35 Burst results for "Med School"

"med school" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

05:30 min | Last week

"med school" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"In a little montague and Ryssdal. Horribly with affiliate connected culturally connect defy that I come from channel like three three hours away but still had the privilege of nine lie Harpoon von Anyway. When Tina could look around and I knew that Monte getting an unfair deal. That, we went treated the same that I slow the racism. Teen weirdly and ninety may a ten year old Brian off what I'll do something that would piss the pack as off because they wouldn't either expect me to be a doctor. At teen I decided I would do that. And I did that as a social justice statement not because I'm raving racist not eighteen. But in my mind now was a reaction to a society that I could see was not fear for my people. So I wanted to do something that would break the stereotype. Break the prejudice and just proves the wrong word I wear that makes seems do you think it was more difficult for you must always one of my privilege and disadvantage just being Mahdi in none of itself as a disadvantage in New Zealand and tunes of Educational Outcomes. But at the same time, I had a privileged to a school that Catholic high school on the shore but. May via an end because I made the decision early I knew I had to take some sciences but I will say really wanted to take their money and at that school I had to take it by correspondence and got room not actually cutting minimal academically for that and that bomb my maps out and if I had an I actually was an a plus student ahead a tube examined. This one thing could have stopped me getting to municipal main. Not Having all the sites subjects I needed. But I'm quite old and it was back in the day we went straight through to medicine I. Think. Having this one year you have to compete against. So many people to get an also different playing field for many of the students today. So. Every student who guys listen. That's a huge achievement is so much they have to do the. Really intense program, and so we should be used we want to celebrate everyone but. Yeah I don't see Modern Pacific graduating as as being unfit via to others in New Zealand. It's a good thing is something we should want and celebrate not challenge, but it's also true that the our students who have. A GPA scores on the precipice of meats go miss out in some of those people might think they missed out because of the earth necessity because the will Asian or Middle Eastern will born in the city or to a wealthy family..

New Zealand Catholic high school Brian Ryssdal Tina Monte Modern Pacific
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 3 weeks ago

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
"med school" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

03:44 min | Last month

"med school" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"You're listening to the actress black voices in healthcare I'm Ashley mcmullan. We. All have stories that becoming. Where we come from where we go is different for all of us. We might move forward with the laser focus. Or bounce from. Chapter Chapter. May find ourselves in unexpected places because of chance opportunity because of circumstance or perhaps because of faith. NC Any black doctors growing up who I did see was my mom and nurse I saw how hard she works in the impact she had on her patients made me WanNa be a doctor. There were many times I thought about quitting premed though, and it was my mom who encouraged me to keep going to do something no one else on our family had done before. For Med school to residency chief year to faculty, I'm still becoming the amazing Black Queer Woman that I am. This week.

Ashley mcmullan Med school NC
Loneliness In A Socially Distant World

Dear Sugars

03:48 min | 2 months ago

Loneliness In A Socially Distant World

"We've all felt lonely at some point in our lives, but the reality is loneliness is so much more than a bad feeling. It's a public health crisis that affects more than half of adults in the US. Many. People feel that if they're lonely. That means that they're not likeable or that. They're broken in some way and I certainly felt that as a child that was one of the reasons I never told my parents all those years. I struggled with loneliness. In fact, feeling alone, and we WANNA, ultimately address loneliness. We have to figure out how to eradicate that stigma and help people see loneliness from what it is, which is a human condition that all of his experience at some point in our lives. This is the former US surgeon general Dr Viv AAC morphe- who served from the end of two thousand fourteen until twenty seventeen. He's the author of together the healing power of human connection in sometimes lonely world, and just make it even more clear. Listen to the scientific finding Dr Martha told us so. Loneliness is associated with an increased risk of heart disease of depression, anxiety of premature death of sleep, disturbances of dementia of impaired wound healing, and the list goes on when studies have actually looked at them. Mortality impact associated with loneliness. What they have found is that that mortality impact is similar to the mortality impact seen with smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. Okay fifteen cigarettes a day. That is almost a full pack. In one day. We were shocked when we heard this. How can loneliness cost so much damage? Well, Dr Martha says it's because it puts our minds and bodies in this primal and unsustainable state. Loneliness is a natural signal that our body sends us when we're lacking something that we need for survival in this case, human connection, we literally need him. In connection for survival in that sense is very similar to hunger. Thirst signals at our body sends up when we're. We're lacking food or water now we if we respond to that signal by getting a meal or a drinking some water than the hunger, thirst will subside similarily, we seek out connection with others. If you pick up the phone to call a friend, get in the car and go visit a relative. That loneliness may subside, but when the loneliness persists for a long period of time is when we run into trouble, because physiologically loneliness induces a stress state in our body, and in the short term stress, states can motivate. Motivate you to action in the long term, they're associated with increased levels of inflammation. That's associated with an increased risk of heart, disease and other chronic illnesses. The chronic illnesses are what surgeon general's have focused on in the past and Dr. Murphy said that was initially his plan to when he came into office, but when he actually traveled and spoke to citizens across the country. He had an epiphany. What I recognize overtime was behind. Those stories were so many threads of loneliness. People would often say I feel I have to. To deal with all of these challenges by myself, or if you if I disappear tomorrow, no one would even notice or feel invisible and hearing that again and again from college students from parents from people in remote fishing villages in Alaska to members of Congress in Washington C.. It struck me that something deeper was happening here. He'd heard that a lot, too as a practicing physician, and he knew it was a problem, but addressing loneliness. It wasn't taught in Med school when you enter a profession like medicine or nursing. Because you want to help people and relieve suffering, and when you see people suffering in front of you from 'cause you have no idea how to address something like loneliness. He doesn't feel good, and that's how I felt when I was in the hospital. And I. Encounter patients who were alone and I didn't know what to do and I felt I wasn't serving them.

Dr Martha Dr. Murphy United States Dr Viv Aac Alaska Washington Congress
Empowering Women Everywhere with Dr. Anjali Malik, MD

The WoMed

04:01 min | 4 months ago

Empowering Women Everywhere with Dr. Anjali Malik, MD

"Did you get started in medicine so my parents are both physicians? Which is also why. We ended up in our small town in Tennessee because foreign medical graduates were binding positions in the small rural areas. Being heavily recruited yes. My mom is family practice. She was your. I mean she was your old school physician who is essentially. You're twenty four seven Life to death physician I was cool. Yeah so when I was little she actually did obstetrics as well so she did. Deliveries as part of her family practice And then also of course did pediatrics Adolescent Medicine Adult medicine internal medicine and geriatrics. And I say that via the scope of general family practice is she was not sub specialized in in the and then thankfully at some point. She gave the the deliveries but through her. I mean I saw her. In outpatient care inpatient care nursing homes so she was really a huge exposure to medicine. And then my dad was sort of the exact opposite of that but kind of because he was. Okay yes yes of course Totally different patient interaction still doing a lot and easing to hear him when he did eventually help with chemistry and physics and not hear him talking about those kinds of things and NC him in action but But yeah so I had to spectrums of medicine growing and so there was always that sort of You know the the seed planted that I would wanna be a doctor and that were even expectation. Vam IN SOUTH ASIAN SOUTH ASIAN. And then the funny thing is. I went through that rebellious days where I was like. Oh I don't WanNa be a doctor. I'm not going to be a doctor. I'm GONNA at this that or the other public. Health was sensing that I was always interested in Outbreak was actually one of my favorite movies growing up where that was fantastic. Yeah my husband. I actually just re watched it recently of with all this going on. Kinda hits a little differently. If you're like wow look at their fully suited has met suits in kind of jealous of that but But Yeah so. I always have this idea that. Save the world public home person and so I was lucky that I went to Johns Hopkins. Which at the time was one of the only undergrad institutions that had public health as a major early. Yeah so I was able to do Public Health Bachelors And really get huge exposure there. I worked in health policy. I took variety classes. I really did the the full spectrum on. That's an interestingly through that I kind of came back to medicine because I realized that I was not A researcher or like a the kind of person who could work at something every day and not see the results. We need those people modestly. They are really the ones that move society forward. 'cause they're they're willing to put in work along call but turns out? Eichel oriented and I need to see that end result every day. And that's finally to yes. We need all types of people exactly that sort of pushed me back towards medicine and You Know Med is hard it it's certainly demoralizing at times But the thing was able to survive and made IT TO MED. School went to. Tulane where I actually almost considered an MD p. h. because they have an amazing school of public health and they're really well known for their tropical medicine and then Hurricane Katrina decided otherwise for me. I decided that I had had enough extra stuff piled onto my

Johns Hopkins Tennessee Tulane Outbreak Hurricane Katrina NC Researcher
Pomp and social distancing

Native America Calling

04:40 min | 4 months ago

Pomp and social distancing

"And it is my honor to introduce you to some of the class of twenty twenty joining us from Hayes. Montana is CAITLIN carry water. She is a haze lodge logical high school senior. And she is a Cinnabon Caitlyn. Congratulations in welcome to native America. Calling Hi thank you and so as a recent graduate how you feel. Kinda shock tough ride. I Bet I bet and for you. What does it mean to get to this point in? No that you're turning a new chapter Oh we had a kind of plotted out for a long time. But we knew it was gonNA make it in any words to your fellow classmates about Graduation and just getting to this point We just need to keep moving forward and we need to keep with our education and make a better future for reservation. You know all right I hear you Kaitlyn And also here with us today out of Gallup New Mexico as Dr Key Smith. He's a university of Minnesota Medical School graduate and an incoming you see. Sf University of California San Francisco Resident and he is day my pleasure to have him here and Thank you for being with us. Casey and I'm just GONNA to keep saying Hello Dr Smith. Welcome thank you for having and another great accomplishment and feel to be referred to as Dr Smith Now I think it's a while to get used to but I think there's been a lot of like challenges and sacrifices and also a that went into being able to say that and so it definitely feel it feels good But I take a lot to get used to that and so Dr Smith your thoughts about getting to this point in knowing bright now. The entire country is Looking to our medical professionals more doctors are needed. And now we can say we have another doctor Adding to the workforce in just your thoughts about getting this accomplishment especially during these times. Yeah really the question so I think just what I was saying earlier. I think as native people We tend to make a lot of sacrifices leaving our homes and our and our nation and going on to care education and so Being able to be at the point that I'm out right now and overcoming those sacrifices and challenges and being able to Say I'm a doctor now? it's just very exciting very humbling. I feel very honored to be a native person in medicine and I'm a little nervous and scared to be Kind of moving into the next journey next part of my journey during this time. But I also feel like I've been equipped with many skills and the knowledge to be able to to Treat patients and being able to learn a lot of many awesome doctors. And so I think it's An exciting but also kind of nerve wracking time but also to be on the front lines and to be able to do what I've been wanting to do for a very long time. I think I'm looking forward to it. Into what discipline are you going to be going into? So I applied to internal medicine Welby Training in internal medicine. And so you will definitely be there in critical moments in Casey just thinking of getting through all your studies in getting to this point where now it is more of the practical side where your thoughts I think I don't know I feel like at least the first part of Med school year in the books into taking lot of tests. And there's not a lot of patient interaction until toward the end of Med school. But I think I think now as you have mentioned being able to apply a lot of this knowledge and these skills that able to gain and being able to actually make changes in individuals lives is is very powerful and and and honoring into so graduation is truly a moment where you are transitioning into something new Leaving behind space that maybe you got very comfortable in. And so I know how How big of a moment. This can be for many

Dr Key Smith Casey Med School Caitlin Hayes America Montana San Francisco Minnesota Medical School New Mexico Sf University Of California Kaitlyn
20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

20 Minute Fitness

06:41 min | 4 months ago

20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

"Laurie run to introduce yourself. And Your Work Sarah so Lori Gottlieb. I'm a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. I'm the author of the book. Maybe you should talk to someone. And I write the weekly your therapist column for the Atlantic riots. You had an interesting career progression from first starting out in the TV and soon industry and then transitioning to Med School. And then eventually becoming a psychotherapist. How how did that come about? So I've always been interested in story and the human condition and so I started off after college working in film and Television and one of the shows that I was assigned to when I was over at NBC was Er and we had a consultant on the show who was an emergency room physician and I spent a lot of time in the emergency room with him to do research for the show and he kept saying to me. I think you like it better here. They maybe she go to medical school and say. I was a French major in college. I was very math and science. You but I was always insisted literature language but I did go to medical school and when I was up at medical school I was up at Stanford and it was This time when the healthcare system was changing it was a lot of talk about managed care and I had this idea of really guiding patients through their lives and it didn't seem like that was going to be the kind of clinical environment that would be easy to manage and so because I was still interested in story in the human condition. I left to become a journalist. Writing Roth and I. I still have a journalist but after I had a baby I've been a journalist for about ten years had a baby and I really needed to talk to adults during the day and so the ups guy would come in he'd like I would detain him with conversations if he would back away to his big brown truck and at a certain point he just tip toe to the door gently placed package out so I could not you know engage him in conversation so I called up the dean at Stanford and I said maybe I should come back and do psychiatry. And she said you're welcome to come back. But you might be doing a lot of medication management and. I know that you really want those those longer deeper relationships with your patients. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and becomes psychotherapist? And that was exactly what I did. I feel like I simply went from being a journalist where I help people to tell their stories to being therapist where I help people to change their stories and how you think your your initial background in the TV industry has been influencing your current work then is it really the storytelling telling or what is it. Exactly it is. I feel like when I sit in the therapist's chair that I am really editor and People come in with a faulty narrative generally because every single one of us is an unreliable narrator meaning that we're not trying to mislead but we tell our stories in a particular way and from a particular perspective and usually that version of the story is what's holding people back. A lot of people think that they're coming to therapy to know themselves by really. I feel like what we therapy is helping. People unknow themselves to let go of the limiting stories that they've been telling themselves so they can live their lives in some faulty narrative that they've been telling themselves about their lives. And how does it look in practice? What we now are like the radio said tell about themselves and how how is that changing after. Actually those with you. A lot of people come to therapy because they want something to change. Something's not working in their lives and usually what they want in the beginning. Is they want someone else or something else to take and what they come to realize is that they have so much agency to make changes themselves. That it's not about changing someone else or something else it's about. How do you respond to that? What kinds of changes can you make in your own life? And so we shift the story. So they become the protagonist in their lives and they're not just reactive to something that's going on around them right in you've seen riding that those individuals stories form to the call our own lives and you've been deeper meaning. Can you elaborate on that? Yeah I think that we're natural storytellers. Even starting with cave drags always wanted to communicate through story. And I think it's so much easier to see ourselves through somebody else's story so in. Maybe you should talk to someone. I followed the lives of four very seemingly different patients on the surface and then there's a fifth patients in the fifth patients is of course me as I go through my therapist. I go for something in my own life and I think that really the book is about the human condition. It's about the reader so so many people who read the buck say oh. I learned so much about myself. I saw so much myself in those stories. Because if you say to someone you know you do this or you're like this. Our instinct is to say no not notes but when you see somebody else do something. It's almost like having a mirror held up you where all of a sudden you see yourself much more clearly. And that gives you so much more agency and power in your life when you understand why something isn't working and what you can do about it and does require us to have you know these compensations to have basically that bureau held against us to really understand our own story better or something in play of how our own stories are forming in the first place like something that we can do actually to be more conscious about unknowing ourselves. I think it's hard to do by yourself because it's kind of like if you're zoomed into a picture you just see a little portion of it but if you zoom out you see this wider perspective and. I think that's what other people do for us. Were so close to ourselves that we lose perspective. We don't see the big picture and talking to somebody else can help me to see something that you haven't been either willing or able to see it's almost like. I think going to therapy is like getting a really good second opinion on your life and for those of us that don't have access to a therapist is like another way of actually realizing how the people in our own environment perceive US actually. Oh yeah absolutely. I mean the title of the Book May Be talked to someone. Doesn't just mean maybe you should talk to a therapist. Maybe we should all be talking more to one another and this was written before the pandemic so no this this applies all the time even more so now course but I think that a lot of times. We don't really take off the mask and talk to people about what's really going on with us because we have shame because we're afraid of how they might react because you know we're embarrassed whatever it might be and. I think what people come to realize when they do make contact with another person in that way is how much the same we all are that that underneath all we all want the same things we all want to love and be loved. We all have regret. We all have anxiety about certain things were also similar and so I think that we feel isolated so much time partly because everyone's going through something similar might look different but underneath the courts very similar and yet nobody wants to open up and share that so we feel like we're the only

Stanford Los Angeles Med School Laurie Lori Gottlieb Sarah NBC United States Roth Editor Consultant
Build the Gut of a Hero

Plant Strong

10:06 min | 4 months ago

Build the Gut of a Hero

"Season. Two of the plant. Strong podcast has focused on those individuals. Who have the heart of a hero? The way we're going to talk about the guy who has the gut of a hero doctor will ball shirts. Or as he is affectionately known doctor be the author of the forthcoming book fiber fueled. This is quite simply the playbook to optimize and restore your gut health. We take a deep dive on. What can be a very complex subject but in fun and lighthearted way leaving you with actionable insights tips and best foods optimize your gut health. A little side note. You can't have a conversation about fiber without discussing poop and as a gastroenterologist Dr B. is more than comfortable with the subject so yep we talked a little about poop because guess what we all do it so grab a big bowl leafy green. Sit Back and prepare to get turned on to fiber with Dr be will show wits the gut health doctor. Today's episode of the plant strong podcast. We have Dr will be Dr be will boss Bozo. It's also which wits got. I did first of all you nailed it on. The first try emailed it on the first try many second. Guess yourself a little bit those who it's also there you go and it's just confidence. My friend is just common. You just gotTa say it with confidence. That's well what. What is that Polish? What is that? It's polishing is a fully Polish name. And you know in the in the hard thing is like we say it now is in American word. Polish names are not meant to be said as American work. It's just so let me let me hear you stay it. Will I say the same way that you said? At the first time I said Bolsa wits I say both Switz- but if you were to go to Poland's they would stable Schevitz and actually think Bolsheviks just roll off the tongue. You know what it does bull shit like that Wife is Polish her her last name. Coalition ski so I think she's my cousin. Actually yeah I see a resemblance So we got a lot of exciting things to talk about here today. You know I think for starters what I'd like to ask you is so you are a gastroenterologist and I think I pronounced that correct. You did a gastroenterologist and so what exactly is a gastroenterologist we are the we are the experts on all organs of digestive function so one of the things that people kind of look at me including my mother-in-law the first time I met her like why did you decide to become a doctor so and so let me. Just say the the reason that I love what I do are the reason I love what I do is that if I were cardiologists I would just be a heart guy all day long art all the time whereas for me I get. I get to have diversity as we're GonNa hold earned during this podcast. Diversity is a good word I love it And so I. I'm the I'm considered the expert on the Asaf. Igus stomach. Small Intestine. The colon the pancreas the liver even the hemorrhoids. I'm expert. That's a good thing to be expert and I bet you I bet you that the line out your door is never ending. Probably can circumstances. There is a line out the door. There is no lack of business. I'm not worried that no matter what I put into the world's that I truly believe a person like my book every person in the entire world could read my book but unless they all actually do. What's in the book? I don't I'm not GONNA be putting myself out of business anytime soon. That's for sure. Yep You're talking about the book and we're GonNa get to the book which is Super Exciting. It's your first book right for smoke. First Book Fiber fueled what? I'm going to save that for a little bit later. So gastroenterologist and how long have you been practicing finish my training in two thousand fourteen so basically six years? Now I've been in practice. But you know if you if you look at just sort of Long drawn-out path and I know that you're familiar with the way this works. Yeah I started college back in ninety eight and I went and I did for years of college. Four YEARS OF MED school. I did four years of internal medicine residency including I was achieved president northwestern and four years of GI training to become a specialist in part of the reason why did four years is actually didn't Epidemiology Fellowship University of North Carolina. So that's sixteen years at Sixteen Years. From Ninety eight until twenty fourteen finally wrapped up. You know it's Kinda funny. I thought about this too by the way sixteen years of training but like working eighty to a hundred dollars a week which means that just my training alone is essentially the equivalent of what most people do for the entirety of their labor campaign. Before they retire. To- totally sixteen years of training right before you went into practice before I enter crackers before you enter practice and in that sixteen years of training. How much information that you have been your new book fiber fueled. Did you learn in that traditional setting and when and when did your education really begin? The education never stops never stops. And that's that's true. I think for all of us but I think that's particularly true in medicine if you're if you're not constantly updating your knowledge base in medicine than your rapidly going to become a dinosaur and but with regard to your question rib and this is a completely valid question and it's one of the weak points to me of traditional Western medicine. I will openly acknowledges very little very little training on Diet. Nutrition lifestyle in honestly. What kind of one of the big things that I did along the way to try to update that nutritional training was actually did the e cornell. Course yeah so. That's that's just one of the things that I did but it's it's actually quite shocking that I do sixteen years of training and have almost no conversations about. How do we fix a person's diet to address the root of the problem well and I would imagine that and correct me if I'm wrong here but I would imagine that those line the lines of people that are out your door that are seeing you because they have some sort of a GI issue distress That ninety percent of those could be resolved by filing what we're GonNa talk about today which is really a a whole food plant based Diet. That has a huge diversity of fiber. That that too simplified. I don't not only do. I not think I think that is spot on number one and number two might here ninety percent and think that you're overreaching and you're being hyperbolic and actually think it might be more than that right. I mean I have not exaggerating. I literally I literally bleed and I'm not saying that that ripped that we would live in this Utopian world where we all live to be two hundred years old literally no disease at all. I'm not saying that what I am saying is that if the root of the problem starts with our microbiome which in my specialty that is where the root of the problem starts if the root of the problem is the microbiome and number one way that you can change. Your microbiome is with the food that you eat then. We need to be doing that when we take care of these patients. Otherwise we're knowing the root of the problem we're putting a patch over it with the pill but so you say the term microbial but in your sixteen years of training was that was that discussed or is that kind of like for example. I feel am. I'm embarrassed to say that you know this is kind of you know wh my huge passion right and I didn't know about the microbiome and how it's considered kind of like the second brain in the lost Oregon until like three and a half four years ago. I mean to the conversation. Just start recently about this or you know others these studies. There's these studies where they say. Okay how long does it take from the day of publication for it to actually get into common knowledge among medical doctors when they look at that? But they come up with seventeen years. It's at seventeen years from the day of papers published and I just think we don't need to be practicing medicine with the research studies that came out in two thousand and three right now. I think we need to be practicing medicine with the Research Studies. That came out last week or or this week right. It's time for us to update and that's the beautiful thing. Is that everything? Every single thing in my book is sourced. It's all source. There are six hundred references. And I'll be honest. I challenge doctors. I challenge the doctors who are listening to this show. Want you to read my book and I want you to check my sources. Because they're there and I think when you do you're GONNA learn you're going to learn that this is the path

Dr B. Research Studies Poland Switz University Of North Carolina Schevitz President Trump Oregon E Cornell
Dr. Elaine Ingham, Soil Scientist

Cultivating Place

08:57 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Elaine Ingham, Soil Scientist

"This week. Cultivating places women's history month interviews gets to the very basics of horticultural work with soil. The soil world is integral foundational to the plant world. Since the nineteen eighty s mainstream academic soil science has been transformed into a search for biological discovery. It is a fundamental shift from a science that seemed blinded by the theories of the Green Revolution from the nineteen twenty s through the nineteen seventies. The Term Green Revolution refers to innovations intended to increase food supply around the world specifically through introductions of new often dwarfed sometimes genetically modified varieties of cereal grain crops developed for high yield along with introductions of synthetic fertilizers herbicides and pesticides often derived from the chemical byproducts of World War Two the Green Revolution asserted increased production of and reduced pest and disease damage to crops. Managed by these men made inputs over traditional agricultural methods. Beginning in the late nineteen seventies however more voices started questioning the long term results and benefits versus serious disadvantages of these methods. Many of the voices raised in opposition. Women's voices among them was Dr Elaine. Ingham Elaine's work in microbiology. At the Colorado State University for Collins in the nineteen seventy s through the nineteen eighties began illuminating. The incredibly complex living systems at work in healthy soil. Her work is strongly associated with the concept of a soil food web and in the beginning of this century. She is the founder of Soil Food Web Inc and she's here to share more about her work. Welcome Elaine thank you very much. I'm very honored to be here. So you have had a really long interesting career in which you have accomplished and articulated some really interesting. And seminal things for our field of interest Plant life here and how it relates to so much else. Can you describe for listeners? What does your work consist of right? Now especially as it relates to soil and plant life lane right now where. I'm still continuing to work on. What is the soil food web? How is it different in different? Parts of the planet given climate season changing weather patterns. Things like that. How do these organisms interact with each other to help? Plants grow or what are the conditions that results in the disease causing or not beneficial organisms winning out over the beneficial's all those stages of succession and so many people doesn't don't understand that it's the biology that pushes succession along at. What's really altering things so that next stage of plant life will succeed into that system and then of course. Those new plants communion alter the biology in the soil which sets the stage for the next stage of succession. So lots were of information yet to go and only really begun to scratch a surface soil. The MORE QUESTIONS. We answered the more questions. Come up I think is is so often the case so before we get into the technicalities of this big interesting wide world that you are studying take us back a little bit and set the scene for us of of where you grew up and the kind of journey of your work of the people in places in plants that grew into a person. For whom this would be your. Life's Focus Elaine. I grew up in Minnesota so the frigid northlands and I thought every place in the world had twenty five feet of snow in the wintertime. That was just how everybody else lived. It was a kind of a shock when I learned it was different than that so my father was a veterinarian At the University of Minnesota and he would take me into his laboratory. He took me because I was the only one of his offspring who was interested in laboratory work and I remember at the age of six years old. My father sat me down at a microscope. Wasn't quite sure what to do with me. I couldn't be running around the halls getting into trouble. So what is he going to do plops down in front of a microscope and says county coli so he showed me how to make the microscope slides and start counting and he wanted me to do twenty five fields and he figured that it would take me a long time to get twenty five fields. If he coli counted he was right. So a my first introduction to the microscope my father and I worked on all my science projects through the course of middle school and high school and I went off to college at Saint Olaf College in Northfield Minnesota Various Scandinavian Norwegian school. One at the top Pre Med schools in the United States. But I decided I did not want to go to medical school. I had met some of the people I worked as a In the heart hospital as a lab dishwasher during my senior year and discovered. I really didn't like those people. They were too con- focused on the wrong things. I wanted to stand how the world works. Not How you get the patient to spend the most money on the most expensive drugs and you know all of that. medical It was just an anthem. It to me so I decided to go to graduate. School went to Texas am where I worked in Marine Microbiology on the digest organisms in the digestive systems of oysters and freshwater mussels on started understand that you know science purports many ways the academic world reports that it knows everything we found all the answers. And so just ask me. I can answer all your questions and began to discover that that is absolutely not a case There's so much we don't know that it's overwhelming and the methodologies that people often use to try to collect the data and then the misinterpretations that they perform in explaining the world if if you take the material inside the digestive system of an oyster in played it out on a petri dish you're only going to find two or three species because we are so changing the the habitat think about the inside of an oyster versus In a medium in a plastic petri dish that you spread a point one meal of choice tres digestive system and and how many microorganisms well? I looked through the microscope at those organisms and I noted that there were literally a hundred different species of bacteria that I could see a couldn't identify them to genus and species. But I could see there. Were one hundred different things that were totally different. Egmore Doing very different things and so I figured I should be seen that many little colonies coming up on my petri dishes and I was seen one or two. And so how can you use that method? Petri plate methods. Do not allow you to get an inkling of what the diversity is out there in the real world and yet that was the standard of microbiology. That's what you had to do to start the organisms in now. Fill in the blank. Whatever you want to write so there'd been a lot of work done on the ecology of different ecosystems that were just completely inappropriate. When it comes to understanding any of these

Ingham Elaine Soil Food Web Inc Minnesota University Of Minnesota Colorado State University United States Saint Olaf College Founder Collins Northfield Minnesota Various S Texas Marine Microbiology
Helping Underserved Patients Get the Quality Specialty Care They Need with Daren Anderson, Director at ConferMED

Outcomes Rocket

09:17 min | 6 months ago

Helping Underserved Patients Get the Quality Specialty Care They Need with Daren Anderson, Director at ConferMED

"I have the privilege of hosting Dr Darren Anderson. He's a director of confirm. Darren is a board certified general internist and has worked in safety net practices for his entire career. He's published articles in several peer reviewed medical journals including health affairs. The American Journal of Managed Care The Journal of Family Practice and the Journal of General Internal Medicine Doctor. Anderson obtained his undergraduate degree at Harvard College and his Medical Degree from Columbia University College of physician and surgeons. He's an outstanding contributor to the telehealth space. We've got a lot of things going on right now. Value-based cares one of those things. How do we deliver better on? Our healthcare dollar. Corona virus is something that's very live and and and a concern for many of our provider organizations and communities and so today we're going to touch on several of those things with Darren and also to learn more about what he and his company are doing to to add value to healthcare so Dr Anderson. Really appreciate you jumping on to join us today. Oh thank you. I really appreciate the chance to talk with you in the share. Some of the work we've been doing with your audience. Thanks a lot for the opportunity absolutely so tell us a little bit more about your journey and and what inspired your work in healthcare and in particular your focus on safety net practices yet will journey released her back in college. I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my lights. Give the short version. But I I became really inspired by more that I was reading By various authors talking about Underserved patients and their efforts to try to provide healthcare in safety practices. And I kind of decided early on that. I wanted to turn it for your that. Would allow me to to work in a medical in the safety net. So really went through my training with that. As a goal in after MED school did an internal medicine residency training and then went right into the National Health Service Corps where I was assigned to practice saw in a new Britain Connecticut Community Center. That's how he ended up in Connecticut which is to stay and you know. I started off working fulltime as a primary care doctor taken care of by an inner city population with a lot of a lot of complex problems. Most of my patients spoke Spanish in. I think early on even in my first year actes. I absolutely love taking care of patients but I was so struck even even having fun in knowing a little bit about What was going on in in Satanic Practices? I was struck by how inequitable the system was and healthcare. Quality is something that just greets you the minute you walk into an exam realized the opportunities that you may have right may have private insurance. The opportunities that are patients who have no insurance or perhaps Medicaid insurance don't have and so sort of starting charting career win. It took me more into the administrative research side of things looking to try to derive solutions to help reduce helping it make sure that patients regardless of where they were born what language they spoke or what insurance. They did or didn't have finding ways to make sure that they got the best health care that we provide in the US. I think that's That's wonderful baron. As we as we consider the topic of access and the challenges that surround that social determinants of health much of which were tackling. I think more seriously today in healthcare. I think this is a great opportunity for for us to to dive in a little bit. Deeper on on what you're doing at complimented Ellis. What it is that you guys are doing there to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. You know so one of the most striking and obvious disparities when you start practicing in in a federally house. Hendrick Community Health Center is when you need to send a patient. See a specialist so many may knowing your audience may know that there is a network of over twelve hundred community health centers across the country. They're called federally qualified health centers but they are independent nonprofit L. centers that are run by a board of directors that's majority controlled by patients in these clinics. Had been around for decades and really developing a strong effective primary care infrastructure. They were among the earliest without the. Hr's the SIM that I worked at. Has KIOSK CHECK INS integrated behavioral health? Many of the things that you would like in expect to see in the in the the best primary care clinic you could envision but it all comes to a screeching halt when you refer somebody or need to refer somebody actress in back in two thousand twelve when we first about the idea for what eventually became confirming. Mike Clinic was facing nine to twelve month. Wait minimum to get one of our Medicaid patients into be seen by the pitas dermatologists in pretty much. All of the specialties. Have at least some degree of a delay and this presents a real challenge for the primary care provider. You may have a pretty good idea of what you need to do. But you may not be sure you may need surgery. You may need a biopsy procedure but in any case off the only way to get answers to your questions or get a patient to have procedure disturb. Refer them into a specialty center and No unfortunately uninsured patients and and even those with Medicaid have great difficulty finding specialty care because the simple fact is reimbursement rates relatively low in many most specialists impact on limit or completely. Don't accept it. All patients without insurance or Medicaid and so forth that presented a really substantial challenge to us and that was that was the issue that we sought to address. Confirm it and that's a that's great so comes from a from a frustration that you had in your own practice and your patients not being able to get the care that they needed. I mean nine to twelve months. Wade is is really not acceptable. And so you dove in you. Roll up your sleeves. Tell us what confident does today? That's different than what's available today to solve on that specialist problem so I think we tested in the process that ultimately became for mid was designed and tested by me and my team of primary care providers nurses referral coordinators. And basically. What confirm it does is it allows the primary care provider to confer with a specialist virtually before they refer in a synchronous conferring dwell so died essentially it allows the primary care provider to send their question in some of the details about the case from the medical records to a special instant. They can get is on that console question rapidly and in no more than two days that most of our specialists on a within the same day. Seventy seven percent responded on the same day. The question was submitted. And they're able to put ice on that review the information that we submit and send back to that Primary Care Provider Advice Guidance. So basically what? We are as virtual network specialists around the country. That are on standby ready to answer. Questions in take a first look at all of the console requests that the primary care providers have in pretty much any specialty in his rebuilt out that network and developed really the understanding state by state of all the different types of Payments Environments. All the different types of practices. We continue to see that. A substantial percentage of the cases that get submitted to us in most specialties upwards of eighty percent. Don't need a face to face visit. It's not because it's inappropriate. Consult of the. Pcp made a mistake it simply because the nature of what the primary care provider is asking. The question that they have is one of the specialists answered by senior question reviewing the data and sending back in opinion and so what that does makes the system more efficient it allows those cases that can mean be maintained managed primary care same primary care. Unit allows those scarce resources that face to face visits to be allocated to patients who really need a procedure or hands on for some reason another and that's basically we met all that outdid series of studies in Connecticut. Utah in our health center to prove that it works that it was safe and what confirmed has done is take that scale and we're now providing that service to over one point three million patients across the country. That's fantastic congratulations on on the scaling of it To the point you've gotten it thus far Dr Anderson and and You know thinking through the the efficiency that this provides much of what we need in in healthcare is is the logistics and the efficiency. And and so you've created a nice fast lane to provide the care that's needed and eighty percent. Don't need that face to face visit and I think that's A great solution. So what's the cost than if somebody if it specialists is giving you a their idea or their analysis of the of the patient. What's the cost? The cost is way less than the cost of that specialised in their time in their overhead. Seeing the patient face to face meetings to think about it we batch leads. They're an inbox in the specialist and review them imaging patients evening in rattled off a significant number of them one after the other most e console responses. Take ten minutes out. There's arranged and we have. We have some units are averages tend to fifty minutes but if you think about it all they need is a laptop or whatever to do that office cost. There's no checking medical assistant. Any of the overhead costs the

Dr Darren Anderson Director American Journal Of Managed Ca Connecticut Harvard College Hendrick Community Health Cent United States General Internist Journal Of General Internal Me Columbia University College Of Medicaid National Health Service Corps Britain Connecticut Community Ellis Med School Mike Clinic HR
‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Sets Alex Karev Farewell Following Justin Chambers’ Exit

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 7 months ago

‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Sets Alex Karev Farewell Following Justin Chambers’ Exit

"Herself after sixteen seasons tonight is Alex Karev farewell on grey's anatomy on ABC some months ago you're in med school being taught by doctors today you the doctor's Alex Karev played by Justin chambers was an original

Grey ABC Alex Karev Justin Chambers
Bulletproof Your Kids Immune System with Integrative Pediatrician, Dr. Joel Gator Warsh

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

09:38 min | 7 months ago

Bulletproof Your Kids Immune System with Integrative Pediatrician, Dr. Joel Gator Warsh

"Dr Joel Gator Wash. Welcome to the brokering podcasts. Thanks so much for having me here and I just want to start off with one thing. You're doing something really cool. I WANNA plug it. Because I'm not a parent yet but I know the first thing is that everybody's always asking me because they know him in this space who's an integrative pediatrician and I know you are here one in La. But there's not a lot of them that are out there the same way that are functional medicine and integrative doctors that are there for like adults. No there's so few integrated pediatricians and so. I hope there's GonNa be more in the future and we're trying to talk more about integrated pediatrics and get more pediatricians involved. But they're just really is very few people. I think there's like three to five in Los Angeles right. Which is crazy. Because there's so many here and everybody's so into all this holistic living in and wellness but anyways what I was leading up to is that you have an online summit coming up. Integrative pediatrics summit it's inaccurate. Integrative PEDIATRICS DOT COM. Just give a quick plug. Because I want people to hear this. I normally get the plugs and but any because there's so few pediatricians and we really want people to work with great practitioners out. Their parents who especially with young children are looking for resources. That are out there. And because there's not that many pediatricians that are available. Where DO I turn? Where do I go to so you have an online summit coming up? When does it happen? And what can people learn from the shore? That's going to be on March. Nineteenth to twenty third it's going to be at integrated pediatrics. Dot Com and we have a combination of top experts. From around the world we have integrated pediatricians. We have experts in various fields. Like homeopathy supplements meditation and we also have a bunch of celebrities as well. Who are interested in being involved From the MOM Perspective or the Dad perspective some of them might have either use integrated medicine for their own families who had kids that were sick or dealt with their own health issues in started really paying attention to this. And that's where I feel like most people get introduced. Integrative medicine is when they've been through the regular system and they get really frustrated with it or there isn't any solutions or all come back normal and so they look for maybe an alternate solution or maybe one of their friends had such a good result from something integrative and so then they start searching it out and then they realize how amazing some of the solutions can be and so that's where people get really plugged integrated medicine and so we're trying to feature that it's going to be a free event online for five days you get to watch everything one hundred percent free. There's no catch and we just want to get the information out there and introduce people to a lot of the integrative practitioners from around the country. Yeah so I don't start off that way but again if you're listening to this you probably are fascinated about that. And that's a great resource. It's free sign up okay. Let's jump in an interview. I will start with Hero's journey we already talked about it. There's so few integrative pediatricians that are out there how did you get into it yourself so for me? I got really frustrated with the regular system. The really short visits just treating antibiotics for everything and my wife was very holistic minded. You grew up in a very holistic family and seeing a lot of her friends go through the medical system for years and really not get better and then maybe to naturopathic doctor or Chinese medicine doctor and get better and to me. That was a lightbulb moment. That said you know. Maybe there's something more we need to learn. I don't WanNa just have to give antibiotics for everything. I WanNa have more solutions that we can do. That are a little bit more natural and gentle on the body and so that really pushed me to start learning about integrative medicine as well. I'm against Western medicine at all. I think there's so many amazing things that we have learnt and we have added through science and research and we have cures for cancer. And we we get sick with pneumonia and we can take an antibiotic can get better so the point of integrative medicine is not to say we shouldn't do Western medicine. You use it when you need it but there's a time and place for everything and and to me. There really shouldn't be the terms integrated medicine. Homeopathy supplements Functional Medicine Western Medicine Medicine. Which do whatever's best on the day and that's really what I've learned through my training. Yeah but sometimes you have to use those terms in the beginning because Just signify to people that you're thinking about a little bit differently so in regards to that thinking prior to meeting your wife how. She had that background where she grew up in a very holistic household. You were saying how did you grow up you know? How is your health like as a child? And what was your opinion on things that are in the space of integrative medicine you know because a lot of young doctors being doctors in my family That are there and sometimes they can have a little chip on their shoulder especially when they're graduated they're done residency either out there in the world and they're like well. I learned everything in the text books that I need to learn. I know it all. And there's no evidence for this. There's no evidence for that so what was your mindset like and how did you grow up and what was your health like a kid overall. I was pretty healthy by definitely was not very integrated minded at all. When I was growing up I grew up in Toronto and so I played a lot of sports. I played a lot of hockey and baseball was on the road for tournaments all the time and did not eat that healthy fast food all the time and I always had stomach issues. I always had stomach aches. Constipation bloating never really made the connection. I just thought it was normal and just dealt with it and as I got older though symptoms got worse and especially during my medical training worth stress was elevated I would have more stomach aches more issues and I never really put that together until after I met my wife and sort of eating some of her food and started seeing the things that she's doing and I started to feel better and that again was another lightbulb. Moment of. Oh maybe we need to be thinking about some of these foundations. Some of these things like our diet and it's it's so obvious that we do but I think we've forgotten about that a lot. We really don't focus on the foundations anymore. We just think about you know you have this symptom take this medication. And that's the way that we learn. Even a medical school is is how to treat something as opposed to for the most part how to prevent it. That's so key. I think you mentioned two important things in that. What you just shared the first thing is that most doctors who are in Functional Medicine Notch about medicine occupier. Whatever the modality might be or in the case of integrative medicine they have often had their own crisis and I think for the generation above us. Because how old are you thirty four? Okay some a little older than you thirty-seven. We're the same generation the generation above us the mark hymens of the world. The Dr Mark Hyman said world and the other Great Doctors Dr Andrew. Weil other people. They had major healing crisis. I mean mark. Dr Mark Hyman talks about a story but he was in China. He got like deathly ill for mercury toxicity. Many other factors is brain wasn't working and I think that as the Internet age has grown and we have more access to this information. We're more open minded. There's been doctors like yourself who just didn't feel well. They didn't feel great like my brother-in-law's a cardiologist and San Diego and he's part of that young doctor trend like you who just weren't feeling exactly that well learned about functional medicine. Integrative medicine made changes to the health and that caused them to think differently when it came to practicing so at that point in time. Where were you in that moment happened? Were you working in the hospital system? Did you have your own private practice? I never had that moment of practitioners. Did I think for me? It was when I was going through residency. Maybe Med school where I just got really frustrated with options available and the really big lightbulb moment for me was the first functional medicine course that I took and just learning things from the other perspective thinking about root cause. When I saw that I was like. Why didn't we learn? Why Am not thinking this way? It's so obvious. Why are we not thinking about? Why you have a rash. Why are we thinking about treating it and when you have a child? Who HAS A bad rash? There's nothing wrong with doing a medication. In that moment to make them feel better but if that rash keeps coming back we need to think. Why do they have their ashes? There's something in their diet. Something in their environment as opposed to just continually treating it and nobody really ever talks about the medical school or residency. Just really learn about the problem and the solution. But that's not the whole picture and so that really push me in the direction of Kenny to learn a little bit more any to think about this a little bit more and as I got into it seeing the success with it seeing how excited people got about it. That to me was what I wanted to start sharing this information. 'cause it's not that common out there there is stuff about adults and there's a little more information starting to come out but there's very little about children and what you can do and even as an integrative practitioner. There's not a lot of resources of how much do you get? I supplement for kids. What kind of supplement? Your dosages can be different. Kids bodies their brains having fully developed their right. It's a lot more subtle. The little things can have an impact on their body can but the reality is kids are so resilient that for the most part of the maybe a little baby. There's no reason why they shouldn't be able to use some of this stuff and do very well with it but the hard part is there isn't a lot of research to back up and when you talk about the medical model most western physicians will come right out and say well. Where's the evidence? Where's the evidence for this? Wears a clinical trial that this shows that it works and there isn't a lot of clinical trials for most of this stuff. There is some evidence for some supplements in some Protocols that you can do but for the most part isn't double blind controlled trials. Because nobody's doing it because you can't really do a double blank controlled trial ginger. Who's paying for that

Functional Medicine Western Me Dr Mark Hyman Dr Joel Gator Los Angeles LA San Diego Pneumonia Bloating Private Practice Toronto Weil Dr Andrew Kenny China Hockey Baseball
A Look Back at HIV

2 Docs Talk

08:31 min | 7 months ago

A Look Back at HIV

"Before we jump in. Let's clarify what exactly HIV and AIDS are good call. Hiv stands for human immunodeficiency virus which is a virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Yes so HIV is a retrovirus which means it is an rn. A virus that is a cellular machinery from the infected cell to do a reverse transcription of itself a DNA version which is inserted into the cells on DNA when the cell becomes active. It will make new copies of the virus that go out and continue the cycle and this is important because the drugs that we use today to combat HIV a variety of antiretroviral agents target different points in the cycle. The right combination of drugs can keep the viral load solo that it isn't detectable exactly so HIV infects a specific immune cell the CD four cell and over time the virus kills a CD foresaw which being part of the immune system plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight infection as de decline. The body becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. Right these are often infections caused by pathogens that are normally present in on or around the body but a healthy immune system recognizes them and keep them in check someone with the depleted immune system however is susceptible to unusual infections. That healthy folks don't need to worry about. Plus they're they're susceptible. To all the irregular infections even healthy people get okay so an untreated course of goes something like this. A person is infected with HIV. The virus being transmitted during sexual activity directly into the bloodstream during childbirth or breastfeeding or a blood transfusion at this point the virus makes its way to the lymph nodes where has access to lots of CD. Four cells and replicates like crazy? This goes on for about three weeks three or four weeks. The patient may experience a viral type of illness during this time period. Fever swollen glands rash but not everyone experiences this yes and it feels like a regular just viral infections. So you don't really think about that. That might be what it is but after about two weeks the viral load in the blood is at a peak and CD four levels fall. This is a period of time where it is really easy to transmit the disease to another sexual partner because the viral load is so high after about six months the viral load and CD. Four count stabilized to set point and the chronic phase issue begins. This can last a up to ten years without treatment during which HIV gradually destroys CD. Four cells at some point the CD four count gets low enough. That opportunistic infections are possible. Yes and that's how we define AIDS either the CD. Four count is below two hundred cells per mil or the patient has an AIDS defining conditions such as retinitis from cmv cytomegalovirus or invasive cervical cancer or many many others so this was the typical course of disease for people early in the epidemic. Did you amy? That AIDS was around before the Nineteen Seventy S. That's when the epidemic began but it is believed that the virus jump from chimpanzees to humans in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in one thousand. Nine hundred and sporadic cases were reported from then until the mid seventies when the epidemic got its legs. Very interesting now. It wasn't until Nineteen eighty-one that we really understood what was happening in. La There were five young gay men who develop Mrs to screen pneumonia PCP which is now new. Mississippi'S VICI pneumonia. I know I can never get used to that. I still call it. Pcp Yeah. I'm sure a lot of school. It was pretty much standard at the time right. I mean that was like defy so defining but anyways another group in New York in California who developed Kassy's sarcoma which is an aggressive cancer caused by the human herpes virus eight that wouldn't normally happen without a suppressed. Immune system right both of those diseases. And by the end of that year there were two hundred seventy cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men and nearly half had died. Yeah that we knew so fast forward. A few years by the end of nineteen eighty five. There were over. Twenty thousand reported cases coming from every region of the world. The virus was officially named in Nineteen eighty-six and in nineteen eighty seven A. Z. T. was introduced. The this was the first antiretroviral drug this drug worked by inhibiting the initial reverse transcription of the virus into DNA. This was a very exciting development because the epidemic was growing quickly. Now there were three hundred seven thousand reported AIDS cases worldwide compared to the twenty thousand. You mentioned just fine. Harsh prior and two hundred and seventy just nine years prior to that. It's impressive how. The pharmaceutical industry kind of ramped up so quickly research development. Yeah and those remember. Those were the reported numbers so they estimated that there were actually a million AIDS cases in another eight to ten million living with HIV worldwide. At that point. So if you're younger just in med school residency right now. It's hard to explain. How unsettling this was that how fast it was spreading right. Yeah and these patients were so sick and dying in such large numbers and there didn't seem to be in and site to the expansion of the epidemic. So there's a lot of fear and misinformation out there the had a policy to not allow those infected with HIV into the country and it was still viewed as a gay disease. So that created a lot of stigma for the LGBTQ community so by nineteen ninety three. There were two point five million AIDS cases globally the US Congress dug in and voted to continue the travel ban. Things are not looking good even with easy. T- which wasn't really panning out as everyone had hoped. And the fact that it was approved at all was questioned by many. Yeah so but in one thousand nine hundred things really started changing. This was kind of a turning point. The first price inhibitor was approved these inhibit the protease enzyme. Which is important in the translation of HIV v? Virus back into Aurigny. Yeah and this was the beginning of Heart H. A. RT highly active antiretroviral therapy and it immediately dropped deaths from AIDS related diseases by at least sixty percent but still there were thirty three million people living with HIV by nineteen ninety nine and fourteen million people had died since epidemic began. Those are huge as is to be expected the UN had to step in and negotiate prices to make antiretroviral therapy available to the people who need it The World Trade Organization that announce the Doha Declaration allowing developing countries to manufacture generic versions of drugs. Go See Fire Dallas buyers club. Yes also yeah so in the two thousands people who needed it weren't getting treatment aids. Was the number one cause of death in sub Saharan Africa. That blows my mind by the two thousand ten. A lot of goals had been set to get treatment where it was needed and have the spread of HIV an organization such as the UN and the World Health Organization and individual government agencies are getting involved at this point yeah the US finally lifted the travel ban for people with HIV treatments that decrease the chance of spread were discovered pre exposure prophylaxis or prep was shown to reduce transmission between male and male sexual partners by about forty four percent. Yeah in two thousand. Eleven research demonstrated that early initiation of antiretroviral treatment reduce transmission to partners by ninety six percent. So this is a real game changer. Because until this time the antiretrovirals weren't started until HIV was had started advancing and causing aids. So this is when they started the treatment early after the infection was discovered and it really changed things as far as transmission. Yeah as related. Deaths fell thirty percent from the peak. Year two thousand five and thirty five million people were living with HIV dramatic slowdown in the spread of the epidemic compared to previous decades. Yeah Okay but now we may find yourselves at a standstill here. We are twenty twenty because the immediate crisis of the wildfire spread and almost certain death is well behind us. Attention has waned key populations that account for over half of new infections are not receiving access to combination therapy and the gap between resource need and provisions as widening. The funding is is shrinking. It's pretty typical right. Yeah as a species. Humans aren't very good at thinking long term. If it's not an immediate threat it's not threat right well. It is a threat to those populations. So there's clearly still stigma that has marginalizing

HIV Aids Nineteen Seventy Partner Pneumonia Immunodeficiency Us Congress Retinitis UN Congo AMY Saharan Africa California MRS Mississippi New York Aurigny
"med school" Discussed on Hi Everybody - A Bad Medicine Podcast

Hi Everybody - A Bad Medicine Podcast

07:51 min | 7 months ago

"med school" Discussed on Hi Everybody - A Bad Medicine Podcast

"Are proud of you right now. Possibly possibly. which was the first I. Yeah. I'd say through the Australia pay the kiss I can't say I. I covered. If someone's using percent a break. I discovered. Human commented fossil. I believe I remember it was Australia newsy by Dr. Documents. Way was talking about something else I have no idea now. One hundred percent you. Dad. But you're also everywhere. You're definitely in an old nokias sixty one I want. Your. Phone that was not a flip. Phone phone. June Cluj. That parenting when he hit one hundred percent break capacity, you end up in full phones but you also crack screen just like we do. A. The movie ended. She ended up in the football and she's everywhere everywhere. I thought it was going to have like. Space. opposite. With her like there was there was so much space. There was a lot of space and then speech became jellyfish she ended in a USB drag. Young. Actually ended up in usb drive a sparkly USB drive actually those Bruce Berkeley. She was able to compress herself into shape that we understood that can be put into a machine could use. That's a lot more. Civically for blue balls detective. Yes I needed and the attacker was real upset with Lucy disappeared. Poor Jimmy is like what platforms can I? Feel. Like it's probably flash so we can't even run lucy anymore. It's true. That's technology moves pretty fast or if you don't stop to look around every once in a while, you might miss. This Johnny. Johnny thank you. Ended with. Joe Hats. That was. knocker movie that was not a great movie. I'm going to take out like a great misery. Doesn't us go to show up like you need to watch it and go. Back to the very first line of the film. which was life was given to us a billion years ago. What have we done with I'm sorry life was given to you four thousand years eight thousand years ago Biblical. But if you're going look I'm already getting letters the science. If you're going scientific bacteria three point five, billion fun Guy Five, hundred, million mammals two, hundred, million. So literally, the first line of this movie was wrong just not manage. Working ten percent of his brain. But it sounded rakes Morgan Freeman it does he no one? No one would act has got bankrupt us. In fact, check as a penguin I gotta be honest. The Penguin isn't he the Voice of the Penguin? March the penguins he's not he's not like playing a penguin. I still wouldn't fact check him as a penguin, my statement, Jolla all. Wang. What what I believe is what? What Type of this. Horrible reference. So. I do have. I'm. GonNa face of shame right now, this is an audio only podcast. You can't see me literally covering my face as I say. I have an important question. And that question is. Big Sigh, but not out SCOFF COUNT IS NASCAR OFF. We had an internal scoff count going as characters graft each other. The human centipede bills itself as one hundred percent medically accurate. If that's the case if that is our baseline. How accurate? Is. Lucy. Ma'am. Are we only using ten percent of our medical accuracy Not, as probably the most fitting number I can give to this this I mean people don't float. Like I saw I gotcha would blame Akif floated. That should have been the end of the movie. Ordinary. Her becoming dust that should have been. There was still like an hour and a half after those things happened the. Crazy. was an hour. Number real reeler. This movie is ninety minutes long and if have years older. Yeah. Here. I got to agree I mean I think. If. You're if you'RE GONNA make the best jokey EST answer it's ten percent it can't it can't be. And even if you think about the medical stuff, the anesthesia with the hover race, it's like anything that is medical. Also immediately IBM where she chugged IV bags through her vein where they also have used basically a. Basketball inflated needle to put an IV into her flora sure. We've seen the. Shooter maybe. To needle. What else everyone getting shot with the brightest red blood and that's a stylistic troy satis that. Day. That's a stylistic choice except for all the other choices they make. But really the biggest sending all of this is the ten percent of the brain kind of thing. Okay. That is the biggest soon, but this is a comedy podcast. Technically. A TV and Film Kingdom to I. Guess. So. If, you weren't going to go just ten because it's the easy answer. I think. The right I think it's the right and it is so great. Generous it's. But if that's based on the human human, saying they're a one hundred percent, which is already wrong. Yeah Right. It's zero saying, Hey, there are people in it and those people drink water. That's some percentage. As one tenth as accurate as a human center that exact and I will say that is true. Okay. Even non jokingly. I think. They wanted to make sure you're taking this seriously because this, you know this is a serious podcast obviously. Taking what seriously Are Highly Scientific and methodological only right that word out. So I don't know how to say. That's right. Yeah. Cool. Evaluation. Of these films I'm glad that we follow the same gravitas that Morgan Freeman approached talking about penguins. Sampras ten percent is now you guys remember the penguin movie. Ten percent will keep me on. That's all.

Lucy Morgan Freeman Australia Cluj Dr. Documents Johnny Bruce Berkeley Joe Hats Jimmy football Sampras Basketball Jolla Wang IBM Akif
Healthy Food=Happy Life Featuring Angela Villa

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

09:43 min | 8 months ago

Healthy Food=Happy Life Featuring Angela Villa

"Today. We're excited to sit down with Angela via to discuss her views on healthy healthy eating and what she does to keep yourself on track. Angela thank you so much for joining us. Today is a true pleasure to be able to sit down with you. Oh sure thing thing. I'm excited to. I'm excited to chat. So what we want to talk about. Today is a really big issue. I think for a lot of people and that is healthy eating. I was doing a little bit of background research. And on the health dot Gov website it talks about how half of all American adults have one or more preventable health issues a a lot of which are related to poor quality eating patterns or low physical activity which is just a huge number. So we want to talk about how people can overcome this and make that change in your life. So what foods should people be eating. That's a loaded question. It's actually true you're right. We we have a problem and there is what I'm learning is. There is a lack of understanding about food and it was that way for me for the majority of my life. I was pushed I was well over three hundred pounds and it was simply because I didn't understand food and the people that were teaching us about food didn't understand food either so I mean I don't know if people notice but doctors get less than four hours. Total of Nutrition Education Med school. So we have a problem right so when asked what should we be eating eating. We tend to look at the the latest guru like what is what does this person promoting or are they promoting high fat low fat high carb. No car no no sugar and we don't really learn what our body does with food so when I just got fed up with the weight issue and all these things turn to learning about wet food does in the body and so when asked what should we be be eating honestly we should be eating foods. That's not true with sugar though so I'll talk about that but we should be eating. All foods is this body was created to be nourished to be in balance and the typical American diet consists of extreme imbalances as we go one way. Really hire the other way and the problem is is that we send our body into massive imbalance and it's really unhealthy. So when you ask what should be eating. I say all foods we should be eating proteins. Our body is literally made of protein and so keeping keeping out of the Diet is an extreme problem. We should be eating fats. Fats are good for our body. We need all forms of Fat Lee. Ho You know all fat not just you. We don't need to stay away from butter or we. Don't you just stay away from whole eggs. We need all forms of fat. We need carbohydrates. I feel like I should say that again because people fight with me on this popular opinion it is. It's a problem because nobody really understands carbohydrates and I like the expert of carbohydrate living I get but now I understand that people are afraid of it because they think that it makes them fat which is so false. Actually nourishes our thyroid's especially Ashley for women. It's really good for the brain. We need it. The problem is that we tend to eat a very har high carb high sugar diet and so then we turn them. We blame carbohydrates for being the problem. And they're they're not they're so good for us so we need to have carbohydrates. I could probably talk more. I could go on and on about Let's see we need to have vegetables and I am the worst with that. have to blend everything because I'm like a two year old and my I don't Wanna eat that. But we do. We need them. They're good for us. They fuel us they give us iron. They give so much benefits for the body to function. Fruits and fruits and vegetables are key we need. We need some dairy not lots of dairy but some I feel like I go against the grain on like the Food Pyramid that the government government puts out. But it's okay right we need. We need to limit some dairies. But it's good for us to an extent so except for sugar honestly sweet. Everything is important to the body. I feel like it was put on this earth to nourish the body that was given to us on this earth so why eliminate anything. That's incredible and I think that's the part that all these fad diets misses that true balance and listening to your body and taking care of it so you mentioned sugar which I think because a big one in people's minds but are there other foods that I should be avoiding or maybe types of foods that we should be avoiding. So here's here's a really cool thing about the body that I learned and that excess sugar in the bloodstream is not a good thing and so if if a if a product says non-fat your body is going join to make that ally because any time there's an excess of blood sugar in the Diet the body will reject something so so. Here's here's what I liked. Here's let's make make it simple any sugar. Your body cannot use turns into fat whether or not the package says fat free or not any sugar. The body can't use turns directly you too fat while in so the first place that insulin wants to go to. So Insulin carries proteins fats glucose through the bloodstream. It's a good thing but we've made it's such a bad thing. Insulin makes us that know. It carries things through the bloodstream. And the first place. It goes to your muscle cells and you kind of think of your muscle cells like like you know the real tidy proper. I don't want to label anything but just librarian title. Once your muscle cells are full. They shut down and they will not open open up. No they want an open up again. But Insulin knows that. Okay if you'RE NOT GONNA go open up for me I'm GonNa go to the party. Animals which are your fat cells. They're open open twenty four hours a day seven days a week and they never say no. That's what we know about fat cells that once they're full they start to duplicate his. You can produce more so we send everything that our muscle cells won't take into our fat cells and there's your problem so when I say. Avoid sugar at all costs. Yeah yeah it's kind of like a drug and so you gotTa look at foods. Anything that's packaged. Fat Free Low fat. I kinda like to tell people that so talk toxic that garbage storm. Don't touch it go to your more wholefoods look at that but besides sugar another thing I teach people to avoid are are your white flowers. Honestly the body looks at that and goes sugar. which are they're basically in everything package thing? It's it's crazy when I got into learning about food and reading labels I was shocked and if you think about sugar it's very very addictive. The more you eat the more you want and so so it just becomes this cycle of. I'm craving sugar all the time. Sugar is not evil if you are willing to listen to your body if you're willing to you know so. Am I really overdoing this as head-spinning does my tummy hurt Our adrenals feeling shot. Most people don't WANNA listen to their bodies they listen to the most marketed fad. Because it's easier right that's our. That's our big problem. If like we're listening to like we're listening listening to people who don't have an education on nutrition or listening to people who maybe did some fat and lost amazing wait or but we're not listening to our body and that's the biggest problem wow that is astounding just to think of the things that people are doing without thought perhaps you know all of these things that are marketed towards us. All these things that we get in everyday everyday life aren't really helping our body. No so you mentioned that. Maybe it's not the easiest thing to do to seek out whole foods to avoid the sugar to avoid the processed food. So so what is the draw. What's the benefit of changing that changing your eating habits and striving to get these better foods in your body so the benefit is there are so many benefits when you start taking maybe it is a more time consuming path? It is I mean but this is your one shot with this body. What are you going to do with it right like treat it right? It's beg like I love teaching the emotional stuff about eating because it's begging every day just to be treated right and so when you start listening to it. One of the biggest side effects of listening and listening to and respecting your body is weight loss without a shadow. Oh have doubt is a huge side effect which is awesome side effect weight loss side effect. I say side effect. But that's the word that most people have signed a positive. The side effect is our skin clears up our ADRENAL start to function. Normally adrenal fatigue is a big. That's a big lake trigger word for for people or not. Maybe that's not the right word but anyway adrenal fatigue is something that's being thrown around a lot. Another great benefit to listening to the body is most most all skin. Conditions can be fixed by putting the right things into your body. You'll actually start to know when you truly are hungry and when and you're just bored you know our body makes all sorts of gurgling sounds and it's supposed to your stomach is gonNA settle. That doesn't mean you're hungry just means that it's settling and other times times you'll start to feel okay. That's not a settling gurgle that is I am starving. I need to eat very I need to honor my body. One of the things I love to say is what's The kindest thing I can do to my body right now now and sometimes it's moving sometimes sleeping most of the time it's eating something that's going to nourish it in a really respectful way

Angela Fat Lee Nutrition Education Med School Ashley
A Functional Medicine Approach to Treating and Healing Acne with Dr. Robin Berzin

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

08:38 min | 11 months ago

A Functional Medicine Approach to Treating and Healing Acne with Dr. Robin Berzin

"So i was one of the lucky ones in high school who never had acne and you know felt like i'd exited that age teenagers unscathed and then i hit medical school and everything unfortunately changed so early in medical school also i was around held was i spent like twenty five because they went to med school a little late i went to undergrad and then i worked for a little while and went back to to school to do my premium ed studies and so i- landed medical school ready to go and over the course of the first year developed really horrible cystic acne and it was super confusing to me like where did this come from i was seen dermatologists we tried the birth control pill we tried sperone unlock tone which is a heart medication heart failure medication and blood pressure medication who's a secondary effect has been discovered to block certain male hormones to block acne we tried that i had peels had creams i had make-up's i had products i had tanning beds i even and at one point had a dermatologist who was injecting my zits with cortisone steroid to get them to go away and that was a really bad idea because when you use steroids on your face especially in an injectable format it actually leads to scarring and so familiar i have a little scar tissue still left over from bad acne and those experiences brady's continue yeah so you've been there and davis has been there i never i never ended up on accutane eventually i do credit the sperone unlock tone with kind of shutting things down temporarily but it really didn't fit six the problem and it was through learning about functional medicine that i learned where the acne came for and i was ultimately able to completely resolve it without any medications peels creams et cetera and that was such an amazing experience yeah wanna unpack doc because this is a topic that so many people have asked us to dive into and i can relate to the story mine is reverse i had really bad acne when i was in high school hey and i want you to talk about how acnes different for men and women mine was pretty straightforward i figured out that i had food sensitivities dairy and also to wheat and around my senior year all the way at the end louis right after prom i was in los angeles for conference in somebody said oh this lecture that i was at sometimes dairy can be inflammatory for some people if they have got issues if they were annabel addicts and they said why don't you try to go dairy free is like my first version of hearing from the limitation diet so i went dairy free for like two months cut out also wheat as well in minimize sugar and my acne completely cleared up and i haven't had a flare up since that time so i can relate but also imagine it's so much tougher dealing with it as an adult because you were like my skin is amazing when i was younger and now all of a sudden it's challenging so what did you find out and help us get a little bit of the lay of the land what is you discover are some of the root causes that are there that could trigger an adult acne or sister doctor yes so there's there's quite a few of them and you and i actually have a lot in common because wheat and dairy ended up being kind of at the core of my expense france and clearing my acne ultimately but it was first of all there's a lot of misinformation out there that hormone uh-huh cause acne and i see this all the time i see women told it's your hormones at your hormones and the reality is that oftentimes it's really not true you can get breakouts before your period because of shifts in the balance between church testosterone and progesterone and so p the who are already acne prone may get that sort of pre period break-up breakout you also can see what i call post birth control pill syndrome where after going off the pill as the female body is resetting hormones going back to its natural menstrual cycle which has been suppressed for however long we're on the pill you can start to see breakouts in somebody acne prone and the reality is though for a lot of these people for whom we blame hormones for acne the underlying cause isn't there hormones at all and if you think about it doesn't make sense because there's plenty of people who have the same hormone ones so the question is why what's the underlying driver and so there's a couple of things that we see driving acne and breakouts in general that really go missed so number one is food sensitivity so i'd eaten meat and dairy my entire life growing up wasn't an surly a help we were a healthy household but we weren't like health foods focused i mean i think about like you know goldfish in twizzlers as being my like after the school snack growing up and so i wasn't necessarily aware of these things and i had no idea that you can become sensitive to a food dude later in life and that was a huge moment because we think oh you're either allergic to something or you're not but these food sensitivities can really develop in for me the food titties had developed in that first year of medical school in a period of high stress so when you're under chronic stress in very high chronic stress psychological stress you actually break down the barrier in the guts you can break down the proteins that hold the cells that line the gut together and you can get something called intestinal permeability and end up developing allergies to some of the foods at your commonly eating that you didn't use to have because all the sudden when that gut barrier breaks down your immune system seventy percent of which is right behind that gut lining living in your gut is only exposed to things at it didn't used to see and you can develop some of these food sensitivities and so when i go back impatience history and i ask a win this acne start you know you didn't have agnew your whole life maybe developed in your teenage years maybe a developed it in my case twenties or as an adult what was happening around that time and oftentimes there there's a there's a trigger it could be a surgery for some people it was an accident or or the loss of someone close to them a major break a major raikov i was in that mode i was going through a really bad break up transitioning to medical school you know having all of those details of like oh my god the next seven years of my life for here and you know but didn't recognize the impact of that stress and in that time developed food sensitivities that ultimately be name the call underlying cause of my acne so the reason that the pills and the prescriptions and the topical in the antibacterial 's didn't work and the steroid injection certainly didn't work was because of the inflammatory root of the acne was coming from the inside and that's what drives me nuts out dermatology general is that were kind of told this myth that oh you can fix it from the outside when generally speaking you have to fix it the inside so going back to the couple of things that we see really commonly driving acne one you see food sensitivities and dairy wheat are the two most common that we see but there can be other ones eggs soy for some people nightshade vegetables so doing these elimination diets and here's the here's the acre people say well i cut that out and i say well how long did you cut it out for and they're like oh week or two we'll takes at least three weeks for the antibodies meaning you're an inflammatory reaction to kind of shut down so if you're kinda sort of eliminating a food or you're only doing it for a week or two you're not going to see that i need clear up and you mentioned you clot out dairy for two months and i for my case when i cut out wheat and dairy i really didn't see the benefits until about week six and that's when all of a sudden everything went away and now all if i really want that pizza like hey i just have to decide a zip worthy because i know what's gonna happen but at least i'm in control

Two Months Seventy Percent Seven Years Three Weeks
"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"You're listening to white coat black art this week a new generation of doctors who connect with their patients better because they come from similar financial and social backgrounds for the past three years the Max Radi College of Medicine at the University of Manitoba Has Been Actively Recruiting Med students from diverse cultural and disadvantaged economic backgrounds this summer they appointed Dr Sarah Goulet a Mateen family physician as associate dean of admissions and Dr Goulet entered medical school at the University of Manitoba in two thousand. She was one of just three with indigenous ancestry. I spoke with her from our Winnipeg Studio Dr Goulet what went through your mind as you're listening to Kate O. I'm so excited to hear that Kate it overcame her fears and applied to Mexico. Many people like Kate who would be excellent community doctors. Family doctors was who we really need. Our healthcare system also are deterred from applying medicine because they're not sure they come with the right attributes. I think our society has classified doctors as having certain positions within within it and I some students they if they don't see themselves within that media kind of portrayed or the the values that they imagine physicians might have they even f they're academically strong are discouraged or fearful fearful about applying and it makes me really happy to know someone like Kate. took that leap and tried and I'm sure she serves serves a group of people who otherwise might not have been as well served because of her experiences in life recently the University of Manitoba Crunch French the data on the typical candidates who tended to be the most successful getting into your medical school. What did they find well. I think they've found owned that and this is not necessarily unique to the University of Manitoba. This was actually something that the American College of Medical Schools Look Dad and found that more so students coming into academic programs and medicine were from privileged backgrounds backgrounds so higher socioeconomic classes with more access to you know not having to work during university parents who could support them and perhaps pay for their tuitions and probably less diverse life experiences. How representative were those medical students of Manitobans in general I think to a certain degree the students in the classes at that time served served a large portion of the population very well. I think for a lot of listeners what I find when we start talking about diversity versity is that there's not an understanding of the need four different types of practitioners with different life experiences because they they feel like the practitioner they have thankfully meets their needs the listeners I would say who know exactly what I'm talking about. When we talk about diversity our city are those people who haven't been able to find someone in the system who they can relate to and who they might be able to share their experiences safely with why is that a problem when you're trying to build a workforce of physicians and other healthcare professionals well having that gap prevents access is to our system so if you're not able to find a healthcare a primary healthcare provider who is able to understand and and deconstruct your story and enter you into the other parts of the system that could be helpful. You're not GonNa get the care that you need and at the primary healthcare provider you see also has to know the barriers that you might face better than you do because patients patients don't know our system and the things that might act as barriers to prevent them from getting care so a simple example of this would be a patient anti recently have had in the hospital who was seen in a primary care clinic didn't have the resources to fill their prescription but wasn't didn't feel safe at the particular clinic to divulge that so left the clinic with symptoms of a urinary tract infection which could have been easily easily treated with a few day course of antibiotics had the patient been able to afford it but instead ended up hospitalized for a few days as needing IV antibiotics for a more progressive kidney infection or pylon nephritis and I think there are clinics and providers providers like kate who might think to ask patients if they can afford their medication but not all care providers have had that experience with treating patients patients who may be from lower lower socioeconomic groups and might not think to ask if that was going to be a barrier we do have some diversities -versities statistics which were published saying that we have about forty three percent of our class who is from a visible visible minority for the first time ever we have fifteen out of one hundred and ten indigenous students that are in our class this year and and we also have a number of students about half that declared that they are from households that had lower socioeconomic status. Are there any groups of physicians that are still under-represented medical schooling your opinion. I think we are like working towards that. I think we we still I'm obviously an indigenous physician and I know that we have some work to do in terms of increasing our number of of indigenous physicians so the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. Has You know one of the outcomes for health was to look at not increasing the number of indigenous providers because we know indigenous providers healthcare providers are more likely to be able to meet the needs and particular zero cultural and spiritual needs of indigenous patients that can be very challenging because particularly for students from northern isolated rural and other areas. We have trouble getting the students to get into streams that allow them to apply so so we still are very much messing a number of first nations and you eat students who we would like to see as practitioners being unable go to the table to apply to medical school and so the university we talk a lot about what kind of and this is a poor phrase but we call it pipeline projects or or ways to create streams for indigenous students to make it to the table to apply and and finally there there. There's a tendency to think in terms of winners and losers when it comes to places a medical school that having a medical students. I'm from more diverse backgrounds means fewer students from privileged backgrounds and whatever one thinks of that why is having a diverse health professional workforce force a good for everyone while it's really important as a physician and a health care provider in general to have you know certain academic. Sadak attributes I think patients are asking for healthcare providers who also have non-academic attributes which allow them them to feel safe heard and providers with empathy professionalism sympathy and that can hear their stories so I think the university is trying to shift in response to what patients are asking for in terms of healthcare providers and in the end those patients will be more likely to trust their healthcare providers with their stories and their lives yeah. Thank you for speaking with us. Oh well thank you for having me for generations. Medical schools have recruited students who are smart now. They're also looking for future doctors for a wise the ways of the world and that means the next generation of physicians will be much more diverse a group that includes more people like Kate Payne San brings a wealth of practical experience to the job and if recruiters get things right serving patients better will be privileged all those new doctors will we'll have in common wherever they come from. I look forward to working alongside them. That's our show for this week to to let us know what you thought of the program email us at white coat at CBC DOT CA or post to our blog at CBC dot ca slash white coat. I'm on twitter at night shift. MD and the show is at CBC White Coat. We're also on facebook to listen anytime download the CBC radio APP or the Radio player Canada APP our podcast it is available at subscriptions dot CBC DOT CA on Itunes or wherever you obtain your podcasts and if you're looking for the latest in health news and analysis subscribe to second opinion at subscriptions dot CBC DOT CA coming soon. I'll be visiting Chemphil just outside of Ottawa where lime disease is common yet. Doctors have a hard time recognizing it. Just ask Andy Green. WHO's five year old son chase had to be hospitalized after coming down with line. They want it to wait for the lime test results again he had never seen a rash like this wasn't a typical bullseye didn't look like lyme disease to him either. We were sent home again by the afternoon. He was playing on the floor. He crawled across the floor onto the couch screaming that he didn't feel well and that he had a really bad headache. he had had a stiff neck. The entire the time the stiff neck was getting worse at that point a word. We're at that point very very worried egon open his eyes. He was photosensitive. The tears were pouring down his face. He was was not well at that point where do next straight to to you the triage nurse luckily or unluckily has a wife that was suffering from chronic lyme. Aziz and he rushed to the Er doctor and got us into a room right away. That's coming soon on white coat black art. This sweet show was produced by Jeff goods with help from SOGETI. Berry digital producer Ruby wease the rest of our digital team. Our senior producer is Donna Dingwall. That's that's medicine from my side of the Gurney. I'm Brian Goldman see next week.

Kate University of Manitoba white coat CBC DOT CA Dr Sarah Goulet CBC White Coat Kate O. American College of Medical Sc Winnipeg Mexico Max Radi College of Medicine producer Kate Payne San urinary tract infection Brian Goldman Mateen MD family physician
"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Me how you did it. I remember went in my interviews. DASHA have a lot of stations where they're put into real life situation how to counsel a a patient a stressful situation and I remember there's one station there was into your he. Ashley asked me what drawing to medicine. We'll come population do you you. WanNa work with and when I explained to him like where I came from I wanna work was in the city population and was people who don't have all the ability to really get good medical. Nicole care as being able to really connect with him and made impression upon the interviewer and also I think because I underwent even though I was into was only nineteen eighteen back then give him a life sentence moving to Canada was thirteen. I do know award English nor French and working two jobs while studying a high school full-time time may be very calm under pressure so even though there's a lot of stressful situation I mean I was able to rain very calm and respond appropriately and also I guess during residency even get criticism. I take it essentially as a constructive feedback and I said there's no pointing ruminating about what I do wrong. Let's focus on what I can do better and become a better doctor for my patients. Where do you think that comes from. I guess because of one seventeen I decide to apply to medical school. I realized that don't really really have the means and my chances were pretty low so I said even though I know in my head is GonNa fail and get devastated. be prepared for the worse. Consequences always have plan B. in case you finally got into medical school and I want to know what what did you notice about your classmates to be honest. I had trouble fitting in to medical school because I realized most people are not who look like me. Oh sound like me. Oh have moderate experience. Just give example. Would you probably House lecture and my probably House Staff. Physician was talking about Welfare Welfare and childcare causing Kinda. If you don't make money they supplement for each child around five hundred six hundred dollars and she was asking so. You have a single monster for years old She only makes this much money. Can she get any benefits so I raised my hand. I said Shank Canadian child benefits and I think everyone was looking around me because nobody knew that was option. And how the heck did you know the answer to that question. Did you share your background with your classmates so I did sure my background was my classmates and I think a lot of being very supportive and they're not very judgmental pricing some semi custom with some PD in there is 'cause they're saying oh I feel body had to go through San Rec- welfare when you were young but I don't see us a negative experience I think when you come from different non traditional background than going into medicine and was all the obstacles Yasha. May you a better person better the physician because you can really understand your patients. Better is different teaching medical students about what is like to be poor was like not your four medication was like Bob being able to put food on your table honor. Stand award your doctor said than real live so the expense so you can actually provide better care to patients yeah yeah. I'd be really pissed off. Somebody pitied me. If one of my classmates pity me yeah but do you mind medical school. I think it was kind of difficult to fit in but I found and my a few good friends I was able to connect with but now my friends really came from the same background None Sasha to none must've only sometimes. I didn't feel lonely because I think was able to connect with my friends at classmates on different level but I think it's as you've just may realize how hard it is to get medical swing Canada. If you don't come from a family dot Ku Sapporo financially and socially to get you connected to football and tearing off were take the semester off to study and I think I personally feel very strongly about having diverse team medicine and I really see a difference that you makes was the most one of a population of people in the rural communities That's why I feel very strong about it now that you're a resident at Saint Michael's Hospital in downtown Toronto. How does is your experience growing up affect the way you're conducting your residency. I think while the Komo see from reser is like I'm really being a good advocate for my patient and they also noticed like have a good personal connection to my patients because when my patient of renewable they say I really can't afford this medication are they show up an hour late. always tried to for them and I always try to see what extra benefits Co.. I could get them 'cause my solving golfing benefiting from Canaan Welfare system and you how the system works. I was able to hold my patients to get those benefits and also you will know sometimes have they don't really show up as expected and everybody judge them and say. I'm really happy to see you again. I show up today. Yeah I'm hearing as is where where often in the healthcare system one of the watchword phrases for handling patients were laid is tough love. yours is is give them a break yeah. I very I have really really enjoyed speaking with you and I look forward to watching in your career grow and I hope you'll come back to the show me to thank you for having me. Nice to speak with you. Dr Goldman please call me Brian. kate pains plans on advocating working with some of the most marginalized patients in society including people who live in inner cities homeless people as well as refugees and emigrants..

Canada Ashley Nicole care House Staff Bob Komo San Rec Toronto Sasha Dr Goldman football Saint Michael's Hospital Brian. kate five hundred six hundred dolla
"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"This is a CBC podcast. I'm Brian Goldman. Welcome to white coat black art the the show about medicine from all sides of the Gurney there you go. We've got it okay so what Jeff Breakfast Noodles Noodle Sank Coffee Yogurt Yogurt. My parents came to visit me this Marine Charro when they're over. They make noodles for breakfast. She gets your quota of noodles in the rest of the time when they're not here. Is it eight serials croissants but that's Dr Kate. Payne San Kate went to med school at McGill University Montreal before moving to Toronto to start a family medicine residency at Saint Michael's hospital sounds pretty typical but kate's path to becoming a doctor has been anything but for one thing when Kate was in high school she was also wonder for families key breadwinners contrast that with two thousand fifteen Canadian survey which found the close to two thirds of First Year Med students come from families with an annual income greater than one hundred thousand dollars. That's forty percent more than the average Canadian family and some are saying those middle and upper class newbies at little in common with some of their patients who are far less fortunate and that can make them less likely to fully understand and empathize with their challenges which is why there are growing calls to recruit young doctors from backgrounds as diverse as the patients. They treat recently. I spoke to kate about about her long. An improbable journey to becoming a doctor Kate Pains on welcome to Waco Placard. Thank you a lot of future future. Medical students are spending the summer doing volunteer work some of them in other countries. They're going to summer school. They're bolstering. Their applications wants to get into medical school. Your summers were different. What did you do so while I was in high school and was in Stage IV because I've found Kevin Doc. I remembered because it didn't come from a privileged family so most of the summers when I was doing I was working fulltime and remember as Song Point Point. I was having to full time job positions. During the summer. I've been working at retail shop also work as a personal healthcare attendant two fulltime jobs yeah the the reasoning is I was helping my family. I'm glad to Kinda was thirteen and my dad he was doing a master. we're living a family of three living on his twelve thousand dollars scholarship grant. You wasn't enough to make the ends meet and also my sister. It was boy in West so we have felt like I had more responsibility. Take Care of my family financially financially so when you were working a lot of a a lot of students here who were born here who come from say middle-class CIRMAC around they would they might be saving up for their own education. They might be saving up to travel where did you where did the money that you earn go. I think what I did was when I received my salary. I put into my parents account so they could pay the rent and the food and didn't really travel nor have I travel probably very far to be honest in my life so what was the moment that you decided to become a physician so my Mahala health complicate okay pregnancies so my sister was born premature thirty three weeks so she was any coup for at least a month to two months I think that was a very stressful period. Eric my time 'cause I was finishing up high school and my parents they couldn't really come when Kate very well with the physicians know was a nurses and remember had to miss schools while I was seeing highschool everyday to go to nick to talk with physicians. I updated the NICU intensive care unit. Yeah and I see like I think so physician like they're very understanding. Remember was my mom going showing up at her family. Physicians Post for Postpartum Visit son has we arrived late but she will always fit us in even though route arriving elite I think sometimes when when you have trouble making ends meet worrying about how can pay the rent pay for baby clothes showing up on time and Dr Doctors Healthcare Appointments. Oh you notice on some who is not the first priority. I remember the family doctor. She never blame us and she would say like I'm happy guy show up today. And how can I help you. She empathized with you she did and I think given that I come from war immigrant background first generation immigrant and also came from a family where we are live on welfare. I think I'd that'd be wander standing of patients when they couldn't make it on time owain their house their priority that have a lot of complications those when decided to probably I should try medicine as the point and decided you said you lived on welfare will evolve Alpha given what family of four was still living on my dad's twelve thousand dollars a year tough Elza and even I try to work a lot during the summer and during the school year was enough and I gather in your in were you were you came from in your country of Origin Your Dad. Your family wasn't living on welfare worthy. no won't in China my dad. He worked for governmental company who are not living welfare so why came to Kinda was very shock. I see the difference of being a AH privileged perspective and being underprivileged perspective is very different. Kate pains perspective. There's a relative rarity in today's schools. A lot of medical student wannabe spent cash on things like courses that prep them to score high on the medical college admission contest or mcat including travel costs and then there's the practice of creating the perfect resume it typically includes volunteer work as well as unpaid research work for Kate. All of that was hard to do when she was working to help her family buy groceries. You talked about being a personal care attendant. You said you also worked in retail. I think those experiences are not tradition value by medical school experience but I think I learned are lot Friday because we interact with a lot of clients and also like I was studying full time so allow me to be Reno how to manage my time very well and DOPP to a lot of stressful stressful demands all at once and demanding clients demanding demanding purchasers yeah. I I was a golf caddy. One summer I sold Bingo cards. I helped set up rides at the Canadian National Exhibition and worked in what these two K. Land. I used to work on the kids merry-go-round. Do you think that your retail background gave you any advantages when you were trying to get into medical school and when you when you went through it I think the advantage is really really struck. Rukmini was when I was in clerkship ending residency. I think sometimes patients when you don't understand what's going on. The can be really easily. Get frustrated and and say I'm not saying you're good doctor. I WANNA see more competent. Instead of getting flustered and panic are just rang calm and I tell the patient expand them in simple words and apologized for what probably misunderstood and I think I was able to deal with more difficult patients famous in residency I have a lot of complex patients who sons have a bit higher demands. That's all my colleagues. They say I don't want to deal with this patient but I was able to take those difficult patients agents on because actually teach me a very good life lessons a hundred really be a better doctor for them. And how do you talk to them so they can understand. What's going on at the moment you you decided that you wanted to try to get into medical school? you're facing a lot of obstacles. I was fixing lot offset ghost remember. I told my Dad I want to apply to medical school. He said all that's a good aspiration and give it a try but mixture we have backups because because I think a AH while I was browsing through this websites I think I was in what the websites message portrayed they were looking for. our the different how how did you you see the different from from the medical students as projected on those websites had looking for some who have academic attributes which rights certainly do have but who had lot well rundown life experiences but I think live extremely volume or by volunteering having a lot of research done and being the leader as you would have loved to have some hobbies like playing piano. Go play karate or go to Africa to help those several country kits by. I just didn't have the means so tell.

Payne San Kate Kate Pains Brian Goldman Marine Charro Jeff Breakfast Africa Dr Doctors Healthcare Appointm Kevin Doc Toronto Waco Placard China West McGill University Montreal Canadian National Exhibition Eric Reno Saint Michael Rukmini
The Murder of Buzz Clinton

True Crime Brewery

12:43 min | 1 year ago

The Murder of Buzz Clinton

"And carpenter was the achiever in her family. She got her law degree from a prestigious college at made plans for successful life but beth's little sister kim had a more difficult and far less charmed life was unemployed divorced and living as a single mob up by the time she reached her twentieth birthday after kim's divorce beth and kim's parents took over much of the character his trial rebecca so they had a lot of control over are there granddaughter's life until him met and fell in love with anson buzz closeted now buzz was an exotic dancer with a reputation as a real party guy he he moved from one job to another so needless to say the carpenter family did not approve of him beth carpenter us turn allen skills as an attorney journey to help her mother sue for custody of rebecca but buzz really shocked everyone when he acted as kim's attorney and one the custody case or rebecca rebecca would remain in the custody of kim although she was living in a converted tool shed with buzz. The matter of rebecca's custody became a really volatile issue. Oh tearing the carpenter family par then bus told his mother that he wanted to move came in rebecca away with him to arizona. He was found shot to death just just weeks later at first police believed that buzz had gotten himself killed in iraq dispute as the truth came to light however conspiracy to murder buzz clayton god led by beth. Ed carpenter was exposed so join us at the quieting today for ambushed the murder of bus clinton. This is a story of control paul hashing enrage which left a young father and husband dead and his family completely often greece who ran a dirt connecticut beer today this is when i don't think of the style before this is liberator double bock a double back beer brewed by thomas brewery and feel connecticut. These spears on the new not very alcoholic did not hop to the gills just pretty pleasant years sweet tasting. This is dark beer. Listen redness around the edges is a medium sized hand head leaves. A little bit of lace. Aroma is roasted mop. Some fruit and the taste is very nice coffee dark coffee espresso some chocolate and raisin. This is a pretty rich neil neil yeah but this is a very good beer relaxed and say sell it could be a meal in a pinch could yeah. You're not a fan of raisins in anything but i guess it's just a tactic touch. I'll give it a try. We're and i've heard a couple of physical bottles to their five hundred milliliter bottles those negative swing time to the auckland yet who also i got a few of those. We'll take him down to the end and share around all right. Let's open it up. Okay okay. Let's get to the quiet we are. She is two guys down here at the other end of the bar. Quiet draper's recall that exactly get an boisterous guns. You don't don so. Let's start with the story. Anson clinton third also not his buzz was born in nineteen sixty six his parents buck tuck in d. were young and been married for about a year and they lit with bucks paris and decided that her baby boy needed nickname like his father. You're his book was also an anson and that's a family name that had been passed down through generations so between the two of them they decided to call his son buzz which turned out to be a pretty apropos nicknamed flung conceit buzzed appear student pretty much from the start school at diagnosed with dyslexia. It isn't third grade got enrolled in a public school special education program to help with meeting at their little chance of him being a scholar the school. I think he had any desire to be a scholar. No i dropped out of high school the second half of the senior year you you get that far. Can't you finishing issue diploma. It's not what was going on later. He did eventually get his g._e._d. Now in-school glow he'd been very good wrestler. He's a small larry. Panicking so restless goody <unk> gymnastics as father was a high. I school wrestling coach and he encouraged us this future messenger. There isn't really in probably the best you can do is get a scholarship ship to a big wrestling school that like we said he wasn't a scholar wasn't interested in school right right so he's out of school for house d._j. Meagre random using that business name rent. The bus entertained yeah but when the d._j. Business didn't take off. He decided for a while to follow aw father's footsteps as a union ironworker he got work in different parts of connecticut and even iowa but when the steel industry came on in hard times plus was without drought it moved back home with his mom and dad did jobs he became quite the party guy got a reputation as someone like a to exaggerate. He began to drink and use drugs to excess. I nineteen ninety and his mom and dad knew it was a problem. He was spending a lot of time. In the local. Oh bars when he was in his early twenties. He moved out on his own a few times but he just returning to the family hall he was a good looking guy very small and compact but it kind of above jonas face so when he was offered a job as an exotic dancer has decided to give it a try he'd been working as a mechanic connect and a tow truck driver but the work wasn't steady. The dancing was just a few times a month at a local bar and no experience was necessary. Say didn't didn't have to be like a professional dancer news of a good vibe yeah he was in shape and he just had stripped out new g. straight in kind gyrate around in women would give dollar bills so it was pretty good money compared to what he was making it most of his other jobs in ninety two buzz had been dancing ladies eighties night on a semi regular basis and then one night can cartner came into the bar she was with a group of girlfriends and buzzsaw her and they made eye contact so when he was finished dancing the night he approached cam and started chatting with her. Him was pretty shy but she liked buzz right off. They were both twenty any six of the time. Him got married right out of high school. In that marriage had ended badly less was really sweet to her. He cock lament her and destroyed her like a princess princess. He was instantly really taken with her which surprised people because she wasn't like other girls that he dated as this good looking guy china dancer had plenty of opportunities to hook up with a lot of attractive women but kim seem special to him and kim in her two year old daughter rebecca. We're living with kim's peres since the richard carpenter had this time when she met buzz and so when she is growing up him doing fewer especial and some people would later compare her childhood to the fairytale cinderella her big sister beth was the daughter could do no wrong and kim seeing credit doing anything anything right kim's none. Cynthia was a college grant into father on and worked in his own landscaping business. This is after he spent twenty some years. The serbs now kim was boiling finicky neria p._k. You nancy inborn error of metabolism that results in decreased metabolism of the amino acid fennel -ality so it's untreated were inadequately treated can lead to intellectual disability seizures and other mental disorders. Now is a diet to prevent these problems so is a lesson in p._k. You okay so the era in this people are p._k. You lack an enzyme that converts fennel alan into tyrosine and because of this is as we said visitdell nepomuceno al anon which always issues basically you'd put the person on a low protein or low fennel allen in diet the should've okay right and that's been proven that the earlier you initiate the diet and better you here to the diet that the outcome is so used to dome and i'm not sure what stunned these days the the formula that was used because they couldn't use regular farmyard rescue was a diet on the law and fennel allen his canola very original name and what used to be the thought was that once the child's brain was mature. You didn't really need to hugh to the diet that much. That's wrong to be on a diet for life. Forever is what's going to happen off the diet this i._s. Damage so you'd know it rains mature that says i stood in a lose some parts sinai actively. Yes definitely let scary so you need to be on a diet particularly as you have p._k. You and you're pregnant. You're absolutely still be on a diet. Who's you can really cause problems. Shoes fetus well. Rebecca did have some issues so i don't know if that that was the problem or not if can wasn't sticking to the diet it could have been has dante rebecca some issues. You know she wouldn't pass p._k. You on tour because as a recessive trait so we know that rebecca would be a carrier she had to be she wasn't could be affected blessed to metabolic screening and even at the time rebecca was born the metabolic screening in connecticut and they live pick that up at birth reassuringly after his big thing. Is this what led the original metabolic swing was for p._k. You got your test and grew into that those details and now he added a bunch of different tasks onto that in ice out. He's still call the p._k. Your metabolic scream mr couple dozen disorders that can be tested for so what i'm saying is if kim was an honor p._k. You die. I issues pregnant her. That could cause a problem. Okay all right so kim did graduate from high school and then she waited tables at a local oh restaurant she ended up marrying a physically abusive alcoholic then she filed for divorce while he was in jail in august of nineteen ninety he can give birth to rebecca and afterwards she lived at home with her. Mom and her mom took a lot of the responsibility of taking care of the baby. Kim wasn't and always the most responsible parent but she did love her daughter and her mother became very attached to rebecca so in kim decided to move out. Cynthia had a really hard time signed with us. She actually wind cantu. Leave her daughter behind with her. Euros discussed for well yeah so kim's sister beth and carpenter was was really the families golden child in many ways to sit the dick. Van was just perfect. She was like a female opie from the andy griffith show with blue eyes pale white skin. She had this thick really gorgeous dark. Red colored hair really stands out by the time she reached high school. She made up her mind to go to med school so she knew she was exceptional and was doing well shoes. The firstborn as you said the golden child yeah there was just no chance even without disabilities that can can really live up to this. It would be a tough position to be in for anyone but kim was born three years after <hes> beth anne and she was kind of the happier more carefree sister but her parents really didn't expect much of her. She wasn't a student at the same level as fat but she did want to go to beauty school and become a hairstylist then fifteen when kim was a high school sophomore beth then left home for college. Bethune was enrolled at george washington university as about me major.

Rebecca Rebecca KIM Beth P._K Beth Carpenter Connecticut Anson Clinton Ed Carpenter Richard Carpenter Cynthia Murder Arizona Wrestling Attorney Iraq Thomas Brewery Greece Andy Griffith Inborn Error Of Metabolism
"med school" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

Medicine ReMixed

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Medicine ReMixed

"Lot of people you can ask him. If people who met me in my first year of college kind of I wrote on the wrong way and it was in part because I think I was unsure as to how I was going to continue being who I was being who I wanted to be in the environment but I always had this idea of. I'm representing this place and these people you know where I come from and I'm bringing them with me and my hope is that once I get to where I'm going. They will also follow. You know there was always that kind of idea. I'm not just here to play around. I'm really here for the education to make connections but also there are people back home. There are people in that. I haven't met that are not in my home but you know something like that. I want to see me and be able to say I want to do that. So it sounds like a little bit of both a little bit of play of you learning your place and trying to figure out who you wanted to present. You wanted to be the thing that you remember Steven Right okay. Well say basketball. You know so I ran into a situation where I was in one of our. Pbl's small group learning problem based learning. And it's basically you know. Ten People Can Med students. And we're basically teaching each other. That's the way it works. You know for the first two years of mental. You have these classes and I had a a running with a when the instructors who is leading the class I said something I was doing my learning objective thing. I was presenting to the Class. And he stops and he asked the class. Do you guys understand him. I thought to myself. Oh what did I say that? He would prompt him to ask him kind of that kind of tone. Do they understand me? And this was first year. So I'm wearing like my allergy genes. I'm GonNa you know a starter jacket and I got like California. Angels Kaplon backwards to start a jacket inside so so so anyway. I'm sitting there and I'm I'm looking at the faces of all the people in class and I'm trying to figure out like what did I say I know for sure. I didn't start the presentation with Yoyos up. Here's my you know it wasn't like that. Yeah so Kinda let him go and everybody said yes they all understood and then proceeded literally exactly what I said which confused me more because and I thought what did I say. I thought that's exactly what I said. So anyway he repeats it. I was the last person to go so after that. Okay any questions. No he gets up and leave and I stop. And there's this kid drew and I drew a just between unite. What what is happening? And he goes dude. I have no idea rounding you likes you and I said all right so it's not just me like no. He repeated exactly what you said. I'm kind of confused. I said okay so You know a day pass and then the day after that we we have the classic and and I see him and the same thing happens and I turned him and say Dan. Do you have a problem with me? Like you have very uncomfortable right and I said I don't mean to be rude because I'm uncomfortable around you so it's wrong of me to think that you don't have the right to be uncomfortable around me comfortable. That's fine but if you have something against me at a person you need to separate that from me the student because I don't want this to affect migrate. And he didn't like that and kind of me that he was his German dude so I don't understand what he was talking about. He said something. It was inappropriate what I was doing. Whatever and then so I got last. I think what you're doing is inappropriate so my point is after all this happens we just kind of brush it off and the other kids in the class. Sammy listen if you WANNA take this. Collect the honor board who says like our school court. We're behind you fucking take this to the honor board. Get Out of here so now. I'm really self conscious about it because I'm walking into class and I. I'm not talking to anybody. I don't know these people. I don't WanNa know these people. I was in the sort of mind frame where we're from different places man and had so many little interactions with students. Where they'd say? Oh you clean up well and had to wear a tie. What am I fucking Hobo? Where would you find me on the street and like I said no no no exactly? That's not what I meant but so I would just give them that look and then I had those conversations where other med students would come to me and say. Oh what's your portfolio. Look like fuck folio video and this kid says all. Your parents don't buy stocks and I was like now. Do My parents don't buy any stocks and he's like. Oh did this is ridiculously in a different world is kid is from. He says to me. Oh your parents stock well. You should really talk to them. They should buy stock. Now's like I know what stocks are conversations ads. Yeah so this is offer she right so I'm thinking like man I really don't like this place so I just stopped talking to people I was like. I'm not going to stand where I'm from. I don't understand what you're going to get through MED school and get out so somebody's rumors started that my dad was a plastic surgeon. Some girl came up to me because at this point people wanted to know me but I wasn't making myself available so these rumors are just start right. So this girl says Oh. You'd ads in plastics right and I was like yeah. Dad's plastic so that perpetuated in for another good year and a half that. My Dad was a plastic surgeon. And all this stuff so distant from everybody and Steven comes up to me. This was years like two or three years after that and says something. We're talking something about clothes. And he's like yeah. Your wardrobe will change. What are you talking about like it'll change you? You'll change it? Why would I change it to change? Yeah I thought the same thing like I came in here with my Jay's arms and everything and but you learn that you can't be that guy and I remember thinking like fuck you man fuck you first dog yoursel out already hate you because I live in a big house where I dress a certain way. Or maybe it's because I like Barry Minimum even Barry White and then I found out from pretty well off family reunion. I wouldn't consider him a friend but beef with the guy also from different places but he was black and I think wore the black on him. People look at me and expect me to be that black but he was like the white is black guy. I had ever mentioned growing up where you did have made you a little but the whole thing apportion. Can you look at even? That's almost a little racial to say. What does it mean to be a white black but in the context of where people looked at him expected him to be that other kinds of blackout instead the educated Black Guy? That didn't want people to now that he was the educated black. I really wanted as much as you can get without actually having to be from the hood type of guy so it was a weird sort of way realize. Wow what exactly is my role in this that when people look at me and my Spanish Kim I am I that guy and it really started to bug me because then then I started to better understand Whether I like it or not. I'm representing a lot more than just me. You know whether I want that to be the case or not. That's what it's going to be so It was a burden man because another time. Pb L. Seventy said. No no David said that people in those neighborhoods and I'm sitting right there and I stopped in those. Yeah and I said I. I am not representative for poverty known. What are you talking about? Isn't that what you said? Yes that's an awful thing to say man. I told you what I know. I told you. What my experiences. That's not represent.

Steven Right basketball Pbl Pb L. Seventy California representative Dan David Barry White Jay Barry Minimum
Mystery of Racist Photo in Governor's Yearbook Left Unsolved

Business Beware

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Mystery of Racist Photo in Governor's Yearbook Left Unsolved

"The mystery of whether Virginia governor Ralph north of was actually in a racist med school yearbook photo will remain unsolved for now an investigation that was ordered by the eastern Virginia medical school, failed to determine whether the governor actually is one of the people in the photo, which was in the schools nineteen Eighty-four yearbook. It showed a man in frac face alongside someone in a Ku Klux Klan hooded rope been hat was one of those. Those investigating no individual that we interviewed as politics from personal knowledge that the governor is in that photograph when the photo appeared in February north and I said he was in it and apologized for it the next day, he recanted the statement

Ku Klux Klan Eastern Virginia Medical Schoo Ralph North Virginia
It's a terrible week for all 3 of Virginia's top elected officials

The Ray Lucia Show

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

It's a terrible week for all 3 of Virginia's top elected officials

"Now all three of his top elected officials are battling controversy. Attorney general Mark herring. Is now apologizing for wearing black face when he was a nineteen year old university of Virginia student. He says he and his friends dressed up as rappers at a college party in nineteen eighty in a statement, he apologized saying he is quote, deeply sorry for the pain that I caused with this revelation. He says it's not a reflection of who he is nearly forty years later. He had already called for governor. Ralph Northam to preside over a racist photo in his med school yearbook and the women accusing Virginia's Lieutenant governor of sexual assault is now talking in a statement by her lawyer, Dr Vanessa Tyson outlined, the events of the two thousand four democratic national convention. She says Fairfax exp-. Post himself and forced her to perform oral sex.

Dr Vanessa Tyson Mark Herring Ralph Northam University Of Virginia Attorney Virginia Assault Nineteen Year Forty Years
"med school" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Indicates seventy six percent approved of the president's speech. A greater number of those who watched said they were Republicans CBS's Steve Futterman has more on how the president's political critics or seeing things after the president spoke. The democrat response was delivered by Georgia lawmaker Stacey Abrams and she went after Mr. Trump under the current administration. Far too, many hard working Americans are falling behind Abrahams blamed the president for causing the government shutdown shutdown was a stunt engineered by the president of the United States. And she said that Trump tax plan rigged the system against working people. Rather than bringing back jobs. Plants are closing layoffs are looming. She does not want Mr. Trump to fail. But we need him to tell the truth, South Korea. Today is expressed optimism about the summit. Mr. Trump announced with North Korean leader, Kim Jong Hoon except for the end of the month in Vietnam. CBS news national security contributor. Michael morale says since the first summit North Korea has not made clear strides toward denuclearization. We know that they continue to do activities on the ground to advance their program and sanctions have weakened as other nations have loosened the restrictions and most importantly, Kim has a seat on the stage. So what the president has to do with the second summit is has to incentivize or make clear that he's got to move towards negotiations. Well, there's an investigation at eastern Virginia medical school, which is now at the center of a political firestorm. A racist photo in the schools nineteen Eighty-four yearbook threatens to bring down Virginia governor. Owner Ralph Northam he has resisted loud calls for his resignation school president, Dr Richard home. We all recognize that racism has end discrimination has no place in our society and certainly not in a health sciences institution in two thousand fourteen yearbook program was ended after photos the year before showed some students in confederate uniforms nine of north med school classmates. Say in a letter, they do not believe he ever engaged in promoted tolerated or condoned racism. It's four minutes.

president Mr. Trump Kim Jong Hoon Abrahams Ralph Northam CBS north med school Steve Futterman eastern Virginia medical schoo North Korea South Korea Stacey Abrams Virginia Michael morale United States Vietnam Georgia denuclearization
Virginia governor apologizes for racist photo but resists growing calls to quit

Purity Products

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Virginia governor apologizes for racist photo but resists growing calls to quit

"Virginia democratic governor. Ralph northern is apologizing for being part of a racist yearbook photo one thousand nine hundred eighty four it is asking for a chance to regain the public trust. We get more from correspondent Jackie Quinn democrat. Ralph Northam took office in two thousand eighteen and is now facing a political crisis over a med school yearbook page from nineteen Eighty-four which shows two people one in black face one in a Ku Klux Klan costume. And he admits that one of them is him. I am deeply sorry. I cannot change the decision. I made our can I undo the harm my behavior calls then and today among those calling for his resignation the head of the N double ACP some democratic presidential contenders. A number of state lawmakers and some celebrities, but nor them on Twitter vowed I'm ready to do the hard work of

Ralph Northam Ku Klux Klan Ralph Northern Jackie Quinn Twitter Virginia
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"But you have so much life to live. I want you to move to a big city Sheva Chicago's third largest city stays with the metropolitan area. Having to think about. Doesn't move to Brussels. Small on him. Even though he lives in not sin. Does not prove to you that I've I've really care for the fact that you're calling us right down. You're talking to us right now proves that you're thinking about alternatives that you're thinking whether or not you should be with them, and it is a long distance relationship. And like you said, you're only twenty three and it's it's a nine not a ten. What is he thinking right now? Yeah. Good question. Can I mean, he really cares about me as well? And he he watched to make time for me. But physically he feels like he can't. And I think it's causing him to be even more Streit's, which me feel even more bad. So it's kinda like this cycle of. I'm just weeding. You know, he's done with this. So that he can have more time for me, and we can, you know, be together physically and just. Have you guys? God have you guys been arguing about this? Or in terms of like spending time. We've been talking I wouldn't say arguing, but it has been a topic of this session. It sounds like you guys to talk about this a lot more. Yeah. I mean, I think at the end of the day that will inform you where to go is. Yes. Need to communicate you both. I think you both need to figure out what you both really want right now or sucking through his fucking ass to the curb. That's literally the opposite of what we suggest. I mean, I can't think of anything more one hundred eighty degrees like diametrically opposed to. The nuanced advice. Always attempting. Rebecca, this is getting a lot of conflicting things right now. I'm so sorry. It has been one of those nights. And trust me. We are really trying our first call was really really hard. And I think we're still reeling from that to be honest. So here's what we're gonna do right now is we're going to go. I think we have to go. But Rebecca you guys need to talk. Right. Ken. They need to they need to talk. Right. Well, she says she didn't say that. Anyways, rebecca. You please Email me. And let me know what happens. I'll keep you dead. Please. Thank you so much for hanging out with us. Thank you, Rebecca. Thanks becca. Thanks her back. We'll talk to you soon. Bye..

Rebecca Chicago Brussels Streit becca Ken one hundred eighty degrees
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"But. Rebecca, Rebecca, we need to this is the most passionate so sorry. Rebecca right now. I just look. Lagaan? Rebecca, we helped you is there. Something else you need from us. No, this is we've not helped her at all. I feel I can give great advice. But I also don't think that Rebecca's fully into this relationship actually with that. I mean, you you can be in this relationship fully and then in Woodley express doubts, and that's what it sounds like. So is one of two things either. Either with sim said your questioning the relationship or you're in the relationship, but you're expressing some healthy doubt. So either way I don't know how to interpret that so, but I think either way time we'll time we'll tell every time anyone says, but I'm only twenty three or moly twenty two. That means they're not fully in the relationship. It means they want to explore every single time. Someone says that that's all you need to hear. But I'm only twenty three she said it twice or maybe once. The only been dating January you've only been together since I mean, you'll even boyfriend and even off and on for years. Yeah. That's true. It would never like to relationship. But it's not like a guy you just met in January and even together since January. This is a guy you've known for four years, and you guys are both adults in your twenties. And you're starting your careers. And so you're not really, you know, wondering whether or not he is going to have time for your wondering, whether or not you want to be with him because you're lifestyles are gonna be so different than you're going gonna be so far apart. I. What you're saying? But I I think that it's a little bit of both a little bit of both. Okay. See I'm trying to have it both ways or Beker. So what I'm doing? Hand. All right. I feel like I'm the bad guy here. So the bad guy. Good trying to have about ways. But here's we haven't resolved this yet. I can't end this call until we figure this out or until you give her some final advice from ready for it. Right. Do you love this person? Yeah. Like. On a scale of like, I don't wanna do one through ten. But let's say let's say that you that he were to leave you in a week from now on a scale of one through ten how devastated would you feel? Probably a nine. Okay. All right. It wasn't a ten. It wasn't as had just because I feel like it's like I was like d you know, unable to survive in nine. It's like really still really really bad nine is like I'm only twenty three I'm going to do fine. Yeah. I mean, I'm hurt right now. But I'll I'll balanced back. That's what a nine is right now. But when you're in it fuels painful, if my girlfriend left me, I would be devastated. It's ten ten. Plus, the answer should always be ten you're married. No not. But once I were twenty three we were fools. We were like we still are..

Rebecca Woodley four years
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"I hate to say this. I hate to say this do it. Do it. Do it. Do. I don't know I from her voice, and I didn't think very long Rebecca, we didn't talk very long to we spoke. So I'm just going to just say this. I feel like you should like she's not sure about him. That's why she she. She twenty. Right, right, right, playing devil's advocate. It's okay for twenty three. But I think it's deep I think it's deeper than than the fact that he's in med school. And that he's going to be really busy. I think there's something else right now. And the fact that she's twenty three are you looking at med school as an excuse to break up with him. No. I think it's more than trying to protect myself than that factor. I think it's this. I'm I'm worried about you know, what might happen. So I'm kind of kind of protect my saddle, and especially from when we were kind of on and off in college just like the fear of when it was like to be on that off kind of cycle. I think it's healthy to have doubts. And I think is healthy. You know, I mean at this point time time will tell and I think that he. You know, there will. Cycle of applications will be over by the spring. And you know, you'll have a more clear idea as time goes by. Yeah. Yeah. Ana final advice for back. Final of ice. Do not get married until you thirty that Bessie advice. Got the that's what n hey. So Rebecca by the time, you're thirty seven years from now he'll be full fledged. Doctor right. No, we won't. We'll be an MD MD. Gonna depend on him on. I'm just saying that it's if she supports all these years. Thank you. Why didn't mean it that way? How dare he may need Rebecca remotest talk. It'll be. Dr. Earning on you talking about support, and how you were so happy that you had to support system and how they should support each other. So if he if she's going to support him for the next seven or eight years by time, he becomes an MD. That's amazing. How dare you? Both. Well, anyway, I'm so sorry. Yep. Sorry. Sorry. Sorry. Beca of fuck you. Yeah. Sim- here is all of a sudden like yeah. Support your partner. Sorry, guys. Are he's Lenny Kravitz this place to real. What's your least favorite song, but liberal? My least favorite song is. Oh, I don't know. There's. Least favorites on. There. What song annoys you whenever you hear it? I mean, there are a lot. I'm just trying to think they're just so. Rebecca while Kennedy's thinking, what's at least favorite song? Okay. Hold me up. Yeah. This is a tough one, right? What's your yours? This hotel, California. Right. Yeah. But I also like REM, but I hate that stand in the blazing. From. Chris Elliott because I have bad posture. And I wanna stand. It got me through a lot scoliosis. They you. They you. I learned how to read a compass now phase. Great. And. Well, I I didn't like oh God, where's that one? That toadies song twenty years ago. Like, I forgot the name of. Possum kingdom. No, that's Crash Test Dummies. I didn't like that song. Fractious Eric Andre Zanga. Oh, I yeah. I hate I kind of like that..

Rebecca Lenny Kravitz Chris Elliott MD MD Dr. Earning Eric Andre Zanga Bessie California Ana partner Kennedy thirty seven years twenty years eight years
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"What about those sexy? Nurses, sexy, nurses? I mean to me it really is about it. Really? It really is. You can't get through anything in life met school or otherwise without support and love, and I think every every couple and every relationship is unique. And so to me, it's really cool that you have kind of diverse interests like in PR and in medicine, and like my wife's doctor, and and she still practices, and she's never been more supportive of my acting career, and I've actually dated other doctors and med students that when I would tell them I would do comedy or something which is really an unusual thing in the world of medicine from that perspective, they would bump on that. They would like I don't understand really what you're trying to accomplish. But, but I think the reason I'm with my wife is that she was able to stay my. A world of medicine, but also understand just my love of comedy, and and wanting to try to do acting full-time, and and whether I succeeded or failed in it. She would have she supported me. So if anything I was really scared to do this full-time as a as a as a profession, so it really took my wife love and her support as and she's a doctor that she believed in me at that time more than I believed in myself. So it it really is about is it really is about support. In fact, it sounds like you guys are really making the commitment to support each other. So I think no matter where he goes I mean, solely plane trip away. So I think you know, nowadays, it's it really is about how you establish that relationship is, you know, every relationship is unique snowflake. You know, no to relationships are like. I have a question about that thing kind of hard is he doesn't always have time to actually talk to me because he is too busy like feeling with obligations and dealing with work. So I was just wondering if you have any advice on like should keep sticking it out. I mean, it's just hard because I don't even get to see him like maybe like three weeks, and it's kind of a long distance situation. Too hard. I mean, you know, I think I think right now. I mean, the answer autumn it is up to you guys. So it really is. Yes, right now applying is incredibly tough. And as I flash back. It's applying all these med schools. Were I didn't know if I would get any of them. So you know, I was not was released. No, I I wasn't a relationship at that time. But it wasn't as serious. So, you know, I was really yeah. It's tough. It's tough. If you're is tough if you are more committed in a relationship and wanting to get to that next level. But I think there there is something to be said about. Giving each other their space in this kind of time. And and then after you know, come what may and after kind of everything settles down. Kind of assessing where your relationship isn't that wife in med school? I know I met her at work. Resident no actually why was intending where both attending. We so we we had just come out of other. Did you have a relationship while you were in med school where you in a relationship? Yes. Was she was, but she was also in med school with you. Okay. So she understood your schedule. Yes. Now, any peers friends that have had that were in relationships that were not met students that yes, they had other jobs. How did they make it work? Was it difficult. Thinking I've seen relationships work in work just like in anything else in life. I I've seen relationships that were super stable. I remember, my residency, you know, one married couple in particular, my wife could not be more supportive of my friend. And she was not in medicine at all night. Again. I think every every couple is unique everyone has a has their own unique definition of what their relationship is..

med school three weeks
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Rebecca. Hi, sorry. We're out of breath right now because we've been laughing for the last ten minutes. Sorry about that. But we already on is here Ken Jong is here. The brilliant. Amazing Ken, John from Dr Ken on ABC's here just told me had gonorrhea and. Silly laughing about that for a while. And they'd been laughing because it's. Rebecca, I'm so sorry. Sorry. We're we're here to help you live Rebecca we have. But. But. Ten Ken is he's a not only is your special guest. But he's also he may very well be qualified for your situation. So Rebecca tell us what's going on. All right. So I've been on feeding my boyfriend's been about January, and we went to college together, and we were together on and off for like all for years, and he's actually in the midst of applying to med school right now, I live in Chicago and he lives in Addison with Thomson. So we're kind of already long to them. But I just don't really know where relationship is headed because he is going to my school. And I'm afraid he's not gonna have time. So I'm not really sure what to do. So art will you be staying in Chicago. In the next year. You know, despite wherever he's going for Mexico. Most likely will change looking to go to school in the mid west. But he's not obviously, not sure we where he's going to get in. And all that. Sure. I think yes, always scary. When you're appointed met school. And I think apply to like ten of them from Duke in didn't get in. I did not get into all of them. So yeah, it's always it's always a scary prospect. But so you guys have been dating on and off for four years. He said. We did throughout college. And now, we're like officially boyfriend and girlfriend pretty much got it going. Well, I mean, I think the fact that you know, you're being supportive of your boyfriend no matter where he goes. I think that's to me more than distances. You know, you guys have made the decision to commit to each other. So that's that's the most important thing. So wherever he goes from there, you guys have already established that framework how hard is it for a woman to be. Or a person to be supportive through somebody's somebody's mid? No, it's very tough because when you're in med school. I look at it this way think the science curriculum that you had that one had in college at their pre med multiply that times three. So that's like the amount of volume of bookwork is it's it's really really really hard in terms of till later that I know that many times tumble bug, and we have. But I do think that I do think that the fact that you are supportive of him in him of you may ask what are you? What are you interested in going into or? I'm in public relations, got it. So I mean, I think as long as there's mutual support you guys love each other that that to me, you know, that it sounds cliche and corny and hacky say, but that kind of Ken walk through walk is through the life of a life of woman dating someone who not only goes through med school. But then. Residency and all the hours we're talking about being on call. I mean, we talked about this early. I of friends who are doctors. And I know that they're they're on called for like, you know. Time, nurses..

Dr Ken Rebecca Ken Jong Chicago Duke gonorrhea Rebecca. ABC Mexico Addison ten minutes four years
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"And however, you want to sort of express sort of like the initial like olive branch idea. I think later on you, and your wife should just make sure that you're overly grateful, even when you don't wanna be for the time that they do sit for for your son in if you're overly grateful, and they feel like oh, wow. We we feel recognized that you know, whatever we gave, you know, our our time this week to be with Milo if you say things like. Thank you so much Milo loves you guys. And he always like, you know, he talks about you, guys, whatever whatever placating all of branch, extending you can do that will benefit you. And then eventually, you can say like, you know, it's so nice when you guys watch Milo because then I get to take my wife your daughter out for a nice meal or we get to spend time together. And and I and I really appreciate that. Because you know, I know that she went through stuff was hard in the past and force them if they don't wanna watch the killings reward. Don't force. The issue is. No, no, no, no. I may resent exactly yet. Yeah. Don't force the issue at all. But, but when that does happened happens reward awesome person, and you know, that all branch that's already like that thirty had yourself four hundred forty five days sober, I've been back for a while. And that, you know, saying he's an sorry and making amends like those things have happened. And when they were when my low is like first born, they were super active grandparents like, they were super helpful. Really great. But it was at that point when my low was like, okay, I can't really walk. I don't have an opinion. I don't want to run I can't run around and do the things I do. And now that he's three it's almost like they're just like the too much. Well, they may come back. But yeah, they may come back. They may come back when he's like ten, you know, or whenever they may never come back. You doing the right thing, Tim, you're you're sober, man. And it's more hurting. My wife, you know, like, it's I've already put my wife through so much pain, and she's forgiven me, and I love her till the ends of the earth. And you know, when she's heartbroken like that. I just want to solve the problem team. I know are you close with your parents at all? Oh my gosh. They're the greatest and I'm so glad kinda like what Mark was striving. My son has that relationship with Mike carrots to where they will literally call it'd be like would do today. Oh, we're just sitting around bring my low over. We just wanna watch him here here. Take some money going some dinner on us. And it's like, oh, okay. Great like, he's so lucky to have them. But it's just like that kind of gaping hole on the other side of decide. Oh, well, what about this? The only thing you can do Tim also is just support. You know? I'm sure your wife feels terrible that our parents are like that. You just have to support and say, Honey, I still love you, no matter what your parents do. And I support your parents, and let her know that, you know. Her parents are not bad people. Obviously, they're just that's their choice their choice. That's the way that they handle things. And it's okay. It's like, you know that some people handle situations differently. And it's fine as long as you're supportive, and you support meyler you're protecting my alone. You're you're making sure that your wife doesn't feel like shit because her parents are you know, a certain way, you're gonna be fine. I mean, Tim, you should know though, like. You know, I'm qualified, but I think pretty much every married. Couple goes through this same thing where it's like. Yeah. It's like who you know, where where like I need I need the community of support..

Milo Tim Mike Mark four hundred forty five days
"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"med school" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Thank you guys so much. Okay. We call tell em p about okay. So we we call people. We give them advice attempt to we. That's why we get a call somebody. Yes. We are Omar we've already vetted the call. We've heard earlier. Yeah. But I, but I don't Email the show with questions that they need help. And we're on. We're really unqualified. No. Yeah. Exactly. But we try our best. Are we to are we going to be liable for any of this? We've been doing for three years. Nothing's happened. So far really knock on wood. Nothing's happened somewhere. Lord, yet are so good. Okay. Disclaim? Is there a disclaimer we need to read? We should probably read a disclaimer. Disclaimer, how is this not have you not tiny. It was called. At the end of it the fine print what the fuck is going on your holy shit. All right. Well, I'm going to put it out there. Whatever advice, I give you I I'm not responsible here to be great. No. I know I'm going to be great. That's not the question. I'm not responsible for this shit, though. You're responsible said right here right now. We've all fall signed away. Don't fucking come after. We're not. We're not gonna you them. Then. Okay. Yeah. Whoever they are somebody's business for four kids. Mouths of guys. Because like we're gonna we're gonna call ten. She. Two boys never real issue. Holy shit. Don't have anything. You follow our lead. I feel like I know you're gonna something to say. Like an opinion. I have to say all right. We're gonna call him. He's in Nevada and he's thirty two. Oh my God. Tim what the fuck are you doing Tim? You're calling it podcast. They wanna. We are loving and caring here. Okay. Hi, tim. Hi. All right, honestly. How did Tim? Hi, tim. Hey, thanks so much. You're so sweet to to to do this. And to listen to our ding Dong advice on yours. I am an enormous fan. Thank you. And we're here with Mark Paul gosar, Gus Gus Gaza. Yes, it's all who you are. I'm a also huge fans..

Gus Gus Gaza Omar Tim Lord ding Dong Mark Paul gosar Nevada three years
Keeping Secrets Makes Life Harder, Emotions Change Your Perception of Time

Curiosity Daily

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Keeping Secrets Makes Life Harder, Emotions Change Your Perception of Time

"Today. You'll learn how keeping secrets can literally weigh you down. How we knew the earth rotates before we had space travel, and how your emotions can alter your perception of time with satisfy some curiosity. Do you have a secret? Here's a fun fact, according to a two thousand seventeen study the average person has around thirteen secrets and five of them will never come out to anyone. The researchers say that it isn't the number of secrets you keep that really matters, though, it's the burden of those secrets and the real effects. They have on you. Glad I don't have to deal with this. You don't have any secrets or do. I you'll never know. Do you know, I I feel like I need to have more secrets if you like that would be good for me to just like stop telling people everything, according to this research that may not be the case this study out of Columbia business school showed that when a subject thought about their secrets they actually acted as if they were burdened by physical wait this happened. Even on the subject wasn't hiding a particular secret at that moment. There's more research to back this up a twenty twelve study showed that quote, people who recalled were preoccupied with or suppressed an important secret estimated hills to be steeper perceived distances to be farther indicated that physical tasks would require more effort and were less likely to help others with physical tasks, unquote. So even if you're not actively hiding a secret everything could be harder just by thinking about it. The recent paper notes that our minds are constantly trying to resolve issues or reach goals that we haven't achieved yet. But. Here's the thing. A secret is a goal that can never be accomplished that leaves one solution. Just don't think about your secret. Hopefully, someday in the near future, researchers will figure out the secret to doing just that we know the earth rotates, but if you've ever wondered how we figured that out before space travel, you can thank a thirty two year old med school dropout from France. See it turns that you can accomplish great things. Even if you like Ashley, and you can't handle the sight of blood, right? That's why he dropped out of medical school. And he didn't have any formal science training. He's basically my mail French twin from a couple of hundred years ago, I'm talking about John Bernard Leone Fuko he was born in Paris in eighteen nineteen and after he left med school. He got a job as a lab assistant and did some pretty cool science stuff. But his biggest accomplishment might have been figuring out. How to prove that the earth rotates? Now rotation wasn't a brand new idea over the centuries Galileo and a lot of other scientists had proposed the idea that the. The earth was rotating not the heavens, but they were typically put to death or imprisoned for their heretical views. Fortunately, most educated people cited with Galileo and his ilk by the time Fuko was around and in January of eighteen fifty one Phooko figured out how to show the effects of the earth's rotation the Fuko pendulum. Here's how it works. Imagine. You're standing on the North Pole, and you have a super tall pendulum swinging from side to side tracing its path in a pile of sand as the earth turns beneath the pendulum the pendulum will keep swinging in its original direction, irrespective of the ground beneath it that means that over the course of a twenty four hour day, the path of the pendulum would look like it's shifting bit by bit until it had drawn a line at every degree of three hundred sixty degrees circle the pendulum swinging side to side, it's the earth that's moving beneath it that proves that the earth rotates who co calculated the sign law to figure out how many degrees the pendulum would rotate in. Twenty four hour period in different places in the world, including Paris where it would turn two hundred seventy degrees in one day. I first demonstration to the public. He hung a sixty two pound brass Bob from two hundred twenty foot long wire and let it swing through a thin layer of sand on the marble floor of the Paris observatory today, you can see full-scale Fuko pendulums at museums and universities all over the world there a great reminder of how a little curiosity and confidence can lead to earth turning discoveries. Speaking of rotation. Today's episode is sponsored by MOVA Globes spelt, M O VA their Globes that rotate by themselves MOVA, Globes rotate using technology. That's the first of its kind no batteries. No cords, just rotating Globes. Powered by ambient light. I have a MOVA globe of Mars on my desk at work and it just fascinates everybody. Who walks by? It's definitely moving. I love looking in the corner of my eye your desk and just seeing. Yes, there is a constantly rotate. Getting globe. You certainly don't need to cope pendulum to measures rotation. I don't have to turn it on or off. It just doesn't thing. And the outer space collection features graphics provided by NASA and JPL he can get Globes of planets moons, asteroids and even constellation designs. You on musk legit tweeted a picture of his Mars MOVA globe. That's how accurate and how seriously cool. They are. There are forty different designs. And they're not all about space. You've got world maps and even famous works. We have an exciting offer for curiosity. Daily listeners. You can get fifteen percent off of your purchase. Please. Visit MOVA Globes dot com slash curiosity and use coupon code curiosity for fifteen percents off your purchase to get fifteen percent off of your purchase. Visit MOVA Globes dot com slash curiosity and use coupon code curiosity that we got a question from one of our patrons many blaze. He asked why does time seemed to slow down during certain events the clock. Always seems to run slower when I'm staring at it. And recently we had a magnitude four. Point four earthquake. That felt like it lasted forever greed question. Many. Here's the short answer MRI based research suggests that time isn't tracked by just one part of our brain. Instead the job is shared across a large network of neural areas. That might explain why so many different things can change. How we experience time passing by? There are a few things that make time fly. And if you things that make time crawl so here, a few examples, we all know, the time flies when you're having fun. But time also flies when you're in the zone. There's a thing in positive psychology called flow state, which is when you're fully engaged in doing something with a complete focus and maximum energy. This could be if you're an artist painter or musician or writer, but it can also apply to anything you're passionate about. Whether it's coding accounting. Cooking, hyper, focus is a more passive version of flow state. And that's something has your attention. But it doesn't demand. A lot of effort thinks zoning out in front of your TV. It doesn't feel as good but time still flies now. Now, a few things might make time stand still one is when you're awestruck a twenty twelve study showed that watching an inspiring video made time feel like it was going slower than when people watched a happy video and Aw inspiring experience of being in nature can also slow time like walking in a forest versus walking in a major city. One more thing. That's lowest downtime is fear. Participants in twenty eleven study experienced time as slower even after they had finished watching a scene from the shining with Jack Nicholson, maybe take a horror flick on your next vacation and see what

Mova Globes John Bernard Leone Fuko Paris Columbia Business School Paris Observatory Jack Nicholson France North Pole Nasa Writer Ashley Mova Galileo Med School Musk VA Phooko
"med school" Discussed on BuzzFeed News: Reporting To You

BuzzFeed News: Reporting To You

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"med school" Discussed on BuzzFeed News: Reporting To You

"And by the way that's not factoring in things like housing and food. These sky high debts are causing med school grads to flock to the higher paying specialties like cardiology and plastic surgery. As a result, does a shortage of doctors going into specialties with a lot. Of need like primary care, pediatrics and research, something's gotta give. Here's Kenneth g Langan he's the chair of the board of trustees of the NYU Langone medical center and the day they get their diploma. They owe nobody nothing. They walk outta here unencumbered looking at a future where they can do with their passion, tells them which is to help people better quality lives. The university also hopes this will lead to a more diverse class dean. Dr. Robert Grossman said a population as diverse as ours is best served by doctors from all walks of life. We believe and spine. Physicians and surgeons should not be prevented from pursuing a career in medicine because of the prospect of overwhelming financial debt preach. So happy back to school season everyone and may more free tuition be in all of our futures. So here's some of the things that are happening today. The White House is hosting a salute to the heroes of ice and see BP event who the third bailout program for Greece is finishing today. Venezuela is introducing a new fischel currency. The sovereign believe are which will be pegged to its cryptocurrency the petro while and tonight is the MTV video music awards. And before we go, there's a new political podcast in town. It's called what's left by BuzzFeed news. It's all about bold in depth conversations with people at the crossroads of Neo American politics. The show is hosted by Sarah Leonard. She's executive editor of the peel and a contributing editor to the nation. What's left abuse, what's that day? And the show Dobbs new episodes every Monday here wherever you're hearing my voice right now.

executive editor Kenneth g Langan NYU Langone medical center Dr. Robert Grossman contributing editor MTV Dobbs Venezuela White House Greece
"med school" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"med school" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"And I'm Marsha Taylor an autopsy will determine how a man. Whose body was found along the econ river died a. Bicyclist spotted the body about five thirty yesterday in. The area. Of colonial drive and. North, econ trail onlookers were shocked in in this river Investigators say the man was tangled in some vegetation and it appears he's been there for a while his. Identity has not been released in Washington today a presidential, spotlight on school safety the fifth meeting of. The president's federal Commissioner school safety comes students. Across the country had. Back to, school overall the commission is looking, into a wide range of possible actions from more counselors and school resource officers to age. Limits for the purchase, of certain weapons the commission expects to release a final report this fall but don't. Expect any new rules or requirements the Trump administration, only plans to, make recommendations not mandates that's reporter Justin gray dozens of teacher. Positions remain unfilled unfilled across central Florida then includes about one hundred and three, jobs and. Osceola county. Alone the teacher's union says all of. The jobs may not need to be filled a fewer students than expected show up for now substitutes, helping out Osceola county what thirty five four and teachers this year as part of a. Visa program but the district is not necessarily Turning to foreign candidates to fill those jobs incoming students at New York University med school got a nice. Surprise, yesterday tuition is now free for everyone thanks to the rising cost of med school and skyrocketing student loans do doctors have been gravitating to only the. Most lucrative specialties causing a shortage this doctor recently finished, NYU she says the move is also good. For the school is really going to be, able to choose anyone. They want, from the whole pool of medical, applicants rate they're now going to be able to pick the brightest and the best of. All of the potential, applicants the school says there's a moral imperative to reduce debt with the normal cost. For a year at NYU med school get this, about fifty five, thousand dollars whether it's high school or college you may still. Be shopping for tech this weekend Depending on You know what you plan on doing with your laptop that will really help you determine what if that Bianca Jones with, best, buy says what you're studying can make a big difference in the type of computer you. Should buy and if you are headed, to college you had the many bridges. And microwave she, also says don't forget a coffee pot You're not going to be in every day and buying coffee Tony Marino news ninety six point five WDBO in. A new study finds life expectancy is down in the US most other high income countries along with the US other nations where people, aren't, living as long include Canada Britain Germany and Sweden researchers found only Australia Japan Denmark and. Norway showed an increase in the US, the average life expectancy for a woman. Eighty one and, it's seventy six for men When I when I saw the death of Aretha Franklin yesterday at the age of. Seventy six I thought oh. She's young she's younger than she should be you know when. It comes to the eight to talk it up to an actuary table but she she did not achieve life expectancy for a woman and that that. Means she's gone too soon frankly. It's five thirty. Five you're.

Osceola county US NYU med school New York University med school Aretha Franklin econ river Bianca Jones Marsha Taylor Justin gray Washington NYU Florida Tony Marino reporter president Commissioner Norway Australia Japan Denmark Canada