases is that while the virus Shirley spreads slowly in households among family members, it also spreads rapidly at indoor events. The bring lots of folks together. Meanwhile against that backdrop, an NIH press staffer is being pushed out after being exposed as a secret anti. Mask Blogger, William crews, a public affairs specialist at the National Institute. Of Allergy, and Infectious Diseases told officials that he will retire after the daily beast revealed yesterday that he's the managing editor of the far right website red state were under the pseudonym strife. He is ridiculed the government's activity in response to the coronavirus outbreak a job that he does from the inside. It seems based on time that things were posted that he was doing a lot of this writing during work hours the daily beast reports that cruise under his pending called Tony, Ouchi, his boss, a quote mask Nazi and implied that quote government is responsible for the pandemic response should be. executed. Articles include one calling the Democratic governor of Nevada. A mask fetishists after trump finance would hold an indoor rally in defiance of that state's covid restrictions. And the White House has also again move to shake up the personnel office at the Department of Health and Human Services. After a series of IMBROGLIOS, the trump administration yesterday removed its top two liaisons between the White House and the Health Department Emily Newman and her deputy. Catherine GRANATO will be shifted work fulltime at the Voice of America. Newman already has spent more than three months detailed to the global media agency as its chief of staff which politico reports has meant that Grenada who was literally an undergraduate at the University of Michigan this Spring and is in her early twenties has been in charge of the entire health departments personnel policy amid pandemic that has killed more than two hundred thousand. Americans. In Reminder, the personnel is policy. There are new indications that America cannot fix. It's ninety five facemask shortage, and we have a story today that sites several experts agreeing that the trump administration's mismanagement and incompetence are the major reasons why? And the numbers themselves are still really bad a third of states or seeing new case numbers that are at least seventy, five percent of their peak infection numbers. The most recent ten thousand American deaths were added in just the last nine days three fewer days than the ten thousand deaths that preceded those. On a positive note, fewer of those infected with the virus or dying than earlier in the pandemic, and that's great news. But the ongoing addition of new cases means an ongoing edition of new deaths and cases keeping at it.

CDC Managing Editor America White House Donald Trump Emily Newman William Crews Department Of Health And Human Nevada Shirley Catherine Granato NIH Politico Public Affairs Specialist University Of Michigan Health Department Grenada
"media agency" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Your favorite memories. That's a tough question. Well, there was this one time I went camping with my parents in a forest back when I was maybe, like eight or nine. And I can remember one night we were laying out in our hammocks and we were just, you know, watching the trees rustling in the wind above us, and we could hear the sounds of the forest all around us. Frog singing and owls, calling the creeps running nearby. It was amazing. It felt like we were a part of it all. I don't know if I do it justice trying to describe it, but I'll definitely never forget it. Most of us have a memory of being in nature will never forget. Let's protect the world's natural places so more memories can be made for generations to come. Visit World wildlife don't work. I don't even recognize myself anymore. I'm really worried about him this addiction. I haven't seen him like this. Never I never want to start easing. I knew the drill, but I was out of options. I just want to tell him it's not in fault. There are people out there who can help. People have felt your pain. They know what you're going through. This has to stop. I'm losing everything. Everyone. You've been strong your whole life. You could do this, but you have to reach out for help. It's time. I could do this addiction is a disease and diseases need treatment. Call Quit drugs. 321 now at 803 48933 803 480933 803 4809 33 paid for by the detox and free but help line Welcome back to America's trends. I'm Amy Poehler. We're talking a little bit more about social media and just what we share and how much we should share. We have an expert on now with us to talk about specifically. Should CEO shared their personal beliefs and political perspectives on social media were chatting with Chris Ruby, the CEO of Ruby Media Group. Public relations and social Media Agency and Chris Welcome. You frequently speak to associations and work with people and CEOs and do workshops and people can contact you on your website to get personal help with that. We thank you for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to be here and we're happy to have you so let's just get right to it. Should CEO share their personal belief. Is there any good that could come out of something that could be controversial in this day and age when we're so divided over our political stances? You know, it's a really interesting question. And unfortunately right now, I would say that times are only getting more challenging as this upcoming election years, And you know, I've seen more relationship sort of shattered over political divides and CEO sharing their political opinion on social media sites, whether it's family members or even colleagues or professional contacts, the sort of traditional hierarchy that existed within the corporate world, you know of employees to boss or anything else like that. It's just Those rules are right out the window right now, when it comes to politics, and it seems that every day there is something new, and ah, NIU, you know, explosion on social media perfect example of that. Actually, you know me personally as a C. I put out a tweet the other day about the Super Bowl and my own thoughts on that now, I never thought that something that I could say would have such extreme political ramifications. And I, you know, I think it was retweeted or something over. 5000 times and I just had a mop Come after me online and basically attacked me for it. And so the question as a CEO is really what is your time worth? And do you want to spend the time to engage in the backlash that your will suffer as a result of putting your opinion online? Those air such good points, Chris because I mean, I think of Colin Kaepernick and people protesting the NFL altogether. As you say, so it's like you tweet one thing about something that's that's an American tradition. It's basically a holiday, almost the Super Bowl and there's backlash. And I know there have been Super Bowl performers who have been criticized because they agreed to perform. But when it comes to people like that, and CEOs, you've worked your way to the top of something, and they might just think you know what this is What I feel. I'm going to say what I want to say. So is there a way Is there a place for that? Because if you try to please everybody, you're going, please. Nobody. But you might just have a cache of people who agree with you. And you get new followers and new respect or something. What have you found? What I found theater. Fortunate reality here is that I do think there is a place for some CEOs to share their opinions and political point of views in this country, and unfortunately that is only people who align or are on the left. I think that if CEOs put out their opinions from the left, and those air often applauded and agreed with, right, but if you see that there is a CEO that is going to say something that is more right, leaning that CEOs 100% going to get attacked. So what I have found from working with CEOs of both sides of the aisle here is that there is really room for one opinion, one common vernacular in this country right now, And if you try at all, to veer away from that sort of set narrative, you will be attacked, And unfortunately, that also means that your business is going to be attacked. And CEOs have to really think about. You know what prices is worth to me? And also for my own mental sanity. How much can I take this? Because see, I was thinking about running a business in addition to this firestorm, just for putting out an opinion online. Sure you know it does the dynamic right now, Politically, as you say, the left. People will be applauded. But there's a silent right that people are scared to come out there. Hollywood actors it will whisper and they're afraid, Teo say what they really think that they approve of President Trump or what the right is doing on this and that Because they're afraid that just won't get work. So it is such an interesting time to be looking at this Have you seen? Have you seen some worst case scenarios where CEOs have shared something, and it's done a backlash. And Chris, if there is a backlash should people apologize? Sometimes it looks so weak. Other times they say, No, we're saying this and we mean it. That could get even more. Plus, I don't know. What have you found being the expert? So unfortunately, we have all of these CEOs who are not, you know, have never really experienced a Twitter mob before, so they're in this year's position. We're unless you've experienced it. You have no idea what that's going to be like with their phone going up for, you know, 24 to 48 hours, So I tend to agree with you that you end up apologizing for this crazy narrative. That is so far off course, from what you ever even meant. Sure. I don't think that's strong brand positioning or brand messaging when we're you know, forced to make these apologies for messages that we were never even really putting out to begin with. And so I think that's really the challenge When you start apologizing for everything, which is what you know, we see these forced celebrity apologies all the time or force corporate apologies again. I think a lot of those are really written by PR professionals because they're sort of being told by, you know their handler that they have to do this. I'm not sure that in the first place, sometimes those people said anything that was so wrong to be In with right, But I do see you know what's interesting is people direct message me a lot with their opinions around this, And one thing that I will talk about is that in terms of the question, you asked about CEOs where they get this wrong Sometimes you have CEOs that air publicly making statements on behalf of their company and all of their employees. You know, we saw this with all of these tech leaders, something with the gun reform right? And and these people are saying Wait a second. They're speaking for me, but I don't agree with them, right? And so these employees don't know what did Yu because Yu know they signed up for a job. They didn't think that this you know politics is ever going to be part of that equation. And now the CEO sort of thing. We all collectively feel this way. Well, no, they don't all collectively feel that way. That's impossible to collectively feel that way. If you have more than one employee So maybe they can get away with it. They say this is my belief. This is my opinion. I don't speak to my employees. Something simple like that which they're never going to say right? Because if they're good leader, they should, of course, be speaking to their employees and understood not for their employees. I meant to say, Yeah, exactly. Chris Ruby is the CEO of Ruby Media Group. You can find her at her beautiful website, Ruby media group dot com. She is a columnist and cover social media, public relations and tech trends..

CEO Ruby Media Group Chris Ruby Chris social Media Agency Amy Poehler America Chris Welcome Colin Kaepernick NIU NFL Twitter Hollywood President Trump Teo Yu
"media agency" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Program won't let me out I'm sorry what is that the problem so I don't know what you're talking about because everything is not finalized jab when well no wait a minute are you talking about tonight's trump rally the one that set because we're on the radio trump is on television how are you well I'm here it's a very unfortunate we're sorry all I'm saying is I don't know what well I don't know this but this is our time to be on the radio to tell you about what's going on you should be paying attention and taking notes and not worrying about trump not being on TV we're not responsible for you having a TV war war war all are easy on the radio well CJ I'll tell you once again because apparently you're here is not very well it's not on the radio we're on the radio tonight this is the but on a different channel well it could I doubt it but you know it's on the internet and it's on television I can't help but Mr CJ does not have anyway so let's talk with Mildred and we'll take this call and then we'll talk about the media he's talking about the media we're talking about the media you're talking to me talking to me anyway here is Mildred Mildred good evening hello hi you're on the air Mildred I want to know if if I can hear the president trump I think you have to turn on the television what I have no idea what I'm in here doing a radio show and go to foster fox and I don't know which it cable channel you have my feeling I think it's on C. span right now we're sorry listen no more calls check these calls out I don't want people telling me about trump's speech and you know make sure these people are calling about the issue right now I want to give talking about the media right so let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news network well that's gonna be eight let me say this there's a new book out it is moving up the charts extremely quickly by the way in my soul today in the in the Wall Street journal it's already number seven on the top ten list it's called the United States of socialism it's by Dinesh d'souza yeah who has written many good books and has done wonderful work in a world of documentaries which is something we need to do more often okay a lot more often and in all of these type of books that these these wonderful conservative writers put out they usually at the conclusion the final chapter is always what can we do type of chapter right and this is what's interesting the national zoo's a says in the final chapter that we need to have a local grassroots patriotic constitutional Republic power I need he explains we need to have media control we need to have grass roots activism an informed public in other words he describes super citizen to the T. he describes everything we do which is necessary after I retired from the legislature after twenty years I told Valerie I said I have a plan I'm going we're going to dedicate for years the saving the world or we're going to go to Sarah Sarasota she said it's a wonderful plan I'll go to Sarasota you'd go save the world not for you but she's been by our side and working hard but that and that's what this is all about Jim this is all about I'm gonna work hard for the next two years we put about a year and a half into this it's grown and has grown the virus like everything else has heard us it is lotus now what I'm telling people out there always mention this we always hear criticism about George Soros yeah George Soros is probably the most evil man in the world one of them one of them but he he's he's there and there are planning is the best known he's the best known and unfortunately more of them have to be exposed however you know George Soros hates America wants to destroy America he's he's a general in the war against America for but you know once he puts his money where his mouth see if that's true the open society he finances yeah I'm gonna give you people shock out there right now I have already given you a shock about Phil's family you know the Baltimore Ravens that we love our great football team Mr back not a I think his name is I'm not sure if I pronounce it wrong I apologize he's the owner well they have a president of the ravens okay the president of the ravens is a George Soros guy when he is on the board of the open society in Baltimore yeah the open society controls education in Baltimore the open society controls the juvenile justice in the state of Maryland yeah he's a George Soros guy why and you wonder why the players fall into line or taking a knee sure okay through a lot of people don't know that all right that's what you find out on this program this is what you do so anyway we're your way past break time we're gonna take a break we'll be right back are you always.

"media agency" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

The How-to Entrepreneur

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

"Calvin I lost you. Lost Your audio. Last thing I heard was started your social media agency, and then it just kind of made a loud, high frequency, noise and cutout. No not now I can read your lips though. Leave it and come back. Okay, yeah, I can I can read your lips fairly well. You'RE GONNA. Leave and Can you hear me? I can see you. Every. Yeah So are you recording? Can I pick it up? Yeah, you can pick it up. The last thing I heard was that. The that you know that you had the failure of from para, her periscope was a failure, and then the last thing you said was then I started to social media agency. Yeah, and so then I started the Social Media Agency and that. Still going so you could call that success, but then I wrote my book fish out of water, because I always knew I, wanted to write a book that was awesome, because that got me into some other passions of mine, which is speaking so through my book fish out of water been able to do more speaking, but then there's other things I've done first of all none of these things have gotten as big. Big As my ambition, that's for sure you know like the social. Media Agency was going to be a multimillion dollar. Thing hasn't hit that My speaking career was going to be multiple six figures again, still working on that very hopeful with it but then I've done things that have just flat out failed so I've made online products and stuff in the tried to promote it, and it was just like. last year was probably two thousand and nineteen probably had the the biggest quote unquote failure because I spent months on building a financial product because I was really passionate with helping other people get their finances in order and getting out of debt like I did. And again I spent months building this thing and I was like this is going to be the thing that explodes and I launched it and got crickets and so..

Social Media Agency Calvin
"media agency" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"News Talk Let's help each other. Feel good today. I've got a fantastic show lined up for you and now that I'm working from home. I joined the thousands of other broadcasters that are doing just that and saw on although how are you doing today? I'm doing are you yeah? I'm good I'm good. It's weird. I've got my cat tiger and my cat being in my my room with me and You know I hopefully. They won't get into my paperwork into working at home. Well this is day three and it's getting better is it. Do you think it's getting better from from You know A board OPS from your You've been in the business for doing this for a while. So I've been by myself longtime. Yeah it so. It's an adjustment for me and you know one of the things. I think I kinda did mistakenly is. I didn't dress for work the last couple of days because I was like. Okay I'm home and You know of course I brush my teeth wash my face combed my hair all that but today I You know took a long shower and put on clothes like I would if I was going into the studio so and I have to say I do feel a lot better. And what a great day it is too because it's earth day today. It's The fiftieth anniversary. So happy Earth Day to everyone out there listening birthday happy birthday and you know I've got a lot of earthy friends and two of them. All three of them actually are on the show today. We've got a great show lined up. We've got keynote Burnett. And the second half and autumn. Connolly's going to be coming up. And we have Courtney Garza on the line. She's an amazing and she is. She's so Passionate about the whole lifestyle and that brings her love for journalism. Creativity helping local businesses and animals altogether with her compassionate Social Media Agency that she co founded with her business partner. Kristina Buford Who I absolutely loved by the way. The sprinkles creative if the name of their business and it is to eight businesses with their branding strategies and courtney also owns and operates Bech World magazine which is an international Vegan lifestyle publication and is the editor and chief to curate and promote plant based stories from Vegan product services and individuals from all walks of life. How you doing today courtney wonderful? I'm happy to be here. Thanks wonderful action. I did my best and you're welcome appreciate it gets so great well. Today's Earth Day so so many are celebrating all over this this wonderful world that we live in. So how do you personally celebrate Earth Day as a Vegan? Yeah well you know to me. It's kind of every day so it just makes me even more happy to to kind of spread the love to the earth which with Vegan Diet is such a great way to do it because It's a kind of win win situation. When you're cutting out meat and dairy in your life you are saving a lot of You know emissions gas emissions a lot of resources naturally from the Earth because you're not contributing to Kind of animal farms agriculture. That is pleading that so To kind of have a huge impact there would just simply the meals that I choose to to consume and I think that's such a big and easy way to save the planet. You know to me. I'm like man. This is like the easiest situation ever. I don't do much but obviously yeah my other practices. I do also absolutely. That's true and and for you know but I think it's a transition for everybody There's a lot of meat eaters out there listening. We cover everything we cover. Paleo we cover Kito and so I. What is your best tips for someone who wants to slowly transition? Maybe not to a hundred percent the vegans. But you know maybe fifty percent Vegan. What do you say that I say? That's exactly how I did it because I certainly didn't go what we like to call. Code Kofu overnight we You know I tell everybody. You're on your own journey. No one is rushing. You know one is pushing you. I certainly took about six years to fully transition from plus get -tarian to Vegetarian Vegan like no. I was not an overnight case for sure I you know just found things that I could reasonably get. Give up like for me. It started with red meat. And then I got rid of Pork and then poultry. And then finally I held onto a fish for many years. Four years and then Phased that out and then the last thing to go for me was ice cream but then I discovered this amazing ice cream called not a new and then I'll ask love that. I had them last night. I had the strawberry cheesecake. I actually I you know a little bit more comfort food than I might. Typically and so are pro. We're flavors last week and I've been like under so darn good people that don't know really don't know like you can't even tell at least me anyway. I don't know maybe my my taste buds are a little different than someone You know each real ice cream time but to me. The vegan ice cream is even better because no animal has to suffer. I love that and I love you. Know States Earth Day. We're talking about you know the ramifications of our choices on the earth and so you know it's all good things to consider but yeah if you have never tried it and we're not getting paid for this we've both just really loved their product Or their coconut milk. What are they? It's not ice cream. Well I guess it kind of is but it's coconut cream. It's cold coke instead of cold. Cow's milk so yeah yeah so you don't have to do much to make the change. You just Kinda do you can. Yeah and it doesn't like you said it doesn't have to be a hundred percent. It can be fifty fifty or I guess. I actually thought that. But you know what I'm saying but So how do you suggest others Vegan or non vegan integrate more sustainable practices into their life? That are earth friendly like not food related but just you know Earth Earth related. The H- me there are so many ways The best way is to kind of look at you. Were products that use every day such as dish though for bath bath. Soap or You know just gotTa the products and see what they're made of. There's a lot of different ways you know. They incorporate pets wax prosthetic with their packaging. Or they you know. Source their ingredients in their soaps from non sustainable sources such as a big one is palm oil. You're seeing that a lot of I'm oil then. You should probably switch. You should probably look for something that either totally amidst problem while or has A sustainable way of sourcing which I will say is very hard to find though. It's probably just best to go for things that don't have it entirely look for Shea. Butter look for Olive oil I mean. Just there are so many other sources that you can switch out That's something non. Food related obviously Probably Oh isn't a lot of food but it's also a lot of soap and I think that's a big way that I tried to make a change in my household. Yeah other than you know like what you can do Just with household products really makes a difference Obviously reducing plastic anywhere. You can such as grocery store. I always suggest pay. You have some old bag lying around but them in your car the night before. You're you're you're planning to go to the store that way. You have no excuse in your car. they're reusable bags. They can be. You know old cloth bags or something. That's obviously you're not gonNA throw away paper plus. Yeah Yeah you wash them. And they're also. There's a lot of ways to be ECO friendly. That was the word I couldn't think of. But yeah there are probably from from using cloth Instead of paper towels that you you know put into a little Pale and wash you know every other day maybe do a small load of wash instead of and maybe have one that you use for like you know for food related kitchen items and then one that you may use for pet items. There's so many things that you can do To to preserve the health of our planet. Yep and it's a lot easier than anything. It doesn't have to be dodging well. Let me ask you this. So what would you say is the first and easiest thing that we can all do to make a positive impact on the state of our climate in the world other than becoming a Vegan. What what's what's another really big thing that we can do. I I also think it becoming mindful I I really think it starts in your head because let's be honest. Nobody's going to do something Unless they truly want to do it. And you can yell and point the finger all you want and say you're doing it wrong but that's just gonNa make them. I'd do it less. You know I think that starts with our with our mindset. It starts with our hearts If we kind of look around and see the state of the world's not just through Cova D- But You know just kind of environmentally. We know that we need to make a change. We know that things Need to change in our everyday practices and I think that really begins in our hearts first and foremost as you know as hippy. Dippy as that might sound you. We really do kind of have to look within and say what can I get change? Everybody's GONNA be different. Everyone can have perspective and like the financial situation and might be. Just you know the way that you get your resources and every everyone's different but I could sit over here and say. Oh yeah just use less plastic or oh yeah just right maybe take less showers or you know make sure you you don't run the thinks so long or which out your Cleaning Products Yeah. That might be easy for someone in the more you know financial situation where they're more well off but it might not be the case for other people and I think that's just again. Just look around. See what you can do. Maybe it's just simply like I said using less water every day Yeah so the how much you use by all the showers you take or whatever you know just like. What do that fit your lifestyle? I I really don't WanNa have a one-size-fits-all situation even though I do believe that going Vegan is the most good that we can do Just just kind of blanket term because it really is Kinda like a three punch deal so much resources and well well. Yeah and you don't have to do it. One hundred percent. You can just start with Wendy. Our Week Make It beat Lewis Monday Tuesday and just have fun with that. Get Creative. Always a pleasure to have you on the show with Courtney Courtney Garza she editor in chief a veg world magazine. I encourage you to check them out. What's the website to get the magazine digital digital right yet all all digital so just veg World magazine Dot Com? That's it all right all right. Well always a pleasure. Thank you so much. Happy Birthday to you and everyone out there listening more coming up. We've got a great show lined up you. Autumn commonly is back. She's going to be doing a chant. A prayer for the earth Along with some great tips. She planted a garden. I think two days ago we're gonNA hear all about it and of course t number. We're GONNA BE TALKING ABOUT BIOMETRICS WHICH HAPPENS TO BE TINA SPECIALTY. So pay to everyone. We've got lots coming up. You're listening to wildlife radio.

Courtney Courtney Garza Kito Kristina Buford Social Media Agency Bech World Burnett Connolly TINA SPECIALTY editor in chief partner Shea editor Wendy Lewis
"media agency" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"media agency" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is a business rockstars I'm Pat o'brien is our rock stars today I own a college is right it's right and we love that he runs an R. six agency what do you do there so I'm the founder and CEO of north sixth agency and six A. as we have come to become known as through the years I the company handle the day to day operations were based in New York and have a small office opening this year in Toronto as well there's always going to be an entrepreneur you know I don't want to be a leader in some capacity I didn't know if it was going to be an entrepreneur per se but I always wanted to have some kind of a leadership role whether it was in the business capacity or teaching capacity and you know sure not the turned out to be a business what do you think you got that you know it's funny because if you look at my Indian entrepreneurship is not necessarily in my DNA you know I I have the greatest parents in the world neither of whom happen to be entrepreneurs aggression is aggression I have a lot of energy you know in my bloodline my grandparents hardworking immigrants came to this country that's what six six I mean that's what it says for we you know the funny story about being in the services business I want to launch our agency and I was very young at the time and expressions services business you don't really need a lot of young founders especially in two thousand nine two thousand so you're like twenty eight hours twenty six minutes and it is because you know that the economy very wall tile difficult to start the services business as a young entrepreneur and I don't know anyone you know I don't have he is a teenager and I didn't have many connections believe me at that time and so it's just I I just tried to meet with successful entrepreneurs from other services businesses who have made it and asking for some advice and almost everyone of them the only one we name the agency we should name it after the principal after the founder and if you look at some of the largest and most iconic agencies today and after the scene you know person Marsteller and the list goes on and I just said you know for industry PR marketing that prides itself on being creative I don't think that was the most creative thing to do and I wanted to build a company that really stood for something and my grandparents had a tremendous impact on my life and I like the values that they represented and that's where we can go through sounds like a an Irish name so what was your first job my first job was working in my neighborhood you know group of about twenty miles north of New York City I just do not jobs in gardening and things around than the the our neighbor's houses I got into high school actually work public access and how to sports that talk TV show was trying to take your job is to work out too well and sure enough I I I joined the other side the side down the road more you always we always interested in management are here again I wanted to do something in a leadership capacity after I got out of college I worked actually I started house for Sony BMG where and a lot of the domestic PR and marketing for their international artists and I want to be a sports agent so I would work at Sony BMG during the day sports as well so that was my store you know I I got out of school work for Sony in the daytime news again three hours ten to seven or whatever it was I would race home and I would I represent basketball players and try to get them overseas jobs and my goal was just to save enough money to turn the sports agency into a full time gig and then I found out quickly that the good guy doesn't always win it's not a fair fight in the world of sports agents and I sound and when I ultimately lost in six a lot of the skills that I developed at Sony and as a sports agent we're pretty transferable to media you got to get the right player too but in closing so who are your mentors who is your favorite entrepreneur no I don't know I do have some entrepreneurs that I I admire Steve Wynn comes to mind as one Richard Branson obviously has done just incredible job building a brand and marketing with the level of differentiation in that industry that on the the win but you're right there's a guy who many completely reinvented you know yeah absolutely you Steve when it's it's interesting because at the size and scale that we're at as a business now you can you know you come up with you come across challenges with regard to you know span of control you know now we're up to forty people its downside really trusting you with an amazing senior management team and manager level staff and really comes down to trusting them and delegating and making sure people are inappropriate lanes Steve Wynn wrote the book on how to scale and handle span of control so I really admire him for that case on his golf course but not by him I was playing golf with you either want to see you again we are here to inspire inform and connect the community last one or is this is business rockstars I'm Pat o'brien that reserve as our guest north sixth agency here into a lot of things I was going to knock them off their technology consumer entertainment Canada cannabis cannabis yeah with the roll the dice a little bit there and special services healthcare and financial services Canada should be the new one and positive or negative except on driver run over me but I would have thought that would be the hardest thing to get into right now you know it's funny cat it is I mean it certainly is becoming it more popular nursing agencies were that three or four years ago what would have lasted and having his prospects certainly now trying to be opportunistic about it and we were fortunate I mean as we we had built a nice agency and scaled our business to the point where we could afford to take a few risks kind of this was one of them A. I. artificial intelligence it was another cybersecurity was another of those are three that's that I have paid off for us we we had some that haven't been as a fruitful but those are certainly three categories are proud to be an what's the culture around your company so our culture is really rooted in in a bunch of things it begins with we have two different task with six taglines to it which really define us one internally is competing care and I think that that's really the defining a model for other users we have everything women embrace the pace one about working fast in fact in a basketball guy or increase the pace logo our members a paste add lines there's a college basketball team you know when we did I did a Google search on this and as a college basketball team that took increased the pace from us and I said I said that was our ours and we actually started talking to a D. and then we're gonna be doing some stuff together now yeah that's good competing care is is really the fabric of our internal culture and the Audi is where media agency in New York City the most competitive media market in the world well maybe not so much that we come back again I'm interested so that you're right I mean there there are some emerging markets I mean in New York historically has certainly been there in the market sure okay and so the whole point is we're not going to ignore competition you know we're gonna embrace competition and everybody who walks through our doors as an employee as a team member I need to be competitive but at the same time we like to bounce that that's where care comes in you know with team work team oriented spirit collaboration so you know what I'm managing our business and you know the type of perks and incentives and not the type of programs we have they're all rooted in one of the really competitive but on the other hand it never comes to the detriment of the detriment of the team the one I want is I was wrong okay so I got that for you but you know most people most people who come into and succeed in the sea that tattooed on our walls they think we're just wrong about everything the stories the story is it goes a little like this but when I started the business can I tell you I don't really you know I don't have much at all my wife my wife was eight months pregnant she had just I went on maternity leave from her job as a second grade public school teacher I could a pretty cushy job at the time to start our agency you know income no income because our first house you typical entrepreneur anonymity connections no capital no connections like the recipe for a wonderful budding startup business right I'm in a tough economy that had to be kind of frightening it was scary it was scary you know there was people who believed in me and rolled the dice and I think that helped me get through a lot but one of these individuals who was a tie in our industry was crazy enough to agree to sit down with me before I started the the business and to give me some advice and just out of respect from a woman in his name our staff knows who it is but just to put his importance in perspective it would be like an aspiring actor sitting down with Denzel Washington or you know basketball players are now Michael Jordan I mean that's that's the caliber of the prestige and this person had and he sat down with me I gave him all my whole pages look I'm a first time entrepreneur trying to start an agency she was my business model here's what I want to do to drive innovation and differentiate ourselves anything this thing's going to work and he looks at me strangely I think this is Matt I have no doubt no doubt you're going to be a successful entrepreneur this business is going to work you brought me here for my honest opinion my honest opinion is don't start the agency now you know you're young twenty six years old the company was terrible I need Connie I'll build your personal brand and you know couple years from now open up shop so that was his advice of course all schools will of ministering kid from New York what I do I start the agency the next day and fast forward now about about three or four years after that conversation obviously we have launched the business we had achieved some level of success and we were named at that time it was one of the things twenty fastest growing agencies in the country and this individual remember the conversation we had four years prior send me an email and all the email no subject line just three words I was wrong all caps and that's kind of a chip on our shoulder that we like to carry all your T. shirts we are here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs this is a business rockstars I'm battle Brian back in.

Pat o'brien founder and CEO
How to Become a Masterful Interviewer and Podcast Host With Josh and Erik From Onair Brands

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

09:46 min | 1 year ago

How to Become a Masterful Interviewer and Podcast Host With Josh and Erik From Onair Brands

"Guy so I guess we're GonNa talk about your to set this off right. I've got Eric Cabral and Josh. I've got his last name against him. There y'all work of Josh. Carry with me and these guys are the While. Eric you started on air brands. I correct than Josh joined you. Yes on brands is our media agency which started roughly two years ago. As a result of answering the question for our clients and the market How do I get a logo? How do I get a website? How do I then how to inch I in turn make all of that Worked in social media. So that's what we really did for our clients. A lot of them were real estate investors. Because I am a real estate investor and then it slowly evolved into podcast production creation Which we partner with one Luis Diaz and then there's also the aspect that morphed into podcast creation and production into podcasts events called now a new company. We created called pod. Max Yep yeah that's that's it in a nutshell and it's pretty cool because what we do is give people a platform invoice and opportunity to shine and it just you know. It's a whole abundance. Mindset it just you know. We're we're successful because you're successful. Yeah exactly and For me what I WANNA bring you both you guys on here today. I I fall is funny because twists will who were just talking about listened with. She tagged me and one of Josh's posts and she sees like I don't know this guy but he's doing some podcasting and then you should connect with them cool so I reached out to Josh. And that's how we hit it off as we cannot connected So shout out to twist for that. She's in this group but What I want to bring you guys on here for a you guys been doing podcasting. You're both you both. Have Your own shows you both successful at it and you are able to use the podcast as a platform to grow your business. Build your brand and essentially develop network developed connections with people who are essentially business partners. Jv's or just good friends. So I think you guys are doing it. Right in that aspect. The second thing is with pod Max I like you got something about the concept house like. This is amazing because I think it's something that people want. I WanNa talk about that a bit too. And kind of what that's evolved into and why and why people should lean towards of this event or lean towards events like this in the future to grow their their awareness online so To kick things off. You said YOU'RE A REAL ESTATE INVESTOR RIGHT. Eric before right still are still still You know Hopeful that This is all going to be good. Yeah you see the interest rates drop you the day I mean. Yeah that's a good thing. Go Bill Barlett shit ton of money. Yeah Yeah we've seen this happen before and it didn't boat out you know didn't work well so but yeah. Yeah Yeah. Of course. We're GONNA talk about Corona virus here and there. It's kind of everywhere. So the writing's on the wall is going to be interspersed throughout this conversation but I guess first question is you guys both are involved in podcasting lot. You know a lot of podcasters whether they're in real estate or not's what are some of the things that maybe you can give me the eighty twenty some of the things that Uc podcasters who are doing. Well what do they do differently When near maybe when they're like when they're interviewing guests or when they're on other podcasts. You guys were a lot of people who want to get on the PODCASTS What are some of the things that the best are doing differently? Maybe from the the normal the average people. Well I think what it always comes down to is Perhaps you've heard why do people tune into a show? It's for the host to embrace understand that concept. They don't show up to the guests. They don't show up for the topic or the theme they show up for the host. So what does that mean that you have to be your best? You have to become your best. You have to bring your best. That may not happen overnight. I learned this. You know really the hard way after spending forty plus years in hiding showing up not as myself seeking approval trying desperately to get anybody and everybody to like me want to hang out with me. Turns out that doesn't work nobody cares. Nobody is attracted to that so until I made the definitive decision to say I gotTa Change. All this sharp is my best. My Best ECOMMERCE best through the podcast medium. Which is why. I adore it and love it. I now attribute it to really saving my life at my business but you have to realize you have to grow yourself to show up so to answer your question directly what are the good host doing. They know that this is a crap. They know that this is a profession and they know that this is something you can improve and get better at with work and effort training and education. So you have an know that you are the kind of person on the Mike that people want to be around. And if you're not you're not but you have to work every day to evolve and grow your cells and learn about the industry so you can perfect your craft and everything that's involved with it. I love that. That's so true and it reminds me of a I want the for shows. I actually listened to which was Michael Steles our social media social media marketing or social media examiner. He's such a good interviewer. I don't care who is interviewing 'cause I know he's GonNa pull that what he needs out of them he's GonNa pull out all the good stuff right. And he's such a vicious vicious but like he knows how to control the conversation so that. I don't care who is interviewing because I know I would get something out of it because just 'cause how he shows up on every single interview so that's a great point and people listening if you want to go check out that show go to. Michael sells nurse type in that. Name S. T. E. L. Z. And your And you'll see how he interviews but that's a great point Josh. I think Sometimes people rely on the host or they rely on the topic and I know that there are not hosting guests. And I've done that in the past shirt and it's a great reminder so for you how did you change and like how did you things you did to bring more energy to kind of like reinvent who you were to improve the podcast. Well it's a very. It's a very good question. There's a very good a very specific answer to that what we're talking about because it's all about you and your persona and your personality. This is all about your likability. Do People like you. Do they want to be around you? Are you attractive in the literal sense of the word? Do you attract others to you to want to tune into Wanna. Listen to one time you either are or you aren't. The good news is that you can become so for forty. Plus years of my life I was not attracted. I REPEAT. Held people through all of my insecurities. Yes we all have it but to what degree. I was knee deep. I was depressed. I was sad. I was anxious. I was insecure. Nobody wants to be around that or should say the white people don't want to be around. The people are going to help you become your best. WanNa be around that show. I found my why it was my two adoring children that I have today made showed me that I cannot in will not spend any more time being that person so I stepped up. I took full responsibility for what was going on and I said this is on me now. I want a different outcome. I have to be a little different than my actions so I started changing. All of my bad habits. I started figuring out how to enjoy who I am and slowly but surely strip away those insecurities show up fully evaluate honestly who. I was what I was doing and who I want to be in order to attract the right people so it starts with an honest assessment of what you are doing. That is just not working. Take one non habit. At a time I had many small medium and large start removing them. If you can't figure out how to duly signed the reasons I'm your why you should and want to do it in start doing it. And seeing the result that is huge that you'd Eric The amazing and save and one thing giants look. They were forty men. He looks great for fifty seven retirement. On I'M GONNA be forty six this year which is quite absurd are the same age actually So here's here's the call. I'm sorry Eric. Although we're not your two years old in two years we're not tired. There's a time when we're only one year apart like three days of the year but anyway So Josh Amazing at really getting people to identify and craft their message and then also he's I love to go we call him the doctor internally in our team in our company because he really goes to work with his clients and he goes to work with individuals and really in a therapeutic way he he could really really get deep and help you sort of identify some of your hurdles and then maybe leverage those hurdles for your show and for your

Josh Eric Cabral Wanna JV Michael Steles Bill Barlett Partner Luis Diaz Mike S. T. E. L.
Coronavirus: cruise passengers relieved to be ashore but stranded in Cambodia

This Morning with Gordon Deal

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: cruise passengers relieved to be ashore but stranded in Cambodia

"The cruise industry may have some reputation damage to conduct after how the corona viruses wreaked havoc on a couple of it ships the western dam arrived in Cambodia and allowed passengers to disembark after days of circling the city but over the weekend on American passenger tested positive for the virus raising concerns that infected passengers were dispersing across Asia then there was the diamond princess anchored off the coast of Japan were passengers were quarantine for two weeks as the virus spread to more than six hundred of the thirty seven hundred on board both of those ships are owned by carnival what now analysis from al dill Guido president of the north six agency communications and social media firm in New York City al how do you see it Carter was gonna have a problem here and it's gonna be a major problem because they're being associated their cruise line is being associate were coronavirus coronavirus something good coming out of the news reports recorder virus and the fact that they're taking on passengers now that they were cruising in that area the taking of passengers who are being quarantine on the ship it's not a it's you know it's it's not a great place to be for them for brand standpoint could you start to call into question you know what's what's the impact of having quarantine passengers who have either have or haven't you have not been yet detected as having coronavirus on ships of theirs so my sense is they should have been over communicating from the very beginning and they weren't and that's not a good situation for them to be in right now from a consumer standpoint do we hold all cruise lines are all crews are operators accountable or do we want to win on carnival and say I'm not not ceiling carnival anymore like how does that work the card above the carnival is just is one symptom of this whole issue I think it really is a call to action to all the crew to a court cruise lines to say what are you doing on an ongoing basis within your cruise line for from a hygiene standpoint mcclemon this standpoint from a detection standpoint all of those issues are going to be res now because god forbid somebody who had yet been made detector coronavirus jumped on another cruise line and then eventually when they got to port they were found is having the disease so you know the cruise industry has had issues before with the customer experience and customer issues they need to be out ahead of that a bomb the prime of royal Caribbean and for many of these other cruise lines that are out there I'm really starting to talk about what they do on an ongoing basis within their ship environment with their staff with their with their crew with their passengers to make sure that there's no outside kind of influences coming into the cabin bar because you're here you are on a on a cruise in your all kind of isolated together be it you know all the gonna decker in the cabins are in dining rooms and then you've got step there and crew there you know you're going to be sorry the questions are going to start to come up now for all the cruise lines so that from a cruise line now I'm doing everything I can from a PR standpoint to be out there talking not about the court of ours which is talking about what you do to make sure that your cruise lines would please put queen and that you have a level of safety built into your ongoing way which you engage with passengers that protects them from any kind of issue like this speak with L. dog we don't he's president of north six agency a communications and social media firm in New York talk about the cruise industry in corona virus one of those crisis response meetings like for carnival right now yeah it's not pleasant I think with their store to see obviously is people who were planning on doing you don't taking your cruise anywhere within the whole fleet of where they're going are starting to have second guessed more maybe you'll go on that cruise maybe we'll go to a different cruise line so they're probably taking you see the significant cancellation hit our people already books cruises so they get those prices meanings are what we say right now to make sure that people understand that the issue whatever issue there has been isolated system the Asian Pacific region and just to several ships they've got to do everything possible to just kind of block walls and good and isolate those cruises no ships as opposed to every other chip that they have in their fully going to other destinations because it just took the passengers that are in the mood and those are booking cruises are going to have to marry all of this with with other you know destinations in cruise cruise ships and everything else they have to be out of the front is dramatically quickly and animated movies quick as they should have they should have been out there saying it's isolated to the water damage isolated to these different ships and that's it and here's what we're gonna do with those ships once they come into port and people disembark we're going those are you get those ships input north port what more balls and then they're going to be the clean like you would ever clean the shipper before so there's no issue at all they haven't done all that so but in their crisis meetings that's what they're talking about the messaging they want to get out to the public to the press to the consumer to the booking a trip there was a you know they're isolated situations with isolated ships it does not have anything to do with the regular cruise Lotto cruise destinations that have been there please thanks L. L. del Guida al degree president of north six agency communications and social media agency in New

Cambodia
"media agency" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on KOMO

"Leader to step up security on the eve of his deadline for major nuclear concessions from the west ABC Judy show is in Seoul north Korean leader Kim Jong then call for positive and offensive measures to ensure security of this country what that exactly means is still unclear but details are expected to be outlined at its annual new year's day speech they comment was reported by the north state media agency covering a ruling party meeting held over the weekend Kim also stressed armaments defense industry and certain industrial sectors to be worked on KCNA said North Korea has been pushing Washington to offer a new soft and approach and resume nuclear negotiations by the end of the year if not can pledge to take an unspecified new path analysts in Seoul say Kim is likely to announce resumption of long range missile test things that would be a direct threat to the United States the last time North Korea test fired an ICBM was two years ago the White House reaction national security adviser Robert o'brien if Kim Jon un takes that approach will be extraordinarily disappointed in them all I will demonstrate that disappointment to each show ABC news March is half of the energy used in your home goes to heating and cooling it come was Ryan Yamamoto reports there are some ways to keep the heat in your house and some money in your wallet for easy energy savings turned on your thermostat either manually or using smart are programmable ones dial.

Kim Jong Kim KCNA North Korea Washington Seoul United States Kim Jon un Ryan Yamamoto ABC White House Robert o'brien
"media agency" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"Division Shen. Maybe it won't be just a truce the Olympic truth or maybe it's going to be more than maybe it's going to be the start of resilience process basis because I think that sports that the nation and and I think that when you support your nation to a team who cares if you were ordeal over its boggs the nation and I think that this is something that could be a great hope for this nation here in London because it's coming up in Rome tennis next summer so maybe it could be the moment ready to try to bring people together. You are an optimist only only by by my sense that well. I you know what you something wrong happens and it had to happen. You didn't suffer and when it happens. It's the same problem if you're a pessimist you a lot of that never happened and when the exactly the same so I prefer the first option insurers happier happier that way of course let's. Let's let's look at then you people know from this in the audience of this podcast. No you as the guy who was in charge of our sport entertainment for a long time and you were comparison. You came to London. what what was your sort of recall of that period in your your career. What did you learn about the difference between gene agency life or market sports marketing in London compared to Paris. I came to them because I realized that the markets was driven by this place when I say the market the international market because I started my life. This has asked by setting them the agency. I created years before lifetime. Rushing marketing group created this as part of sections shoot and then I I am took it over from such and such and then is only to have that twice in the beginning of the two thousand and I realize lies in two thousand and five actually in Singapore that was good to be a great agency having been able to raise two million to help pirates twenty twelve to put together a great bit and we did amazing things and everything was great but the story was that this story was to compete against international cities like New York and London and to win over those in an international competition and that was not done by the Frenchman and realizing syncopal apple that was a global network of people that were had been in supporting London has been activated very clearly by the London and that was the case of so. That's where that's where I was kind of a as you can say that if you want you pick here okay and then I started to realize that we needed a network so that's where I started athen too often agencies around the world. Can I just pause you say when you say the London bid had this network. What do you mean you mean so I mean the British philosophy of exporting your throughout the world where people speaking leash is a great strengths because you have a network of supporter in the UK from the UK to the US to Australia Singapore Hong Kong and all the rest of that's also a lot of English speaking people that are connected to the other English speaking people run the world and that's an health when it comes to convincing every icy he members everywhere whereas US kept thinking that we're a global relations where nobody's speak French out everywhere we are French became very proud of but it's so and I realized that was great agency with the other sports. Position didn't the trump international claims but from us so that's when we realized that what you've done having those people will run the one with something that we were missing missing in this business if you wanted to be filled solid and if we wanted to have a new way to win after we have debriefed on that disappointment of Singapore anyway so I built this network because I was thinking that and then we came to quite significant size agency's natural tonight Mexico Brazil and South Africa Australia in China in opponent Germany Italy Spain and the rest any in the UK where we realized that as the market sumo mature than forms to answer one part of the reason was necessary to started anything but to acqui- ah very skilled and reputed provisionals that's what we did with Sponsorship Media Agency of TCP and Marcus right and cake and March to into arrest but even having done that we realized that we were constantly as a a great French network French agency with an international network and you were not considered by global brands as global global network because we were not headquartered in so I decided to move the headquarters from Paris to London and just took this decision during the London Games when I spent in six weeks in London and the time to make it happen it happened to him just six months later and then I moved to London part of my staff might my international stuff and with family and yes then I was part of your community that could be the place where Global Brin came came to find their way to and that's exactly the difference between what we got in funds which was quite state of the art industry but really looking at the domestic market very out in the UK. Even if you are a big market you always have a global view of the opportunities and Renault that so they come and fetched agency in this place so that was a few years back and I think that when I arrived from Paris Greece even if I was commuting like every week without local team then I brought the energy of the network from Paris to London so we kit some kind of control accents I should say but we borrowed a lot of your very efficient way of working and a very creative approach to marketing which I really appreciate analytical skills existing this so when you look at that across the Lonzo stepping outside the Hamas experience and you look across the London agency who stood out who was doing well at that point sort of and Redo. Did you Amalia so actually when I was this a beat that has been a call by Bartlett. Yes for the event they had at the time is six seven agencies that wanted to merge everything the one single agency and so the open the competition to democratizing maupassant there was twenty agencies running for that bid and so we had to compete against everybody so yes and as you can imagine the finalist read the fuse sportsman's image was the octagon yeah I think there was also of course and see such an said she sports an intimate yet very great agency at the time and and pitch was yes. There was those agencies some some of the new ones I've seen recently coming up but it was really really a very strong group. What did you what did you learn about about the role of sports and entertainment agency and sponsorship within the broader advertising and media networks that you know and have us? I think he's the six largest possibly of those global networks but they will to varying degrees. You've mentioned views and you know in terms of being only calm within that network. What's one of the challenges because it's it's there's issues of incentives but there's also issues of of just the domino expertise expertise. I guess there's some there's a whole there's always been an issue. Isn't there about trying to make sport and entertainment agencies work within broader. God Yes that I've been different phases vets. I think that today everybody except the idea that this is a different culture sure this different expertise you need to be connected with the stakeholders of that world and as an agency. You need to provide to clients some connections with these. If you want to make your strategy the jeep applicable so you need to really not just think about great creative ideas but you need to make these creative ideas to implement them in the right talk be authentic vis-a-vis communities fan the as themselves the federation and so forth and that needs a special culture special expertise got you so within whole. Communications Group people would recognize that there is a sports parts or sponsorship group of people they would be the people who know what to do understand the fan culture can activate those levers to really make it so I think the problem expertise expected is is soaking and also the way people understand.

London Paris Singapore Sponsorship Media Agency Division Shen boggs UK Rome Global Brin US Communications Group Hamas apple Australia Singapore Hong Kong Bartlett New York Paris Greece domino Germany Italy Spain
"media agency" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Your Business's growth with your host Angelo Ponzi. I am Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining me. You know I'm a fractional. CMO I do work with a lot of different organizations in alternately when we look at tactical execution social media social some kind of social execution comes up the problem. I have is a lot of times companies and he's just really lacked the experience or the wherewithal to really implement a strong social media program and until today at my guest is Neil Shaffer social media expert and Social Media Agency owner joins me in the studio cafe to explore the impact of social media and hopefully we're going to offer some great suggestions suggestions. Maybe solutions to our audience as we go through the program. Neil Welcome. Thank you very much Angelo to honor to be here just a beautiful day today. Isn't it beautiful day for business growth. Yeah absolutely in southern California Lisa's not the hundred that we've had for a while indeed where I was where I live. It was about eighty today a a couple days ago. It was one hundred ten. I think when I got my car so it was just a little toasty yep so to get things started. Why don't we take a few minutes. Tell the audience. It's about yourself about your business to give everybody the audience perspective of who you are. I am a local business owner based here in Orange County and the beautiful city of Irvine You you know I am a what you would call a social media strategist social media consultant really it covers all the marketing because social media digital does not exist in the Sino so so help companies really better leverage digital and social media marketing. There are some companies that just want to in fact how I started. My company was about ten years ago. Oh I wrote a book spokesman Conferences and it was four local companies here in Orange County. They reached out to me within the course of two weeks off from different industries saying we don't social we need to get social. Will you help us now. My background is more technology B. Two B. Sales Biz Dev marketing so I wasn't an agency Guy Right and I'm thinking this is not the agency what you need you need to do it yourself and you need strategy and you need training and education and so I started what's what I call a social media strategy consulting company so I five years of my company launched in two thousand ten was pure consulting training side then I had opportunities in the agency side where companies they took the strategy and training. They didn't have the resources sources available so they go neil. We implemented for us and that's why launch. PDA Social Agency so I really you know some companies. They just they just want to utilize. Does your ideas do some coaching an hour at a time I do that to other companies are actually going to their office four hours a week here locally and Orange Gallini Elanie so from strategy training and everything in between I just wanted to be resource. I have a unique understanding and unique perspective that a lot of companies find refreshing. I'm very rational practical what I do and yeah when the right company finds me and we're the right fit. It's a great combination where I really help them. Get More R. Y. Out of what they're doing in digital and social okay. We were talking in the Hallway 'cause we we actually just met we been communicating but we just met and I'm a fractional. CMO and you kind of call yourself a fractional actional social media person. I mean it's what we do. We go into organizations and it's interesting about the timing of you starting. Your Business. I was leaving an agency at at the time and somebody made a comment about well. What do you know about social media and you don't know me but my personality I'm GonNa figure this out and so I actually went to UCI and their Social Media Strategy Program and actually you know became certified Social Media Strategist. I didn't want to be the tweeting and the posting but I wanted to be able to add that strategic aspect into all the other strategies because to your point it's not a silo. I don't believe in integrated marketing at. I don't believe there's a silver bullet that solves all our problems so I typically ask a few questions of all my guests in the first one by the way was that mere. Navarre your your professor. Do you remember I don't okay no worries my my one of my books maximize. Your social is actually it used as a textbook for some of the programs you know what I have to go back and look actually now that you're talking about it. It sounds it sounds a little familiar so when you think about growing talk about you for minute share think about growing your business us what keeps you up at night leaving money on the table so there are many businesses. I think two different types of businesses right one. They need more attention. They need more brand awareness. They're not getting traffic to the website. They're not getting phone calls but they help something great to offer and they need to get the word out right on the other hand. You have other companies that already thirty people know them. They already have customers but they're leaving money on the table because they're getting visits either offline. They're getting sales. Calls people coming to the website or they're finding a yelp reviews views whatever it is but they're not close as much business as they could be. I am in the latter rights. IRA business been doing this for a decade. I'm not a startup but there's always more business to be. Had I get a tremendous amount of website traffic. I have a tremendous amount of what I would like to think is good Karma out there and I have really only sold more to enterprises incorporations so so what keeps me up at night is I need to develop more products and services for the smaller for the smaller startup the smaller business owner the individual marketer that wants wants to get to the next level so that they can get to the next level in their career and that's what keeps me up at night as how to monetize that large audience they have instead of going a one to one which is more of the enterprise marketing or ABM to more of like a one too many where I have a digital or whatever product I can sell to many people also that's. That's currently what's keeping me up. It's a good thing to have. It's not able to fall asleep at night and everything but it is the one thing that I focused on that. I it's like I need need to do this. I need to do this fast and yeah. That's currently a subscription model for small businesses. I mean I do not and that's one of the things so on a one to one basis of companies. Contact me like yourself. We offer different types of programs depending on the company. They're all custom priced enterprise packages so I need to have something where people people who can just click on a button pay pal you know credit card for however much and subscribe to coaching subscribe to whatever it is and those are the things. I'm working on developing right now yeah. I I had a research company in the Action Sports Industry for a long time and we're always selling to the big companies but all the small companies like why don't you really want you know information in about skateboarding and trucks and wheels so we started segmenting and basically created a subscription model they could just pay a small fee every month and just get the data as it was produced. I and it became a beautiful thing in a nice revenue stream greats. The other question I ask is what is the best business advice you've ever given and door received well. There's one little token one little nugget a business advice before I went on my own I like. I said I was corporate. B. Two B. Sales Biz Dev marketing and and it was actually the second company that I worked for well. I guess I'm going to cheat and give you two little bits of the first one was working for a Japanese semiconductor manufacturer fracture and I spent the first fifteen years of my career in Japan which is a whole other story but at that time this is the ninety some ag myself here. There was a really popular book in Japan on with manufacturing industry called reengineering and reengineering was all about we were in the business of manufacturing semiconductors so we had to wait for forecast cost information from Sony's in the Panasonic's Samsung's and then we had to manufacturer based on that and then we had buyers who were putting in buffers further their inventory and for their own goals what have you so we were never manufacturing and inventory control was never at optimum. This was a big struggle that cost the company a lot of money reengineering. Miriam was like hey everything can be real time now. Let's just hook up our customers. You know manufacturing systems computers to our manufacturing systems computers and in real time we can be understanding what their needs are and we can have the material ready it just you know potential revolutionized the industry and we're seeing that today obviously with the way that companies do business in manufacturer manufacturer in in real time or just in time so that that that me later on in business the name of my company's. PDA Social Right plan do check activists comes from Professor Edwards. Deming Professor Deming was considered the godfather of quality control and everybody at this company that I worked at right and there were two thousand of us at our headquarters and killed or Japan. Dan We all had to learn about Professor Edwards Deming and this concept of PD that everything you do. You should have a plan for you should do according to plan you should check an act upon on an optimized that so that that single thing has really impacted the way. I do business because when I created my first social media strategy for client back in two thousand ten there were no frameworks right so so I thought well I need a framework. I I need a rational approach and that is the rational approach. I took that companies. Were doing social without a plan. They were just doing they. We didn't know what the check they didn't know what to optimize and therefore they couldn't figure out what the ROI is and how to improve upon that the other one the second one is a quick one is the second company worked at a company called. Wind River that was later bought out by Intel the strategy at a conference. He said you know we were talking about our strategy for the next year and he goes. You know what I've realized in my career is I decided not to include a strategy is almost as important as deciding what to include so that less is more eighty twenty. You know there are just certain things if it's not strategic not just don't spend any time on it so I believe in rational systems rational processes I manage my clients work the same way and those things about a significant impact on my career right that that's actually actually really get I. I liked that a lot the so it was I didn't know so I said we had some things in common so about the same time you were working and and semiconductors I also actually was repping a semiconductor manufacturing piece of equipment out of out of the Netherlands call. Esm with Agassi okay so I was doing the marketing for them and the other thing we'd like printed circuit board yeah exactly and the other thing though is I noticed that one of the videos I watched your drummer and so am I nine Zeidan playing drums for high school and actually the last time I played drums was just a couple years ago very cool bands a lot of fun. I don't know you still playing any mom nod. I really want to get back into time right. It's a but it's also the you know in Japan where I picked up drums there tons of practice studios that have drum sets. What's that you can rent and going by yourself. Five bucks an hour wow to practice with a real in a real studio. We don't have that environment here and that's that's the problem exactly that I mean and I remember just even a couple years ago. I had my my kid in my garage had a couple of guys over and we are going to town and I some guys wrapping on my garage. Is Your talents to be quite. He's GonNa call the cops on us and I had to start laughing like mad. I felt like I was back in high school. Well living in Irvine. They will not allow that exactly so I started off talking about what I believe. Is that a lot of small to medium sized businesses where I play like three million to seventy five million to one hundred million. They really just don't understand how to use social in the expectations that they have. I mean I I I pulled a bunch of stats and I'm not going to sit here and read them all but the amount of people all that are on facebook the amount of people that are tweeting and have accounts looking at instagram. I mean there's so much opportunity unity to connect and sell but most companies just don't know how to do it. It's allusive to them. They get very frustrated and so oh as a consultant in this world when you're talking to companies what what has been a merely all over the world that you work with but what has been some of the most consistent isn't complaints issues problems that companies have implementing a strong program well first of all the executive team doesn't do it themselves. So if you don't do it you're not. GonNa get it case in point. I've been podcasting. I have about one hundred thirty something episodes but to be honest with you. I haven't been consistent and I haven't seen the value in it until very recently. I've noticed downloads have have increased quite significantly but you know what I was never a listener podcast myself so recently..

Social Media Agency Japan business owner Social Media Strategist Angelo Ponzi CMO Irvine Neil Shaffer California Guy Right consultant Orange County Orange Gallini Elanie facebook skateboarding Professor Deming yelp Professor Edwards
"media agency" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Your Business's growth with your host Angelo Ponzi. I am Angelo Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining me. You know I'm a fractional. CMO I do work with a lot of different organizations in alternately when we look at tactical execution social media social. Some kind of social execution comes up the problem. I have is a lot of times companies. He's just really lacked the experience or the wherewithal to really implement a strong social media program and and today at my guest is Neil Shaffer social media expert and Social Media Agency owner joins me in the studio cafe to explore the impact of social media and hopefully we're going to offer some great suggestions gestion. Maybe solutions to our audience as we go through the program. Neil Welcome. Thank you very much Angelo to honor to be here just a beautiful day today. Isn't it beautiful day for business growth. Yeah absolutely in southern California Lisa's not the hundred that we've had for a while envied where I was where I live. It was about eighty today a a couple days ago. It was one hundred ten. I think when I got my car so it was just a little toasty yep so to get things started. Why don't we take a few minutes. Tell the audience. It's about yourself about your business to give everybody the audience perspective of who you are sure I am a local business owner based here in Orange County and the beautiful city of Irvine You I am a what you would call a social media strategist social media consultant really it covers all the marketing because social media digital does not exist in the Sino so so help companies really better leverage digital and social media marketing. There are some companies that just want to in fact how I started. My company was about ten years ago. Oh I wrote a book spokesman Conferences and it was four local companies here in Orange County. They reached out to me within the course of two weeks often different industries saying we don't get social. We need to get social. Will you help us now. My background is more technology to be sales marketing so I wasn't an agency. Guy Right and I'm thinking this is not the agency what you need you need to do it yourself and you need strategy and you need training and education and so I started what's what I call a social media strategy consulting company so I five years. Here's my company launched in two thousand ten with pure consulting training side then I had opportunities in the agency side where companies they took the strategy and training. They didn't have the resources sources available so neil we implemented for us and that's where I launch. PDA Social Agency so I really you know some companies. They just they just want to utilize. Is Your ideas do some coaching an hour at a time. I do that to other companies. We're actually going to their office. You know four hours a week here locally in Orange County colony so from strategy training and everything in between I just WanNa be resource. I have a unique understanding and unique perspective that a lot of companies find refreshing. I'm very rational rational practical what I do and when the right company finds me and we're the right fit. It's a great combination where I really help them get more R. Y. Out of what they're doing in digital and social okay we were talking in the hallway because we we actually just met we then communicating but we just met and I'm a fractional. CMO and you kind of call yourself a fractional actional social media person. I mean it's what we do. We go into organizations and it's interesting about the timing of you starting. Your Business. I was leaving an agency at at the time and somebody made a comment about well. What do you know about social media and you don't know me but my personality I'm GonNa figure this out and so I actually went to UCI UCI and their Social Media Strategy Program and actually you know became certified Social Media Strategist. I didn't want to be the tweeting and the posting but I wanted to be able to add that strategic aspect into all the other strategies because to your point it's not a silo. I don't believe in integrated marketing at. I don't believe there's a silver bullet that solves all our problems so I typically ask a few questions of all my guests in the first one by the way was that mere. Nabarro your your professor. Do you remember I don't okay no worries my my one of my books maximize. Your social is actually it used as a textbook for some of the programs you know what I have to go back and look actually now that you're talking about it. It sounds it sounds a little familiar so when you think about growing talk about you for minute share think about growing your business. That's what keeps you up at night leaving money on the table. So there are many businesses. I two different types of businesses right one. They need more attention. They need more brand awareness. They're not getting traffic to their website. They're not getting phone calls but they have something to offer and they need to get out right on the other hand. You have other companies that already thirty people know them. They already have customers but they're leaving money on the table because they're getting visits either offline. They're getting sales. Calls people coming to the website or they're finding a yelp reviews views whatever it is but they're not closed as much business as they could be. I am in the latter rights irony. I've been doing this for a decade. I'm not a startup but there's always more business to be. Had I get a tremendous amount of website traffic. I have a tremendous amount of what I would like to think as good Karma out there and I have really only sold more to enterprises incorporations so so what keeps me up at night is I need to develop more products and services for the smaller for the smaller startup the smaller business owner the individual marketer that wants wants to get to the next level so that they can get to the next level in their career and that's what keeps me up at night as how do I monetize large audience and I have instead of going a one to one which is more of the enterprise marketing or ABM to more of like a where I have a digital or whatever product I can sell to many people also that's. That's currently what's keeping me up. It's a good thing to have it's not able to fall asleep at night and everything but it is the one thing that I focused on that. I it's like I need need to do this. I need to do this fast and yeah. That's currently a subscription model for small businesses and that's one of the things so on a one to one basis of companies companies. Contact me like yourself we offer different types of programs depending on the company so they're all custom priced enterprise packages so I need to have something where people people who can just click on a button pay pal you know credit card for however much and subscribe to coaching subscribe to whatever it is and those are the things. I'm working on developing right now yeah. I I had a research company in the Action Sports Industry for a long time and we're always selling to the big companies but all the small companies like why don't you really want you know information about skateboarding and trucks and wheels so we started segmenting and basically created a subscription model. They could just pay a small fee every month and just get the data as it was produced. I and it became a beautiful thing in a nice revenue stream greats the other question. I ask is what is the best business advice you've ever given and or received well. There's one little token one little nugget of business advice so before I went on my own I like. I said I was corporate. B. Two B. Sales Biz Dev marketing and it was actually the second company that I worked for well. I guess I'm going to cheat and give you two the first one was working for a Japanese semiconductor manufacturer doctor and I spent the first fifteen years of my career and your man which is a whole other story but at that time this is the ninety some aging myself here. There was a really popular book in Japan on with manufacturing industry called reengineering and reengineering was all about we were in the business of manufacturing semiconductors so we had to wait for forecast cost information from the Sony's and the Panasonic's Samsung's and then we had to manufacturer based on that and then we had buyers who were putting in buffers further their inventory and for their own goals what have you so we were never manufacturing and inventory control was never at optimum. This was a big struggle that cost the company a lot of money. Reengineering William was like hey everything can be real time now. Let's just hook up our customers. You know manufacturing systems computers to our manufacturing systems computers and and in real time we can be understanding what their needs are and we can have the material ready just the potential revolutionized the industry and we're seeing that today obviously with the way that companies do business in manufacturer when you factor in in real time or just in time so that that that me later on in business the name of my company's. PDA Social Right plan do check comes from Professor Edwards Deming and Professor Deming was considered the godfather of quality control and everybody at this company that I worked at right and there were two thousand of us at our headquarters and killed or Japan. Dan We all had to learn about Professor Edwards Deming and this concept of that everything you do. You should have a plan for you do according to plan you should check an act upon and then optimize that so that that single thing has really impacted the way. I do business because when I created my first social media strategy for client back in two thousand ten there were no frameworks right so so I thought well I need a framework. I need a rational approach and that is the rational approach. I took that companies. Were doing social without a plan. They were just doing they. We didn't know what the check they didn't know what to optimize and therefore they couldn't figure out what the ROI is and how to improve upon that the other one the second one's a quick one is the the second company working at a company called Wind River that was later bought out by Intel the strategy at a conference. He said you know we were talking about our strategy for the next year and he goes. You know what I've realized in my career is deciding what not to include. A strategy is almost as important as deciding what to include so that less is more eighty twenty. You know there are just certain things if it's not strategic not just don't spend any time on it so I believe in rational systems rational processes I manage my clients work the same way and those things about a significant impact on my career right that that's actually actually really good. I liked that a lot the so it was I didn't know so I said we had some things in common so about the same time you were working and and semiconductors I also actually was renting a semiconductor manufacturing piece of equipment out of out of the Netherlands call. Esm with Agassi okay so I was doing the marketing for them and the other thing we'd like printed circuit board yeah exactly and the other thing though is I noticed the one of the videos I watched your drummer and so am i. Nice Sivan playing drums for high school and actually the last time I played drums was just a couple of years ago very cool bands a lot of fun..

Social Media Agency Orange County Social Media Strategist business owner Angelo Ponzi CMO Neil Shaffer Professor Edwards Deming and P California Irvine professor Intel Wind River skateboarding Japan Sivan yelp Professor Edwards Deming
"media agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"KFI twenty four hour newsroom. President Trump says a retaliatory strike against Iran was ready, but he never gave final approval. He told the press he called it off ten minutes before it was supposed to happen. They came in. They said, sir. We're ready to go. We'd like a decision. Trump says he I wanted to know how many people would be killed. I'd like to get back to you in that great people, these generals, they said, came back, said, sir, approximately one hundred fifty the president says he thought about it and decided to strike would not be proportionate to the shooting down of an unmanned US drone and Iranian state media agency is posted pictures of what it says are pieces of the downed US drone Iran continues to claim the drone was shot down over Iranian airspace. Not over international waters, as the US claims a woman from Texas says she got more than wings, when she went to a restaurant near LAX before she even ordered, you could hear something come down. And then plot it lands on the table. She tells NBC four it was a live rat now the rebels gonna be injured because it hit like. Like a metro it was a big the looks dead in the picture. The woman says it was alive. And that the manager of Buffalo Wild Wings grabbed two plates picked it up and put it in the trash, he blamed the rodent on construction at the shopping complex and comped the woman's meal, the student pilot at Fullerton airport has gotten some rare real world experience in the art of the emergency landing. The small planes, engines stopped yesterday shortly after take-off aviation instructor Benjamin Dennis says he knew the busy street Commonwealth in Buena park was his Goto backup runway.

President Trump US Iran KFI Fullerton airport president Benjamin Dennis Texas Buena park NBC LAX instructor twenty four hour ten minutes
"media agency" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

"Hey peeps. I have a guest coming to us all the way from Romania and his name is Vlad Kayla's, and he's with a company called plannable and today. We're gonna talk about how to plan out and get your posts on social media more efficiently. So Vlad, how you doing, man? Good. Good. Thank you. Thanks for having me, good. Well, since this is the first time you've been on the show, I always like my audience to get a sense of who you are, and where you've come from, and let me start up. I saying this guy's twenty three years old. All right. So he started to company and is doing some pretty incredible thing. But I want my audience to get to know you better. So how did you go from being a person selling doors to opening doors for people on social media? Great question. Yeah. So I actually worked in digital media agencies before starting plannable, actually Microsoft, does salsa, work than social media ages before I went to a start up competition. It was back in the number two thousand sixteen. And at the startup competition I beached my own idea, but didn't have the chance to actually find the gym to work on for, for that we can do work on the on the start up. But then I was walking the room and there was a friend of mine who is now Shannon microphone there. She was already part of the team. So we just started talking. I was asking about whether we do, what a bitch with, and I ended up being part of this team to participate that startup beacon competition, and four to eight hours forward. We ended up winning that startup empathy Shen, which was the vetted a beginning of our team on the beginning of our comp. Very cool. So let's get into, you know, social media, obviously been in the business. You've worked with some som agencies and things of that nature. Obviously this world changes so fast. I mean it just it's amazing how quickly things are changing. So tell me about, what was the origin of plannable. What, what were you trying to accomplish? What was your vision and goal when you started? Yeah. So I was saying, all of us worked in digital media agencies before. And we find out that we share the same fashion for social Megyn. But then, discussing between us we actually understood that we shared the same frustrations and not only passion, that's because one of our founders was working with different clients on so many debt. And one of the declines was Coca Cola regionally and then Louis were collaborating with this clients in spreadsheets, and XL documents in were to exchange feedback on the social media conduct. And sometimes it was fine. We were sending this extra documents on Email, and before waiting for feedback for a couple of minutes or. Hours. But sometimes we hated it so much. Because it was taking us couple of hours or even weeks to get this back from our client. And then we ended up just looking to different solutions to solve and fix this problem to make this more Gile make this more real time and more efficient processes, and we tried from ably fifty solutions that were available back fan on the markets, including for hoot sued sprout, social, and many, many more. But none of them really worked for us because we went on the blood firm, do that would help us to actually review, the content would look like because all of our clients were was were always asking us. Hey, how would this link look like on Venables? This on Facebook, for example, build this image. Be the right format or the right size on three earns one so we just start building our own product for ourselves a van. When we understood that there are hundreds and thousands of agencies that are struggling with exactly the same problem. So we just focused on the planet, but more and here we are Gotcha. Okay. So I'm very familiar with all the things you talked about who'd Swede and, you know, even on some of the larger platforms like hub spa, and those kind of things, so one of the challenges that you were solving was the collaboration problem? The second problem you're solving was the whizzy wig problem with gonna look like before you posted because I think that's one of the biggest challenges is. And I just did a podcast on this yesterday. Twitter once graphics that are optimized to be wide Instagram wants them square linked in really doesn't have an optimization. I mean, it can be square could be why they could be a handful of different things. Pinterest. I know you guys don't work with Pinterest. Pinterest wants to be tall. So, you know, having the ability to take your content and see what it looks like in all those different platforms. If it doesn't look good in Twitter, you obviously can go back and recreate the graphic, or do whatever you need to do. And obviously, the, the differences are Twitter, you get two hundred and eighty characters in linked into get twelve hundred characters and Facebook. I don't know what the limit is maybe two thousand characters or something like that. So you guys work around that don't you? Exactly. Yeah. And actually, that's and I would say that even feeler that we are also solving the first deal is one about transparency, because one of the key problems in marketing teams right now, is that that are so many departments in the same company or in the same brand and even disdain agency that are struggling to have the access to information and what I mean by that someone has one type of, for example documents data has other images and they dont really shared the same workflow and the same cloud, even. And this is why we believe that transparency in Maine firstly that everyone has. Access to the same information, and we've built this as a core implantable, because you can also follow all the conversation by equi implantable, any feedback, any activity, any action, everything what happened from your team in any decision around the content, you can see all of this implantable, and with that in mind, I believe that, that's bad has to place at the heart of any organization, and it has to be spread across all the teams and between that. So what are some of the biggest challenges you see, because you obviously work with some large brands like coke. What are some of the biggest challenges that they're having or you've seen clients have with posting this social media and getting the kind of ROI or return on investment that they're looking for out of it? You know, is that they expect too much? Do they not understand the phases of like awareness versus sales? I mean what are you seeing? Yes. So I've attended the first one is that there is an enormous amount of wasted time and effort big van creating the social media content, which results in the loss in a lot of productive hours because all this teams are working on creating this content and trying to make sure that everyone is on the same page and exchange of deceased back. But because this workflow is brought him broken. And because they are not working with the right tools and do not enable the right processes. They are wasting a lot of time. And on the other side some teams just choose to make social media just for the sake of it. Just read a couple of false on Facebook Twitter. Invent schedule some euros or you're also linked bats, the problem that it causes is that it can create multiple VR crisis for kimes that do not have an established Bruegel and feedback and communication processes, because we've seen so many teams, for example event, the teams, for example, that Obse with the KENDALL Jenner at an it happened. You remember the scandal that Scotland, so maybe the outrage by, by this ad because it was faucet than on YouTube, it went around from so many people for so many layers of approvals and steal, nobody even fought about the ads and the way it might be interested by people owns. Social meet. And this is exactly why there has to be established approval and feedback and communication process. And then I would say that the last challenge is that. Teams that do not have this established workflow where approval process might all of this multiple back prices might create huge really huge problems for debris because the customers might lose trust. And also might lose confidence in the brand unbear- willingness to purchase it. Right. So there's two different things that I think my audience would be interested in, you know, not everybody's the agency side of things. So what are, what are the key benefits, for say the solo preneurs the one person doing this versus having a team? Is there a major benefit over this say for who sweeter, or buffer, any of those of things for the Silla per Noor? Definitely. Yeah. Because for jumble in buffer where evening to you can just see on. I mean, you, you can just see the text that you're creating and band, you know, that it's scheduled for example for the next week or the next month. But the court valley plannable is that. You can actually oversee all of content for any video of time and see how the content would look like hunter, the stunt exalt perfect expedience before publishing any, an for example, you would not have any situations than, for example. You're publishing an iota link and then it pops up the wrong method image on the euro lane or not the decks that you would expected with, or they image is not looking the way one toward, not the right far much were not as wide as you would want it to be for Twitter. Yeah, totally makes sense. So one of the challenges, I think that a lot of people have with audit schedule programs and I hear this all the time. So when I'm speaking is they want to auto publish. They want schedule out there week's worth of content, but they never go in and actually engage with the content, they don't go back and say, thank you for commenting liking share. Whatever people are doing, which is something that I quite to what is known here in the US is ding, Dong ditch, where people ring a doorbell and then run away just goofy game. But that's the way it feels a lot of times when people are posting. So what's your best advice for people when they use this tool to go in and engage because this is not going to go into each platform, and monitor all of the different posts? Right. Exactly. Yeah. And I would say that my advice would be that tools are just one of the instruments that you're using it doesn't have to be the pillar of your social media, where marketing strategy because what you should were what I would suggest soliver nurse do after we are scheduling work, creating all of this content is to engage, and connect, DVR community offensively and by that, I would I would mean that waitress a has to reply to all of your comments and engage revere. Comed-. Start asking questions starts finding out what their community especially at the boat. What our subjects that we want to find out more about you, whether your brand were yourself as a Senator for Noah. Olso connect with as many groups, different groups, share, the these known that you have example. There are so many so many groups in the same niche or in the same, for example, industry that you are. It's definitely great chance to just start engaging these deaths these different communities, share some of the cheeks or techniques or any any ideas that you that you think that community would benefit from Gotcha. Okay. So this platform works on Facebook, Lincoln Twitter, Instagram. Those are the four key ones in those platforms. Is there anything that you see that your clients are doing that? You're doing. That's working better is at the style of graphic is the headline is there something that you could, you know, through your experience of working with this. Give give a gold nugget to help people get better engagement on their posts. Gotcha. That's a great question. I. With saying that's the most.

Twitter Facebook Instagram Vlad Kayla Pinterest plannable Shannon Romania Megyn Microsoft Senator Venables Maine Comed Louis US YouTube
"media agency" Discussed on The SpiritBros Podcast

The SpiritBros Podcast

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on The SpiritBros Podcast

"Sounds like for your audience, but there's also value for you as a tool to meet these people what we want identify first before we think of how. How to reach them like who are we reaching? And so who are the personas, or the client types, are, like who are your audience's? And so if you like you have a few subjects in this hypothetical example of this podcast on spirituality, health and entrepreneurship, those are three big topics. So even as a end user, you could say, all right. We have our health audience we have our entrepreneurship audience. We have our spirituality audience. It would be important to keep those separate to really then target those individually later really speak to them only for their interest. We'd also in my questions, what I'm trying to get at it. Let's say at an initial understanding is like, what's the model and because you are producing content and not just content. But then, like visibility you're offering to these guests. You're kind of like a, a media like. You know, you, you and ought to consider yourselves as that. And then, so how does like when you think of like business model? How do you know how to media companies make money? That's an important thing to, like, have clear. So that if you understand that that's what you're doing. You can then go further and that how platform like media platforms. We're giving them a platform. We're giving them media without thank of, like, you know, CBC, thank of Lapress, who pursuer CNN. We're, we're either. Yeah. For sure I don't think they're so audio. Yeah. But yeah. You so then as a media agency, essentially. What, what are the ways that you would position yourself? What are the ways that they market that you like that you don't like so I would need to identify what is the spirit rose the CD as, like a business model as the project what are the goals, it has a business? And so if that is your model is the goal to just create a ton of content and use it as content for your own businesses. That would be part of your marketing budget, essentially, if this was, let's say, if you had this, like, company, calls, organic, and this was like a value, adding piece of content. It could be considered your marketing budget to produce this, and not get a direct return off as project, but it is bringing return to your business for your own advertising could be like I think regatta should be paying me Scott. Maybe maybe it is. Transparencies. Yeah. So, yeah, I would have to identify your goals like, what would how, and that's actually a committed question. I'll try I'll ask you guys if I can video, you take video tape you in a up some social video. It won't be instant though. How do you measure, like your success like, how do you measure your impact? What is what are the goals of this content? How how will we know it successful for you? I feel like that's a question that there there's a lot of ideas so far. I think the, the baseline is are we into are we into it? You know, are we into this interview in the enjoy ourselves do we find value because we don't earn any money. But of course, the, the dream would be that this becomes an earner, eventually so that we can justify spending more time, and you really going all in perhaps, creating different forms of media that we could offer lake video like written content, like you know, long form content, perhaps e books and other other valuable things. And I mean, I feel like you're joking about organic and should it be paying. But, but one of the reasons why I think, you know, Scott stuck with organic, and I think it's a valuable thing is that. It's, it's, it's going to be an it's an enabler. It's, it's a voice that needs to be heard, you know, beyond their, the company itself, and, you know, we are entrepeneurship health and spirituality, but we're not the best in either of those things that's not where our area of expertise is what were really fascinated by the hybrids. We want to be in those areas of discomfort, where health meets entrepreneurship entrepreneurship, meet spirituality, spirituality meat help, you wanna find those areas and those questions of discomfort in there that, that really is where I think the opportunity is right now. And I mean, like something like organic is a real organization. There's years of experience behind the liaisons by think Scott and you think you could confirm this. There's a lot of resistance, maybe less so today than before, but it's just, you know it's, it's integrated resistance. It's subconscious to a certain extent in a lot of corporations, that are out there when you talk about healthy talk about, hey, you know, this could be really beneficial to, to give your employees time to exercise our to have maybe a metaphor. Nation practice. That's not on their lunch hour. But when you when you try to convince, you know, accompany that's following a structure that they didn't even shoes. That's one that we've inherited from Pakistan rations there's going to be just a natural resistance natural assistance to change. That's the nature of existence. There's a resistance to change. There's fear like you brought up before I feel like that's that's where we're at, you know, that's that's where we're, we're really passionate by forget where we why started saying this. That's why. That sounded good that for in terms of the spare prose, what you said. It was. That was great. It was nice to hear it like okay yeah. That is to hit. Yeah, I agree. And I thank you for doing it because I even just personally in the process of having the, the questions that you sent me an advance really like was incredible journey for me to take fulltime that's the dream I'd love to do that. It just researching and setting setting the tone and getting the person to walk in here and feel special already. I mean, that's all you. That's, that's on that on that the power of team you're going to say that thing but I know where you're going with that. But it's true. I see it and I see when the person sits down the ready, feel comfortable because of the attention because of this is another, as you know, out of the industrial economy in the connection economy, and you create that connection way before they sit down here. So an and it's been confirmed with every single person sits down here. Everybody says, thank you for that. So I guess that's, that's an indication of value. And that's how you know, you'll know is like if we're talking about answering are screaming need back to the business basics. You know, I'll people will, and that's part of the lean process to visit discovery, there is this program called the lean launchpad. It's a new take on, like forget the business plan, you don't really need one of those. Run of business, but it's still good to know the model the goals, the, the audience, this is sort of where we're headed. This is it. This is comes from Levin. I it was started by this guy. Steve blank who put a class together, it was offered on you'd was like one of those online education platforms, and it was the first like I'd been monitoring online education for business. No one was speaking to business or marketing, no one was teaching it, you can get amazing tools like the Khan Academy, and all these other ones that teach a lot of other things. But it's tough to teach a online marketing in general, but business and marketing weren't really up there, the breakthrough came when he introduced this course that was based on his concept is, how to build a startup was the course and the concept is around this lean launchpad. Program where for ten weeks every single week you start with a business hypothesis that you put on a business model canvas. It's this tool to map out the business model the value the audience without having to go into the depth of a business plan ochre. You can download it. Find it business model canvas. There's also a value proposition canvass now. It's something that really has like it shifted entrepreneurship education. It's shifted business education. It was a disruptor. So the lean processes, you take this business model canvas. That's your hypothesis for this business, then ten weeks, you do exactly the same thing ten people per week interviews on your hypothesis. Okay. And so you introduce your concept you might have a minimum viable product, the MVP with you. If you have to give a demo or website to prove it, but again, minimal viable means, like put it together, as quick as possible. Don't invest a lot of time. The goal is to get your hypothesis as fast as you. You can to other people's opinions, you can sit in a like basement and make a business plan for two years before you ever test or concept against anyone to know if it's valuable or wanted. So this is like go out interview ten people week one revisit your hypothesis pivot change it ten more the next week, ten more the next week by the end of ten weeks. You've interviewed one hundred people, you usually already have a bunch of them, that either one of your clients, either wanna be your suppliers, either to be your partners. You also have a proven proven business case. It's something that there is demand for your proving that it's meaningful as valuable as demand for someone. So just so I go back to this hypothetical spirit rose concept. I know. It's really great idea. A lot of power there. I think I can't really get out of my head now that you've bought it and. It's just really special. I would still that idea. Yeah. They're well be tough to be spirit, rose. It's like masculine feminine. I don't know. It's really interesting. It's a it's a interesting challenge. I, but the fact that it's merging these conversations that are so important that are proving the need for the organics of the world's that in one of the questions you asked me like you know why, why the studies in yoga meditation nutrition. When you wouldn't expect that from someone in business, it's like, well, this kinda ties in leadership. And if you're running a business like you it really is dependent on you in a lot of ways, whether you're self-employed one hundred percent otherwise if you're growing it and have a team, you're the one who sees this entity that nobody can see or or you can identify the need, and describe it like you represent it. And so you're the you're the channel near the transmitter. And so there. Before the work on yourself in health in spiritual. Authority is now. I think people are waking up to, hey, actually that's wise for business that maybe as a business leader, I should know how to manage my mind, I should know how to manage my body, my emotions and this, actually becomes a way of perform like perfecting my craft and my sport like almost like a as an athlete like quizzes the practice. Yeah. Exactly. So the conversation that you're merging between those three accesses is super unique. And I think that is really value, adding in the sense that it's not something that's really covered. It's also helping bring change which I personally love. And so. This ties into the why of the spirit boroughs, and that's really important to know for you to keep showing up to it. It's really important for the audience to know it, it's the point it like back to the barter system. We're not it's not for money. What are we here to exchange? We're here to exchange value were here to create change, you know, in a system that will benefit all of us, then you can go into the what and the how sweet you've got the why I would say that it would probably, I think it'd be really interesting if that was the case, then you had this podcast that was featuring local talents and giving them a platform that they don't always have their own marketing together or their own web sites together or their own time to build their own content..

Scott Pakistan CNN Khan Academy Steve blank Lapress MVP Levin ten weeks one hundred percent two years
"media agency" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on KFC Radio

"You should just win. The you. You can't fucking can fucking crazy to say. Well, it's it was the best seventies KB. Now. First of all again, it's a new story second, what's the best movie? Now, there's a reason why it's probably been made five times four times we've got confirmation for split the difference. Yeah. I'm such a sick. Fuck now that it didn't win. I'm like, I got to see this movie. If it one I would have this shit's overrated, Washington. I don't know if it's out yet. But you know, what I love it's weeded after I hadn't change the channel once the Golden Globes ended, and it was I looked up the news came on they won like introductory story. And then went back went to commercial break. And the first commercial was like is Bradley Cooper like crying to seem the movie, Bradley Cooper crying, lady Gaga, like fall. It's all right. I'm barest allow she's like don't be embarrassed embarrassed about and while that's happening. It's just quotes about the movie. And it's like a masterpiece the best movie the year stunning while listing all is nominations and stuff like that. And then it just ends with four your consideration. I was like the media agency sent data out there like calling up. You'll play fucking so bring you remind everybody who we are. It's fucking believe me Razzie little Conseco, you experience you reminding that were devastating story. That's amazing to see. Flex on 'em showing who you are like there was one. It was just like just lists of all the film festivals. They won and stuff like that. I mean, the move coli call it the commercial version of a sub tweet great before you know, what you wanna do. Mary. Fuck. You'll friday. Yeah. Let me pick on Monday. We put up on on Instagram. We had everybody put out their favorite Mary kills. So we'll answer a couple of them now from Instagram..

Bradley Cooper Golden Globes Conseco lady Gaga Mary Washington Razzie
"media agency" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"media agency" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Hello, ladies and gentlemen. And welcome to another episode of the working experience. This episode is brought to you by my company. One circle media one circle media full service media agency servicing networks studios. Brands and fortune. Five hundred clients one circle creates content that builds networks in audiences across multiple platforms. Check out our work at one circle digital dot com and one circle brand dot com. If you work for a studio network startup or corporation in are looking for a partner to create media that will build engage entertain your audience reach out to me at John at one circle media dot com or D M E on Instagram at John Byrne Caccio, and that's J O H N B R A N C A C C I L. I'd love to hear from you one circle. Not only creates media across multiple platforms. Such as TV digital video social media websites and apps for clients, but we also create original content for consumers. One of our latest projects is still believe still believe is an app that transforms pictures into video of children's favourite magical characters in their home with the app parents can catch the magic of the tooth fairy leaving money under their children's pillow or Santa delivering presents on Christmas Eve in their home. You download the app take picture, and we create the magic we utilize feature film. Virtual facts artists to transform your picture into your still believe video to amaze your children, you can tell your kids that you have a special app that can detect and capture the tooth fairy. And Santa and then present them with the video proof in.

John Byrne Caccio Santa partner J O H N B
New logo for Stitcher; new daily podcast for The Guardian

podnews

01:54 min | 3 years ago

New logo for Stitcher; new daily podcast for The Guardian

"In the latest poll news, Stitcher has a new logo a bit more. Modern Habid. Boulder says the company podcasters are asked to update their listen badges visiting the partner portal and then hit promote this show. Stitcher is now also the parent brand of mid roll and air wolf. The guardian is to launch your daily flagship podcast. By the end of the year, the host has been announced as Anouchka Astana who is currently the newspapers, joint political editor. Leo Hornak is EP Bose is usually the launch sponsor, and acoss will represent the podcast pod crypt is a proposed new app for sharing money with podcasters based on how much you listen, it will use crypto currency and a progressive web app telegram group to join. If you think it's a good idea. How does the YouTube algorithm work will link to an article all about that? It's based on how long users stay watching a video. It seems digital. Discuss his podcast measurement and attribution. Dan Grainger from media agency. Oxford road says, quote, attribution has been a challenge for more than a century and will likely be a challenge a century from now. It never goes away. Nick cough from pod, suggests serial season. Three is the single biggest podcasts sponsorship deal ever. ZipRecruiter have tweeted that the show will include a show within a show. NPR will be placing fundraising support messages within aids podcasts in two thousand nineteen as an experiment and pod tracks. Top US publishers for August have been announced. Total global downloads are up forty eight percent year on year. Earlier this month, we learned that pod track measures, two point, eight percent of available podcasts

Stitcher Leo Hornak Anouchka Astana Boulder Youtube Dan Grainger United States Partner NPR Political Editor Forty Eight Percent Eight Percent
Papa John's founder accuses media agency of trying to extort him for $6 million

Dr. Drew Midday Live with Mike Catherwood

03:13 min | 3 years ago

Papa John's founder accuses media agency of trying to extort him for $6 million

"Blitz after the news break about American talk to Tim Draper venture capital investor regarding the California split, California. Three it's on the ballot with he'll tell you the status of all that learn what's next The company we work which basically rents out office. Space but it's a massive company, all over the country they have banned meet at company events and, they. Won't let employees expense meals that include meat because they want to minimize their carbon footprint Employees who need medical or religious. Allowances, are being referred to? The company's policy team but basically the twenty. Billion dollar office rental company announced that it will no. Longer. Reimburse employees for meals that include red meat poultry or, pork and we'll stop serving meat at all company. Events well what will I do you will not be able to work there that is absolutely true to look for a new job yes How's that going to work now. What, if somebody comes in and goes. Look, hey I've diabetes I'm only employees that need medical or religious allowances are being considered by their, you know so then you will policies going to large-scale large-scale that's a look if you want to reduce your carbon footprint that's, the best way, to do it did it become vegan I've been. Proven, way to do it? That is true better than getting an electric. Car well let's still leaves a huge carbon yeah I. Know So the companies forward thinking in. That, all right Apparently and. You've been Complaining about this as long. As I've known you urgent care centers are. Over? Prescribing antibiotics study why because people come to urge and care centre and they don't care. What they're diagnosed with they don't care. What the doctor says. They, want an antibiotic okay so. That's every patient visit but what's unique about urgent care is. They have large volumes they have to get through these patients and get to, the more urgent cases urgent care and nothing ends a visit quicker than pulling. Out your prescription pad. That's how you visit so then that is about them not being able to have the time to sit down with the patient and argue explain this is, what this is then, and by the way huge. Liability associated with that let's say they go home and have something. Adverse happens to them, they, turn his, go? See should've prescribed right you have. To document like crazy if you make that choice, is a is a I. Cannot blame. These people, I can't it's a it's a. Problem in the system if we just, get rid of that the tort issue that would go eighty percent. Of the way there, and if we would you know if the doctors Sort, of sort of a judgment had. Meaning in a medical record we would, be really all the way there but we are are means nothing. Anymore just ridiculous I'm, sorry just as bad yeah You heard about. The whole brouhaha over Papa John's founder, saying word well now he says a media agency tried to extort six million dollars, to keep that, inward call quiet, that's crazy it's now clear why Papa John's board of directors asked former chairman John schnatter schnatter to stop talking to the press schnatter. An interview Friday with Louisville. Kentucky CBS station accused media agency. Laundry service of trying to blackmail Papa John's for six million to keep quiet about a made conference. Call in which a founder? Admitted he used the n. word he also told the TV station he was provoked.

Papa John Tim Draper John Schnatter Louisville Founder California Kentucky CBS Chairman Six Million Dollars Billion Dollar Eighty Percent
Founder And Chairman, China and Tiger Global discussed on Politics, Policy, Power and Law

Politics, Policy, Power and Law

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Founder And Chairman, China and Tiger Global discussed on Politics, Policy, Power and Law

"I'm media agency working with papa john's international has decided to cut ties after the pizza makers founder and chairman john schnatter allegedly used a racial slur and graphic descriptions of violence against minorities on a conference call this according to forbes papa john's and the agency laundry service did not immediately respond to requests for comment shares of papa john's refuses ticker peasy as pizza laura now by two point nine percent tendered on one thirty second looking at a yield of two point eight five percent gold is down eight tenths of one percent twelve forty four the ons west texas enemy eightyeight crew tumbling three percent now seventy one ninety one for wti bread also lower by four by four percent seventy five sixty nine for a barrel of brent it is one oh two on wall street and that means one thing it is time now for the market driver's report with a focus on american depository receipts here is dave wilson thanks charlie eighty yards or falling more than us shares the s and p a r index is down one point seven percent while the sp five hundred's lower by six tenths of a percent eighty ours of mining companies are lower after the trump administration announced those plans to expand tariffs on chinese imports australia's be hp billiton has lost four point four percent switzerland's glencore has lost a five point six percent and uk based rio tinto has dropped four point seven percent turkish adr's are lower amid a plunge in the country's currency the lira among banks you've got guaranteed down nine point six percent and act bank down eight point nine percent industrial company koch holding is down nine percent japan's softbank group has risen two point two percent person with knowledge in the matter said the hedge fund tiger global has invested more than a billion dollars in the internet company a representative for tiger global declined to comment and china's new oriental education has gained one point one percent people now said the company plans an initial public offering in hong kong for an online learning unit called cool learn dot com charlie alright a store who were watching we thank you very much.

Founder And Chairman China Tiger Global Koch Rio Tinto UK HP Australia Dave Wilson Papa John Hong Kong Representative Softbank Group Japan Glencore Switzerland John Schnatter Nine Percent Seven Percent Four Percent