35 Burst results for "Meat"

Vegans may be at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:34 sec | 2 d ago

Vegans may be at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

"Vegans like to tell the health benefits of their plant based diet. But a new study identifies a health risk to more Vicki Barker box for the university researchers say People who avoid all foods derived from animals have a far higher risk of broken bones than people who eat dairy, meat and fish. The long term study of more than 55,000 people, of whom some 2000 or vegans found the vegans have a 40% higher risk of suffering a bone fracture. The advice anyone following a vegan diet needs to think carefully about how They obtained the calcium, iron and vitamin B 12 they'd otherwise be getting from

Vicki Barker
Vegans may be at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 2 d ago

Vegans may be at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

"Time 1 53 a new study finds vegans could face a health risk Here's correspondent Vicki Barker, Oxford University researchers say people who avoid all foods derived from animals have a far higher risk of broken bones than people who eat dairy meat. And fish. The long term study of more than 55,000 people, of whom some 2000 or vegans found the vegans have a 40% higher risk of suffering of bone fracture. The advice anyone following a vegan diet needs to think carefully about how they obtained the calcium, iron and vitamin B 12 they'd otherwise be getting from meet. The participants were followed for an average of 18 years. The findings were published in BMC Medicine. It'll aged adults. Those over 45 face a greater risk of catching sexually transmitted infections than ever before. As according to researchers from the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. They found that because society has been unwilling to talk about older people having sex people in that age group are simply unaware of the dangers of unprotected sex. All the experts recommend doctors conduct more S T I

Vicki Barker Oxford University Bmc Medicine Belgium The Netherlands UK
Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

The KFBK Morning News

00:23 sec | 2 d ago

Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

"And Oxford University research study shows vegans and other non meat eaters more likely to suffer broken bones. They have to be more aware of calcium, right? It is indeed, you know, Lucinda. That's exactly what it is. A lack of calcium, iron and vitamin B 12 could mean a rise in popularity of veganism causes some bone health

Oxford University Lucinda
Cleveland Browns lead Philadelphia Eagles 7-0 in Sunday's game

WGR Programming

00:19 sec | 3 d ago

Cleveland Browns lead Philadelphia Eagles 7-0 in Sunday's game

"We're getting into the second quarter kind of the meat of things here in week 11 Eagles and Browns. Brown's lead seven. Nothing right now over the Eagles. That was a pick six. That's how we got there. So Carson went on the day 74 yards passing and an interception and, yes, he has been sacked once it's been Add weather right now in Cleveland, so hey, at least maybe the ground was soft. I don't know.

Eagles Browns Brown Carson Cleveland
California adopts stricter workplace coronavirus safety rules

Marketplace

01:47 min | 5 d ago

California adopts stricter workplace coronavirus safety rules

"Million workers here are going to be covered by the new mandate, which would include specific requirements for masks and physical distancing and reporting of outbreaks, all measures that aren't legally required at the federal level, but as marketplaces, making McCarty Carino reports That might change. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration usually set specific, enforceable rules for dealing with workplace dangers like hazardous chemicals and blood borne diseases. But not for covert 19. There was no guidance anywhere really for people. Maggie Robbins is a safety advocate with the nonprofit work Safe, which collaborated with California regulators on their new emergency rules. No way we can control the broader circulation of Kobe it If we keep having outbreaks at workplaces, California regulators will have new tools to enforce mask wearing and physical distancing, and employers will be required to investigate report and test for potential outbreaks. But Robert Moo tree with the California Chamber of Commerce says that could unfairly burden employers as community spread surges. You may have no role in those cases of hearing your workplace, but you will be put under outbreak protocols here. Large workplace outbreaks have been documented at meat packing plants, garment factories and among farm workers across the country. And incidents of workplace infections or growing. That's why the federal government needs to follow the lead of states like California, says Rebecca Randall, with the A F L C E O. The virus doesn't know boundaries in any national leadership to set those plans. The Labor group will be making recommendations to the Biden transition team for who should lead OSHA, the president elect has said, and acting national workplace safety rules is a high priority. Making McCarty Carino for marketplace.

Mccarty Carino Federal Occupational Safety An Blood Borne Diseases Maggie Robbins Robert Moo California California Chamber Of Commerce Kobe Rebecca Randall Federal Government Biden Osha
A Bulgarian Feast

Travel with Rick Steves

06:13 min | 5 d ago

A Bulgarian Feast

"Let's start today's culinary edition of travel. With rick steves for the sampling of bulgaria's lively food traditions. That's one country where you definitely want to be invited over when he was going to be a feast as a crossroads of dynasties for centuries gary is one of the oldest tenure in it is a proud cuisine based on all of these cultures that have come and gone it. Mir's it's complex demographic makeup end it's fascinating history. You can learn about people through their museums and art and you can also learn about a culture through its kitchen and right. now we're going to is. We're joined by stefan motza jeff and we're gonna talk about book garin cuisine seven. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me here. Ick stephan how does bulgaria's history and it's complex ethnic makeup show itself in your cuisine. It's interesting question because we have always been. At across of civilizations turks greeks mediterranean culture slavic culture and all of these different cultures they reflect in our cuisine. And this is the reason why. Our cuisines has many specifics. Okay so you're gonna take me out to dinner and we're going to demonstrate that. What are some dishes that would illustrate the many different invasions that bulgaria has endured the first and most traditional dishes actually liquid. It's our alcoholic beverage. Here rakiya we start every meal with rakiya typically made of grapes or other fruits while we're waiting for ourselves to come. We hear foley. Our first sakir finished your drink the rookie through the meal. Exactly okay. So the first course would be solid kind of salad may have the most traditional one East coat subsc. Sarut literally means a solid from subscribe region this region our capital cities software. So around sophea. But i find that every meal all across bulgaria the beloved chops ca salad. Yes it's like our traditional south in every single restaurant from the obscure the most upscale restaurants to those in the remote villages. This is a must on the menu. If you are familiar with the greek salads. It'll be something close tomatoes cucumbers onions peppers. The best peppers are not the robust but roasted peppers roasted peppers s and on the top. You put some cheese. Typically countries couches. Yes and increase it a slab cheese. Yes is a slab of jason here. We grated cheese. Stefan when you eat the very best shops ca salad. You've been eating at all your life in connecticut. This is really good. Why is it really good. really good. What distinguishes a chops salad. I this is the cheese. The cheese chase is important and the other thing the peppers. they must be roasted in some restaurants. They don't want to work quite much in the kitchen. So they're all but roasted peppers and cheese. I've catcher this is travel with rick steves. You're talking stephan. Both jeb about garin cuisine. Okay you've had your salad. What comes next after salad. It came to the main course. Our main course. Of course a lot of grilled and barbecued meats kickboxing or give up is means meet crooked and meet bo grilled meat balls so these are minced meat or meat balls stuck on long stick. No no no long six. No no. they're just like pure meet. Maha put on the grill and then put on your plate. What kind of spices. Oh all kinds of spices. Actually the spices that we use of course a lot of parsley a lot of do savory. These are very traditional spices and on top of that. We have one very traditional shot in a soul this mixture of different herbs. This is a sauce. It's not a sauce. It is sort salt. Yeah it's okay. Bold colorful sought and different herbs. So red paprika sage savory everything put together and we dip our breath insight and we just enjoy. That sounds very good. Do you have an influence of greece. Greece's a big culture and and a lot of ways. You have the similar environment in your cuisine. What sort of greek flavor would you find for sure. One of the most traditional meals that bulgarians belief. It is bulgarian. It is the moussaka sexually coming from our southern neighbours from from the greeks but here in our version we add just minced meat and potatoes. We don't at zucchini or eggplant inside. No potatoes mainly towards the potatoes and and the minced meat in greece. Of course they have a lot of these appetizers. You have this way of serving people family style plates yes. It is also very popular in bulgaria. The missouri style intellectually is the same word that we use for that. We have different. Appetizers some Cheese some dry sausages and also different dips. Now i'm remembering some beautiful cold soup kind of a vegetable called supporters that this is called the the atar. It is very traditional bulgarian soup during the summer. It consists of yogurt chopped cucumbers garlic. Do walnuts and a few drops of olive oil on the top sound just beautiful. Yes and it saves us during the hot summer days because it can be quite hot in the summer. Yes that's very possible. You talked about the Grilled peppers in the shop salad. But also i remember when i go to a restaurant. There's a lot of stuffed peppers as part of the main course. Yes stuffed peppers. This could be on the menu of every bulgarian family very traditional one. The most traditional one is to have stuffed pepper with rice and minced meat but also on the other hand we have a stuffed peppers with what which is of course and these are very delicious. Choose sca buick

Bulgaria Rick Steves Stefan Motza Sophea Stephan Gary Foley Mediterranean Greece Jeff Stefan JEB Connecticut Jason Missouri
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 6 d ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 6 d ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
This Is a Great Time to Start a Compost Pile

Your Gardening Questions

02:41 min | 6 d ago

This Is a Great Time to Start a Compost Pile

"Well fred i know that With all the leaves down there people still raking some leaves as well It's a good time now to use that and the grass clippings in everything to get compost pile going well. Mark is a wonderful time. As a matter of fact i have been a theme. Well i've i've done that for probably forty years now as a spot that is ideal for it. it's Behind the fence and way from the the neighbors view i put in some farm wire. You will farm fence. It's about forty two inches high. And then i put. And i do it a bit lazy man's way but of the chipper grass clippings bland with leaves. I toot around dumped into this compost area. Now i usually put in. Let's say a bag or two of the clippings. Then i have some old compost material in the same pen. 'cause it's four by eight i will put some of the the worked down compost. That has all bacteria and fungi and so on in to get the others going and am amazed some well. Family kids Long time ago. I had put this pie altogether on a thursday. They were here for the weekend. And i took them out when they didn't understand what i was telling him and had them put their hand down into that pile of composting materials and where didn't burn them. They pulled their hands up. Pretty darn quick because it builds temperature when this is happening and it's You need at least a reasonable space for but when you use only green things will no meat no cheese anything of that nature and you put in the blend that is We'll call living tissue and dying tissue. It's almost ideal for composting. And then you kind of adulterated. A little bit with the older compost to keep it going and then. I don't bother to turn it as often as i should. I put it together in the fall. I dig it out and start using it in the spring because over. The course of the winter is pretty much composted and Therefore i call it the lazy man's way you can build three bends and keep moving material back and forth into bins. All of which is very good. I am well between age and a very bad back and a little laziness. I just do it. The lazy man's way.

Fred Mark
Sustainable Meat with Diana Rodgers

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

04:40 min | 6 d ago

Sustainable Meat with Diana Rodgers

"So is a registered dietitian. I am so fascinated by your background. And i know you're registered dietitian as well as wondering if you could just tell our audience a little bit about the work you do and then how you got to be in a position where you are dietitian specializing in this very unique area. Yeah i mean my current. What i'm doing is i have a part time nutrition clinic where i help people i mostly focus on moms That's just who tends to gravitate towards me folks who are looking to either lose weight or fixed gut health. Those are the two specialties and actually lately though during covert i've had a ton of binge eating and stuff like that so it's really interesting to me kind of didn't really work a lot with that population but it's just kind of come out. I think of cove it. So i'm learning more about that. I think it's really interesting. And then the other part of my time just to mix things up a little bit. Is i just finished. Producing and directing film called sacred cow. The case for better meet. And i released the book this passer. So i'm doing a lot around the promotion and advocacy for especially meet the value of meat for women and children worldwide and. Really sort of debunking all of the concerns around meat so it's sort of attacked on three levels and it's really beef that i'm focused on but i'm pro all animals foods. But it's you know we've got the tricia arguments meets gonna cause cancer and heart disease and all of that. We've got the environmental case against me. Cowards are ruining the planet. They take to up too many resources. Why not just eat directly from crops. You know it's inefficient to eat me. And then we have all the ethical concerns of course around me and i address ethics last in the book because i feel that you really have to fully appreciate the nutritional environmental contribution that well raised. Animals can make before we can even talk about whether or not. It's okay to kill beautiful animals to eat them. Because it's you can't just start with that rate and how i got here is a little wind. E i had undiagnosed iliac disease as a child and was extremely malnourished and muscle tone. Basically everything i just went straight through me and i also had a lot of neurological issues from that to just like words swirling around the page kind of almost like dyslexia kind of thing and it wasn't until i was twenty six when i got diagnosed and i couldn't believe that you could be allergic to wheat. I mean i was like that's what people eat you know So really took me by surprise. And i gave up way and it did make a huge difference but i also at the same time still kept waiting my doctor saying. I think i'm diabetic. Like why. I need to eat every hour or two. I was always had my gluten free granola bars on me. All of that stuff. So i've always been interested in like. How do i fix myself. Because gosh if i miss lunch i have like tunnel. Vision asserts sweating in. You know just it was horrible and so i really entered the field of nutrition later in life just to figure out how to fix myself and at that point i then decided to become a dietician with two little kids and at the time it felt really overwhelming but i just decided i really wanted that medical credential. I wanted to be able to take insurance. And i wanted to have some credibility in the space and so having that medical credential of our d really was important to me for while the rating speaking i do and so i just made it my part time job basically to date biochemistry and all these courses that i didn't take undergrad is an art major and so it took me a very long time. It took me about seven years to complete it and it was really rough. Because i was already sold on no processed foods and kind of the real food. Wait life as going through the program and so it was tough for me. And especially when i was working in the hospitals and nursing homes. Where like boost is your only solution for. Everybody is just so depressing. So i'm really happy to be on the other side to have a private practice. Where i can help people who want to learn more about the new tradition and i don't have to necessarily follow guidelines of my boss telling me what to do in a more clinical setting

Iliac Disease Heart Disease Dyslexia Cancer
Beyond Meat launches first product for the China market

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:10 sec | Last week

Beyond Meat launches first product for the China market

"Getting some attention today, the Southern California based company launching beyond pork in China, the first product created for the Chinese market and beyond meat moving higher today on that news up 5% that out

Southern California China
MacBook Air with Apple's own M1 chip is faster and has better battery life than Intel-based predecessors

Techmeme Ride Home

03:06 min | Last week

MacBook Air with Apple's own M1 chip is faster and has better battery life than Intel-based predecessors

"And speaking of that our final blizzard of reviews for probably this year blue in this morning the embargoes for reviews of macs using the new emlyn ships broke this morning. Let me get two of the devices out of the way before we focus more on the meat of the interesting stuff. Which in my opinion is the mac. Air all include links to these reviews in the show notes even if we don't delve into all of them deeply at the verge chris. Welsh says the mac mini with the new ship is a mixed bag. Existing apps run well and the price is certainly appealing but with ram limited bizarrely to sixteen gigabytes and the inability to upgrade that ram and since it doesn't support external. Gpa's could you really run this as your main machine. His conclusion though was mostly positive. Quote spending a few days with the twenty twenty. Mac mini has shown me that it's a barn burner of a miniature desktop. It outperforms most intel macs in several benchmarks runs apps reliably and offers a fantastic day to day experience whether you're using it for web browsing and email or for creative editing and professional work that potential will only grow an apple inevitably raises the rams ceiling and hopefully bring back those missing usb ports. These six hundred and ninety nine dollars. Starting price is tempting but most people will be better off upgrading to sixteen gigabytes of unified memory. Which puts you at eight hundred and ninety nine dollars. Doubling the default six hundred and fifty six gigabytes storage makes that cost climb higher to one thousand ninety nine dollars but even then the price to performance ratio for the mac mini has never been better than with this. Change over to apple silicon. Even if you ignore iphone apps completely transition is off to an impressive start considering just how smoothly everything comes together. And just as ever the mac. Minis flexibility is what makes it special and quote. Also at the verge. Neil patel tackled the macbook pro with the chip and he concurred great performance. Great display great battery life but again why ram limited to sixteen gigabytes and also this kind of got lost in the shuffle of the original announcement but only two usb ports only two period only to on a pro machine guests. I'm gonna be holding onto this last macbook pro with actual ports and sd card reader and hdmi etc until it literally is on its last legs. Anyway knee lies conclusion quote. There are two things to say about the thirteen inch. Macbook pro with 'em one chip one. The m one and the work apple has done to make a difficult processor. Transition seamless remarkable success and to this particular mac book. Pro doesn't necessarily seem like a worthwhile upgrade over the macbook. Air with an m one chip. Yes it offers slightly better sustained performance and a little more battery life than the air. But i would happily trade back. Those seconds of faster rendering time on the pro for the hours of frustration caused by the touch bar. And if you have much more serious performance needs it seems likely that you might want more than two ports sixteen gigabytes of ram and only one external display so. This machine is a twitter. An excellent fascinating twitter buddy between her nonetheless and quote

Apple Welsh Intel Chris Neil Patel Twitter
Dr. Shawn Baker On The Carnivore Diet

The Ultimate Health Podcast

04:40 min | Last week

Dr. Shawn Baker On The Carnivore Diet

"Sean. Welcome to the podcast. How you doing today really well. Thank you for having me. Good good we got a lot to get into. I m fascinated by the topic of the carnivore diet not something. We've gone deep into on the show to this point so i'm just curious off the bat. How do i get into this. My personal experience into this was just turn on improve. my own. health now was already a low carb guy and ketogenic diets. And i ran into you. Know this kind of group of people doing these zero carb. You know quote unquote meat-based. I thought that's interesting. I looked into the history. Said while try it you know what the heck amari low carbs not gonna make them big deal. I don't really like vegetables anyway. And so i tried it in. You just felt phenomenal as this is really something here and i did it for thirty days and i went back to the the more never side. I just didn't feel good. Now's like all things being equal. I prefer to feel better. That's how i kind of stumbled into this. This is after. I mean literally six or seven years of playing with nutrition pretty seriously in studying and researching it and coming from a background as you know not only as a physician as a surgeon but also locked long athlete performance. Actually you've been able to set world records on different sports and that has always been a big part of that. Not only did. I feel good on surely meet. They stopped but my performance improved significantly in sapporo breaking a number world records. And so that's what kind of made me sick or something and so now i am Just about four years into this whole celebrate my four year anniversary in about a month so then interesting and over the course of that four years has there been a lot of close ups and downs along the way or is it just been you know pretty much getting better and better over time. Well i mean the you know. The diet has been pretty consistent. And sometimes i'll throw a little bit vary from fat. Content protein content sometimes include a little bit variety within this animal base thing words eggs dairy and fishing cheeses and but most of its been mostly red meat for most of the time so occasionally i'll have something off you know like if my son has a birthday sometime piece of birthday cake once in a while but this extremely rare. I usually don't feel that actually doing that. Quite honestly i guess not a point. My life work. You know being my fifties you notice little small things Kind of creeps up on you pretty quickly as far as health is can gone. I mean generally spend just dot good stayed good. Continue to get good very rarely by seeing anything other than that. I mean you know. I've had a cold here and erin you know those types of things but nothing but generally pretty good health well sounds like red. Meat is a staple of the diet. Talk about the evolution of the diet over the air. So what was it like in the beginning when you first got into it and how has it to where you are today. Well at the beginning I used said decent amount of variety news a lot of red meat for sure. There was a and bacon and dairy and a little bit of seafood. Shrimp have different salmon. Things like that as time went by there was a period. Good probably gosh sixteen eighteen months of nothing but red meat every single day and felt great goal time and then i kind of said well that seemed to work fine in house like know because i live with other people. That don't necessarily fall is donald. Oh my girlfriend is about ninety. Five percent carnivore. She still has a few other things in there. She started vegetarian mile away in transition from that were she was having a lot of just not particularly great health and even though she very fit athletic person but still having a lot digestive issues. And you know she's found out that basically the seating start really helped her. So i mean i would just you know. Sometimes i cook for other people. So i would include that stuff in my diet with more variety. They'd want other things other than just red meat. So you do. I never really got into much into the things like chicken for some reason just never really made in died doesn't appeal to me very much if i have a choice. I usually do like to cook for myself. I'm going to pick a state or some kind of the redmi. Typically when you make choices purely based on taste or do you feel better eating the red meat. We'll both tastes better and feel better. So i think it kind of goes hand hand every once in a while i'll look and i said you kind of feel like having this you know maybe some eggs and i'll throw that in there and it may be just an unconscious subtle way saying you know you need a little bit more variety. Perhaps but it's very intuitive quite honestly like i said unless i'm training for some specific purpose specific body composition that is kinda e what i want to eat. What's appealing to me. And how much and how often is very like. i said. very much feedback directed.

Sapporo Sean Erin Cold Donald Trump
Beyond Meat to launch two new versions of its meatless burger

Murph and Mac

00:32 sec | Last week

Beyond Meat to launch two new versions of its meatless burger

"As the meat substitute company capitalizes on its popularity by offering consumers more choices beyond meat, says one of the new Patty's Isas juiciest yet It has 35% less saturated fat than a beef burger that is 80% lean, and the second Newberger is meant to appeal to a more health minded customer with 55% less saturated fat. Meatless burgers have drawn criticism from many dietitians, however, who say they're not much healthier than beef. Thank you still remain on indulgence. Investors celebrating Madonna's vaccine

Isas Juiciest Newberger Patty Madonna
Diamond Jim Moran

Gangland Wire

06:25 min | Last week

Diamond Jim Moran

"Welcome wire-tappers out there here in this video of gang. Lenoir beautiful fall afternoon not on the golf courses afternoon folks in here getting ready to record a podcast for y'all i have the grandson of james diamond. Jim brough cada. His grandson's name is bobby. Bre qatar now bobby. Did i pronounce that close enough. Yes sir okay good. I like to say my northwest missouri nasal hillbilly kind of trying funny. What about that. I just had a comment. Somebody said always seems weird to have a guy with a southern voice. Say the word capco. Now i don't really consider southern voice to you have got northern voice to people up this guy resume shah firm chicago to him. I have a southern boy. So a hewlett you guys. Listen to bobby talk a little bit and you'll hear that salt sweet syrupy south louisiana voice. Our true southern boys right. Yeah it's a little different than new. All has its own unique accent. I've been confused being from boston. New york no. Yeah you know. I hear that now. Wow i do hear that many dollars around the city you know. Talk to different people. You can tell what part of the city from interested in so now. Let's get to the meat of this. You've written a book here recently. Called food for kings. And it's part to crime as part history in his part a recipe book cookbook. If you will food for king diamond jim. A new orleans legend now diamond. Jim mocatta was your grandfather. And there's a really interesting book folks especially if you like to cook. It's got those really great new orleans recipes in it and this guy your grandfather. Your grandpa was one of the most colorful characters in new orleans from what i've read about him. It was unbelievable. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got interested in doing this particular book. Okay very first of all. Thank you for having me on your show. appreciate it. earth off a married with two children in military. Over twenty years i retired in two thousand and eight and i've been aircraft mechanic for american airlines and now delta. I picked up this project after my father died and wait basically he motivated me to kind of pick up the torch and carry it. My dad was a dentist for forty years and he always wanted to do a screen. Play or movie per se. He's never do it. I have i did a screenplay originally. But i didn't go anywhere with it so i decided a couple years ago. Put a book together and kind of tell a story about my grandfather while i'm telling. The story basically blended in combination photos and recipes as i journey through his whole life. I start off when he's a childhood and carried on throughout his life until the success of his life until he died. It's a good read. It took me about eight years to go through it and do the research are did get a lot of information from father. My father ahead a manuscript he has deposition that he had put together with a attorney. Back in nineteen seventy seven. So i use all that information and took my tom everything in the book that i've talked about a kind of support it with a document and the article. Either that was given to me handed down to me or maybe that of actually found in the library found a lot of information doing the research about my grandfather in the library his life. It was pretty easy because his life was documented since he was a teenager so every time i tried to fill in the blank. Something in my father didn't pass down to me. I was able to answer all the questions that i wanted to answer about his life. You know interesting. That stuck a little bit about his early life. He fought under the name of jimmy moran which is kind of like no joy hupa in chicago took on an irish name in order to fight. I think more likely it was a lot of prejudice against italians in those days. Especially in new orleans. If you remember we go all the way back to the black hand days and they they killed the chief of police some Supposedly some black hander. Kill the chief of police in of new orleans storm to jail and hung. I dunno must have been six or eight say ends i. I can't remember exactly for sure. How many so. It would have been wise for him to fight on her an irish name. I would imagine tell me about his fight career. Let's get started. Well that was one thing. They kind of treat. My curiosity was widely. Any changes his name in the book. I did find a quote where someone asks them. Same questioned do an interview. He said he did for business reasons. But that was part of it because you gotta realize he didn't get into business opened up first restaurants on nineteen forty nine. He changed his name. I found articles where he had his name change in teens early. Nineteen hundreds. He hung around a couple of friends of his feet. Herman who's an italian pita. Golota was his last name. And the other guy. By the name of powell moran. His name was francis. Paul miranda and all of them were full blooded italian as you know and you listeners. Know that back. Then the titans will kinda frown upon. They weren't considered equal. Maybe to a lot of different even the irish whatever. So i've found out. He had changed his name one. He didn't want his mother was fighting when he was on the fighting card. You know and during the preliminaries in hours fighter. Irish name would draw big crowds for fight. A lot of people don't know new orleans was actually a big boxing city equivalent to chicago and new york but on a smaller scale of course but it was a big boxing town in a drool audit. And that's how he got to meet jack dempsey marciano. You know all those big fights back then because they came to new orleans and then he connected so his first circle of friends will all italians. pete. Herman was abandoned. Champion thinking sixty nine fights from nineteen twelve to nineteen twenty two now as far as my grandfather. He wasn't as big of a boxer as those guys. He did it for my research. Maybe about six years and then he got a little older. He got into referee in and he started refereeing. He did that until about twenty seven years old. Then that's when you up his barber shop in the open up a barber shop with a boxer front of his last name was burke in as when he got an barring after referee

New Orleans Bobby James Diamond Jim Brough Capco King Diamond Jim Jim Mocatta Lenoir Chicago Hewlett Qatar Jimmy Moran Shah Missouri Louisiana American Airlines Golf Boston
Washington, DC-area restaurant chain offers free Thanksgiving meals for seniors

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | Last week

Washington, DC-area restaurant chain offers free Thanksgiving meals for seniors

"It's an act of almost unbelievable kindness by a local restaurant owner feeding seniors for free this Thanksgiving fighting calls for smaller holiday gatherings this year because of covert 19 medium rare D. C. Is showing some concern for the elderly and is making a generous offer. Mark Butcher, owner of the D C area chain, is asking anybody to email them. If they know of a person, 70 years or older who will be alone for the holiday, and they'll deliver a meal in person for free and they need some help. We need donations, and we need drivers. They want to make a donation that can email us a secret sauce meat, medium rare restaurant dot com. If they want to drive, they can email us same address and say, I want to drive. The initial post had quite a response so far on Facebook and Twitter. Here to retweeted more than 2000 times as of Friday night. Ken Duffy w T o P.

Mark Butcher Facebook Twitter Ken Duffy
Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Are Beans a Protein or Carbohydrate?

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition. Diva podcast. i'm your host monterey nagel and in this episode. i'm going to answer. The eternal question are being of protein or carbohydrate food. Vegetarians and vegans lean pretty hard on beans as a source of protein. And even those of us who sometimes eat meat but also enjoy plant based meals will often build our meat free meals around some sort of legume and that's because they contain more protein per serving than most other plant foods but the nutritional profile of legumes is very different from animal protein sources eggs meat fish and chicken get anywhere from fifty to ninety five percent of their calories from protein with the rest usually coming from fat leg. Hume's on the other hand only get about a quarter of their calories from protein and the rest is mostly carbohydrate. Soybeans are a bit of an exception being higher in both protein and fat and lowering carbohydrate than other legumes. Peanuts which are technically legumes are another exception. They're even higher in fat than soybeans and lower in protein than most beans. Perhaps because of this peanuts are generally categorized as nuts for the purposes of dietary guidelines despite their botanical classification. So can you get enough protein from beans well. Although we think of beans as being a protein food the truth is that they provide a lot less protein per serving and per calorie than animal proteins. A three ounce serving of cooked chicken breast for example provides about twenty six grams of protein and about one hundred and sixty calories. The standard serving size for beans is a half of cup of cooked beans and that provides just eight grams of protein for around one hundred twenty calories so we would need to eat a lot more beans to get the same amount of protein as we get from meet. It would take two cups of black beans. That's about four hundred and eighty calories to get the same amount of protein as you'd get from three quarters of a cup of chicken breast for example so for every gram of protein and beans. You're also taking in about three grams of carbohydrate and a lot more calories now although beans are relatively high in carbs these are some of the healthiest types of carbs. The carbohydrate portion of beans is a combination of fiber and starch but about half of the starch in beans is actually what we refer to as resistant starch that means it resists digestion and absorption in the small intestine and goes on to function much like fiber in the gut the fiber and the resistant starch in beans feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut. They promote regularity they helped to modulate our blood sugar response to food. They also increase our satiafaction and society after meals helping us feel full with fewer calories. Perhaps that's why people who eat. More beans generally have healthier body weights and lower waist. Circumference beans also contain fido sterols. These are plant compounds that are shaped so similarly to cholesterol that they can occupy the cholesterol receptors in ourselves and regular being consumption is linked with better cholesterol profiles. So beans have a lot going for them. But let's talk about how they fit into your diet because when we build a meal around beans instead of meat which is a great idea. We may need to make some other adjustments to our plates because beans contain both protein and starch. It might make sense to reduce other sources of starch to compensate for that. So if you're having black-eyed peas instead of blackened catfish for dinner. Perhaps you skip the bread or the potatoes. Beans and rice of course are a classic combination in part because of the complementary amino acid profile. But you could have a smaller portion of rice with your beans instead of half a cup of beans and a cup of rice. For example you could switch the proportions on that double up on the beans ordered to bump up the protein and reduce the rice to half a cup and keep in. Mind that if you're trying to match the protein content that you'd get from meet. You may not have as many calories to spend on other foods due to the extra calories that are riding along with that plant to protein.

Hume
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Are served meatballs garden no corrobos. It's a fast food restaurant subway yeah all right. Where do you go yeah so they're testing it out and six hundred eighty five locations micro nationwide. That'd be pretty cool. Oh yeah you can read another posted. Alec your subways vegan so i know i know the same thought they were testing. The like vegan subs like what was that maybe ten years ago yeah thirty five seven years ago went out and tested them all out and i was thinking that would go nationwide. It was like man we're going to be on it. They were like one of five locations testing using this when they go nationwide. We're going to be like blown up. You got a lot of search traffic. Some did it for a long time probably not anymore because they never they never did. You may have been a cause of this meatball thing. Maybe maybe i'll have to actually forget bamberger. Forget how often often how how many other places there you can put beyond meat into <hes> and great yeah all right and final finally and i think you might know someone who released last week a very important climate change report stating that more plants centered a and a more plant center diet would help reduce the cause of climate. How would i know that one does because because it was talked about on slack al gore now this is this is the u._n. The u._n. Big client they're big climate change report and <hes> talked a lot about plant centered diet good glad to hear that i missed album you did vis. I wonder i anti gotten if i had not been traveling. I don't maybe maybe one or two but i don't think most of those would hit my radar good. What do you think should do more games. Totally love games games all right all right good luck with c._n._n. Will thank you we'll talk. We'll see everybody next week. Take yes good to be back. Thanks for listening everyone and looking forward to next episode and the next and the next right all right <music> ah..

al gore bamberger thirty five seven years ten years
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Are we improving yourself too much? Yeah. That was good one. That was a good one. That was interesting topic mantra recap recap in thirty seconds left. So our whole podcast has been typically, I think about either diet, or fitness or habits all of which are sort of a form of self improvement. Particularly the habits. But fitness, as well and even the night and I read a book that I forget the name of by now. I don't them. But anyway and an article in the New Yorker and it was about just how this whole self-improvement movement had gone off the rails. And like with now the bio hacking and all the data we have it just kind of has gone too far. And the question was in this article that the asserted actually was that doing this is making us worse, not better, making us less happy, not happier and less fulfilled. And all that. And so it just sort of shook me up a lot to, to kind of read this kind of believe it, and I read a book about it, but these guys kind of did some experimentation anyway, it was about that it was it was questioning why do we even bother trying to make ourselves better? And it got some response got to Email sent by people not not to angry things, but just people who were who were also shaken up that I did not like that idea. Do you. How are you feeling about it? Now. I would say, I am definitely different. It has changed me not that episode, but that that whole week or two where I was just thinking about that reading, but that like it has definitely made me feel differently about that stuff. I we that is what kind of launched us into now going on a year or more. Talking about doing things just for the sake of doing them and kind of, you know, when there's no obvious future, payoff to this investment you're making with your time, like, why would you do it? And we've, we've kind of landed on the answer like that's the point. The point is to do things like that, because otherwise why are you really here? So you could disagree with that, obviously. But I don't know. I to that's that has become my attitude, much more. And I still have lots and lots of things that I tried to do for the future, obviously, because I like those things, but I, I have some more balanced because of that. I think I like that, too. And I come back to this discussion and that kind of idea often, and I don't know that it's significantly changed the way I do things or approach things. But it kind of allows me to you. Accept or justify doing things for the sake of doing them like you're talking about you and just feeling comfortable with that versus feeling. Like I have to always be improved myself and always be doing something to get healthier make money or whatever. Yeah, exactly. And this ties into some of the other topics we talk about on here a lot like the blue zones thing and the idea that, that, that sort of attitude that it is okay to, of Yeah. course, Of you course, would. you would have sense of purpose. But also this idea of being able to relax and have fun and be around people you love and all that. It's really important to health too. So, yes, by the way, the book is called desperately seeking self improvement. If anyone wants to go that, but start with the New Yorker article. Yes. All right. Which we don't know the name of. I think it was something along the lines of are we improving? Yeah. Because again, the podcast exactly that we didn't know if we get in trouble. It wasn't exactly that we changed if you thought about calling. I think it was. Are you improving yourself to death? Okay. All right. So this one this one is not necessarily one of our top episodes, but in fairly recent, but I feel like we, we owe it to the audience to have a little quick update on this one and Matt's. Quest for deeper sleep, we did a whole episode on things you were trying to do to be able to sleep better and the kind of rabbit hole you're going down on sleep..

Matt Yeah. thirty seconds
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"He got highlighted in born to run which certainly helped. So when I look back at like, I don't know what nobody athletes place in the movement is what I know is that when I started it like there weren't other Pam based running blogs like this just wasn't. 'cause because I know this because when they would sprout up I would my ears perk up, and I would say, wait a minute. There's someone who's doing the same thing. I am. And I remember a time. I could think of like four people who were kind of now doing what we now it was doing, and it was like, wow. Like, they're they're a competitor is now in some sense, and I had to keep an eye on them. But it's so funny because now if you try to do that like, it just would be the point that's exercise because you'd find I I don't know hundreds of blogs where it's like a plant based person or vegan vegetarian, bruise independence. And they're blogging about it. I, you know, I do not at all think knowing that. It was the first blog of that kind of plant based fitness or vegan, fitness or vegetarian, fitness. There were certainly people who were in that healthy living space who were vegetarians or who would begin and who were posting about their runs and things it just that they for some reason, no one had kind of said like what this thing is about is pimp as fitness, and it was more just like about about them about their life. And they happen to be those things. So yeah. So nobody I think like came along right at what seemed like the beginning of the whole plant based athlete idea hitting hitting its stride. Because as I said it has existed for ten twenty years before that with people like Brendan brazier and Brennan bridge, even his thrive book out. But it just hadn't really gone anywhere yet. And so we came along and certainly helped to move that along, but we didn't invent that. We didn't start it became along near the beginning and kind of provided this sort of central hub for it. Maybe it was minds for four that. And just added I think to the legitimacy of it because as you start to see more sites that are that are, you know, at least trying to be fair and scientific about it adds ads legitimacy and helps people to make the choice to do it. So you know, who knows where we actually fit in. But that's how I have perceived anyway. I guess I want to make sure that it's clear because I think I know how you feel about this. But I mean. We don't we don't view all those other podcasts and. And blogs and stuff as as competition. We're grateful now for all of them. Right. Yeah. That's that is very true. That was hard to learn. I think one of the things I learned about when I used to think about trying to because I always wanted to have a business being entrepreneur was that if you find a space, and there is nobody in it. That's a pretty good sign that that is not going to be a good space. Now. There are exceptions that changed the world when someone comes along and does it, but you know, if you don't have competitors. Or if there are people doing the same thing as you inviting for the same attention as you are. You're probably not in a good space. First of all. And what I learned is that if there's no one else blogging about your topic, or you know. Doing things around your topic. There's nobody to link to you when you're when you're trying to grow blog..

Brendan brazier Pam Brennan bridge ten twenty years
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"It was just a an interesting thing, and it was hard. Because I my daughter was only two months old. No, not she was like four or five months old at the time. So it was kind of strange to go away for two months from her and from our family, and I just just like one of the things like when I did it seemed fine looking back. I'm like, I can't believe I left my wife with the two kids for that long. We have to do that with an infant, basically. I don't know. That's amazing. And then they actually ended up they've flew out and met me in in Washington for a little while few days, but in Seattle, actually. So yeah, it's just it's just got it all went down and got it all happened. I'm proud of it. But man, I just was a whole lot of stuff that had happened for that thing to. Yeah. I would say that was that was definitely a turning point at that point. I was working for you semi part. I mean, I don't know doing customer service, and it was doing the podcast and kind of any other random thing you needed help with. And the team. Let's see the team would have been Susan myself and knew that point. But it was soon after that that we grew pretty pretty significantly. Yeah. This is what I was saying like kind of becomes a blurred to me at this point from from year five to your ten like I can remember the past two years, and we doesn't change a whole lot in the past two years. But I think I don't know six seven eight was sort of just awkward transition period. I didn't really know what kind of business. We were what we wanted to do. When did we start having more people? Like, I remember I went to the Seth Godin a thing where I got the chance. So we've mentioned Seth Godin many times on here. He's a marketing author, but just the guy who I think is work is so good. And so important, I got this. She has to go spend a week in his office with like fourteen other people's from one this little like con- you to make a little video and do these as my one and got to go, and that was really fun when I came back from that, I was all fired up about creating the running groups, right? And that's where that whole idea kind of hatched, and it's good and really had hands on that a lot and really helped us to figure out how to make that work. So that was really cool. We hired Maggie to help coordinate. There's running groups groups. Yeah. Yeah. And she was with us for about a year or so. And then I think she she had to move on. She moved actually just things changed. But we'll Esther Esther who who if you Email me athlete right now, you're probably going to talk to her. A lot of people. I think I think more people investor the we realize. Oh, yeah. Yep. But anyway, she's about to hit her three year anniversary with athlete. Okay. So she would have joined the very beginning of twenty sixteen. I think. Yeah. So she may have overlapped with Maggie. I don't remember. But there was Maggie. And then, and then we had Billy helping us for awhile guy, helping us with some of the marketing things. And then when did when did will come on?.

Maggie Seth Godin Esther Esther Seattle Washington Billy Susan two months two years five months three year
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"And then soon after that we decided to you you can as to rekindle the podcast. That's funny because I definitely remember those early days of me trying to get into the gas. But. I don't remember being the one who who convinced you to get back going. Yeah. You definitely did. I think I think you're you're the more progressive thinker of us. You're the younger the millennial of our of our team. So you know, what is hip and cool and used to the podcast is where it's at. So it wasn't. I don't know. It wasn't. It's not clear memory like how it all went. But I got to the point where I was only writing a blog post a week or maybe even two weeks sometimes because I didn't think it was that important. I would have preferred back then I chose to write things that I thought were good took awhile to write rather than posting a random thing just to just to read a new post. So. That happened. But then we started growing more podcast episodes. And it's funny because no mouth it started as a blog, and like the my contribution in terms of personality and talking about my life like that was all on the ball. And I never do any of that on the blog anymore. Now that kind of stuff is more on the podcast. And so we made that transition. It wasn't really on purpose. We just decided to start doing more podcast episodes. And now, I think the guys is the more active place as far as as far as. Well, at least when it comes to me, creating content. It's mostly via the podcast. But we now have a lot more guest writers and things on the main site. Yeah. I mean now, we kind of you the website as a resource in an educational tool in the podcast as still as that. But also as like a. Way to connect with the community more. So anyway, yeah, I'm just trying to think what they weren't. There was all this stuff at the beginning. And that's all very clear memory. I know them we had the book came out. And this was kind of around the time. We were starting to podcasts. Again. I think the first book that nobody it, which is called no meat athlete. And that's the one that recently got revised and updated now five years later. So this is about halfway into Nome athletes lifespan when that happened, and when I did this book tour with which I think really neat thing. And one of the things that I'm most proud of with it was that the public who didn't want to do a book tour because it was a small publisher and most the vast majority of publishers don't do book tours anymore. They're just with the with the internet being available to us to promote books. It's kind of hard to justify paying for an author to go around the country and stay in hotels and fly planes and all that. So they don't really happen that much anymore except was really really big already successful authors. But I had wanted to do it forever. I thought like this would be such a cool thing if we have. All these people who don't athlete all around the world, like how cool would it be to be able to go on a trip a tour where I go and do all these events and meet all the people who've read the blog, I thought that'd be the coolest thing. So the book was the perfect excuse to do that. And the way it worked with like emailed our audience or maybe wrote a moldable was about it. Instead like I want to do a book tour. Here's roughly the route, I can imagine taking and the time line. I want to do it in which was two months from like, I don't know September October, my partner member. Like, if you are on one of the in one of these cities along this route, which I've just put a picture of let me know if you have an interest in doing an event, or if you know someone who would do an event or just want to be part of it somehow, and we got tons of responses from all these different people who like new running store owners own stores themselves or own little juice bars or whatever and ended up booking MIT treating like forty or forty five events in two month period that Adrover from ashville up to New York back down to DC.

MIT Nome partner publisher Adrover ashville New York five years two months two month two weeks
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"And then oh, so I have mentioned Susan yet. Susan came on pretty early Susan like is still in our in our company, and she manages social media now, but she wrote a lot of post in the early days of no doubt. The I think for a while. It was she I am. I sister wrote one post for weeks. My sister lived with me during that time in between her. I don't know what it was college. And then eventually moving into your own plays with her boyfriend at the time. But so we would all right one post a week. And that was that was the beginning of it being different from other blocks because first of all it was I was studying that stuff a lot. And I was learning how to you write compelling blog posts and pretty soon after about six months started to realize that what I ate for breakfast today is not an interesting headline unless you're looking. Attract that sort of community of just like people who were there to be friends and hang out. But that was the only one I wanted something that would be much bigger than that and grow and that would keep getting bigger and better. And I realized that I could not do that. If it was just me, and I didn't want I didn't want it to be just me because I just realized that I did not want to be stuck where like if I was down or out of running or whatever, I just wouldn't want the whole business and brand and everything to go away because I was unable to perform for it. So I just got dead yet. It'd be better if other people were involved in this, and if people were not here to follow Matt Frazier, but they were here to follow. No athlete that'd be way better. So Susan's sorry writing posts fairly often and. Then I went to a I read we needed help you needed someone else who would do more like administrative kind of work, not an assistant, but you know, someone who could handle customer service emails do things like that. And just do lots and lots of random odd jobs that there are when you're running a website. And so we were hiring for a job, and we put out some sort of offer on no Math Made and a little just rip shin and said, here's what you need to do apply. And we got these applications one of which was yours, and you turn me down. I think you've finished in second place in that in that job race. So okay. And of about sixty people, I think who good, okay? You read near the top. You not the winner though. The winner was Ben Bonilla's who I don't know. I think I'd met him like south by south west or something. I don't know what it was..

Susan Ben Bonilla Matt Frazier six months
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"And then pretty soon. It was the point where I was I was now I would leave early to commute to school, and I just leave it our too early. So I could stop at Starbucks, and like just do a solid hour of work on the blog before I got to school. And then finally like, you just mentioned I was the point where I was writing in the class, and it wasn't too much longer after that too. I decided that. You know, grad school was not going to be something that I finished. So I got my masters, and then I don't know if it was your after that. But I didn't I got I realized that one more solid year of work, and I could finish grad school and get a PHD. Maybe I should have done that. But I don't really know. Because if I had then, you know, you would not have had the energy that had got over the next year. And maybe someone would have beat me to it. And maybe maybe it would have been a whole lot harder to do it after that. Or if I've finished grad school, then I would've gotten job offers, maybe and that would have been tempting in may be needed to do the easy secure route. So anyway, I think it was a good decision. Yeah. Right. So anyway, it only took it only took two years. I think from the time I started to when I said I'm going to stop grad school give up that small stipend and live off the money that Athey makes. And that was that was kinda cool scary for sure, but did it my wife was supportive, even if she was apprehensive. And did you have a kid at this point? Yes. Because I haven't had to keep when I was in grad school. So yeah, we had a kid at that point. So that was kind of scary. I guess now that I think about. Actually back then I mean now feel like it's like, everyone has a side hustle. Right. All right have affected like. Even six years or let's see tenure anniversary two years eight years ago. Back in twenty two. And it was definitely less of a thing back then. Yeah. It was. I don't know. I so I read a lot of posts in those days like inspired by that whole Tony Robinson. And I had a lot of stuff about burning the boats, and I'm like if you wanna take the island burn the boats, and so a lot of that was going through my head at the time. Like, you know, I'm going to do this. And it's going to guarantee that the box because he's because I have no other option if I if I do this. And that's scary. It's a lot harder to do as you get more kind of not entrenched. But as you put down more roots and have a bigger family and more responsibilities. It gets harder to make decisions like that. But you know, it wasn't that hard. Then did it and you what else helped like by by that point? I had gotten contacted by agents a few little book agents, and they wanted to publish books, and I didn't end up doing it. With them didn't end up doing it 'til maybe another year later that I signed a book deal and did it. But the fact that like that was happening, and I was starting to get little things in magazines here. And there it just started to feel like I could kind of point to those things that are not that wacky. Like not as well as having a blog and claiming you're going to one day make that your job. But at least I could tell other people like there's I have a have an agent now, and I'm working on a book deal or something. It just started to feel like this is this is kind of legitimate thing. I am pursuing. So that helped a whole lot. But anyway, that was it. And then shortly after we moved to Asheville and around this time is when I met you Doug. And we started working, I think, I know I met you..

Tony Robinson Starbucks Asheville Athey Doug two years eight years six years one day
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"I don't know anyway. But people started vying, desserts, and they started wearing them, and they started sending their pictures of themselves wearing them to my Facebook page, which not not my personal minority page, and I don't know I think that was kind of the beginning of this might actually be a real thing that is going to work, and like, maybe I can eventually do this instead of grad school, so and no one in my family, even my wife included for good reason really took me seriously in that way, like it because it was just so small it was a tiny thing. I think it took six months before we could get five hundred page views a day. So when I was having these big dreams we were getting sixty or eighty people clicking pages per day on the site. And. Obsessively refreshed that looks like watch when a new person clicked on new page. So it's so different now. But but it took off like that. So were you so one thing I remember about starting rookie critter? Was I had had this other fulltime job, and you were in grad school and any chance I would get between like. You know projects at work or if I had a few minutes here in a few minutes here. I would be like working on my blog in my little cubicle. Pretending like, I was doing real work. We're you know, you're in school. But like did you re sitting in the back of the class ready blog posts? Yeah. Eventually I was doing exactly that literally. I remember the first time I wrote about in the class. It was like, man. This is kind of weird that I'm in grad school and doing this. So yeah, it just it just gradually consume more like at. I I said I'm gonna read the post today because I had heard that if you did that for two months, then Google would start to notice that your site existed and start sending you traffic, which is exactly what happened. But it was really good in hindsight that I had a goal like I'm going to write a post every single day for two months because as we've talked about that that that's enough to get through that little dip when it feels like no one's reading. So that was your goal from the very like the very beginning. They won. Yeah. It was I'm gonna read oppose every day between and I don't even know if I did it which is funny, but for a long time six seven weeks for sure I didn't miss a day. Even a weekend just wrote every single day, and I would start to get up early to do that stuff or or stay up late and just always make sure that post went up, and then as you can imagine like once that's a priority. Something else, usually shifts. And so the grad school started to become less priority. And I definitely kept it up, and I kept doing it. And I was it was I wasn't like failing as a student vitamins. But I I really did stop like any sort of extra work that I made it thought I'd be putting it at school in started going into this instead, and then my weekend started filling up with like projects of trying to do redesign the website or get something working..

Facebook Google two months six seven weeks six months
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"And there were post every single day. You should mention that. It was I mean, it is a niche for sure, but I mean, I don't know anymore. But those blogs used to be huge. Oh, yeah. They had they had massive followings like like, they would get hundreds one hundred two hundred comments on post, right and three times a day on that. Right. Like, I just think they had basically rabid fans who just would refresh the page or what check their RSS feed back in the day. Just looking for new content. It was like it was kind of like reality TV, basically. But even more real because now it was not orchestrated the way reality TV is. But it was just someone's life, and I really got into that. None of them were really making businesses out of them. They all not many of them ran ads from this company called food buzz that would just serve you different food ads. But it just the pay was was pitiful that thing did. And so to me I saw that happening. I was part of that. And I enjoyed it. And it really helped me 'cause I got some of that energy if people who were that into this. And that's where like all the comments came from. And it was good. And I made some good friends I got to post on their blogs, sometimes some of them posted on my blog too. So that was all good. No problem fund. And then when I started the site, I didn't really know like what would happen with it. Or what I wanted to happen out of it. But I just had this sense that if that it would be good to build an identity who cared about what you were saying. And so I even as I saw that there wasn't anything about blogs. But I saw that this healthy living community existed. And I just got the sense like, well, if you have all those people paying attention to what you think and actually caring about you. And when you recommend something they actually listen and go, try it. Then surely one day if you get enough of those people there's a way to create a business from this or make a living from this or make it so that it can be what you do. So I wasn't concerned about the fact that it looked like there was no real business around. And so in my mind, it was like I'm going to do this. And I think what would be fun is. If us old t shirts once I came up with the name. No Methodist said well that we need to have a t shirt. So that was kind of my ultimate vision for the site. Was that one day we would sell t-shirts at races and there'd be a big community people. But that was all I had in mind have anything in mind about how like it might turn into anything real just had the sense that it was good to build a following people. So anyway, that's that's what I was has to do started selling the t shirts. I was so scared to sell anything back then. So I like the first few batches we just sold them at cost. I did not want people to like criticized because I didn't I wanted it to become a business. But that was not my reason I was doing it for like, I just thought it'd be really cool to share this thing. And I wanted there that'd be this information out there. And I wanted to do something that was fun and something that was so different from what I was doing grad school. So started telling the t shirts like at our cost. I don't know if they were twelve or fourteen dollars this this scraggly looking carrot that we made computer at home. Started Jamaican paint. My sister made in pain. Yes. And then I, and then I took it into Microsoft publisher was the name of the software, and you could make these things I don't it might even been like a PowerPoint slide that I made and then district printed off..

Microsoft publisher t one day fourteen dollars
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Just like do you want to make that decision or not? And the other thing holding me back was like I was like just seemed like a ton of work and hearts like how would you possibly go over to a friend's house or a family member's house for dinner like what just how would you manage being vegetarian? So it was it was on my radar. I was into it. But I had decided I couldn't do it for those reasons. And I said I'm just going to be eating the no more red meat. No more four legged animals base because what I did. And so that's where I was was eating chicken. But at the end of Tony Robbins thing on the last day of a four-day thing he gives you his diet and pitches, you his on his diet, which is really about like maximizing energy as well as long term health. But it was it was talking about short term health, and fitness, and he really encourage you to be mostly vegetarian. I think at that time. He was saying eat a little bit of. Fish, but it was basically fish and vegetables, some greens and things like that along with some other ideas that I don't fully agree with about how you combine the foods and all that. But. After that. I was just all because being one of his things for four days if you're into him it gets you really excited an amped up. And so by the time the last day when he saying, okay, go to this. I was like all right. I'm in I'm excited about this. And I said art, I'm really gonna try to be vegetarian 'cause I got convinced that maybe it wouldn't be the end of my boss marathon journey that maybe it would actually help. I had no idea. But that wasn't the reason I was doing it. I was doing it because I had ethical motivations for wanting to be that. And finally this event convinced me that I could do that without giving too much giving up too much in the short term as far as my health and energy and all that. So. I was I would do that. I and I think I ate a chicken sandwich or something like on the way home from that event. And that are you like half of it? And I said, I just couldn't do this. He he had all these pictures of this. I don't know fecal soup or something they call it like in the factories of the chicken in their own fecal matter. I don't know. But it was gross. And I and I just said I'm not going to do this. I'm actually going to try this diet thing. And so I did it. And I think it was only like I don't know four or five days after I got back from that that I said I'm going to start a website about that. Because the other side of the story, then just the decision to go vegetarian was that. I was in graduate school time studying applied math trying to get my PHD and was sort of not sure where that was headed. I just didn't really want to become a teacher. But I was kind of doing it because I felt like I just needed. I don't know. I love math. And I wanted to find something to do with it interesting. But I couldn't and didn't know where it was headed at least. So like. The chance of. Wow, I'm also not just changing my that. I'm going to start something new and just see where that takes me that'll came up. And I said, well, you know, there's there's not that much information about how do you do this thing with marathon training because I looked for that? I wanted to make sure that I was doing it correctly and found almost nothing what I did find was like either really old outdated websites or kind of like ours now or. Just stuff that was written by clearly militant ethical vegan types who were like, just you know. It wasn't really anything halfway scientific about how this might work for sports or how to use it for sports. It was just like why? It's so good for sports. And why it was so wrong beat me? And like it just it just wasn't talking to me at all. So that'd be cool. And then I came up with the name, and I just got got. No, meat, athlete dot WordPress dot com. I think is what it was and wrote a blog post, and then told them my friends about it..

Tony Robbins five days four days four-day
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"To deal with your crazy. Uncle that stuff. Yes. All right, good. Hey, we're going to be talking about history or you can go down a little of the history books. This is going to be fun. I liked so we decided to do a little combination blog post podcast episode. This time. Kind of just talking about knowing athlete and about. The not not about the team per se. But certainly we will talk about the team in the process. But you know, we're coming up on our tenure in anniversary. So that is kind of cool. Yeah. That isn't that is amazing for me to believe that we've been doing this for ten years. Now, I've known for ten years, but it wasn't much longer. It was only it's only year into that. Probably the people started helping me, and I was not the only one doing it. So. Yeah. That's that is just hard to imagine that it's been that long. And we figured we begin the begin the process of celebrating that by just looking back at the tank 'cause we figured ten years. A long time. There's probably a lot of people who are new listening to this podcast from the past year or two. Who haven't heard us tell the same old stories about the early days? So we'll just go through how began. The changes that went through. And where it is. Now, just the case that it's interesting to anyone who kind of a fan of the podcast in the site in the brand and everything else or if you are interested in just starting your own thing. I think I would imagine it would be useful for you as well there at the very least inspiring to make you realize that you can do this is quite possible to have an idea and started website. And then eventually you turn that into a job, and it actually becomes something that that is legitimate that people care about and that's a pretty neat. Dr ho community, you built a whole tribe. Yes. So quite doable. And that is that is something I'm thankful for thank before that we live in an era when that can happen because when we were born there weren't there were jobs like that. You couldn't really do that so easily. So it's true. That's very true. There you go for better. What's that said for better or worse? Yeah. I think I think for way better. But we do have that idea of making social media illegal and just having a dictator who information. He's. Have you better? Anyway. So I'm gonna go to a Tony Robbins event. Dug in December this coming December, the San? Yes. I know you turned around and said the little metoo thing happened with him. He did he did. But he seems to have. Apologized profusely for it. And I think he's pretty good at managing his image. And all that. 'cause that's sort of his thing. He's a communicator. I think that from my understanding it was something he said, not something. He did. Oh, no, not at all. It was just that. He was he was appeared to be criticized in the movement, and he's he's kind of explaining apologize. But anyway, go into that. He so I went to his thing for by first Tony Robbins event, and I do not make secrets that of the fact that I'm a fan of his stuff and his his teaching and things have helped me a whole lot. But the first one that you went to an event was two thousand nine which was ten years ago from six months from now. And I went to that. I was not vegetarian. I I was trying to qualify for the Boston marathon at that point. And I was like six years into that journey and six years into Boston Dery. Yemen vegetarian. I didn't really, Yep. Yeah. So I was taken a ton of time off the thing. I'd take an an hour fifty minutes or something off my no not that much ninety. I take ninety minutes off my time. So anyway, I was kinda start though, I was getting injured and at the same time I had started wanting to become vegetarian. Not the didn't didn't think about that. At all didn't know what it was really. But I just like everyone else I had this idea that if you do that you will not be able to do any serious athletics that if you do that it's kind of the end of the Boston marathon thing it's.

Tony Robbins Boston Boston Dery Dr ho community Yemen San ten years six years ninety minutes fifty minutes six months
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Right? Black friday. Holidays. I enjoyed like Friday. I enjoy the doorbusters idea. Don't actually do it that often, but I like people people declare war on black Friday, specifically REI hate Nari for that reason. Man. I just do. Yeah. I like I love that. I love the shopping. It's like the kickoff of the Christmas season. Everyone goes out at talk crowded and festive you start finally putting on Christmas music and you're shopping for loved ones. But no, I realized that that's bad. Opt out or whatever that was what does that up though up outside? Yeah. I think it's really I love that idea. But I sure do. But. All right. So anyway, so back to back to here. And I think that this kind of wrap this up with this is where are you going? Now, we're going to Spain as I think I mentioned bicep. So I don't really know we did is you went to Spain. And we went to mostly the south part of Spain Madrid out and this year, we're going to Madrid north so we will get to Barcelona which people say all kinds of great things about him quite excited about Barcelona as well as some of the Basque country, or they speak different language, which they also be different language of bars loan, but and Catalonia in general, but in the Basque country, they speak different language, and we've also go to real Lowry, Ohio, which is the wine region in between Madrid and the Basque country. And yeah, that's actually beat for Thanksgiving Day. We there we have a little little I'm going to do a hike thing. I guess it's appropriate right on my least favorite holiday. I'd do at least favorite activity. We have this hike plan to this beautiful lake thing. I don't know. So that'll be nice terrible. If well it'll be okay. And then I guess. I guess we'll go out and get some top us for for our thanksgiving dinner. That sounds great just you in the immediate family. And my dad is going to be there for that first half. He's slow and a half. But he'll be for the first week cool. So that will be a different kind of thanksgiving and. Not well, not really miss it that much. Yeah. It sounds great. It sounds like, you know. Tells like just a wonderful adventure for the family. It will be I hope swimming all goes. Well. Anyway enough about that. But what are you doing thanksgiving? The reason we're talking about these giving is because this is our last episode before thanksgiving, we'll put out one next book out on black Friday because it's a holiday, but we will not have one leading up to thanksgiving. So that's why we're that's why we're gonna thanksgiving bit. Now. What are you doing doing 'em? Am going back to the old stomping grounds of Washington DC. Okay. Birthplace of record Renner, and our friendship met. Yes. That's right. Yeah. Katie's brother lives up there, and is hosting most of her family, and my mom, and it's just going to be a whole bunch people in a tiny apartment and can be a lot of fun. Good. Very nice the black mountain turkeytrot. The winner is is up for grabs with United. Yeah. I'm kind phone to miss the miss the turkeytrot this year. Are you going to do anything up there? I don't know. Maybe I haven't haven't even looked into it. I definitely want to go for like a run. A couple of runs up there in the. You know, my old routes, but. Yeah. No, no, no race plans. Well, somebody's happy like who's going to be going for the for the win. For the regular. I've never never done before. There's usually mimosas and last year. There was a baby stroller. Involves. Gotcha. Well, that sounds nice. And I don't mean I don't really mean to hate on thanksgiving. I do think reconnecting this family, reunions, re uniting whatever that's all all very good stuff. Yeah. Absolutely giving. Thanks. It's a good thing that that part as well. Tap for the whole the whole reason for the season. Yes. Anyway, we're not gonna talk about vegan thanksgiving and what to do with as vegan. I'm sure we have episodes about that. I know we have blog was about that. So if you're interested in that stuff, Google, no meat athlete thanksgiving, and you will find whatever we've got on the topic. Then there's plenty. Yeah..

Spain Madrid Barcelona Google Renner Katie Ohio Catalonia Lowry United
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"I've heard you mentioned a lot probably just become a classic for me. I saw the theater with my dad, maybe when it came out fifteen years ago or something, and I thought it wasn't any good didn't like it. And somehow it's kinda gone into my rotation that I'll watch it two or three times during Christmas season. Now. And it's it's based on a book. I think is a John Grisham who has a book skipping Christmas that about this family that decides they're going to go on a cruise, and they're not going to spend any of the money. If you any of the stuff that you own Christmas, and they're gonna put all that into a dream vacation. And of course, just things go awry, but the reason I bring that up because we are heading into that season. But I this year, I'm skipping. My least favorite holiday, I'm skipping thanksgiving. My family, and I are doing that. So you're giving with the Frazier's might be IBM movie. Thanksgiving's giving with the Frazier's. Yes, you're skipping this many questions here. First of all how many of these Christmas movies? Are you watching by yourself? I as with your family. Almost all our with family. Okay. We we don't we're not big on TV the kids, you know, the digital Showtime at the end of the day usually, but once the Christmas season hits I'd say December first or so I try to get I tried to do one movie each day each day. Yeah. And like, you know, you might we might not all pay attention to all. But we just put it on. And kind of hang out watch the movie. I mean, I can see how that's one. All right. So that's that's Kushner, everyone. Okay. Number two. I kind of know because I've heard you talk about this every year, but. Must be a little probably will new away. You hate thanksgiving. So much. And is it because you're vegan or is this now it has nothing to do with being vegan. I mean, it's kind of joke. I don't hate it. I do enjoy the Thanksgiving Day. It's fine. I when I was a kid I always loved Christmas like every kid and loved the presence and all that and the festivities leading up to it the Christmas movies all that stuff. Thanksgiving was just this. I mean as a kid it was the most boring holiday. I thought you just had to kind of sit around and do nothing all day. It was all this talking people would watch football. I don't care about that. They would eat food that I'd never liked that it was not into thanksgiving food as a kid. And I think a lot of kids are not into thanksgiving food mine in particular, aren't totally as Ivan the vegan thing just just that type of food. I don't know there's something about it. That is not that kid friendly. And I just thought it was just a boring kind of stuffy holiday, so no pun intended. Yes. They. See I have a totally different view of things a lot of it's a lot of people's favorite holiday. I don't I don't really remember. How what I thought about it as a as a kid? I remember I don't remember feeling that strongly the way, but as an adult I love that it's such let's pressure than Christmas. Yeah. Because I mean, you just hanging out. Eat you go play around disc of gotta drop that in there. Just like there's like, no pressure. There's no gifts. There's no big decorations. Like, yeah. I don't know. I get that is true. And I will say I am gaining an appreciation for it. Just because as an adult you get once you have kids you get busy. So to have a day where you kind of there is nothing to do. Which is why didn't like it as a kid. It's actually kind of nice to just hang out and do nothing until till mealtime, man. I like cooking. I help do that in the morning. So it's good. Of course, you can do. They're put things you can do it. You can go buy off. Like, you said, you could do Turkey trot or tofurkey drop if you'd like so anyway, it's not that bad. I don't hate it. It just it's kind of a joke, but certainly not my favorite holiday. Let your favorite holiday is. I know this one too. New Year's.

Frazier John Grisham Showtime Turkey Kushner football Ivan fifteen years
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"The opposite thing where you start eating better and then you want to start working out a bit more and then you start wanting to drink less alcohol, perhaps. And you know, I'm just, I'm just in that mode and it's sort of contagious errands the same way right now. And it just feels like we're getting healthy again after months of just of being much more lenient with with choices and exercising. So that's really good. Do you think this in part because of the season change in season. You know, I really don't know. It's a great question. I've had this feeling before often for me. It's like January, February, I feel it. You know, usually it's like one New Year's resolution that you try to stick to and then it just turned into everything else going. Well, I don't know. I think it's part of the the life seasons, Doug one of our favorite themes. It's, you know, you tend this. I tend to vary heavily swing back and forth between lazy and sedentary and eating junk. Well, I mean relatively speaking, but and then just being all into it. So I have no doubt that in a few months, I'll be out of it again. Kind of tangent here the at the gauche or the other day, picking up some food. And I was like in the process, it's the meat section. Let me guess us stop being meat, Fridays, stop vegan, meat, Fridays. Friday's and I told you was no good. Yeah, we do. It's not quite as well as as anymore, but. Okay, but you know, like getting some and we were talking about what else I should make a big lake pancake and sausage breakfast tomorrow for the weekend. And she made this little off comment of like, you sure getting comfortable with with those needs and and it was like stung like, no. I don't wanna be. Don't want her thinking that about me. So easy though it is so easy but, but it kind of like with this fired me. And so the other day we were making this dish that we normally do put begin meat into them, and I was like, no, refusing. Thing about the bigamy is like, I don't. I try to always avoid the protein once wonder, protect pros protein Iceland's in them. The ones that are just made to say tan, where it's basically take flour and you rinse the star of flour and you're left with week Luton which makes Aden the meds it. That's all. So it seems sort of minimally processed. It's kind of easy. You can do it at home. I, I just haven't seen evidence that says weekly by itself is bad for you know, refined flours could, but it's like, I don't know it by my definition of junk food. Is that because it does not. Hopefully I haven't quite seen the evidence as if you beating beating big meats gonna be bad for you, but I do believe that it is just doesn't. It doesn't. It's not good for you. Right. Arguable whether it's bad for you, but it's definitely not now hundred percent protein. That's true. It's delicious. I mean, there's a the noble foods which is a, which is. A weekly, which is say Tate in. Those just so good. By the way they just got into WalMart. They're going to be ruled out, rolled out in two hundred fifty WalMart soars cross the country. Oh, that is awesome. I know they look lash company. I don't think people know that. Yeah, they're in. I think all Ingles, now's. Well. Yep, they're everywhere. And what's good about them is that compared to feel roast is that they don't automatically have a ton of fat in them..

WalMart Doug Iceland Aden Tate hundred percent
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"He myron is kind of the main constituent of meat that gives it that sort of irony on very specific and kind of known flavor in in in and meaty paste that you get an burger and they found a way to extract that from um legumes you know and it from plants and so that's kind of what sets them apart it's still not available at retail yet but again when we talk about the main stream these products are getting placed into uh you know standard burger restaurants as a as an option and and people are like wow this is insane and and so i think again yet worst were a little bit of a ways off but you know and the beauty of it is if you don't want to eat it you don't have to you know there's plenty of of of other plantbased options but again i think for the main stream once they get it right once they really dial in um that kind of recipe it's cool and and some in that pat brown whose the ceo of of impossible foods talks about a lot is that you know animals are animals they're kind of like once you take their meat like that's as far as you can go but with the plant kingdom and with plantbased food tech who knows where we can go we can maybe even go beyond that and make something even crazier an even more amazing hen the the flavor of me and so it's it i think it's i got inside these gone beyond the suckley you can go beyond the meat and so there's just so many different compounds in its and i think that is why were so excited about it is just because it kind of melds together all of these really fascinating industries of of science and technology and food um and business and marketing and stuff like that and and and i mean who knows but again it's like.

myron ceo pat brown
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Grow layers of layers of cells using a scaffold to create a steak or a burger or fish or uh even even dairy and milk and eggs and stuff like that so really exciting because like her and said it it really eliminates that need for for an animal to create these products if people still want to eat that and you know in a lot of ways the demand for meat and eggs in an animal products isn't going anywhere necessarily it's it in a lot of ways actually increasing throughout the world and so we can create a technology that that really changes that landscape for the better to make it cleaner in terms of foodborne illness make it potentially a bit healthier by reducing the you know cholesterol quick side and and some of the saturated fat and then of course most importantly reducing and eliminating the kind of ethical concerns that exist within industrialized at animal agriculture so that's kind of the background there an and you know these these products are are just exploding right now and and there was a recently a big deal there's a company and of course clean meat is still far are far ways off from being hitting the mainstream i think it costs you know ten thousand dollars a pound or something right now to have a clean chicken or clean meat but relented probably five to ten years yes that projection that's that's what some of them are saying and and you know that'd be great and so memphis meets is kind of leading the charge in a lot of ways on this it's a it's a company based in san francisco.

animal products memphis san francisco ten thousand dollars ten years milk
"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"meat" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"This sort of food tech lena plantbased foods tech space has has really exploded and um i just read an article recently that i think in the past few years or maybe even i think it's ten years i think the plantbased food tech sector has grown like eight percent or something i can't exactly remember what it said but it yet it still super small so the for example to plantbased meat market is i think one quarter of a percent of the entire meat market share and the i think the the plantbased milk and dairy is i think her like four percent or something like that and so there's this huge opportunity for companies in terms of markets to break into disrupting in a lot of ways in transforming the food system in ways that that are are are really exciting and so the plantbased foodstuffs of course is basically just taking various plant proteins and creating meet like so uh you know the most popular common one is is p protein that's what companies like beyond meat are doing using pease to create uh you know the beyond burger and stuff like that and that's just because it a p protein is widely available but a huge amount of of plant proteins are are yet to be discovered and so that's one one thing and then this kind of new idea of clean meat is is almost even more exciting to us just because from a science perspective it it basically as growing animal cells without using an animal on and and using basically uh you know kind of stem cell like technology too.

food system pease stem cell eight percent four percent one quarter ten years milk