35 Burst results for "Measles"

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

"Up, we're taking a look back at some of 20 twenties major events and one of the most remarkable scientific advances this year came in our understanding of how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air. Krone virus pandemic obviously made this an urgent question. And NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports that old scientific ideas quickly got thrown out of the window. For decades. The prevailing idea about respiratory viruses was that some were airborne, and some just weren't so back in January, Thea understanding of how viruses spread through the air. Was really primitive and incorrect. Lindsay Mars, a researcher at Virginia Tech, who studies virus transmission, she says textbooks and research papers said an airborne virus was something like measles. It could be breathed out in tiny particles called aerosols that hang in the air. Those aerosols contractual long distances from room to room. All of that was very different from non airborne viruses like flew in the common cold. Those were thought to spread through coughs and sneezes, big droplets that travel just a few feet. Maher says. This whole simplistic picture was just wrong. There were very small number of people in the world. I think who really understood at that time how viruses spread through the air, and these people realize that the new coronavirus might be airborne at short distances. That is if people talked or saying the virus could be in small particles, as well as the big droplets and coughs and in a poorly ventilated space. These particles could build up as the Corona virus outbreak took off. These experts started making a lot of noise about this and people paid attention. Maher says She thought it would take 30 years for more nuanced ideas about airborne transmission to gain widespread acceptance. But it's happened in months. It's been pretty wild to see airborne transmission of viruses become Big news. Scientific studies came superfast Josh than Tar. Pia is a researcher at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. We're not even 12 months in and We know things about this virus that you know, we don't know about some viruses that we've had around for decades. His medical center took care of some of the first people with Corona virus in the United States. Santo Pia recalls standing at the end of their beds with a device that collected air while they talked or breathed his lab, then analyzed the tiny airborne droplets. Looking for the genetic signature of the Corona virus. We were getting positives more than one positive in the air samples, and I can't say the words that I said But you're kind of broadcast this, but I was shocked signs of the virus were in such tiny particles. He worried that nothing less than the most protective masks could stop it. Soon, though, studies showed that even basic cloth masks were able to reduce the amount of virus that gets out into the air and suddenly mask wearing became routine sent our P A was floored and how ventilation became part of the normal daily conversation. You know how well ventilated is the space shouldn't be spending time inside or outside. You know how much all these things it's changed so much about the way we view the world. The question is, Will this be a lasting change? Donald Milton is a research Teacher at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. He spent years showing how better ventilation in dorms or offices is associated with a lower risk of respiratory disease transmission, he says. We need to figure out engineering solutions to improve the safety of indoor spaces like getting better ventilation, using air filters, even using special lights up by a room ceiling to disinfect circulating air. I want to see us understand how it is that you can make her Restaurant, a safe place to be during flu season and during a pandemic. I think it's doable, but he's afraid that once vaccines get this virus in check, people will lose interest at least until the next pandemic. Nell Greenfield Boys NPR news

Nell Greenfield Lindsay Mars Maher Thea Santo Pia NPR Virginia Tech University Of Nebraska Medical PIA Josh Donald Milton University Of Maryland School United States Respiratory Disease FLU Npr News
Covid-19 Live Updates: New Variant Causes Alarm Around the World

Squawk Pod

03:46 min | Last month

Covid-19 Live Updates: New Variant Causes Alarm Around the World

"There was more on this. Dr scott gottlieb former commissioner of the fda currently serves on the boards of alumina and pfizer. He's also a cnbc contributor latest op. Ed in the wall street journal focuses on on discussion that we had it at length. Last week Scott about some of the therapeutics and some of the bottlenecks or whatever's causing them not to be i mean logistically. It's difficult home infusion necessarily. We'll we'll touch on your your op ed. But let's talk about this. This new strain i. I looked into it a little bit more. Fourteen mutation seven are in the spike protein. Apparently there have been thousands of mutations already in this virus. So it's it's more contagious. I think what scares scott or what causes concern is if if it's mutating fairly easily. Is it possible there could be a mutation that could make it more lethal. This is not that this is more contagious. But it makes you think that if that were to happen that would that would be very concerning right and the other question is possible. That could be mutation that obviates prior immunity so people who got it again or slips past vaccines right this does appear to be. This is a mutation. The question is was this. The result of selective pressure so was this selected for because it's more contagious or was what we call. Founders effect just happened to get into london in london into some early super spreading events in became the predominant strain but it's not really selected for we. Now think it's selected for we. Now think that this is more transmissible. It doesn't seem to have mutated the surface proteins of the virus in a way that they would slip past our vaccines or prior union fact. We don't think that that's the case. But what this does suggests is that eventually this virus probably will evolve its surface proteins. In a way that they won't be recognized by the antibodies. We have right now. We will have to update the vaccines most viruses mutate. Is you know some viruses like flu. Evolve their surface proteins very quickly. And that's why we need a different flu vaccine every season some viruses can't really change the surface proteins like measles. This virus seems to fall someplace in between it's not going to change surface proteins very rapidly that spike protein but it will change over time and then the final point is that it's probably a good thing that we use the entire spike protein in our vaccines because what we're getting is what we call a poly clinical of response. We're developing antibodies to many different regions of that protein. So even if one part of that protein were mutated and some. Antibodies no longer recognize that they would be. Antibodies other parts of that protein. So this probably will not slip past. Vaccines very easily. But eventually we'll have to update the vaccine's antigen tests are different question and antibody drugs for that matter. If those tests surprised to a very specific region of that spike protein in that region undergoes. Some change it could potentially slip pass those tests. So we're going to need a way to monitor for these strains an update some about technology. Well hadn't even hadn't even thought about that. Well you remember the old days scott. There'd be a mutation it'd be like well. There's a mutation. All you had was the so-called the fina tight we can get the gene type immediately now within seconds literally maybe hours we can sequence the mutation so we got that going for us which which we never had before plus we have this new platform. This new messenger are a platform where you could easily. If you had to you could you could introduce a new version vaccine if it mutated around aren't both of those things positive right the advent of synthetic vaccines makes it very easy to update these vaccines and we will be doing much better surveillance and we've done historically using sequencing so We do that for flu sequence strains of flu. We're going to have to do that. The covert as. Well

Dr Scott Gottlieb Alumina Cnbc Pfizer The Wall Street Journal FLU London FDA Scott ED
NEW VISION FOR A SCULPTOR

Big Book Podcast

05:35 min | Last month

NEW VISION FOR A SCULPTOR

"And now part two story twelve new vision for a sculptor. His conscience hurt him as much as his drinking. But that was years ago. I think that life. When i was growing up was the most wonderful life that any kid ever had. My parents were very successful every new luxury and every new beauty that came into the house was keenly appreciated by all of us. We didn't have things thrown at us. They came little by little. My parents were both jews and in my family life we were always keenly alive to the beauty of religion. Although we were not orthodox. I always saw god as a wonderful force. That was a great deal. Like my father only magnified to the nth degree. I wanna ask my grandfather. When i was little boy what god was like. He asked me what my dad was like. I went into superlatives about dad. Because i really loved him so much. He was such a friendly wonderful father. And so my grandfather said well. Your father is the head of your family. God is the head of the entire human family and of the whole universe but what makes him dear. God is that you can speak to him just as you would talk to your own dad. He's not only a universal father but an individual father too. So i'd always had that wonderful comparison of my own father with god when they found out that i could create sculpture at a very early age. It made both my parents very happy. My two older brothers were not artists but they were very good students. I was very bad student and very much of an artist instead of resenting that they encouraged my art so my childhood was really art and music. And i got along at school usually by leaving the day before examinations or getting measles or something else like that and being put in the next grade for trial. The teacher of the grade. That i left would never take me back. Under any circumstances i was ecstatically. Happy my brothers and their friends lived on horses as i did from six years old on. We did everything. All of our playing in wild games on horseback. This was up to world war one. I was about nineteen years old. Then i don't think i had any fears at all up to that time. We were very close family. Everything was very vital. Anything that happened to one happened to another when war broke out. All i could hear in my heart was the echoes of what my father and mother had me so often how grateful i should be to. The united states. Grandfathers had come over from the other side. One from bohemia and one from prussia because at that time there was persecution in those countries and they wanted to live and be part of the land of the free. They both had magnificent lives and were able to pull themselves up and live happily and die in luxury. I was very grateful to the united states for that. I loved my grandparents very dearly. And i had watched my father's great financial success so i felt that i didn't want either of my two brothers to go to war. They were both married but certainly one of the family should show what we thought and felt about the united states. So i told my folks that i was going to join the army and that scared them to death but after a while they heard that a nearby hospital was forming a unit and i think my mother had a picture of my going to war with my personal family doctor. Nothing could be more luxurious so they gave their consent that i should join the unit. Never realizing that you could transfer when you got to the other side. I was a terrible soldier. As far as drilling was concerned but i had been studying anatomy and dissecting for my artwork so a hospital was sort of a second nature to me. I got along very well in that part of the army. Very well indeed. I went through world war one without actually getting drunk. I did learn to drink heavily in france but it didn't do anything for me or to me. I mean to say. I didn't drink for relief or escape and i was always flattered that i could out drink almost anybody and take them home. Many of the patients insisted that when they got well they were going to take me down and get me drunk and appreciation. It was usually a hike of two and a half kilometers to get the patient back to the hospital. These were the walking wounded. I had one bad experience. In which a truck that i was in was blown up and i woke up in vichy a couple days later in a bathtub i thought i was in heaven. The whole room was full of steam. An enormous sargent came through the steam. And said don't move young fellow. I said where am i. He told me. I started to upgrade him. Why should i move. He said don't move. That's all i did and found. It was very painful. I had an injury to my spine when it was time to get me out of that bathtub that enormous guy just picked me up as though i were a baby and put me on a stretcher that was about three days before the armistice on armistice day everyone pushed all the hospital beds onto the street and had a grand parade of them. Everybody hugged and kissed us and gave us candy and drinks and the sergeant came along with a glass and said the doctor said your to finish this right away. I turned it upside down and believe me. The bed swam from then on. It didn't last very long. Because as soon as i got something to eat a god over that but i think that was my very first feeling of being dizzy or drunk

United States Bohemia Prussia Army France Sargent
Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

Mom Brain

03:22 min | Last month

Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

"To us a little bit about the different pandemics that you've worked on. Were closely on that. You've studied so in terms of pandemic so the panned this is really the first pandemic in our lifetime so good. The last pandemic was the nineteen eighteen pandemic but in terms of epidemics. I've been working on. I've worked on bola for many many years. So basically after i finished my phd I ended up working for an i h for several years. I started setting up. these research. Programmes in african countries. And i started working in the democratic republic of congo in two thousand and two and so i started this huge research program. That's what started as a team. Research program became a huge research program. And we've been working on things like ebola. Monkey pox work on maxene preventable diseases. So trying to get people vaccinated and understanding how many people are vaccinated against regular diseases like measles in leo and tetanus and these things that we worry about here in the united states to so. I've been doing that. But then i've also been doing things like following hunters and people who are at the animal human interface in trying to see will what viruses are. They getting exposed to who gets infected. What are they so One of the themes of my of my work has been preventing pandemics before they start so in the whole idea that it's better to to avoid being in the situation that we are right now vent to spend the money to prevent it in. Its i always use the example. You know my my my late father in law always used to say it's better to stay out of trouble than it is to get out of trouble. How do you do that. What is that look like. What is preventing pandemic or epidemic. What is that look like. Well the the best way to do it is to is to invest in the research in the public health infrastructure to be able to detect these things beforehand because epidemics like wildfires. Or you want to stamp them out when they're just little sparks you don't wanna wait until they've started burning through lots of brush in becoming a huge wildfire the the. It's very hard to extinguish. And so you need trained public health professionals. You need to have good disease surveillance on the ground. You need to be able to have the lab infrastructure in place in the testing in place in all of the diagnostics in place. All the things that you're going to be able to detect what's going on. I you need your your. Your is near ears on the ground. And then the tools are detected and then the ability to go respond to it now is been spending the vast majority of my career doing this in places like the congo you know but here in the united states we're learning. It's the same problem. We didn't invest in our public health infrastructure. And so as a result we're really paying the price you know. It took us a long time to be able to to get Testing in running. It took a really long time to be able to contact tracing in all these people who are trying to figure out okay. This person is exposed to this person. This person gave a guy gave it to this person. All of that has taken a very very longtime time to give get in place. And so we're it's like having a house with a really poor foundation that you know it's sinking while you're trying to build on top of it and that's kind of unfortunately where we are.

Bola Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Tetanus Measles United States Congo
'There's No Quick Fix For COVID-19,' Cautions Pennsylvania Secretary Of Health

All Things Considered

07:56 min | Last month

'There's No Quick Fix For COVID-19,' Cautions Pennsylvania Secretary Of Health

"Going to talk more now about how states are preparing to distribute those vaccines as they become available, and to do that, we're joined by Dr Rachel Levine. She is the Pennsylvania health secretary and also president of the Association of State Health Officials. Dr Levine welcome 12 Things considered. Thank you very much. I'm very pleased to be here. Will you walk us through the logistics for when Pennsylvania first receives its initial shipments of vaccines? I mean, where does it go? How do you keep it cold? What do you actually have to do? Sure. So we're all waiting the meeting of the FDA on December 10th. And then they will consider all of the data of submitted by the Fizer Corporation for the first vaccine. When they issue their emergency use authorization or you away, then operation Warp speed will distribute the vaccine. To hospitals in Pennsylvania and throughout the nation just to get specific is the federal government or or fives or corporation, sending it to the state of Pennsylvania to distribute it to hospitals. I I asked, because this vaccine has to be kept incredibly cold. It's not just like you can send a bottle of aspirin, right? So you are correct. This is an ultra cold chain vaccine that has to be kept at minus 80 C or or Celsius. So it will be operation works speed that will be sending it to the hospitals that we designate now will depend, of course about how much we're going to get, and it comes in trays of 975 bottles. So these have to be hospitals that can Deal with the cold chain and can deal with that amount of vaccine to then administer. Now, the CDC recommends that health care workers and residents of long term care facilities should get first access to these vaccines. That's a large number of people have you decided whether you're going to start With older healthcare workers or people with underlying conditions are only doctors and nurses who see covert patients. I mean, how are you going to prioritize within the priority groups? Sure. So we're going to be developing a decision tree for hospitals to use and we'll be finishing that this week. I want to point out that the distribution for the nursing home and other long term kitchen facilities Goes in a different way. So operation works speed working with Walgreens and CVS will be receiving the vaccine with those two pharmaceutical companies, and then they will be working to administer the vaccine in nursing homes and other long term care facilities. Do you have a sense of how many doses The first shipment is likely to include and how that compares to the number of people in this top priority. First group, so we don't exactly know how many doses we're going to get in the first shipment. So you know, we had lots of discussions with Operation Warp speed, you know, will be looking to attack the end of next week or certainly when they're going to be sent out to know exactly how many doses we're going to get in the first week. And then the expectation our weekly shipments to the hospitals and to Walgreens and CVS for those distributions. I gotta ask a lot of depending here on the ability of operation Warp speed to carry this out effectively And with Corona virus testing, the federal government kind of fell down. I mean, There weren't enough tests. Some of the tests were not accurate. Initially. How confident are you in the ability of this Trump Administration program to get this very difficult job done? We have heard directly from General Purna. You know, we have confidence in them, but I'm sure it will be a significant logistical challenge. This has to occur throughout the United States, all at the same time to all of the states, the territories. And then some specific large cities. And are you also concerned about the smooth handoff from one administration to another? I mean, if the distribution depends on Operation Warp speed, which is a Trump administration program will the Trump Administration only has so many more weeks in office. Now, the Department of Defense under General Karna, you know, will still be there in terms of continuity, But in terms of the representatives from helping human services and the administration, we would like to think that they'll be robust conversation. Nation and communication as the administration transitions. Obviously, that has not happened as much as it should have yet, But we're hoping that all those communications will be going on forthcoming. Just to get back to the scale of the logistical challenge here. This is a vaccine requires two doses weeks apart. Do you have the infrastructure to track and time who has had a first dose when yes, we do. But that is a information technology challenge in terms of making sure that we get the right vaccine into the right person at the right time. And then not only the visor vaccine, but the Madonna vaccine that also is a to dose vaccine. We've heard so many states talk about the extreme budget pressure that they are under and this is an expensive undertaking. Do you have the money? You need to do it? And if not, do you think the federal government is ready to provide it well, it will be essential for the federal government to provide more funding to the States territories in cities that will be tasked with ministering the vaccine. Operation works speed cost billions and billions for the development of the vaccine on Lee $340 million has been allocated for the next part of the mission, the distribution and the administration so clearly states and territories and cities. They're going to need more funding from the federal government to finish and accomplish this mission. These issues you're talking about could occupy you for more than 40 hours a week every week, and you are at the same time dealing with a spike in Corona virus cases and having to contact trace people who may have come in contact with exposed individuals, overcrowded hospitals. How are you juggling all of this at once? Well again. This is the public health challenge of a lifetime. I don't think any of us have seen a 40 hour week. You know, in our memories I stand corrected three ways to deal with the pandemic. You can work on containment that involved the testing and contact tracing very hard to contain a virus that has spread this far. For example, Today we are reporting 11 over 11,000 new cases. In Pennsylvania. It's impossible to contact that many people, so we have to prioritize. We prioritize to congregate, setting such as nursing homes and other long term care facilities, Correctional institutions, schools, etcetera, Then we have mitigation. Basic mitigation sets his mass and hand washing and social distancing. And then in Pennsylvania, you know we had to have a stay at home advisory. And you know, we have really tried to recommend that people avoid not only large gatherings but small gatherings. And then they'll be the vaccine those of the tools and the public health to box that we have to work with. When you're dealing with community spread on the level that we are seeing now, where there is so much of this disease and so much transmission of it. Do you have to change your approach? I mean it, Zeke gone from hand to hand combat to fighting an army out. Imagine it has And so the basic public health tool of containment, which we would do for a small measles outbreak or for it outbreak of tuberculosis? That is extremely difficult for public health to do when we're seeing this type of widespread community transmission, and then we have to pivot to more and more mitigation. It's a very unpopular it is made public health officials sometimes unpopular throughout the nation, but they're absolutely essential to try to stop the spread. And then we have the light at the end of the tunnel, which is the vaccine, but there's no quick fix to hope in 19. After Rachel Levine, Pennsylvania Health Secretary and president of the Association of State Health officials. Thank you for talking with us in the middle of everything else that you were doing. My pleasure. Thank you very much.

Pennsylvania Trump Administration Federal Government Dr Rachel Levine Association Of State Health Of Dr Levine Fizer Corporation Walgreens General Karna FDA CDC Department Of Defense Madonna United States Corona LEE Zeke
Childhood vaccination rates have dropped during the pandemic

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:52 sec | Last month

Childhood vaccination rates have dropped during the pandemic

"This year, according to data from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. And chief of infectious disease that Lucille Packard and professor of pediatrics and health at Stanford, Yvonne Maldonado says it's a situation that worries her. We really need to keep up with that, because the timeliness of visits will really affect spread of disease, infectious diseases. These are preventable diseases, including measles, hooping, cough and polio. We know that something like herd immunity is really important in some of these vaccines that just for the child's benefit, But for the Grand parents on D Again. These airs data that I have been shown by CDC and others to be a big risk not just to the individual child but to the family members. The majority of vaccination postponements occurred March through May when the pandemic was taking hold, and then again in August, the typical back to school time Marty Schafer, KCBS South

Blue Cross Blue Shield Associa Lucille Packard Yvonne Maldonado Infectious Disease Stanford Measles Polio Cough CDC Marty Schafer
Dr Fauci on herd immunity

C-SPAN Programming

04:40 min | 2 months ago

Dr Fauci on herd immunity

"Dr. Fauci, what is herd immunity, and when do you expect the United States to get there? Well, herd immunity. You know, sometimes the the terminology is we use can confuse people. What herd Immunity means is that when you get a certain percentage Of the population that is protected against infection, either by natural infection, and we're not even close to herd immunity now as proven By the fact that we have had spikes in areas that have previous spikes, so the previous spike didn't prevent them from the subsequent spike. So herd immunity is when you get a large proportion of the population that's protected, which means those who are vulnerable and not either the vaccine doesn't work in them. They have a biggest susceptibility to getting adverse effects of an indelicate, eerie is consequence of the infection. The fact that you have so many people that are protected the virus. If you want to use a metaphor has no place to go. It's looking for vulnerable people, and most of the population is protected. That's how viruses die out. That's how we smashed measles. That's how we smashed polio. That's how we smashed smallpox. So that's the reason why you have an efficacious vaccine. You want to get his many people protected so that it's almost like if you have heard of strong animals. You see it in the movies about going into Africa and the beautiful scenery you see about herds of wildebeest or what have you You have the herd that's really strong. You have some weak ones in there. So when someone maybe the metaphorical lions trying to get in there and take care of the weak ones, the strength of the herd protects the vulnerable ones. That's what you mean by herd immunity. So it's a question of Two components and efficacious vaccine and getting as many people vaccinated as you possibly can. Those two combinations together, those two ingredients could protect everyone which gets to another important question that people keep asking. We've got to make sure we engage the community. To realize that the decision about the safety and the efficacy of the vaccine and the speed with which we did it. The speed was based on very exquisite scientific advances and an enormous amount of resource is that would put into operation warp speed to make this happen? There was no compromise of safety. Nor was there compromise of scientific integrity. Now we've got to get that was real. Yeah, the decision. I right, Go ahead. Now. Let me just say it. I didn't mean to interrupt this decision to say that this vaccine is safe and effective. The data were analyzed by a completely independent board. The Datum Safety Monitoring board, which in fact doesn't have to answer to the administration doesn't have to answer to the company. They're independent. They look at the data and they said in Both of those vaccines, both the Madonna and the and the Fiza that it is official efficacious and it's safe and to protect you, even against serious disease. Those data then get analyzed by career scientists that the FDA in association with an advisory committee that again is independent. When that decision is made. All of the data is going to be seen by scientists like myself and my colleagues, so the process is independent and it's transparent. So I know there's been a lot of mixed messages that maybe have come out. But one needs to appreciate that. This is a solid process. So when they say that the vaccine is safe and effective, if we want to protect the individual and all of our society, we should take the vaccine and I could tell you when my turn comes up. And the FDA says that this is safe and effective. I myself will get vaccinated and I will recommend that my family gets

Dr. Fauci Measles Smallpox Polio United States Africa Madonna FDA
Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

10:14 min | 2 months ago

Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

"Who gates welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show good to see you you lost. Join us on the show. I would say it was about seven months ago and seven months ago. Just like dr fauci. You said you will worried because you felt like the worst was yet to come a lot of people accused you of peddling fear and terror and now it appears that unfortunately you were correct. Here's my question to you. Why does it seem like we've become worse at handling the pandemic you know in europe in the us then we were seven months ago when seven months ago. It was so bad. Well there's a couple of things working against us. I is that with the winter when we're colder we. The virus multiplies more and more indoors. More so that is not a good thing and then there's a certain fatigue. Some of the things people have had to do in terms of staying away from friends. That's tougher i've to say this round. It looks like europe is getting better compliance with the restrictions than the. Us is so they're starting to see a downturn. When you talk about that compliance and when you talk about the downturn is part of the downturn like should we should we be looking at the virus cases or should we be looking at the deaths because i never know which one is more important than usual. Be like a million more people to me. Five million seven million and then you'll see some doctors saying yes but fewer people are dying from because we know how to treat it. How should we be looking at this virus and the fight that we have against. It's well the case is our leading indicator it is true that cases are translating into less doubts for two reasons. One is that the cases are more in the young people Who are less likely to be very sick. And the other is that the quality of treatment including some new drugs like decks method have been proven out so when you do get hospitalized you have a higher chance of survival but were predicted to go back to over two thousand deaths a day in the months ahead so for the next six to eight months news is mostly bad after that the volume of the vaccine will have kicked in and then we'll have a light at the end of the tunnel. Wow i mean the the question is then i think for a lot of people is like. How long tunnel. How bad does that tunnel get. And how do we stop it from being the worst possible tunnel one of the big things. A lot of people are worried about is going to be the transition between joe biden. donald trump. You know you've worked with governments all over the world working on their vaccine distribution working on healthcare around the planet. You know how important it is for one administration to talk to the next when it comes to Handing off on their plans. How much do you think this will actually affect america's response if if there isn't a transition well it's unfortunate that the current administration got tied into a positive narrative that you know we're turning the corner And that you now have this transition will make. The message is a little less clear. You know this is when you'd love to see the best. Cdc people on tv reminding us about social distancing and masks. You know particularly when there is that fatigue out there so leaders at all level. This is a chance to step up even on politicians. You know encouraging friends that hey we. We don't want this additional several hundred thousand deaths you know it'd be adjective. A person who dies know when the vaccine is absolutely on the way and so i think the good news should drive compliance not lacks laxity as somebody who's done work globally around healthcare for so long especially around infectious diseases. What have you found is the key to encouraging or convincing community members to buy into the measures that keep them safe where we had vaccine resistance with polio and they're getting the religious leaders to speak out have them a visibly vaccinating their own children for would like we'd never stopped polio in africa and yet now it's just been certified that we've gone three years without wild polio so activating the trust hierarchy and getting rid of the conspiracy political element to it and just reminding people you know in this case. It's about saving lives in that case it's about kids not being paralyzed people back to that. Very human impact. If we don't behave well. I think it will often come through. It's interesting that you bring up conspiracies because the conspiracy theories about you online have are insane on social media and social media has propagates them in a way where it's like bill gates is trying to create vaccines so that he can cook troll your minds and he wants to vaccinate. Everybody can implant change. People's dna is what they said. You're going to change our dna. So that i don't know we turn into something and then we work for you somewhere. I don't know the full story. I'm still learning it when you see these things first of all. Have you been able to track down where it comes from. And secondly have you. Even i know you think about these things you want to like the biggest thing because i hadn't even thought about like the motivation behind it because i'm always trying to figure out who benefits from a conspiracy theory and i'd love to know if you've put any thought to this at all because of how many people won't get a vaccine because they truly believe conspiracy theories yeah usually when you work on infectious disease like dr fauci and high do your your kind of obscure in a nobody talks about t be or or malaria so here we have this complete turnaround where vaccines and are they. Good for people are now front and center. And there's always been a small group of anti vaccination people and we see this with you know measles vaccine. They've now got a platform and they've sort of joined forces with some political and spiracy abuse and it's so easy to click on particularly when a simple explanation for this pandemic that there is somebody evil behind it. You know as somehow easier than you know the true biology which is actually kind of complicated so we have to make the truth more interesting. And you know we've got a label things with the truth and sadly the naievety about how to make social media work. Well is pretty strong. And that's coincided with the election and the epidemic. I wish i had the answer. But you know it's it's it's out there in big big numbers and hasn't it just keeps growing so when we look at the vaccine. Now i mean that's now the story you know. Now the world is waiting for the vaccine because the vaccine becomes the key that unlocks the doors. You say the lights at the end of the tunnel. The question then is how do people get the vaccine. How effective will the distribution method be and how difficult is will the vaccine short supply. The good news is that there's four other vaccines that are likely to get approved fairly quickly as well. The fact that pfizer worked so well makes us optimistic. That astrazeneca johnson and johnson vacs which those are much cheaper easier to scale and don't require that cold chain so we'll have a lot of scenes and we need to prioritize people. At risk elder people people working nursing homes and each country Will have to decide okay. Who goes first. That's still a little bit confused in the us but hopefully we'll get that straightened out very very soon because the vaccine is likely to be shipped a lot in the month of december as you said anti vaccine community has only grown over time. I think the us is now the biggest hub of anti vexes in the world it started as a fringe thing with measles now with corona it is fully fledged and because of politics it's been amplified so now you'll have some people who on the liberal side saying i don't trust that vaccine it was made under trump and then you'll have other people saying like i don't trust that vaccine that came from joe biden and the and the democrats trying to brainwash. It's a lot of people may not want to take the vaccine which may now go against everything we've worked toward. So how do you begin convincing people that the vaccine is safe like in the midst of this political crisis. Well it's clear that the fda through the professional staff. They're all the things that are supposed to do likewise pfizer. There's even an external committee that will weigh in just to make absolutely sure that the the political desire to get this quickly did not in fact the efficacy and safety review and i feel very confident because the people involved are are really doing their job. Well we don't need everyone to take the vaccine. Society will have to decide if there's some jobs like going to a nursing home in taking care of somebody's grandparents whether that person you know how strongly you encourage them to have a vaccine so they're not spreading seeing but with this level of efficacy if we can get to seventy five percent dosed then you'll block the spread of the disease with measles you'd have to get to like ninety five percent because it's even more infectious but the good news here is that we just need that maturity and i think as people see people taking the vaccine and they see that The side effects of any are very very rare. That confidence will build and that will be good for society because when you take the vaccine you're helping to protect other people.

Dr Fauci Polio United States Europe Joe Biden Donald Trump Gates Fatigue Measles CDC Astrazeneca Johnson Bill Gates Infectious Disease Africa Malaria Pfizer Johnson FDA
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

NBC Nightly News

02:36 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Drug. Giant pfizer requested emergency authorization today for its covid vaccine which it claims is ninety. Five percent effective. Tom costello has late. Details it's shaping up to be the fastest vaccine development and us history after forty four thousand. Volunteers rolled up their sleeves. Pfizer today became the first drug company to seek emergency. Fda authorization for a covert nineteen vaccine. We will continue. The work already underway to make sure we can begin shopping. The vaccine immediately after radiation. We're approval vaccine maker. Moderna also expected to its data soon putting both companies on track for fda clearance within weeks. We could have a decision from fda and within twenty four hours of that we will have started distributing millions of doses of safe and effective vaccine to begin protecting our most vulnerable across america. Here are five key steps to authorization. The vaccine trials include at least thirty thousand people who are diverse in race age and risk groups. The fda requires two months of follow up safety data before drugmakers can even submit for emergency use side effects typically appear in the first two months so far both companies report. No serious side effects both pfizer and madeira claimed their vaccines are ninety. Five percent effect to the question will they completely prevent a cova one thousand nine infection and how long that protection. Last the fda's advisory panel will convene on december tenth review the pfizer data. Then the fda will vote on whether to approve it. Meanwhile cdc advisory group will recommend should get vaccinated. I i li efficacious and effective vaccines have crushed epidemics like smallpox and polio. and measles. we can do that. The fda expects to have enough doses to begin vaccinating twenty million people by year's end starting with healthcare workers the general public likely following in the spring or summer. All right now. Tom joins us tom. They're even more vaccines coming down. The pike in the new year your astra zeneca and johnson and johnson both expect to have their vaccine candidates ready in the first quarter. The military is already planning the distribution for all of this within twenty four hours of approval. It plans to start shipping the vaccine to all fifty states. It's a big logistical challenge and tom. A vaccine can't come fast enough as more than two thousand. Americans died from covid it a single day for the first time since may and the number hospitalized set a record at more than eighty thousand.

Pfizer FDA Tom Costello Moderna United States Madeira Zeneca Smallpox CDC Measles Polio Johnson Astra TOM
Dr. Fauci Urges Public to Double Down on Public Health Measures Until Coronavirus Vaccine Is Available

Bloomberg Best

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Dr. Fauci Urges Public to Double Down on Public Health Measures Until Coronavirus Vaccine Is Available

"Dr Anthony Fauci is calling vaccines and opposing force to fight the Corona virus outbreak Mad Madison reports. Speaking at the White House, Fauci touted vaccines by companies Fizer and Moderno that are 95% effective against the virus. So those of you not acquainted with the field, the vaccine ology that is extraordinary that is almost to the level. What we see with measles, which is 98% effective, the nation's leading infectious disease expert noted. Vaccines have crushed other disease outbreaks, such as smallpox and polio found, she argued. People are also in imposing force to covert 19 if they follow through with mitigation

Dr Anthony Fauci Fizer Fauci White House Measles Infectious Disease Smallpox Polio
Early Data Show Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine Is 94.5% Effective

Jeff Katz

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Early Data Show Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine Is 94.5% Effective

"DONOR Announcing its vaccine is nearly 95% effective, and President elect Joe Biden is weighing in on the news. ABC is Karen Travers is in Washington with the latest president elect Joe Biden Rights on Twitter that the good news from drug company Madonna on a potential covert 19 vaccine is quote Further reason to feel hopeful. But Biden adds quote, we're still months away, and he says Americans need to continue to wear masks and practice social distancing, biting. You gonna congratulate who he caused the brilliant women and men who produced this breakthrough, saying they're bringing the US one step closer to beating the virus. President Trump in a Tweet said History should remember that the vaccine development quote all took place on my watch. Karen Travers, ABC News Washington. Are you Via doctor Reacting favorably to the new vaccine news? I was having coffee with friends this morning. I was saying, like, Wow, this is this is gonna be the end of this problem. You know, a year from now will be out out out of this Just awesome news. Via Dr Bell. Petri. He says 94.5% effectiveness is like the measles vaccine. Which of 60 to 70% of the people receive. It could reduce Cove into the frequency. We see

Karen Travers Joe Biden Washington ABC Madonna Biden Twitter Abc News Dr Bell United States Petri
History of the COVID vaccine

The Economist: Editor's Picks

07:50 min | 2 months ago

History of the COVID vaccine

"The promise of a covid. Nineteen vaccine is immense. But don't underestimate the challenges ahead. Nine long years elapsed between the isolation of the measles virus in nineteen fifty. Four and the licensing of vaccine. The world waited for twenty years between early trials of polio vaccine and the first american license in nineteen fifty five marvel then at how the world's scientists are on course to produce a working vaccine against sars kobe to the virus that causes covid nineteen within a single year. And not just any vaccine. The data from a final stage trial unveil this week by pfizer and biontech to pharma companies suggests that vaccination cuts your chances of suffering symptoms by more than ninety percent. That is almost as good as for measles and better than the flu job with an efficacy of just forty to sixty percent. Suddenly a dark winter there is hope not surprisingly phases news on november ninth rouse the markets bulls investors dumped shares in florax peleton tech firms which have all benefited from the corona virus and instead switched into firms like disney carnival and international consolidated airline's group. Which will do well. When the sun shines again the oecd. A club of mainly rich countries reckons that global growth in twenty twenty. One with an early vaccine will be seven percent. Two percentage points higher than without there is indeed much to celebrate. Pfizer's results suggest that other vaccines were worked to over. Three hundred and twenty are in development. Several in advance trials most liked pfizer's focus on the spike protein with which sars covy to gains entry to cells. If one vaccine has used this strategy to stimulate immunity of us probably cantu pfizer's vaccine is also the first using a promising new technology many vaccines prime the immune system by introducing in fragments of viral protein. This one gets the body to make the viral protein itself by inserting genetic instructions contained. In a form of our anna. Because you can edit aren. Hey the vaccine can be tweaked should the spike protein mutate as it may have. Recently in ming this platform can be used with other viruses and diseases possibly including cancer on original focus so celebrate how far biology has come and how fruit fleet can manipulate biochemical machinery. For the good of humanity. There will be time later to worry about how that power might also be abused and celebrate the potency of sciences at global endeavor drawing on contributions from across the world. A small german firm founded by first generation. Turkish emigrants has successfully. Worked with an american multinational company headed by greek chief executive yet despite the good news too big question out about the characteristics of the vaccine and how fast it can be distributed. These are early results. Based on ninety four symptomatic cases of covid nineteen from among the forty four thousand volunteers. Further answers must wait until the trial has gathered more data. It is therefore not clear whether the vaccine stop severe cases or mild ones or whether it protects the elderly whose immune systems are weaker nor is it known whether inoculated people can still cause potentially fatal infections in those yet to receive jobs and it is too soon to be sure how long the beneficial effects will last clarity will take time in the next few weeks. The trial should be declared safe. Though further monitoring of the vaccine will be needed. The company's predict that immunity will last for at least a year. The ninety percent plus efficacy so high that this vaccine may offer at least some protection to all age groups while the world waits data it will have to grapple with distribution will be in short supply for most of next year. Although our any jobs may prove easier to make it scale than those based on proteins pfizer's requires two doses. The company has said that it will be able to produce up to fifty million doses in two thousand and twenty one point three billion next year. That sounds a lot but america alone has over. Twenty million first responders medical staff care homeworkers an active duty troops perhaps a fifth of the world's seven point eight billion people including two thirds of those over seventy risk. Severe covid nineteen. Nobody has ever tried to vaccinate an entire planet at once as the effort mounts. Ge's medical glass and stuff could run. Short worse visors shots need to be stored at temperatures of minus seventy degrees celsius or even colder far beyond the scope of your local chemist companies building an ultra cold chain but the logistics will still be hard. The vaccine comes in batches of at least nine. Hundred and seventy five doses. So you need to assemble that. Many people their first shot and the same crowd again. Twenty one days later for a booster. Nobody knows how many doses will be wasted so long as there is too little vaccine to go round. Priorities must be set by governments. A lot depends on them getting it right within countries and between them modeling suggests that if fifty rich countries were to administer two billion doses of vaccine that is eighty percent effective they would prevent a third of deaths globally if the vaccine was supplied according to rich and poor countries population. That share would almost double. The details will depend on the vaccine. Poor countries may find ultra cold chains. Too costly the domestic answer to these problems is national committees to allocate vaccine optimally. The global answer is kovacs. An initiative to encourage countries equal access to supplies ultimately though the solution will be continued work on more maxine some might survive in commercial. Refrigerators of those will work. Better on the elderly still others might confer longer protection require a single shot or stop infections as well as symptoms all those that work will help increase apply. Only when there is enough to go around. We'll anti vaccines become an obstacle early. Reports suggest the jap causes fevers and eggs which may also put some people off. The good news is that an efficacy of ninety percent makes vaccination more attractive. The next few months will be hard global recorded. Death rates of surged past their april peak. Governments will struggle with the logistics of axon nation. America is rich and it has world class medicine but it risks falling short because the virus is raging there and because the transition between administrations could lead to needless chaos and delays squandering lives. When a vaccine is at hand would be especially cruel. Science has done. Its bit to see off. the virus. Now comes the test society

Pfizer Biontech Florax Peleton Tech Polio Measles Cantu Pharma Kobe Corona Oecd FLU Disney Anna
Possible Measles Exposure Reported At Chicago O’Hare International Airport

Eye on Travel

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Possible Measles Exposure Reported At Chicago O’Hare International Airport

"Of Public Health is alerting the public of possible measles exposure at O'Hare Airport Earlier in the month. Michael Mattera reports a 13 month old unvaccinated boy traveled through and was later diagnosed the child and family returning from an international trip. Possible exposure happened November 4th at both Terminal five and Terminal. Three. Travelers who were at O'Hare on November 4th and who are unvaccinated should check their immunization records and reach out to their healthcare provider if they developed symptoms of measles, the United

Hare Airport Michael Mattera Measles
Measles Deaths Soared Worldwide Last Year, as Vaccine Rates Stalled

Richard Eeds

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Measles Deaths Soared Worldwide Last Year, as Vaccine Rates Stalled

"Officials are warning people will pay the price of years of insufficient vaccination coverage. Tom Roberts has this story. The world saw its highest level of measles deaths and nearly a quarter of a century last year, Ah World Health Organization and CDC. Report released on Thursday said more than 207,000 people died in 2019 from a disease that can be prevented by a vaccine. Nearly 1300 of those deaths were in the U. S the most here since 1992 Oscar

Tom Roberts Measles World Health Organization CDC U. Oscar
870K measles cases in 2019, highest number in 23 years

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

870K measles cases in 2019, highest number in 23 years

"Measles worldwide hits its highest level in 23 years, nearly 870,000 cases and that Is for 2019 before the pandemic brought regular trips to the doctor's office to a screeching halt. The CDC and World Health Organization blamed the record number of cases on a significant drop in vaccinations before covert 19. There may be fewer

CDC World Health Organization
Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine found to be 90% effective

Pacifica Evening News

03:56 min | 2 months ago

Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine found to be 90% effective

"Promising Corona virus vaccine is from the drug company, Fizer today. The pharmaceutical giant says early data suggests its formulation maybe 90% effective at preventing covert 19 on Lee Barrett. Reports Co 19 vaccine developed by FISA and bio intake prevents 90% of people from getting the virus, according to preliminary analysis. It's being tested on over 43,000 people without safety concerns being raised and could receive emergency approval for use by the end of the month from feature story news in London. I'm Ali Barrett. The announcement does not mean a vaccine is imminent. The interim analysis from independent data monitors looks at 94 infections recorded so far in this study that's enrolled nearly 44,000 people in the U. S. And five other countries. Some participants got the vaccine. Others got the placebo visor caution that the initial protection rate might change by the time the study ends. Even revealing such early data is highly unusual Doctor Jesse Goodman of Georgetown University The former chief of the Food and Drug Administration's vaccine division ticked off many questions still to be answered, including how long the vaccines effects last and whether it protects older people as well as younger ones. Goodman cautioned that even if icers vaccine proves the effect of it's going to be a while before it has a major impact at the population level. The vaccine by Pfizer and this German partner buying tech are among 10 possible vaccine candidates in late stage testing around the world for them so far in huge studies of the U. S. Another U. S company but during a incorporated also has said it hopes to be ableto file an application with the FDA for its vaccine later this month, infectious disease specialist Dr Anthony found, she said the results suggesting 90% effectiveness are just extraordinary. Clinical professor, a marriages of infectious diseases that UC Berkeley School of Public Health Doctor John Schwartzberg called the data from the Visor vaccine stunning. There were there were 94 people. Who got sick and 80 for them were in the group that receive placebo. And only nine who got the vaccine got sick so that that's absolutely Running. Um they're going to continue to trial up to 166. People get sick and they've got 44,000 people in the trial so they should get there pretty quickly, Schwartzberg said. Important questions about the data include whether the results were as positive for older people is younger and across, so she socio economic and ethnic differences. Another is whether the vaccine prevents infection without symptoms as well as the disease itself prevents you from getting infected like, for example, the measles vaccine would do You can't spread it lets you get infected, But it doesn't let you get sick, responsible. The still spread the virus. So these are questions that come out. But still, even if it is 90% effective in preventing us from getting sick, That's a major step forward. Public Citizen, the consumer advocacy group called the relief of the preliminary and incomplete data. Bad science, said that any enthusiasm for the results must be tempered. Until they're reviewed by the FDA in this

U. S. Fizer Lee Barrett Ali Barrett Jesse Goodman Food And Drug Administration Dr Anthony Infectious Diseases Berkeley School Of Public Heal John Schwartzberg Georgetown University Goodman Schwartzberg Pfizer London UC Public Citizen
Washington DC Council approves bill allowing children to get vaccines without parents’ consent

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Washington DC Council approves bill allowing children to get vaccines without parents’ consent

"Passed a bill this week that would allow Children as young as 11 to receive vaccines without their parent's consent. The bill that was passed 12 1 would require doctors to determine that the child meets the requirement of making informed consent. The Children could then receive government recommended vaccines at their parents object to for religious reasons, including vaccines for the human papilloma virus, which is sexually transmitted councilmember tray on white voted against the bill. It's an issue of the count. Russell voting to circumvent that includes them apparent making a decision about their child. But council member Merry Chase says this bill is important for public health. The child needs to be protected against the dangers of things like measles, and the community needs to be protected. The bill now goes to Mayor Muriel Bowser for approval. Luke Luke er w t o P news. If you need an

Luke Luke Muriel Bowser Merry Chase Russell
COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

UN News

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

"Countries around the world gear up to distribute covid nineteen vaccines, the UN Children's Fund. UNICEF. has begun laying the groundwork for safe and efficient delivery by buying and pre-positioning key equipment. The agency said on Monday it will begin by stockpiling around five hundred, twenty million syringes in its warehouses to have a billion ready for use throughout twenty twenty one to ensure syringes arrive before vaccines are distributed. This will be on top of the roughly six, hundred, twenty, million syringes that it will purchase for other vaccination programs to US next year against diseases such as measles anti. FLOYD UNISEX CHIEF HENRIETTA FOUR Spelled out that in order to move fast later, we must move fast now noting that by the end of the year over half a billion syringes should be in place that's enough syringes to wrap around the world one and a half time she said

Un Children's Fund Henrietta Four United States Measles Floyd Unicef.
"measles" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

03:12 min | 7 months ago

"measles" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

"And that's really because in addition to harming the pregnant woman getting exposed to measles while you're pregnant, can cause fetal defects in addition to those in the individual who is pregnant. So, fifteen out of fifty eight women, who were study by the CDC, and these were pregnant, and they had active measles were followed to see what affected them as the parental figure who was pregnant, and also the fetal effects fifteen out of those fifty eight develop pneumonia. Two out of these fifty eight pregnant women died. The most common fetal effect that was found in this study was premature delivery, and that happened in thirteen out of fifty eight of these women, and remember that two of them died so thirteen out of fifty six, who survived were having these premature deliveries, which can be dangerous for babies in enough themselves. Additionally five of the pregnancies resulted in spontaneous abortion, and that means that the body just rejected the pregnancy. You WanNa. Be Really careful with us because that means that seven fetuses did not make it through so thirteen out of fifty one. Of these pregnancies resulted in premature delivery in two of the cases both mother and fetus died, and in the cases of five of these individuals. The fetus did not survive. So if a non immune pregnant patient is exposed measles directly prior to delivery or around the time before delivery, they could very well pass this on to the fetus, and it could cause severe complications up to an including death. Measles has not been shown to cause birth defects. But I would say that spontaneous abortion for wanted pregnancy is a very strong side effect that matters very much in and of itself the risk for a tanning these types of issues can be reduced with passive immunization. If you are interested in that, please do. Out to your doctor, if you suspect that you may have measles, go ahead and reach out to your doctor as well so they can check you using your urine, some nasal or virgil secretions, swaths, throat, swabs, or drawing your blood.

measles CDC
"measles" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"measles" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

"You guys I found myself wondering about vaccines. I've been speaking with my friends who have kids and most of them have chosen to vaccinate and others have chosen to go on a delayed schedule. And I wanted to understand more about this perspective as to why someone might choose a delayed. schedule. Really, it's not necessarily recommended at the very least for that child's specific health issues. So, we're GONNA. Start out today with talking about measles, mumps and rubella. The Mr. Vaccine is one folks tend to get pretty early on and I want to know about the actual diseases behind these vaccines. So today we're going to start out with measles. Move Onto Mumps and rubella and stick around to the end when we talk about who should get the Mr Vaccine and what the side effects may be as well as how these are regulated. So I stop measles, mumps and rubella are all viral diseases that can be prevented by vaccines, and if folks are not vaccinated against them, then they do have the potential to harm non immune pregnant women and their fetuses if they're exposed to the viruses. The most concerning out of the three is re Bella because that can cause congenital rebelo syndrome and have some devastating effects on the child. So we're going to take a look at each of these where they come from how they work and what it looks like when you have them. So with measles, measles is transmitted through droplet nuclei, and it's an rn a virus, so humans are the only natural host of this particular disease, and it's highly contagious. There are reports of measles cases in the US. Mostly dramatically declined since the pre vaccination era, however, we have seen rises of some of these types of viruses, including measles and mumps within the US in recent years due to a lack of vaccinations. Show? We're going to talk a little bit as well about some of these numbers. In the year two thousand this CD see declared that measles had been eliminated from the US. And we do still see some outbreaks that are a result of foreign travel. From January to September in two thousand eleven, there were two hundred and eleven confirmed cases in the US of measles and fifteen outbreaks, and that was the highest number since nineteen ninety six. Out of the two hundred and eleven confirmed cases that occurred eighteen percent were among folks who had received at least one emaar vaccine, dose. But until measles is totally eradicated, we're going to still season outbreaks in the world and in the US specifically right now there are over twenty million measles infections worldwide each year. And there are hundreds of thousands of deaths each year as well. So if you get twenty million measles infections in single year, and we take the number of a year like two thousand eight. That is one hundred and sixty four thousand deaths out of twenty million infections, so that's a mortality rate of about zero point zero eight percent. We're round to the nearest to decimal points, zero point zero one percent. If you contrast that with covid nineteen, the crude mortality rate for that is point two eight percent, so zero point, two eight percent, or for every three hundred and fifty eight people, one person dies or out of a hundred thousand people, two hundred and seventy nine people die from Cova. If we reduce that down to the same unit of measurement for per one hundred thousand individuals, then for measles, eight, hundred and twenty out of every one hundred thousand people die from measles in a single year, if we use the numbers from two thousand eight, for example, now that said the numbers that we used for the mortality rate of covid nineteen..

measles US Mumps rubella emaar rebelo syndrome Cova
"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Diseases were associated with subsequently reduced risk of melanoma over and multiple cancers combined in fact the American cancer looked like it was reduced by nearly fifty percent cut in half aw hundreds of thousands of people saved by simply allowing them to get wild measles and wild mumps compared to the four hundred hundred we brag about that no longer die from measles so there it is as far as I'm concerned for the decision making I'm going to do aw. I will take the reduction in cancer for my children reduction in heart disease and I will take the lack of danger. You're from getting the disease because I know my children are perfectly healthy and running around. They're not malnourished. They have plenty of vitamin A.. And I'll give them more vitamin eight. But that's just my choice. That's that's just the choice that I'm GonNa make with my family. You have to make your choice. And that's why all we're doing here on the high wire is presenting you with the facts. It's not bumper sticker slogans. Not Menia not panic facts medical journals things they will never see on CNN or MSNBC MSNBC or Fox or anywhere else you will never see it because they can't show it to you in. Why is all of this happening to close this all love? Why would they create such a panic? Why are they making his terrified of measles? Why are there laws trying to force vaccinate? The last ask two percent of the children who were raised by parents like me. We've done our homework. Why are they doing it? Take a look at this text that came out from one of the bill authors co-authors on Espy to seventy six. This is going to try and take away your doctor's rights to write you an exemption. This is horrific dear. Legislators and staffers if you are in the fifty to fifty six age range you may need a measles booster given the packed halls lately so many unvaccinated kids. This is serious well like I said anybody with the right socialization. It could be a Nazi so I don't blame people. That have their facts wrong. There are being heightened to the place of making people terrified but look what she just said she just say. Go get your your tires check. She said get yourself in to get a vaccine. Odds are anyone in an age. Group had the measles as a child and has no need to get the vaccine scene and those dirty backseat children that were running through our halls. We all have to protect ourselves now. And how are we going to do it by getting the adults. Backseat it see. That's the agenda. She just said it. Right there Senator Pan and people like this are working towards farmers dream. The forced backs nation program for adults. Because that's where the money is. It's not in the remaining two percent of unvaccinated kindergarteners gardeners. It's in three hundred. Twenty million terrified Americans that wrote away their rights one at a time because they were so terrified graphite of a disease. That didn't kill barely anybody. They wrote away their rights. And why do they want you to be getting rid of exemptions now because is there is so easy as I pointed out to write laws for your neighbor to write laws for your neighbors kids. That's easy it doesn't affect me personally. I'll take your neighbors. This kid's rights away. But you are an idiot because what you are doing is writing away your own rights because.

measles MSNBC mumps panic CNN Senator Pan Fox
"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"We've won the war against measles and and what eliminated means is that there will be no cases coming out in. Mary won't spontaneously up here in measles it's not on our continent. It's going to have to travel from somewhere else. And so when they said it was eliminated in two thousand they knew we would still have outbreaks because they knew the World Health Organization role multiple articles about this. All of science knows. You'RE GONNA have outbreaks because measles is still all over the world and and because we have open borders and airports and airplanes. It's going to come from other places. It could come from Africa. Come from Israel which is where it came from It appears this year. And if you look at the world map right now you'll see that Musil's is in an outbreak all over the world this pesky little yeah no virus it makes its way around and it seems to surge every three or four years if you look at it it goes up and then it goes down. We had the big these Disney's measles easels and then we didn't really have anything for year two and now we're going through another cycle and then it's going to go down. We won't and believe the run all these ads next year to say all right we did it. All of the fear and panic. You got out you got your vaccine and so now. It's eliminated again. And then the next he'll be another thousand cases like Oh man man. The antibacterial type actors. That are doing it. It's the natural course of the measles. Folks it goes in waves it always has every three to four years. Here's you'll have a big swoop and measles and then go away and and to be blaming it on the antibodies. I find absolutely comical. Let's just look at this. It's just really logically just for a second okay. If it is anti Baxter's that are really causing this measles epidemic all over the world. Then then. Why isn't everybody like three years old? That's getting it because the truth is is a lot of people say Baxter's causing Adele big freeze causing see the article. You know the mastermind behind the eight I've actors or whatever they WANNA call me whatever diabolical Dr Evil Eye apparently am but really you know. I've only been at it with this movement's really started growing only in the last three years backs came out so wouldn't it just sort of be like one. Two three year olds right now would would be where those Antibac- where the all got started. But it's not it's adults it's it's it's teenagers. It's kids there of all ages. Which means they they were either always there? There's no gross. That's adding to the only growth would be three years old. We don't see a huge amount of three year olds getting this disease. Aziz are all older than that so this things that total manufactured line first of all. Let's make you terrified disease that you don't need to be terrified up and let's make you hate a group that doesn't need to be hated and then let's blame the failure of our elimination of disease on the people that don't use our product. I mean this is what happens happens when you can afford billions of dollars of advertising. Let's here's a few of the facts even though even if you had a one hundred percent vaccine right this is what we know about. Khuda vaccine actually fully eradicate this disease. Well if you have one hundred percent of people vaccinated we know that there's a two to ten percent failure right away to to ten percent of people will not even react to the vaccine at all. Your body's just won't creators. It won't really work and now we're looking at something that's a growing problem. That's waning immunity. As I said before the vaccine was supposed to last for life the way real herd immunity would when you get the wild strain like the Brady Bunch Brady Bunch. They're never going to have to get back ever again. Everyone of US had a vaccine. You're not you're not. What does your on a conveyor belt to go time and time and time again because these vaccines just simply do not last and there's going to be an even greater question? Question of how much of the herd immunity was being established by all of those people that had true wild herd immunity. We don't even know there's some sort sort of boosting quality that's happening those people that have natural immunity that being around them were they boosting each other. Were they boosting your vaccine effectiveness so so much. Science still has to be done when we look at her immunity and when it comes to the vaccine and the fact had the vaccine eliminated disease and that the outbreaks are due to those. That are not vaccinating. Do we have this The slides slides. We found from health and Human Services. I want to go to that right now. Because I think you're gonNA find this absolutely fascinating so. HHS Gino typed the measles measles cases. That were in the Disneyland outbreak. which was now? It's now the number one biggest outbreak American had. Now they're calling it. Perhaps this one's passing. This is the the second biggest outbreak so look at this when they gino type. The measles. Thirty one gino type A vaccine strain from recently vaccinated persons with Phibro Arash illness. Seventy three specimens were Gino type. B three outbreaks strain so that right there thirty. Roughly thirty eight percent of the cases in Disneyland were vaccine strain measles. I want you to wrap your head around this if you're new to this and and this is what the show does we get into science. If you're bored go ahead go back to the talking heads they have a bumper sticker. You can repeat over and over again but I'm bringing you the science and you can look all this up again and type I can. I see an right now on your comments but think about this this this slide show we now have from helping the services was put together before whereas sp two seventy seven with past before sp.. Two seventy seven was passed health and human services with presenting the slide. Show saying we have a problem. Folks folks thirty eight percent of the cases in this measles outbreak that were making everybody terrified about that. We're going to pass a law to make you give up your rights to force backseat in every child whether the parent wants to or not. We're going to run that law and say that the reason we have to force vaccinate you and take your rights away as a citizen remove move body autonomy and the ability to control. What's injecting your child is because of the immunosuppressed child we need to protect? We need to build our heard around that immunosuppressed child and the only way to do that as everybody has to be vaccinated. But here's the problem. Nearly half maybe. I'm stretching the more than a third of the cases in the biggest outbreak that we've Gino types. So far we're caused by the vaccine and Japan. New This we know that Senator Richard Pan knew this when he lied to you and said You could protect immunosuppressed child. The truth is is the boxing needed are putting your child at thirty eight percent of the risk of coming in contacted Contact with the measles because if you are getting the measles from the vaccine same here it is during the measles outbreak in California two thousand fifteen. A large number of suspected cases occurred in recent vaccines vaccines of the one hundred nine hundred ninety four measles virus sequences obtained in the United States in two thousand fifteen seventy three right then defied vaccine sequences. Look at that and look who wrote that. I didn't write that they'll be tree. It's not from Bobby. Kennedy is now from Andy Wakefield this journal of Clinical Microbiology. The American can society for microbiology. I think they know what they're talking about. I would guess we should be able to trust them. I don't think they have an agenda to lie to US so so. Do you see the problem here. If you can get measles from the vaccine and shed measles which some of those cases the seventy-three we may very well have gotten it from being near people who had just gotten the vaccine. If you see the page in the oncology center saying if he been recently vaccinated do not enter here. This is all proof folks that vaccines shed that. Means that immunosuppressed child is being put at risk every single day. A child leaves the doctor's office after back scene and goes into the school. And what did that little sheet say in the hospitals. And say if you got accident accident yesterday if you've been backsied within thirty days thirty days you were contagious. After getting the vaccine this entire thing is crumbling. Do you see the science crumbling. Do you see the lack of a death rate. Do you see how incredibly overblown overblown our fear of measles is do you see how incredibly ineffective the Mr Vaccine seems to be. Do you see the terror around. You know there's unvaccinated children out there. There's no you're not going to protect you. And now we know that your vaccine give the measles and may shed the measles and caused the measles. It's getting very difficult difficult isn't it. It's getting very difficult to hold this together. And I'm sorry that you want to label it misinformation but the Journal of Microbiology really really gets in your way. So what's that pulled on safe and effective. I want to go to let's go to the whistle blowers. Let's move on. Let's talk so now. We know that you know is effective. It can shed on you the vaccine. Now why would someone not acceded whether or not you just say well. I don't want to vaccinate because frankly I don't think that the measles is really a a problem and I want lifelong immunity. I mean think about it. I would love it if my children could go down when there's a crisis at Ucla someone with the measles ran through there and everyone's terrified to they're not covered for it. Well wouldn't it be great to have children grew up to be your future doctors and nurses that they can just charge right in there. Said don't worry about. I don't remember I got this covered. I've already had this disease and I can take care of anyone than these. Were taken care of if you just had a vaccine. You may want to think twice about coming in here. You don't so how long have you got it. You don't know if you were one of the ten percent and it doesn't mean worked on you don't know if it's worn off yet you probably don't WanNa go through this. It would have been much better that you had the measles one I did when I was four years old. Now that you're thirty five it's going to be a little bit more dangerous so be afraid. Be Very afraid the vaccine puts you in that position. You should've had the wild measles when you're a kid like I did and like I hope my kids end up going through but it's more than that more than the fact that we're not worried about a disease that's not deadly are there. Dangers is to the vaccines themselves. And we will hear it over and over and over again. Let's hear it can bring the lady up. Measles vaccine is incredibly safe. It's incredibly effective..

measles US Africa World Health Organization Musil Israel Mary Gino HHS Brady Bunch Senator Richard Pan Baxter Aziz waning journal of Clinical Microbiolo Ucla California Journal of Microbiology Japan
"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Like the Brady's when he did you see that chalkboard. Did you see that already. All had the mumps the other deadly disease scarlet fever is checked off. It's like Oh we're getting through through all of it and think about this thing about the Hor- Africa going through this horror. The Brady's now say hey we've all had the measles we are done with that for life done with that for life. You mean you don't have to go back and five years for another Emma Martin Bucer. Peter has to go to college. He doesn't have to show up for an MR booster. He doesn't need it he's going to be immune for life. You mean these parents are going to have to come in every ten years and get in another. Mr Backseat like they're good for life. They can walk in any going to be a quarantine them at some point. You see people want to say that how you use the brady bunch but the entire a point of the brady bunch. Well let's let's just let's just let me just make one more point as we're saying is it. Scientific is the Brady Bunch scientific typic- I mean. Obviously you had a room full of writers who came up with this idea. And how do they know what the sentiment of medicine was the timer measles at the time I mean they were just a bunch of Hollywood writers right but look what the song of the Creator had to say in this inside edition piece my dad who created the Brady Bunch. He was a pre med student. Actually before he ever got into into creating TV shows and if we knew that it was going to be a controversy about this they're never we never would have done the episode. To begin with there wasn't going to be a controversy. And why would there be a controversy. He'd been he was premed. He'd gone through medicine. Everyone was getting the measles. It was stay home. Don't worry about light lever. Go ahead and drink some water. Take some vitamin A.. You'll be fine. We'll see you back in school next week. Good luck with that. That was where was that. Why would there be a controversy? We knew there was going to be a controversy. If we knew it was gonna be like the black leg if we knew we were marching children to their deaths. Maybe we wouldn't have made the episode but they weren't you see the whole point you know when we looked at all of the tweets and and how are the ANTIBAC- sers making fun of the measles saying somehow that that that the Brady bunch defends her point that that the science is there none of it just shows the sentiment of the time. And why is that important because of this quote. We're really working against the quote by one of the leading spokes holes because of the former `institutions. Dr Paul off it and this is what Paul often has to say about the issue. He said vaccines have been a victim of their own success. People don't fear the disease and he's been saying this over and over again. Essentially is because the vaccine program has been so successful. We've forgotten how terrifying these diseases were. Now antibacterial are getting away with making fun of it and laughing at it when really really it was tragic and deadly well because the pharmaceutical institution is bringing that to you through the news and they own seventy five percent of the The anchors I mean how much of that it's probably starts right about here and cuts across and you just hold onto your right leg is the only part of of your job. That's not owned by the pharmaceutical institutions. Because we know seventy five percent. The advertiser your televisions coming from where farmer farmer wants you to believe you're going to die of the measles therefore you will sign over your rights to control what's injected into your body and you'll sign over your neighbors rights which is really the easiest thing in the world do who wouldn't just sign off laws those that are going to take your neighbors rights away. That's what they are trying to do by making you terrified of the measles and Paul off his out there saying that is the antibiotics is the people that are that. Just don't remember how dangerous it was well as you've seen the Brady bunch that they didn't think it was dangerous. Were they the only ones as I. I pointed out in inside edition. Look at all media when we look at history when we look back in history one hundred years ago what historians do you read newspapers offers of the Times. You look at how people were talking about certain situations whether it's finance or disease or international affairs. You look at those and you say Oh look this. Is what the sentiment the time was. You read the literature. The books what books were being written at the time and now that we have televisions that date back back quite a ways we watch. What were they watching television? What was the sentiment on television in movie theaters will Brady Bunch? Weren't the only ones if we're to say that somehow Brady Bunch. Was this anomaly. In the middle of this horrific Ebola style death march that was happening in America. Brady Bunch somehow missed how terrifying lying it was looking at all the other television shows and movies. That must have missed it to watch the big mcgilla here. What's with my boy? Measles measles easels say. It isn't so doc you're kidding that's what it is. Don't get excited. It's not serious. You've got to help us out me and my boy are in big. A drummer boy. Takes it easy. It would be as good as a few days. He's only got measles only got measles. Doc if he only had gangrene or.

measles Brady Bunch Brady Dr Paul Emma Martin Bucer mumps Mr Backseat Peter farmer farmer Hollywood gangrene ANTIBAC Ebola America
"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"To date my team putting that incredible. Aw Montage together. What's been happening on television since it feels like that? Doesn't I mean when you walk like are you serious and I'm going to hear the same thing like this isn't news reporting. Nobody's having to go out. No one's looking up actual numbers. No one is looking into the database. No one's going back to the nineteen sixties. Excuse has it when was it a radical and how was it a radical. No one's asking any questions the news. That's what the news used to do. It used to say well the CDC is saying this we've done investigative story about it instead. Now they just repeat talking points that are being cranked out by the CDC and health and Human Services which ultimately is doing the bidding. That's the government agency who they listening to the most powerful lobby in Washington. Today I wanNA talk about the measles. We're going to get into the measles because whether or not you're tuning the show I wonder what is that crazy. ANTIBAC- CER- del bigs we got to say about the measles. That's killing children or if you're one of these people that is currently not vaccinating in has no fear of the measles. Then you're going to have to have this discussion or if you're somewhere in between we should all at least know the facts. I'm going to try and go through the facts. That were all laid it out all the all the information that was laid out there is it true is it not. I want you to see the facts. And where they come from and come to your own conclusion so to begin with we are terrified right now the measles you heard every single news anchor will say it's deadly we should be terrified has always been the case as measles have we always been terrified of measles will to get to the bottom of that many of us have been sharing video from the nineteen sixties and this week wake it made the news. This is what that looked like pain. The Brady Bunch. A classic.

CDC ANTIBAC Washington
"measles" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on Science Friday

"So none of this is inevitable. We have certain diseases. We have vaccines that work overall. But not super effective here. We have really super effective vaccines available. So we have a solution, which is to get vaccinated. And if you're a liberal for to to to get the full schedule. Well, we've run out of time. I want to thank you very much for taking them to be with us today. We will we might get back to you Dr Omer because we're going to be tracking this story as the measles outbreak. Measles outbreak continues. Hopefully, not very much longer. Do you expect the Seaney signs might go down? We'll we'll get back to ask you about that. Dr doctors professor of global health epidemiology and pediatrics and Marie university. After the break, we're going to catch up with national poetry month, bringing back some favourite poems about science for one list. Yes. Polite applause. Stay with us. We're right back after this break. I'm Anna sale, and I'm the host of the death, sex and money podcast. At least most of the time. I'm Damon young. I'm John Cameron Mitchell. I'm Lisa Ling in for maternity leave some of our favorite past guests are having death sex money filled conversations with the people there most curious about I'm still extremely cheap. Damn it's like, there'd be session completely uncomfortable. Don't miss this series. Listen to death sex money from WNYC studios. Wherever you get your podcast. This is science Friday. I am I replied, oh, April is national poetry month. When the literary world celebrates with readings.

measles WNYC studios Dr Omer John Cameron Mitchell Lisa Ling Damon young Anna sale Marie university professor
"measles" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"This outbreak is now on track to be the worst in the US since the disease was eliminated in the year. Two thousand put this in context for us as of April eleventh last week there have been five hundred fifty five reported cases of measles around the US in twenty states. The CDC reports total measles cases for the year. Every Monday last Monday, there were ninety fewer that means in in one week. There have been ninety cases, you know, if things continue like that within two weeks, this will become the the worst year. Here for measles since since the disease was officially eliminated in two thousand twenty fourteen. There were six hundred sixty seven cases so five hundred and fifty five and six hundred sixty seven or not that far apart given huffing going. That's most people are vaccinated for measles when they're pretty young. But I think a question that I've heard that has brought it up during this outbreak is m I still protected do I need a booster of some sort. If I've already been vaccinated when I was an infant. So the CDC says, no, you don't if you had to doses of the measles vaccine when you were young you are fully protected, and they say that the the vaccine has very long, you know, along duration that said, it's ninety seven percent effective, which means that three pad people out of everyone hundred for some reason aren't protected because of the, you know, even with the vaccine and you'll see that in outbreaks a few people do get the measles. Even though they are vaccinated. But ninety seven out of one hundred will be protected to turn to those who are not vaccinated. Researchers are concerned about the longer term effects on the immune system. Why is that? Well, you know, there are couple of things I there are some unknown affects of measles that happen. You know, he that when you have the disease itself or right after for example, a rare complication is in Seth Elijah's. And so that one out of every one thousand children in the US develops that. There's also some emerging research into how measles may affect the immune system longer term. These researchers believe that the virus may leave the immune system in this kind of state of 'em nesia, meaning that the body's defenses can't remember or fight off invaders that had has seen before it's sort of like wipes out the immune system for a period of time. So this is a an active area of of research right now, can you give us an update on public health officials efforts to contain this? Current outbreak here in New York City, for example, vaccinations have been mandated, but how can something like that be enforced? Yeah. It's a good question. Shen? So just to remind everybody. Most of the measles cases in the US right now are in a very large outbreak in New York City in Rockland county, just outside of New York City, and there is a sizable outbreak in Michigan which is tied to these to the New York outbreak in New York City has mandated as you said vaccination, basically said if you're not fascinated your kids aren't vaccinated you need to do it or pay a fine. It's really an effort to try to get people to take to take vaccinated seriously and to make sure that schools are not allow schools daycare centers or not allowing children in who have not been vaccinated. So that's the thrust of of efforts right now, they're working pretty intensively to try to to try to make sure this happens. New York City says that most of the unvaccinated children are actually not of school age. But kind of the newborn to five year old set, you know, they're in take care centers or they're at home. And so they really wanna make sure those those kids do give accented besides vaccinations. Are there any other steps? Health officials are recommending for people to protect themselves. That's really it to get vaccinated measles is a highly contagious disease. If you're not vaccinated, it's pretty hard to prevent from getting infected. In fact, anyone born before nineteen fifty seven is kind of a Sumed to have had the disease that contagious. It was until vaccination began. So that's really it vaccination or not breathe the air, which is sort of an impossibility. That's Wall Street Journal reporter bentzi McKay. Joining the inner studio with the latest on the US measles outbreak. Thank you so much Betsy. Thank you. Now onto some more headlines. From the Wall Street Journal waste management is buying its competitor,

measles US New York City CDC Wall Street Journal Seth Elijah Betsy Shen New York bentzi McKay Rockland county reporter Michigan ninety seven percent five year two weeks one week
"measles" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"measles" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"And many people in that shells community are also vaccinated and the disease began spreading from there is concentrated in New York City in the orthodox Jewish community. Let's see this at all related to fears over getting vaccinations. Actually, you know, vaccination rates are fairly high in that community, but people sometimes delay vaccinations for their children. So some studies have shown in the community that school age children are vaccinated. But one four year olds are not with measles measles is. So highly contagious that if you don't have really high levels of immunity in the community meeting a lot of people vaccinated it can start spreading really easily. So that's what's going on. And the spread of this is excel arresting meaning that this past week. The number of new cases is the largest weekly increase that has occurred since the beginning of the year. The number of cases goes up every week. There were seventy eight new cases this week back in February. And March there were usually like twenty or sometimes forty new cases. So the other worrisome thing about this New York City operate because it it's actually spread to Michigan someone who was also in Israel. But also in new. New York went to Michigan, and it became began spreading they're just outside Detroit. What are the challenges public health officials are now facing as they attempt to control the further spread of the disease? Well, measles is notoriously difficult to bring under control and expensive. It's a highly contagious disease. It's so contagious that. If you go into a room where an infected person was up to two hours after they were there that person is no longer there. But the virus is still floating in the air and still active you can be infected so what public health officials and doctors need to do is find people who are infected and then talk to them find out, you know, public health officials do this with outbreaks regularly. But it's it's very difficult with measles. You have to do what's called contact tracing. Find out where they were who they were in contact with. And then try to find all those people with measles. You know, if you were in a supermarket or at a sporting event, literally everybody who was near you or there was potentially exposed. And so it can turn into thousands of people and trying to track down all those people and make sure they're vaccinated try to convince them to give vaccinated make sure they at least know about this is really really challenging and as the number of cases, grow that job just gets harder and harder and harder. So that's what's going on right now. Just in case you're wondering the percentage of a community that should be vaccinated in order to prevent a measles outbreak from spreading is ninety five percent. We've got more information on measles symptoms of the disease. What to do if you or someone, you know, seems infected and info on the vaccine at WSJ dot com. Joined the Wall Street Journal National.

measles New York City New York Michigan WSJ Wall Street Journal National Detroit Israel ninety five percent one four year two hours
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Exemptions. So that means you have more kids going into the public school system. Who are not vaccinated. Right. So. Yeah. So obviously. People who are becoming infected with measles are those who chose whose parents choose to not have them back stated who choose not to be vaccinated, and those who cannot vaccinated or those who don't have access. Yeah. The ones who for health reasons cannot be vaccinated. Do we have any sort of measurable idea of how much they are being impacted by these outbreaks whether what proportion they constitute because presumably these people are immuno-compromised or might be in a way that where they cannot be vaccinated against measles. They get measles. It makes everything worse. Yeah. Yeah. No. That's a really good question. I don't know like I can tell you for sure that the vast vast vast majority of cases in measles outbreaks happened to unvaccinated individuals. So it's not like you got vaccinated in the vaccine just didn't work very well. It's actually a very effective vaccine. It's not one hundred. Sent affective, but it is pretty effective. So there are not stats that I can find on. Why those individuals are not vaccinated whether it's because of me, no compromise or personal exemption religious exemption or lack of access. Okay. So let's zoom out a little bit. And we'll talk about the world. And I'll also address a little bit more about this idea of why some people can't get vaccinated because it's an important part of the story right worldwide. Measles is still huge huge problem. It's a little difficult to get really great numbers. Just like it is for most diseases. It's estimated that only about ten percent of measles cases are actually reported. Wow. That's very low. It's very low. It's surprisingly low but the measles rebel initiative, which is a collaboration between the CDC the WHO the United Nations UNICEF and the American Red Cross they have this big initiative where their goal is to eliminate measles from five out of. The six WHO regions by twenty twenty one year away, by the way. Oh, okay. Yeah. They're not gonna hit their goals. They know it, but they're trying, but they estimate that while in twenty seventeen there were one hundred seventy three thousand cases reported worldwide. It's estimated that seven million people were infected with measles in twenty sixteen for example of sorry. Seven million of million. But but only the ones that were reported were one hundred seventy thousand. Yeah. That was in twenty seventeen. So it was a little bit higher in twenty sixteen. Oh my God. And so it's estimated that ninety thousand children a year die from measles. Again. These are estimated numbers not actual numbers of deaths that we know are confirmed. But that's like two hundred forty six children day..

Measles twenty twenty CDC American Red Cross United Nations UNICEF twenty twenty one year ten percent
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Way lower. Well, those are those are going to seem ridiculous to what I will tell you about the new world, so Caribbean islands and Central American regions where the first hit by measles and other diseases brought over from Europe and Cuba, for instance, may have lost up to two thirds of its entire population. Due to measles in fifteen twenty nine. Oh, two thirds. That's I play status. Yeah. Jesus. I had no idea. I didn't either measles was the leading cause of death in many of these places competing with smallpox typhus mumps influenza Setzer. Wow. Yeah. I mean, the history of measles in the new world reeds pretty much like you'd expect it to just a horrific tragedy the keystone or Francisco Pizarro brings to Nicaragua. And then to Peru as he's on his mission to destroy the Incan empire. And then from there just sort of spreads all throughout South America. Completely unimpeded by anyone or anything. And it also moves north all within the span of a century or so from one Columbus landed, but it's not like it swept through killing an enormous chunk varies populations. And then disappearing it became endemic in many of these regions with more major epidemics happening at irregular intervals killing thousands regularly. So mortality rates they they ranged from sixty percent at the beginning. Then fifty than twenty five and sixteen sort of slowing down or creeping down a bit over time. Right as the immune population built up, right? And obviously, it's hard to separate out the the effects of measles and smallpox all the diseases that were going on at the same time. But measles took much larger toll than I knew. Yeah. It did. Yeah. So measles and smallpox are considered to be. The two big killers of native American populations of the new world with only smallpox outranking measles in the number of deaths caused. Wow. And measles was also an epidemic disease and European settlements in north and Central America, primarily affecting children. But also every now and then getting its grip on a larger proportion of the population. And it seemed for some reason like measles was more severe in the colonies than it was back in Europe. And our good friend cotton Mather, remember him. Why does that name sound familiar smallpox? Oh, I have such a hard time airing with the names and the date something Hotton Mather. We lost our minds over it. I believe any sure it was smallpox anyway. Well, poor cotton lost his wife three children and his made to measles in a span of two weeks to. He has a bunch of found an article that had his diary entries during this time. And it's really heartbreaking. Yeah. He he noticed this big difference. He was like why is it so deadly here back in the back in Europe? This is seen as a routine illness. And probably had to do with the lower population density may be a larger -ceptable population was built up. But yeah, also I wanted to shout out a listener named Meredith who sent us an Email who had some fun cotton Mather tidbits, such as the fact that he may have been an instigator of the Salem witch trials and his father's first name was increase. Fantastic. I remember that. Okay. Over the years from eighteen forty to the early nineteen hundreds the world's population grew tremendously, so almost doubled. And during this time, we see a lot of measles epidemic of two kinds. So the typical cyclic measles outbreaks in debt countries and the epidemic devastation in youth populations. Broadly urban ization increased as transportation, and as did our understanding of how measles spreads. Okay. So does this dude named Peter Ludwig PanAm who is the measles guy? He really set the groundwork for what we understand about measles, or at least what we did going into the twentieth century..

measles Europe smallpox cotton Mather Setzer Hotton Mather Caribbean Cuba South America Francisco Pizarro Peru Nicaragua Peter Ludwig PanAm Columbus Central America Salem Meredith sixty percent two weeks
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"It was there. Although I wonder I read this is a little sign it to myself. I wonder how the black death booboo plague in the fourteenth century how that disrupted the measles epidemic pattern. It probably screws everything up as we saw as we've seen. I just I don't know. I didn't look it up though. Okay. Anyway. So during the middle ages when physicians started to recognize describe measles disease, although the term medals, for instance, was used to refer to the lesions from leprosy. And so it's not fully clear when it switched from being used interchangeably to being reserved just for measles alone. Okay. But the earliest reference that we can say for sure is talking about measles is from the physician Raza's, which was Latin is d- from try to pronounce this Abboud Bacar Mohammed bin Zakaria al-rassi. So he was from close to where Tehran is today. Okay. Not only was he one of the first people to suggest that a fever might be your body's natural defense against disease in like the year nine hundred also wrote a whole treatise on how measles and smallpox different things. And how to tell them apart cool so in nine hundred. Yeah, super cool. That's awesome. Them. All right. So now all of that was just me laying the groundwork for getting to the real part of the story, which is fifteen hundreds onward. So by fifteen hundred which is the end of the middle ages measles was established in pretty much all parts of the old world. But how much of it was actually impacting populations as we've talked about. If you wanna trace historical patterns of disease. You have to rely on some pretty iffy records one of these. Which is absolutely fascinating. I came across is the London bills of mortality, which I think was started to keep track of plague outbreaks. But now, they're golden not just for like statistics and looking backwards in time, but also for ridiculous names for diseases, for instance, in sixteen sixty five which was a play gear three hundred ninety seven people died of quote rising of the lights. Which had to do with lungs possibly crew? Okay. Eighty six people died of king's evil, which is to Bricusse scruffy from the king. Well, this is the whole Royal touched. Right. They didn't cure them. So. And five died of distracted. Driving? It happens. That horse when we're buggies invented. Okay. Anyway..

Tehran king Abboud Bacar Mohammed fever London Bricusse Raza
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The measles virus probably came from something. Like bovine rinderpest. Oh episode. Someday or canine distemper virus, but archaeological evidence isn't really clear on that. We don't really know exactly where it came from. Okay. But what do we know what we know that the Musil's virus would have needed a pretty large population density with sufficient influx of susceptible people in order for it to be sustained make sense the crowd disease. Yeah. But saying pretty large population density, isn't exactly me being precise. So let's let's let's get them precision here. Erin, I mean middle name. Not at all. Okay. But there is some pretty cool math here, actually, a some researchers calculated that the virus has to move to a new host at least twenty six times a year. If it's going to survive in a population interesting that makes sense if it's two two week to week disease. Yeah. Yeah. At a bare minimum. There needs to be twenty six susceptible people in population every year for measles to persist. Okay. But there are a lot of buts. But then those people would have to be in close or frequent enough contact for transmission. And then once infected and hopefully recovered your immune so new -ceptable had come in from somewhere being born whatever basically while in theory, you only need twenty six new hosts, but in practice, you need a whole lot more. So the real the more reasonable estimate was calculated to actually be a population. This includes both susceptible 's and immune okay of two hundred and fifty thousand people. Wow. That's a huge jump up. And so that that's that's for maintenance. Okay. To keep the virus around. Right. Because otherwise, I mean, of course, the virus could could go get into population and sweep through it. No problem of any size. Right. This is for the cyclic outbreaks to happen. Yeah. But yeah, that is that is a pretty big size. So then when? And where did people start to even form settlements that big? Yeah. The authors of this measles book that I read which by the way has a million cool maps so full of information. Holy cow. So so much work on it. Anyway. So they started looking through archaeological records to make a list of possible places where a there'd be enough people and be there would also be agriculture and exposure to domesticated animals because that's probably where the virus came from. And so then they came up with a list and dates for these so-called urban nuclear areas, most of which were in the fertile crescent. But some were also in central and South America and west Africa, but the most likely place where measles was first established was in Sumeria and the Tigris new freeze river valley around three thousand BC. Wow. So it's old. That's a long time ago five thousand years. Yeah. Okay. Cool done. There you go. And that's the maze. Okay. But still were there measles Samaria three thousand BC. Okay. But it wasn't there for long, or at least it wasn't only there for very long measles. Did what does is to spread the virus spread north to southern Europe the rest of the Middle East and east to India China Japan where early writings indicated it was there by like three hundred or eight hundred eighty. As for Africa measles didn't seem to sabotage their the way it did in Europe and Asia, possibly because of lower population density that no possibly because of physical or landscape barriers making pathogen exchange not super frequent or possibly it was there, and we just don't know about it. Because there aren't as many written records. Okay. I dunno distinguishing between measles and smallpox and historical texts is really quite tricky. Make sense. Yeah. I mean physicians didn't often or at least at various points didn't make a distinction between the two, but that would change in the middle ages when measles really came into its own. It's like I need to distinguish myself. Own person my own person. Measles going through its teenage years. Yeah. I mean that side swept beings. The eyeliner I hitting close to home. I know right. Right. Okay. So by the middle ages, which let's say the fifth to fifteenth century measles was fully established throughout the old world. I mean, it was it was there with the population center is big enough..

measles Erin Middle East Africa South America freeze river valley Sumeria India China Japan Europe west Africa Asia five thousand years two two week
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Sense in light of vaccination because what we know is that vaccination with the measles vaccine, not only protects you from measles, but Atta population level, it decreases mortality from non measles diseases for years after vaccination, and the reason that that is what's happening with vaccination is because of how strong the effect of infection with measles is on your immune system. It just destroys it. I think that the the long enjoyed of is that being vaccinated against measles and getting measles naturally and gaining and you need to art not the same thing in any respect whatsoever. -actly being naturally infected will lead you to have adverse health outcomes probably ones that you won't even realize that's needed protects. You exactly they're not even comparible because that's something that I think a lot of people, you know, it's like oh well. Why can't I just let my kid get the chicken pox? Instead of you know, giving him the chicken pox scene or whatever. And in this case, especially with measles. That is not the case vaccination protects you not just from measles. But it protects your immune system and infection with measles wipes your immune system out. So that's it's amazing remark. I had no idea. I'm glad really fun to get to tell you. Yeah. So that is that's measles. That's the virus. That's how it makes. You say. So I've got Erin. So how did we get here? How did we learn how to fight this sucker? It's a good story. Cool Choi take a quick break. Let's do it. But for real get a corn teeny. When was the last time you ate a breakfast that you felt good about not a bowl of sugary cereal..

Choi Erin
"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"But I don't remember. Yeah. We'll have to look it up. I remember her writing on the board measles fourteen. Yeah. I think she wrote polio on there, which was like six or seven. Yeah. Anyways. Okay. Let's get worse. Okay. So measles is transmitted airborne not just in respiratory droplets. But actually airborne I told you it gets worse. So what that means? Is that measles can stay the virus infectious measles. Viral particles can stay suspended and alive and infectious in the forking air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves the room. Wait a second. So the out of like, you know, how pig pen in when he's got that cloud of dust around him. So if you were a measles kid, it would just be a cloud of measles. That would stay in the room two hours after he left. Yeah. That's the thing. It stays in the room. And so what happens when there's okay, we have had some measles cases here. Champagne and every time there's a new case public health sends out in alert. And they give you a list of all the places that this person was during the time that they were infectious along with the times that they were there and those times include a two hour window after that person left because the room itself remains infectious gracious. Okay. All right. Let me summarize the things we've learned so far measles is a virus. That if I haven't before I even know I'm sick for five full days. I can be walking around breathing coughing into a room. And once I leave that room for two hours people can walk into it and become infected by the air, which contains my measles. And if those people are susceptible, meaning if they're unvaccinated ninety percent of them will become infected and then for four to five days after my symptoms resolve I'm still infectious. Oh, wow. Yep. I'm just wondering the total amount of time that an individual is infectious. The total amount of time is probably a good two weeks. Okay. So okay. So let's talk about this. Tim's it starts as the name of our future. Spinoff podcast. Would suggest with a fever. And in this case with measles..

measles fever Tim two hours ninety percent five days two weeks two hour
"measles" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Jersey chime time it is four nine and it's a Friday, and we are diminshed Doyle, Jeff. And I'm big Bill Doyle now this has been a fluid situation that we've been covering and our last correspondent who called in about sniffles. The mouse sniffles, the mouse, it turns out we have we have sound reason to believe while well-intended that that was improper information. Now, I tried to find sniffling measles measles. But I have not. But you have found you found a measles measles. And it's not sniffles. It's something it's a FOX and hound and. Fox and hound was that it rabbit, FOX and rabbit. Yeah. I don't know. I'm thinking of the restaurant. Swear to God. There's a restaurant. And it's an old cartoon, and it's the bunny rabbit. That's why you were thinking rodent. I was because it looks like a rodent rabbit rabbit have measles. The rabbit has the measles. And the FOX is trying to get away from the rap because he knows that it has measles and the rabbit is running after the Dan FOX, and he keeps screaming these measles. And we actually played it. You heard it. The audio meals. Finally after twenty years people people have been emailing us, the actual video clip. So with all due respect to the sniffles guy. I believe we have our answer. So was the name of the cartoon FOX and rabbit. See I don't know if it was in context of something else. I forwarded it to you. But you're having an Email. I haven't gotten anything one twenty five. I just noticed that you were just not meant to find this out. I guess not. But I'm telling you, that's a is a FOX and a rabbit, okay..

FOX measles Dan FOX Fox sniffles Bill Doyle diminshed Doyle Jeff twenty years
"measles" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"measles" Discussed on The Science Hour

"This is the podcast with our pick of the science health and technology stores from around the world all in one place on today's show, we'll be asking why cases of measles have hit a record high in Europe. That's in just a moment and the world's favourite banana is under threat chapels very well as thick skin in us high yielding and it tastes pretty good. It's not a bad banana and seedless. Yes, full. If you've ever actually tried to a banana seed, they're very charged for you. Don't have on one. We'll hear why the seedless nece could lead to its downfall also how morning crushes can reduce the number of small children drowning in Bangladesh. And my studio yesterday is David Robson science writer and columnist for BBC future, and you'll be bringing us news of another groundbreaking. Project in Bangladesh that could help reduce the lifelong problems caused by childhood malnutrition. But throat we'll be looking at the kind of key to this big problem is the gut bacteria well before all that the childhood disease, measles cases in Europe have hit a record high according to the World Health Organization more than forty. One thousand people were infected in the first six months of twenty eighteen leading to thirty seven deaths two years ago. We were saying just over five thousand cases in a year. So this is a very worrying rise. A measles epidemic is also spreading across parts of Latin America. Just two years after the Americas were declared free of measles. Altogether, Claire, Wilson is medical reporter at new scientists. And when she came to the studio, I began by asking her about the epidemic in Latin America. Venezuela seems to be where it's all coming from and the countries to bordering Venezuela seems to be because the such a lot of political turmoil in that country and the spiralling. Inflation people having a really hard time it's affecting health services. So vaccination rates are falling for that reason and what can be done about it? Well, obviously they just got to redouble our efforts to get more people vaccinated. We do know that if you have ninety five percent of people vaccinated in our country, it just stops the virus from getting around is called herd immunity. So even if one person does happen to come in contact with the virus and debt the disease that just not likely to meet anybody else who's Annette vaccinated, so it just can't spread on what about Europe, how many cases of we seen the we Europe is really alarming in two thousand and sixteen. There were about five thousand cases in the following year. There were about twenty thousand a now in two thousand eighteen just in the first half alone. It's going up to forty thousand and do we know what that's down to? Because the thing is, as you say, there is a very effective vaccine against measles there is, but coverage husband suffering for a couple of decades now ever. Since you might remember about twenty years ago, rather controversial research and Dr made a claim that turned out to be totally unsupported by evidence that the seen could cause autism. And then since then, there's been a lot of research which shows he had no basis for saying that. Unfortunately, people believed it, the idea of stuck, and it's now gaining quite a lot of credibility on the internet and its striking all this time later within saying this leap in measles, yes, I'm not is a bit of a mystery because it hasn't been such a dramatic fall in vaccination coverage rates. So we don't really know why it's just happening now..

Europe Latin America Venezuela Bangladesh Claire World Health Organization writer Americas David Robson BBC Annette medical reporter Wilson two years ninety five percent twenty years six months