29 Burst results for "Mcnally"

What Should Kids Be Learning in School?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

What Should Kids Be Learning in School?

"Typing, you had to take a typing class. If you're a guy, you had to take shop class if you were a girl, you took home economics. Yeah, none of that anymore. No, because then, you know, I mean, after the guy's in shop class, it would, you know, they're hot and sweaty. They've been working on it. You have taken a car apart and they're like to the girl that the girl classmates make me a sandwich. See, I would have liked to have had both glasses because I didn't know how to change a flat tire. I didn't know how to do that kind of thing. So you think in today's modern world, women should be able to change tires and change their oil, change the brake pads. I think that would be wonderful. All right. And then just basic, the basics in the kitchen. You don't have to be over here like, I'm gonna make you a souffle. No, just know how to make some cookies. Give me a break. Well, and that's a fair enough point. But the problem is, I think we are so focused now on gender studies that nothing else matters. Now no one knows anything, so everyone's useless. I'm exactly. And that's the problem is that nobody has any common sense. Just think about this. What would happen? You're about to go on a road trip with mister producer. What would happen if the Internet went down Siri just disappeared and you had no maps? You had nobody telling you in your car that voice turn left here. I'm very direct to the challenge, so I would be totally. Nobody would think without a paddle. They would freak out just trying to unfold the Rand mcnally map. And you guys of a certain age know exactly what I'm talking about. I'll admit we would have probably no idea. No, nobody ever. Mister producer can change the tire if it goes flat. Well, there you go. Well, that's good. So all that to say, ladies and gentlemen, I'm curious, what do we need if we had a chance on this program to overhaul the nation's public school system? What classes would you say are mandatory that we need to be teaching in our public education system? But I want

Siri
"mcnally" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

04:22 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on The Mom Room

"Always wanted. Welcome back to Tuesday's episode. It is a great episode. They're always great. Aren't they or am I biased? On today's episode, I am speaking with doctor Melanie mcnally. She is a clinical psychologist that helps teens and young adults manage stress and anxiety and develop coping tools..

Melanie mcnally
"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:08 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"At least two cameras, sometimes more, the holy Trinity of lenses, 14, 24, 24, 70, 70, 200. That covers a lot of the basis. And then there's other ones that would factor in as well. But small measure of small flash. And then I use pro photo for the bigger flash, if you will, you know, the B ten pluses are excellent units. And so, you know, if we go out into the road with four or 5 bags of stuff, pretty much feel we can get just about anything done. Yeah, yeah. And yeah, four or 5 bags of stuff for Jill mcnally, whittles down to one bag for Frederick van Jones. One bag with a couple of things in it that, you know, we make it work. You know, I guess the final kind of landing gear down question would be around the how this works in your world. And your world is different than most photographers I would argue that aren't operating at a high commercial level. But on a post production side of things, once a job is done, let's say it's one of your self assigned yet funded self assignment projects. Who's doing the post production on that? Is it Joe mcnally from shutter click all the way through to final delivery or do you have a team you hand it off to that kind of understands the kind of look that you want and are tuned in and they can pull that out? How does that work after the shutter click? Well, for many years, I had my crew chief Michael calley just left right before the pandemic. I fell in love, got engaged in the married downs, wonderful. He lives down in Virginia. And so then the pandemic hit, so I am in hired a new crew chief for a new first assistant. But Callie was very good. At retouching. And so I relied on him for that. But the beauty small silver lining. Let's call it that of the pandemic was time at home where I really learned a lot about capture one. And I feel very comfortable with that program. So now, like the book that you showed there, the real deal, I did a lot of the retouching on those pictures myself. Which is a new found for me because I had never really paid too much attention to retouching and Photoshop for me was always the deep end of the pool. If we are doing fashion where we need an elevated skill set, then yes, I farm that out professionally. And we use someone who really knows what they are doing and we can do skin work, which is absolutely beyond my skill set. Okay. Does that make sense? Capture one. And we use, I mean, we use solstice retouching. Just amazing, very talented, very talented. I know these folks, yeah. And great relationship. And yeah, really tuned in to we have a lot of discussion, but yeah, like, you know, that fine detail work on skin, fashion that that's an art form unto itself. And I don't approach. Yeah, you remember back in the day day, imagine doing skin work without capture wonder Photoshop. That I can't imagine how those magicians made that work happened back then because that was something else. Something else. So let's wrap up with what's next for John mcnally. What's the next trip? What's the next project? Where are you taking the Z 9 next on the planet? Well, I got a big job in March that were assembling right now and the bits and pieces are coming together. Production wise. And hopefully, you know, I have a zoom this week with an ad agency for a fairly sizable pharma shoot. TBD, we'll see what happens. But in terms of excursions and knowing where I'm going next, wine country. That's my neighborhood. Yeah, Napa. Yeah, going out to Napa and April May ish time. And I have two weeks out there. First week of those workshops are full, but the second week has a few openings. So come on out. We're going to do some lighting. We're going to do some landscape work. And we will have a wonderful time. Because I just came out of the out of the Amazon rainforest. I was in Ecuador for the last two weeks. And it was beautiful. It was wonderful, fantastic group of people, fantastic trip. But wine country will be, let's call it a little more accessible. If you were animals out there too, I'm thinking you're going. So a lot of great learning and we got that it's on our website listed on our website. Okay, excellent. All right, John mcnally, I'll leave it right there. Thank you for doing this. Thanks for coming on and congratulations on the real deal available at fine bookstores everywhere. Amazon included, I'm sure. Yeah, I can't wait for the next one. Is real deal two in progress already, or is that on the whiteboard? No. We're standing down on the right in front for a little bit. Yeah. I hear you. It takes a lot out of it. Up and running. And initial reports are people are enjoying it. So I'm happy for that. Okay. All right. Jim mcnally, thank you so much. Nikon ambassador, extraordinaire, the real deal this weekend photo. Thanks, sir. Thanks for coming on. Thank you, Frederick. Honored to be invited. This is twin. This episode was sponsored by MPB, the world's largest online platform for used photo and video kit. Visit MPB dot com..

holy Trinity of lenses Jill mcnally Frederick van Jones Michael calley Joe mcnally John mcnally Callie Napa Virginia Amazon Ecuador Jim mcnally Nikon Frederick MPB
"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Photographic heart should be preserved at all costs. Your enthusiasm, your love for this. And you can't let maybe naysayers or lack of attendance kind of destroy that. You know, I also think about self projects and you may know Julianne cost from Adobe. Julie Julianne and I had a conversation a while back about the importance of self projects in the signing yourself self projects. Not only for portfolio building, but also as an exercise to get better as an artist. Do you subscribe to that as well? And do you are you giving yourself self projects from time to time? If so, what kind? Yes, I mean, what I'm thankfully, hopefully can do is I decide on a quote unquote a project. And I write proposals. And I try to monetize the idea and get some backing for it. So that I can more fully, because I think kind of ambitiously, I guess you could say, you know, when I'm thinking of dreaming up ideas and I can't self fund everything I do, occasionally I do. Occasionally, I'm just saying, heck with it, I'm going to go do this, whether anybody wants to pay me for it or not. And there are threads that you can establish that you can revisit over time. Or a really powerful thing is to do is to incorporate your interests into an ongoing funded project. I used to do that with geographic. I had a story for geographic ones on human performance. It was their millennial celebration of the human body that coincided with the Australia Olympics down in Sydney. And I photographed athletes and Olympians, et cetera. But I also was able to, because my editor gave me the leeway, I was able to incorporate other sort of whimsical ideas into the idea of performance. Dance, for instance, I feel is a very elevated state of human performance. So I did a dance photograph that was not assigned to me. But geographic funded it, and they loved it. And they published it. I did, I wanted to illustrate strength and bodybuilding. And I thought, well, coiled strength. How could I illustrate coiled strength? So I rented, you can do this in Los Angeles. I rented two 18 foot Burmese pythons. And I got the number three bodybuilder in the world at the time, Chris Cormier, to come into the studio. And we shot it in the studio with this giant snake wrapped around him. When she was sort of dubious about, but he did it. And geographic ran that as well. Total surprise, I didn't even tell my editor I was shooting. You know, so I think if that's maybe nirvana is if you can find a genre of work that brings you places that you're put potentially passionate about. Spend a couple of do a workshop or something. And then spend a couple extra days. And really direct yourself into something that you really want to do. There's all sorts of ways of doing it, but bottom line is yes. You have to feed your eye. And that requires sometimes you just stepping up and driving your own project and funding it yourself. I love that. I was trying to write that down before you finish feed your eye. I'm going to use that. You know, I'll wrap up with this. I know a lot of photographers, photographers, I think part of the DNA structure is talking about gear. And what are you shooting with? What lens did you use to shoot that with? What app did you use the process that where you posting it, all those sorts of things. I'm not so much curious about that. I'm more curious about your approach to going out on an assignment. And is it, you know, slot one, which is Joe has his current 22 loadout of gear, a bag, maybe a backup version, identical of that bag, but you have a bag of stuff that you take with you. And with that bag and what's in that bag, you can accomplish a Joe mcnally level of work, or is it more a team style where you know you're going out on a mission and you go into your sort of matrix room of weapons and you pick the right things for that particular assignment and when you come back, you put them back on the shelf and go, what does it look like in Joe mcnally world? Frederick, I think you and I are in the same boat. We've both seen way too many movies. Totally. You know, I get jobs that are big and small. All over the lot. You showed a few images of the Z 9 camera, the marketing campaign out on el mirage. And that's a big job. Lots of gear, lots of rental gear, winnebagoes, crew of maybe a dozen, or so talent, hair and makeup styling, you name it. That's out on that's at that level. But I don't work at that level all the time. You know, I did a thing for a camera store recently where I did a series of images and I called it a walk with one light. Because I wanted to drive home the point that you don't need a lot of gear. And so I just took a subject and interesting subject, and we walked around New York City with one light. And it was fun. So I think what you have to do is tailor your pack to the job at hand. My basics are always that I have at least two cameras, sometimes more, the holy Trinity of lenses, 14, 24, 24, 70, 70, 200. That covers a lot of the basis..

Julie Julianne Chris Cormier Julianne Adobe Joe mcnally Olympics Sydney nirvana Australia Los Angeles Joe el mirage Frederick New York City
"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

09:17 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Two or three weeks before I would get word from my editor that everything looked good or something like that. Now that instantaneous access to amazing technology, I think has bolstered the confidence of photographers everywhere. Yeah, do we not as photographers do we not know what we're missing? You mentioned with the D 8 50, right? That was it. You know, I remember back in the day, it was that after it was, oh, I have my first pro level camera was a Nikon F three. You remember those? With the screw on battery grit or the motor drive and all that on there. Yeah, so and I thought that camera was, how could it get better than this? It's amazing. Look at all this stuff that this camera can do. And now we have the Z 9. What's next? What are we missing? Seeing into the future or being able to capture dark matter. What are we missing in these cameras, you know? I mean, obviously focusing speeds can get better and all that. But are there any features that you just wish you had that aren't there in the Z 9? You know, I have to say to people might look at this with a scans or maybe you say, oh, you know, he's just blowing smoke. I'm not really. I'm a bit of a simpleton when it comes to cameras. There is a very famous British war photographer named Donald McCullough, a member of Magnum, and I've always admired his work. He said one of the best things ever about cameras. He said, I only use a camera like I use a toothbrush. It gets the job done. And now the Z 9 is a hell of a toothbrush. But every iteration of the technology I say to myself, how much better is this going to get? And sure, there's little refinements that you could maybe add to the present packages that we have, but I don't choose to dwell on that. There's a lot of. Crying and well not crying. What's the right word to say, just like debate and pixel peeping, complaining. You name it. And that's fine. You know, people get involved in the technology. And the shape of the pixel does not matter to me. The end results or the ultimate mission of photography is to tell a good story. And no matter how much technology we have, that's still a very hard mission. And that's what I choose to focus on. And so the Z 9 has a roster of things that I'm still just getting used to. That are enabling me to hopefully press forward and tell good stories. So I got no complaints. I really got no complaints. So the flip side of that is, since you have that Z 9, what are some of the favorite things or some of the more surprising things that are present in that body that you weren't expecting, the ergonomics is that the menu? The focusing, tracking, what are some things in there that Joe mcnally or someone operating at your level was surprised by? Sure. You mentioned ergonomics. I mean, I shot the Tokyo games. I shot them all on D 6, which is flagship DSLR. And I've always liked a robust camera in my hands, especially when I'm using long glass. The Z 6 is Z 7 series of cameras are wonderful cameras. Amazing technology in a small form factor. But you pop that onto the back of a 600. There's not a lot to hang on to. So I was really happy that the Z 9 is kind of this marriage really of DSLR flagship build with mirrorless technology. There's a lot to handle with this camera. It gives you leverage. It gives you feel very connected to it and the way it's designed. The other thing is I mean, apart from the autofocus, the autofocus is astonishing. The eye detect is remarkable. All those things that you've heard about on the airwaves about photography of late. But to me, a real revelation was never losing sight of my subject. The mechanical shutter is gone. And so no matter how you are exposing your banging along at 20 frames a second, which is another unheard of number, as far as I'm concerned. And you never use lose sight of your subject. It's amazing. And I find that to be valuable, not only out there in the field, but even in the studio because you're able to see those nuances, those split seconds in between the moments, you know? And your subjects are right there with you all the time. And I thought, that was the first time I had ever experienced that in all these years of shooting. And that was kind of seems like a small thing, but it's a revelation to me. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, there's so many little bits. I mentioned to you before we started recording. I recently picked up the Nikon Z 6 two, which I'm in that sort of honeymoon period with an understanding the camera, being kind of diving into it and understanding what its limitations are and capabilities. It's just a magical. The system is just magical when it comes to still photography. I can't say enough about it. And that 24 to 70 F two 8 is what I have mounted on it. So very excited about that. You know, when you dive in, or in other words, let me rephrase that. So if I'm an Emma photographer I'm coming to you. And I've read the book. I've been following Joe mcnally. I've been on the website Joe mcnally dot com. And I want to do work similar to what you're doing or operate at your level. And I'm new. I'm just getting into this. How would you instruct me? As a mentor, would you say go get X camera, take these courses at this website, go take a trip and do a workshop, what are the steps to go from? I'm really interested in photography. I want to get better in a Jill mcnally direction. How would I go about doing that? Except the fact, first of all, first off, that it's a long road. And patience is required. And then identify what really motivates you. Are you motivated by the human face? Are you motivated by sports? Are you motivated by documenting the joys of families and weddings? Where are your interests? The other thing that I have always advocated and has been powerful for me is to do a lot of reading and dive into the history of this field and look at a lot of pictures that have gone before. I have very large library of photo books at home. And I find them an ongoing source of inferred inspiration. And so I look at some of those truly amazing photographers and the work that they did in the years that I've gone by. And that has formed a base for me of kind of what motivates me visually. Where do I want to go in this realm? Because, you know, your by and large, talking about a freelance industry. So I always liken my Joe mcnally photography that this old jalopy, you know, it doesn't go very fast, but I can drive it wherever I want. That's a beautiful thing. And if I want to pursue dance photography, if I want to pursue special effects, if I want to pursue sports, I can collect myself and drive in that direction. So starting small, being patient. And the 10,000 hours rule is very, very real here. The more you do this, the better you will get. And education is not to be underestimated. There's educational alternatives all over the place, apart from going to a university or a long and expensive program. There are options for education. The kelby group, for instance, has lots of information there will present it. There are photographers who run consistent sort of lessons, you know, Dave black has his workshops at the ranch. He has an archive. David Harvey at strobes, if you're interested in flash, I think still has his archive of I think it's called boot camp, you know, flash boot camp. So the basics are important. I firmly believe that. The automated cameras will just run you into the ground. So you have to be careful of that because you take it out of the box and wow, I'm making pictures. I got this thing on P and I'm pointing at things and everything looks pretty good. Okay, let's calm down. You got to know basics. You got to have a firm foundation. If you want to take this and build it into a real satisfying.

Joe mcnally Donald McCullough Nikon Jill mcnally Tokyo Emma kelby group Dave black David Harvey
"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:36 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"I mean a clip of that. You gotta guess. You know, I think that for me, you know, and you can extrapolate this in any way you want. When I first really seriously picked up a camera, I knew immediately. It felt comfortable in my hands, and I thought to myself, I don't know, without even really knowing the first thing about it, I thought to myself, I can do this. And I don't know how I felt that. But it was intuitive and it felt natural. The camera just felt natural in my hands. And there's also the other kind of underlying thing is that instantly or in my first classes, photographically, I realized, wow, this could keep me out of an office. Because I'm no good in her office. I'm just not an office person, you know? I drift. I'm like a balloon. My wife is constantly reeling me back in. And. Can you learn to be passionate about something? Yes, I think you can. I think it stems from life experience and its stems from many situations I've met with people who have taken workshops with me or something is that they've they want to turn on another side of their brain. And once that is turned on via the making of pictures, then they're full bore. They can't shut that back down. So yeah, I think once you're bitten by the bug, there's no turning back. And then once you're bitten by that bug, right? And then that's just the beginning, right? So how do you, how do you get to the point where you're creating the level of work, I mean, obviously you got to get your shutter finger kind of exercise and take lots of shots and understand what you're doing. But the concept of the photos, let's take a commercial out of it, right? So it's not a client that says, hey Joe, we need a shot of this car on the salt flats, doing this. That's out of it. If you're just Joe mcnally and you're on, you just want to go do some shots because you're feeling that burning desire. Where does that come from? Does Joe have a list of like, okay, when I have some time, I'm going to do this shot. And when I have more time, I'm going to do this shot. Or is it more serendipitous? You're watching a movie and you're like, hey, that would make a great shot. I'm going to execute that. Where do the ideas come from that aren't driven by commercial? Yeah, again, good line of inquiry, really, because everybody's process is different. Mine is not a particularly organized process at all. Now I don't have check marks and a book or anything like that. I ruminate. I imagine. The phrase, what if what if we put a camera on this? Or what if I was able to get over there or so you start with the imaginative process, the kind of wild ass thought, you know? And then say, wow, maybe I could make a picture of that. The frontispiece to the book, it's just a blank page with two settings on it. Two sentences on it. In bold type and it says, I imagine the life, and then I took pictures of it. So I have a pretty active imagination. I read a lot of comic books when I was a kid. I went to 5 different grammar schools, which is actually good preparation to become a photographer because you're always the new kid. And I read epics and adventures and fantasies and stories and comic books and I know that influenced my color palette. My camera point of view, you know, heroic poses and action and strong vivid color. You know, sometimes I wish I could quiet it down, but it just never happened. I just chew on ideas and sometimes things come from, as you say, you know, I mentioned comic books, but also movies. I remember I saw water for elephants when Reese Witherspoon laid down on an elephant in the movie, I believe it was. And I went to Lynn my amazingly patient studio manager who's been with me for 30 years and she's a marvelous producer. She's actually working on two large projects for us now, which will shoot in March. Assembling the bits and pieces. And I went to her and I said, I just made a screen grab of it, and I said, this feel. You see the feel, the light, and the next thing you know, we were in Florida, and thankfully we had a big budget job. And we built a circus tent and old time circus tent. Wow. And that's where that came from was a split second. And sometimes on location too, you can be walking with the usual scout, and something just glimmers in your eye. Like, oh, and you can't, you know, your head gets pulled for a second. And it's like, that's where we're starting right over there. Are you the photographer that always has a camera with you no matter what? You're out to dinner. There's a photographer camera sitting on the chair next to you. No, no. I take it with me frequently, but not all the time. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, you know, it's interesting. We talked a little bit about sort of in the early days of, I think we weren't recording. We were talking about the old SB 24 speed lights and I remember distinctly, I remember, I don't know if you remember this, but there was, I think it was a video or a photo series of you lighting a jet or something with a bunch of speed lights. And yeah, it was a video because I remember that was the first time I heard you use the term voice activated light stand. So bringing it to 2022, where we are now. That was back in the teens, right? We're in 2022 now. How has that stuff changed? How has your approach to lighting and light changed with the evolution of artificial lighting solutions like the SB series and whatever else we have available to us today? Yeah, the progress has been astonishing. The technology we have available to us now is photographers is off the charts. And we live in this golden age. I mean, Nikon just came out with the Z 9, you know, I had to I had D 8 50s. I still have them, I thought, well, this is it. This is the best camera I'm ever going to use. And then the Z 9 comes out. That's a better camera. More rounded technologically more tuned up. You know, I don't even know the exact words to express it. But we have these cameras now that we can single handedly express our imaginations in ways that we simply could not have done back in the days of F twos and F threes or certainly would have taken a lot of work and a lot of guesswork. That's the thing that impresses me about the technology. You just mentioned the SP 24. That was an era of TTL flash technology. That was very uncertain. And now we have the SB 5000. And we have the pro photos, the a tens, the B ten plus X's, and all this TTL, fast recycle, radio controlled stuff. So the certainty of approach is so much higher now. The confidence that you can go out into the field with that you will wrestle this thing to the ground because you've got these technology tools that are at your service. That's pretty amazing. I mean, shooting film, 36 exposure film, you know? Wrap that cassette up and with kodachrome and National Geographic..

Joe mcnally Joe Reese Witherspoon Lynn Florida Nikon
"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:03 min | 5 months ago

"mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Another episode of this week in photo I'm your host Frederick Van Johnson, today, you know, I say this all the time, but today I really made it. You know, I get to sit down with a photographer who has influenced legions of photographers out there with his work with his work ethic with his story. The lighting just knowledge of photography goes on and on and on. Joe mcnally is one of those photographers. I was telling Joe in our little quote green room. He's one of those photographers where you mention his name amongst other photographers and an eerie hush falls on the crowd, like Darth Vader entered the room, and there's a force there that shall not be challenged. Joe mcnally, you know, the title of his book that we're gonna talk about is the real deal, but Joe mcnally is literally the real deal when it comes to photography, photojournalism, commercial photography, all this stuff. Joe, it is an absolute pleasure to have you on the show, man. How the heck are you doing? I can do it fine, Frederick. Thank you very much for the many kind words there. Should I start breathing like Darth Vader? We should. You should Frederick. I am your father. Yeah, there you go. The force is strong with you. Thank you. It is. It is. This is great. This is good. So like I said in the beginning, we're going to be talking about this a little bit. This is your book. It's out now. It's called the real deal. Subtitled field notes from the life of a working photographer, Joe mcnally. Who's this book for, Joe? Is this book for the average photographer that wants to get better at photography? Is it a glimpse into your life and the trials and tribulations of some of the stories that you've that happened behind the scenes as a photographer? What's the book about? Yeah, it's a good question. My editor and I actually struggled with it. When I was writing and we were discussing it, it's like, well, okay, what is this book exactly? Because so many photo books are like straight line narratives to a destination, like, okay, how to pose better, how to do something better. This book is not that. It's not a superhighway of direct information. I liken it more to a country road. It takes an anvil. Or a ramble, I guess you should say. And a meander could also be applied. Through the life of a working photographer, and there's a lot of information for photographers of all different genres and stages of their life, be they professional or amateur. It's honest. And it talks about the ups, the downs, the failures, the successes, the strategies, et cetera, and the material is generally speaking, presented anecdotally. In other words, couched in the story of a location shot or the story of a failure or the story of some shoot that was going off the rails and then you pulled it back on. Lots of lessons photographically, not only about the technique of photography, but the life of photography. Yeah, and we were talking about that a little bit as well. Just on the life side of photography over the years, being a good photographer and going after the shots and going to the shot, skating to where the puck is going to be. That takes a toll, right? I mean, it's not being a photographer, especially when operating at your level, it's not an easy gig. Can you talk about that a little bit? What kind of wear and tear gets put on you as a photographer constantly going out there and being on the road and getting these great shots and all that pressure? There's a lot of pressure associated across the board. Pressure from the client, you know, to pressure to do well. Obviously, financial pressure, you know, that your next gig is never completely certain. And then there's the physicality of being a photographer going location location, airplane after airplane, gear, hauling, moving, climbing. All of that sort of stuff is perhaps not talked about all that much. But it's a very real presence. Photography is this thing. It's an art and a craft, right? And it winds itself around your life and very powerful and hopefully positive ways. You know, there's lots of folks out there like, well, I do this during the week, but on the weekend, you know, I go out and I do motocross or I sail a boat or something like that. You know, that's how I get my Yaya's out. I think for many photographers, most I would imagine, it's this is it, you know, 7 days a week, you know, we've photographed to work. We photographed a relax. And I always, you know, I've shot dance photography for a long time, you know, in the background of other things I've done. And I always remember those famous quote from George Balanchine, the legendary choreographer. He always said, I don't want dancers. I don't need dancers who want to dance. I want dancers who need to dance. And I think for photographers, we need to photograph whether we're in repose or working hard, you know? We run when others walk, you know, we're working on weekends when others have time off. And we love doing it because it's a very, very passionate endeavor. You think that's a learn trait? Is it learned? Can you learn to have that fire in the desire to have that pull to go out and create photos? Or if you don't have it, you just don't have it and you should find something else to do. Wow, that's a. Frederick, you're good. You're good. What I do, jokes, what I do. It's like I'm going to quote De Niro and what is it analyze this? You, my friend, you got a gift. You've got this. You.

Joe mcnally Frederick Van Johnson Darth Vader Joe Frederick Yaya George Balanchine De Niro
2022 Pro Football Hall of Fame: Meet the newest members

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

2022 Pro Football Hall of Fame: Meet the newest members

"The newest members of the pro football hall of fame were announced in attendance were former services go forty Niners great Bryant young three time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour former Green Bay Packers safety and Lambeau leap inventor leroy Butler Super Bowl coach Dick vermeil and Tony Miceli the first ever Jacksonville Jaguars player to be named a hall of Famer the late Sam mills raiders legend cliff branch and former director of officiating art McNally were also named to the two thousand twenty two class all eight men will officially be enshrined in canton Ohio come August Jeremy takeover eagle would California

Bryant Young Leroy Butler Tony Miceli Richard Seymour Niners Dick Vermeil Sam Mills Green Bay Packers Cliff Branch Super Bowl Football Jacksonville Jaguars Mcnally Jeremy Takeover Canton Ohio California
"mcnally" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"mcnally" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"And another point that i would Bring up is a explainable models. So when you're when you develop a model you need to determine what degree of explain ability your key stakeholders need and there are different ways to approach this one way. And say you know i'm willing to purposely choose a simpler. Ai model maybe it's not so You know it's it's not in fashion right now. it's not coming off the presses. Maybe this is a. This is a technique that was developed two or three decades ago right. But it's because sometimes the simpler models are easier to understand and they're much more transparent On the other hand you could take the approach of post talk application of Explain ability So for example in virtual lyrics one of the exciting projects that we're working on is a network explain ability where we have these algorithms for computing clustering of network graphs. And folks will ask you. W- what do each of you know. It's clear that there these communities within the data you've found these different clusters in that school. That sort of insight. But what are these clusters about. And so we've been working on developing different algorithms for being able to label all of these different clusters and give a nice english description of you. Know what are the particular properties that the users in particular community exhibit and so. This is something that allows people to then go beyond just. Oh it's it's interesting that the you know. The the different members of the this network graph clustered together nicely It allows them to actually say okay. Mcnally understand what these clusters are about. And that's like key to bring allowing people to actually gain some actionable business insight from that So you know thinking through the explain ability angle. If you're model salsa really important and then the last point i wanted to make which i think is actually a perhaps the most important and it served me well. Time and time again is what i call the three by three approach so I i learned this when i was Keying actually in in graduate school So i was The serving as the for the graduate natural language processing class.

Mcnally
Episode 144: Welcome to the Motel Kill-afornia - burst 15

The Swearwolves

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Episode 144: Welcome to the Motel Kill-afornia - burst 15

"This bill. You can bill mcnally for all. I care will. Mitchell is l. virginia bill. I would do this the boot that why would you. Why are you being so aggressive. Difficult up just trying to billion for services rendered bill

Laurie Jennifer Jessica Roy Moore Evelyn Apple Thousand Dollars Mitchell TWO Laureate Arkansas Kelly Five Seconds Jim Mccullough Evelyn Chambers January Twenty Fourth Nineteen July Thirteenth Nineteen Seven Lord Voldemort Bradford Crenshaw Bill Mcnally Virginia
"mcnally" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"mcnally" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"I think you can sign up for as little as three bucks a month. And then you get access to all the exclusive episodes. Many thanks to all current patrons..

Alaska tribes await word from FCC about broadband licenses

Native America Calling

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Alaska tribes await word from FCC about broadband licenses

"This is national native news. Tony gonzales alaska. Tribes are awaiting word on scores of wireless broadband licenses by the federal communications commission. It's part of a push to improve internet access and underserved communities a startup called alaska. Tribal spectrum received a one hundred thousand dollar grant to register as many alaska tribes during the final months of last year's application period gym berlin. Heads the keybase nonprofit which has signed up nearly seventy tribes mcnally commission were set up to create a recreated website in an application process to make it very very simple to join the consortium application and get as many as many tribes to grab a hold of for free asset before before the window closed any unclaimed licenses will go to auction to private carriers berlin says it was a big push to get rural tribes with poor internet to enroll on their website and the struggles. They had were told the craziest stories. You'd ever wanna hear trying to get their application in some of them. We ended up faxing in in in in to get an in Somehow to handwrite it. You know and do paper applications. I mean it was. It's so challenging. One of those tribes as douglas indian association near juneau kamal lint off says the trip was happy to get assistance. We had no clue. You know what this really was. And then no clue on how to how we manage it or even get started We had probably a couple of different places contact us and we kinda jumped on board with that one stinking. I was all we needed to do. Some of the applications overlap the douglas tribes applications for coverage in an area also claimed by central council of clinton haida indian tribes. Overlapping claims are being negotiated. Tribes will still have to pay for infrastructure. The cares act created a one billion dollar broadband fund tribes can apply for alaska. Tribal spectrum has applied separately for a federal community connect grant to bring broadband service to villages and the bristol bay region montana state lawmakers heard two bills wednesday seeking to establish indigenous peoples day in october yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas has more senate bill. One forty six brought by senator. Shane mauricio a democrat from missoula would replace columbus day with indigenous peoples day. Senate bill ninety four sponsored by democrat. Susan weber from browning in northern montana would also establish indigenous peoples day but does not remove columbus day. More support was shown for the proposal to remove columbus day. Even the other bill sponsor said she preferred it. But many proponents including jordan thompson confederated salem in kootenai tribal member spoke on behalf of both bills are believed that the first bill we heard today was kind of like inviting everyone to the same backyard for a barbecue. This one's more like waving at each other with fence in between so we support it. But i'd much rather be at the barbecue. Proponents of the bills spoke to the importance of celebrating. What they called true. Us history acknowledging olive montana's citizens and the harm of celebrating christopher columbus whose acts of genocide and crimes against native. Americans are well documented. No one opposed either bill. During the hearing similar montana legislation failed in twenty seventeen and twenty nineteen. No executive action was taken on either bill for national news and report for america. I'm caitlyn nicholas the. Us senate committee on indian affairs holding. Its first meeting of the new congress thursday. The committee will elect new leaders. Senator bryan shots democrat from hawaii. As chairman and republican senator. Lisa murkowski from alaska as vice chair cove in nineteen relief healthcare education sacred site protection and a long list of other issues are among tribal priorities. I man tonia

Alaska Tony Gonzales Mcnally Commission Douglas Indian Association Kamal Lint Berlin Central Council Of Clinton Hai Federal Communications Commiss Columbus Shane Mauricio Susan Weber Northern Montana Juneau Montana Jordan Thompson Bristol Bay Caitlyn Missoula
"mcnally" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"mcnally" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Senator Martha McNally in a renewed Republican majority in the United States Senate with Congressman Paul Goes our congressman, Mark Wain, Mullen and Tiffany shed in a new Republican majority in the House of Representatives and with President Donald Trump back in the White House for four more years. And with God's help. We're going to make America great again again. Thank you all very much. God bless you. God bless America. Now, let's get done. Arizona. Strange. With.

Senator Martha McNally Congressman Paul President Donald Trump congressman America House of Representatives Mark Wain White House Senate United States Mullen Tiffany Arizona
Podcast Movement shifts to a virtual event

podnews

03:15 min | 2 years ago

Podcast Movement shifts to a virtual event

"We must take care of each other and protect those who matter most. This means that podcast movement will not take place in twenty twenty. We share this news with a heavy heart, but we know it's the right decision for everyone because we start with an exclusive today due to the ongoing Global Pandemic podcast movement, Twenty Twenty in Dallas. Texas has been canceled to take its place podcast movement. Will today announce what they expect to be? The world's largest ever virtual podcasting event podcast movement virtual over two weeks from October the nineteenth, all registered podcast movement. Twenty twenty attendees should take a look at your email. Your options and Pause Movement twenty twenty one has been confirmed for Aug in Nashville in Tennessee. PROCON succumbing to Amazon music and audible, it's official Lipson has quietly rolled out to distribution option for this service. Amazon is not announcing launch schedule. At this time, the announcement says the content license agreement that you have to sign does say that Amazon will not imbed any advertising in or re host your content. spotify now does video podcasts. The technology only place video when the screens on searching to audio only and using less bandwidth when video isn't required, according to the release, its functionality, which of course will be required for Joe Rogan. When he comes to the platform. In September the open podcast ecosystem also does video podcast supported by podcasts and podcasts among others. spotify implementation however appears to be a bit different and we've asked how it works. Next time you doubt the power of podcasting to make change a wonderful heartwarming story from the upsides that you'll find in our show notes now newsletter today it's a podcast that has created a movement of generosity and kindness. audio boom has announced its first half of two thousand hundred and financial results revenues up twenty percent year on year in spite of the panda make the company posted slightly less loss at one point two million dollars. Some new shows are being delayed though storyboards has launched what it calls, the first ever listening commenting system for private podcasts and internal audio and our podcast hosts pages now dated megaphone gained iab certification in May and we've added pod space a Swedish podcast host, thank you to feed ignites for becoming on latest supporter feed ignite offers production and social media support for podcasts based in the UK, but work everywhere, and we're grateful to them for their support. Focused News American skyjacked the final flight of Martin. McNally launches today. It looks at the story of a man who wanted to hijack a plane and get himself half a million dollars, haven't we? All is part of a partnership between imperative entertainments. PODCAST division had cumulus media's Westwood One. The press release for the plastic surgeon podcast, says the Best Plastic Surgery Podcast of twenty twenty is the plastic surgeon podcast by Dr Jeffords John and whom we to argue and richards famous food podcast gets a glowing review in the Sydney Morning Herald. Each episode can take parks up to six weeks to edit apparently blind me,

Twenty Twenty Procon Amazon Joe Rogan Spotify Cumulus Media Sydney Morning Herald Nashville Richards Dallas Texas Dr Jeffords John Lipson Mcnally Westwood UK Tennessee
Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving of Toyota Racing Development's TD2 driver development program

NASCAR on NBC

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving of Toyota Racing Development's TD2 driver development program

"Now. Let's get to part two of our conversation with Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving just this I want to give you guys a chance to put some names with some faces here people who are listening. We've mentioned Christopher Bell. You guys mentioned Harris and Burton. I was reading a motorsports analytics story today in which Jack was quoted very highly on Chandler. Smith just wanted to give you a chance to tell us a little about. Who'S IN THE LINEUP? Right now and we're the names. We should be watching it from the Toyota racing development driver program. So it's funny. I think we have some remarkable kids coming up of all different ages all different ranges But it's still development like Chandler. Smith is is a gifted driver. I mean in in we've been with Chandler for three or four years i. I don't remember how long it's been a few years. He's been fantastic. He's always been a strong late model. Racer Kinda in his family team was was quite gifted enabled to kind of compete at a very young age with some very high level guys in racing and then he transferred that into Arca adventuring end and has been fantastic and the more he matures the better. He gets Which is really exciting. He's similar to like a younger Jones in that respect where he's young and been around it and he seemed so much older in a car and so much more mature in so that is translated into the truck races he ran last year and and I have some pretty high expectations of him as he does of themselves but he's definitely one of our up and comers that is on the young side mean seventeen and still developing and then obviously there's the Raphael Lazard the neckaces that we've been with for quite a while and I think most people know of Kazan truck races now. That were pretty happy about. And then there's there's lots of kids that we actively engage with and develop in all different areas were lucky not geographically focused either because we have teams all over the place and that's helped us engage with maybe some kids we probably wouldn't necessarily always get access to so there's some good kids in California. There's kids racing for Keith in Indiana. There's just there's just a lot of strong drivers out there the thing that's so interesting though. Is that their kids and kids. You never know what's going to happen so it's still development. I mean it's it's People. WanNa say whatever they want to say about how what what it takes to make it? But they're a work ethic focused drive a passionate WanNa do it is all super important to to make it and at some point maintaining that from fourteen fifteen. Sixteen seventeen is very very difficult to do. Know we can talk about it all the time about being focused in wanting it and all that but the proof is in Monday through Friday. And how hard? They're working what they're doing and to to be on top of their game and and for whatever reason at times that lapses and you know you could take a great kid who's Fourteen Jesse. Love is a kid we've been with since he was twelve. I think thirteen stupid. How young that was East we're really excited about him and you know then. There's kids like Geo celts. Who came out of nowhere in dirt and had outlawed program in in our racing with us and pavement. That's a little bit kind of a different road that he traveled and then we have Holly Holland and Greasy Trotter. Who really come aboard and done a really good job in kind of in all of our testing have looked quite good still have a lot of development to do. You know there's there's kids we lost Based on Ford coming in that is painful to so. There's I think there's a lot of good crop of young kids coming out racing and as long as they all continue to work hard developing keep good people around him then hopefully we'll see him down the road. We really good group. We have a good team of kids. it's exciting to them kind of interact with each other watch the quote unquote older kids. Who may not actually be older but have been in higher level than others and back and forth and so he has Jackson. We're really excited about about our kids. You mentioned most of the ones I attend to hit their Jesse loved Yosemite. I think Logan. Cv also part of the lineup. I believe I mean so. Logan was Logan is not as involved now. We still are working through some things to see if there's ways to work together it's just difficult to the process is difficult and how everybody fits in where they go. I mean Logan is ridiculously talented. I mean it's it's just finding the path and making it work is always hard. You know I mean you look at the McNally Lineup or venturing lineup with I mean. You have Corey Haim and drew dollar and Michael Self Austin Hills Rachel H at hr e and in. He's ridiculously good. And He's twenty four with two kids for God's sake so I mean it's awesome right. I mean in in in in Austin Hugely Involved Maximum Laughlin with with a jury in there. There is an amazing group of kids in. What's interesting is we're kind of lucky. We have some really driven dedicated guy who want participate and show up every day. And I mean that's what's crazy about the performance central a lot of those that we talked about minus the group their local to North Carolina. Right you get into dirt kids in our dirt. Kids are Cap. GotTa be the younger kids we've ever had consistently with Daisin Ken McIntosh and Buddy I mean it. Just these they're all babies right in and so they're and they're out. There racing are trying to raise eighty times a year. I mean it's it's just an amazing amazing situation but I think we've been very lucky. I mean part of it is. I think what we've done is a little bit different and and our teams of Baden in. That's been a big part of it. That's it goes back to what I said before. The integration of the teams is pretty special and something. I think I'm probably most proud about. Is that all those teams engage in actively discuss things with each other to try to help develop the drivers.

Logan Chandler Smith Jack Irving Toyota Christopher Bell Tyler Gibbs Harris Corey Haim Yosemite Ken Mcintosh Indiana Raphael Lazard Burton Baden North Carolina Keith California Jones WAN
"mcnally" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on The Archive Project

"A living. You know mess it up and we lose you by. I think we've got if we can get you those first five minutes but I don't know how many thousands of plays I've probably seen at this point in my life and I always have that feeling when it begins. This is going to be good. This is the time that the magic is going to happen. And of course it doesn't but I'm a when it does and you're there it it thrilling. You know I have one thing I was going to read. I'm so used to standing in the back of the veteran. Having some of the best actors of our time speaking my lines always seems weird when I read something of my own and I thought I'd like to read is a little bit of master class and zoo. Caldwell is a number of those reasons you know. Maybe you're in the first time I ever went to abroad. I was a student at Columbia and I save my money for two years to go somewhere trip. We Want Air Iceland in New York to Boston Boston to Iceland or something eventually got to London. You know one hundred dollars later a two days later but we got there. And everyone's are you going go to Stratford. This wonderful new actress that Tyrone Guthrie has discovered in Australia in these mounted this incredible production of all's.

Iceland Tyrone Guthrie Boston Caldwell Stratford Columbia Australia New York London
"mcnally" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Coming up for three o'clock in the great garden state there's Billy Idol the it no one time is three oh three Tom McNally here saying Hey thanks for spending your weekend with us hope everything's good right now we check out New Jersey fast traffic cleared on westbound eighty before the garden state parkway in saddle brook all lanes are now open slight residual delays and roads are wet they could be a little slack in the father's little dancing portions of the garden state so use some caution if you have to be out still a bit slow in Edison northbound route one between old post road and two eighty seven and we still have the closure in Cinnaminson southbound one thirty data shut down after Riverton road because of an accident with a down traffic light leaving New Jersey or okay at the George Washington bridge no major backups at the Lincoln and Holland tunnels but just a reminder all the crossings plus the turnpike parkway the AC expressway all with cashless tolling now and if you have some construction to tell you about this on the Delaware Memorial Bridge leaving New Jersey one lane is closed down the spam traffic sponsored by Lowe's do your next home improvement project right shopping lows for deals throughout the store do it right for last start with lows traffic every fifteen minutes next reported three eighteen I'm Adam walls beyond New Jersey won a one point five Brenton cherry hill you're on New Jersey one one point five Hey guys thanks for being there with the real news that affects our lives it is a strange strange time we're all going through.

Tom McNally New Jersey Cinnaminson George Washington bridge Delaware Memorial Bridge Lowe Edison Lincoln Holland
Award-winning playwright Terrence McNally dies from coronavirus complications

Morning Edition

01:40 min | 2 years ago

Award-winning playwright Terrence McNally dies from coronavirus complications

"Sorry to tell you that Terrence McNally has died he was a playwright whose popular musicals included kiss of the spider woman and ragtime McNally lived eighty one years he survived lung cancer he had pulmonary problems and died of complications from coronavirus Jeff London has this appreciation at last year's Tony's Terrence McNally received a lifetime achievement award for carrying an oxygen tank he talked about all the things he loved I love being a playwright the hours are flexible and you don't have to wear a tie unless you're invited to the Tonys and it was Terrence McNally in and not shelled self deprecating funny and completely aware of his audience he was a true gentleman of the theater in a career that stretched for six decades he wrote three dozen plays ten musicals and the librettos for four operas can you think of another writer who has had the variety of work that he's German intelligence acted love valour compassion which one Terrence McNally his first Tony Award in nineteen ninety five it was one of his many plays which looked at K. life what drove him was this need to write down his true your speak honestly from his heart that was what he knew he understood that when he was writing from that place that it would translate to anyone and even though the play was about eight K. men coping with aids it was also wickedly funny here's a character played by Nathan lane yes if you're sick of comedy

Terrence Mcnally Jeff London Tony Lifetime Achievement Award Writer Tony Award Nathan Lane Ragtime Mcnally K.
Terrence McNally, Tony award-winning playwright, dies of coronavirus complications

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Terrence McNally, Tony award-winning playwright, dies of coronavirus complications

"Sorry to tell you that Terrence McNally has died he was a playwright whose popular musicals included kiss of the spider woman and ragtime McNally lived eighty one years he survived lung cancer he had pulmonary problems and died of complications from coronavirus Jeff London has this appreciation at last year's Tony's Terrence McNally received a lifetime achievement award carrying an oxygen tank he talked about all the things he loved I love being a playwright the hours are flexible and you don't have to wear a tie unless you're invited to the Tonys and it was Terrence McNally in and not shell self deprecating funny and

Terrence Mcnally Jeff London Tony Lifetime Achievement Award Ragtime Mcnally
Terrence McNally, Tony award-winning playwright, dies of coronavirus complications

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Terrence McNally, Tony award-winning playwright, dies of coronavirus complications

"One of America's great playwrights died of complications from corona virus tonight Terrence McNally's prolific career included winning Tony awards for the play's love valour compassion and master class and the musicals ragtime and kiss of the spider woman his plays musicals explored how people connect or fail to connect he wrote about war the strains in families and relationships some of his plays explored the cost of creativity he was an openly gay writer who wrote about homophobia of love and aids McNally won four Tonys and M. E. he was eighty

America Terrence Mcnally Writer Tonys M. E. Tony
Stocks plunging anew on virus fears and oil price crash

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

04:17 min | 2 years ago

Stocks plunging anew on virus fears and oil price crash

"Are the oil markets have crashed more than thirty percent off to the disintegration of the APEC plus salons is triggered an all out price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia at the opening of Asian trading Brent futures tumbled the most since the first Gulf War Goldman Sachs is when prices could drop to near twenty dollars a barrel well let's pick up on that with the Bloomberg reporter Ameri Holden who joins us on the line from New York studios Sir I'm ready good morning let's first will what is why is this happening fundamentally what is going on in the markets good morning while this comes after that disintegration of the OPEC plus meeting and really the break up of the group they didn't even decide to roll over the cuts they decided on in December and really you as Bob McNally puts it Riyadh is furious and they tend to teach Russia a lesson by crashing these oil prices so you saw over the weekend Aramco went out and they cut by the most in ten thirty years on their on their crude prices that's gonna have a rollover to fact to all the other Gulf producers and Russia's going to have to respond and you saw the price collapse and and this is something that even in the thirties any Russia has definitely less smaller breakeven than Saudi but even the thirty these are numbers that's going to even have president Putin start to worry and the idea is to try to push Russia to come back to the negotiating table but it's very risky this is very risking we're seeing it affect not just the oil market this is going to have this is going to affect every part of the global economy yeah absolutely I mean it could basically savage national budgets I mean all of the national budgets of the big oil producers but that is a tough because you say that Saudi has used before though not to this extent I mean it's a very difficult time for it to make this move yeah and that's and Morse put it really well this is different than everyone keeps comparing it to the price worth two thousand fourteen but this is different this is the first time ever we're gonna have significant over supply from the producers at coincides with demand Shockley of complete demand destruction so while we don't have the demand out there which we saw from Asia now we see it in Europe and the U. S. as the court of ours fears continue to extend flights are grounded towns quarantine kids are staying home at school now we're going to have on top of that demand destruction the fact that these producers are just going to start to ramp up their production the Saudis are producing someone in the nine billion million dollars about range they're signaling to the market that they are going to go to ten and then potentially to their capacity which is twelve million barrels a day that is something that is scary but I think for the problem with Russia is that they went into this meeting that willing to do something if it was tiny but I think it was personal and logistics personal front they don't want to be put in a corner I think that ultimatum was a bit scary for them given the fact that they don't want to set a precedent to pack it was really interesting because OPEC released their own press release that that first day and usually they would wait for Russia to come to the table before they say what they're even interested in doing so they really backed into the corner and clearly put did not respond well to that secondly many are talking about the fact that I've talked to a lot of traders and hedge funds going into that meeting saying that Russia just wants to put these low cost producers out A. K. A. shale and Bob McNally from rapid makes another really good point talk about the fact that what Russia could do is that they start to boost production and then come back to the table when they do ultimately cut it's going to be from a much higher level to their end of may be able to maintain a bigger market share Annemarie I suppose briefly there's always the possibility China signaling very much that it wants to come back online trying to re engineer its economy back into normal I mean that could be a resurgence in the Mumbai gas yes and they're going to be winners from this any low oil prices is definitely going to be good for consumers around the world kind of course being one of them the world's largest oil importer to their recovery from the virus will be key for the global demand and cheaper oil prices will clearly help them also it'll help US consumers US consumers at the gas prices at the gas pump and really consumers around the world the problem with the U. S. is that it's going to be short term gain and I think long term pain if this goes on for longer because as city says the shale breakeven is forty dollars about we're ready in the twenties on WTI in the thirties on Brent so this is going to be a big alarm for Texas in the

Apec
"mcnally" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Sanders has been riding high on the momentum of his earlier wins but the field is suddenly narrowed just to super Tuesday arrives leaving the race more sharply focused between Sanders and not Sanders there is a massive effort trying to stop what it says in the clip which are in P. booted judge having just dropped out of the race they throw their support behind Joe Biden just as voters in fourteen states fill out some of the biggest prices Bob moon Bloomberg daybreak Europe U. N. investigators have implicated Russia Syria and Turkey and potential war crimes honey McNally from the independent international commission of inquiry on Syria says they have reasonable grounds to believe that Russian planes twice deliberately bombed the civilian market place and that Syrian forces were bombing hospitals the bigger part turn the switch we've been seeing his deliberate attacks on hospitals to put them out of commission essentially in such a way as to force the population to move and Unilever says it has reached a gender balance across its global management team a year ahead of target now Huff of the company's fourteen thousand manages a female up from thirty eight percent in twenty ten that includes fifty percent in the finance department and area where women have historically been under represented global news twenty hours a day on it and QuickTake by being by passed by more than twenty seven hundred Janice and I'm missing more than one hundred and twenty countries I'm gonna kill off this is Bloomberg what generally interesting with Unilever because if you also would have me on the board that that would be perhaps a key thing it's good managers good but the board is where it really counts yes the Hoff of Unilever's board is in fact all right well thank you already that they already they already taken major strides in order to get it done now will become majority are right okay let's get a morning school his generals and with.

Sanders Joe Biden Syria Unilever Huff Janice Bloomberg Bob Europe U. N. Russia Turkey McNally
"mcnally" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Oh three Tom McNally here plane all the good stuff home all day long right now time to check out New Jersey fast traffic the on the turnpike northbound thru exit fourteen up through the mixing bowl and especially on the western spur heading up toward the Meadowlands area with giants eagles about an hour and change from now it's a little slow on the eastern spur as well north bound up toward fifteen acts in your slow on the parkway both ways around eggs at one forty five partly due to an accident westbound two eighty right at the parkway which is further complicating matters in that area northbound twenty one years law up to forty six in Clifton west bound twenty two delays from Michigan Avenue to Springfield road and you have slow down on the eastbound two seventy eight going to the gospels bridge which is slow leaving New Jersey it's slightly better with four forty to the outer bridge crossing and if you're going to the George Washington bridge it's about fifteen minutes bald dax leaving New Jersey five to ten at the Lincoln tunnel and ten to fifteen at the Holland tunnel more from the one in nine approach and it's a call me pal Myra bridge is back open the drawbridges backed down traffic sponsored by booking dot com want to be more active spend more time with family save more whatever your new year's resolution is booking dot com has an accommodation to help you achieve it traffic every fifteen minutes next reported three eighteen I'm Adam walls beyond New Jersey one a one point five Steve travel east hi there I could do that all day with you about this topic I love Billy topics you love silly topic this is very serious we talking about Monday through Thursday seven on New Jersey one a one point hi I'm Jay Farner CEO quicken loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvements of five thousand dollars or more will pay for those renovations with a high interest credit card that may not be a great.

Tom McNally New Jersey Clifton west George Washington bridge Lincoln tunnel Holland tunnel Myra bridge Steve Billy Jay Farner CEO
The Life of Mike Nichols

The Book Review

13:58 min | 2 years ago

The Life of Mike Nichols

"Ask Carter and Sam Kashmir join us now they wrote together an oral history of Mike Nichols it's called life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred and fifty of his closest friends Sam Ash. Thanks for being here. Just thanks for having US thank you. What was was the genesis of this project? Well after Mike's Death I was at Vanity Fair and wanted to do an oral history as much as we can get away with the magazine and ask had worked as a PA.. With Mike. And I knew him mm somewhat and so I thought it best to join forces and so we did this for the magazine originally and it was so interesting and there was so much material that it just kind of presented itself as a book kind of instantly. As soon as we saw together in the magazine they must have been painful to have to cut. Had it down to magazine size well. The piece was originally assigned at six thousand. Words ran at eleven thousand and still not a word practically about his theater career hear about his time at the compass. Players is a founding member of Improv. I mean there's so much still on the table Ash you're very lucky person having worked as the PA.. What did you work on? I worked on Charlie Wilson's war. That was my first job out of college. I was so upset on hangs Julia Roberts. What was that often? Yes Oh right. Of course. It was a big movie so very often. You felt very distant from where the the real real action was taking place but still. I really feel blessed who've been able to be as close as I was. So you mentioned Charlie. Wilson's war my immediate reaction. Shen is Oh my God. That's Mike Nichols. Also the thing that I think people don't even fully appreciate now is just how incredibly accomplished. He was and for so long so if we could just kind of begin with his I think I real fame fame was with Nichols and may but before we go into each of those stop. Just take us through because I think people may be associated him with the graduate and a couple of other major projects. But let's just list some some of them so people have a sense. Well there was the great success of the Nichols. and May Elaine. May and Mike Nichols as a comedy team. which kind of transformed formed Comedy really and Mike as Director. He and Neil Simon joined forces and he really kind of in a way. Reinvented invented Simon. For Neil Simon. You know with barefoot in the park and the odd couple and as of film director his first film was the Richard Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf which frank rich other people believed to be the maybe the best reputation of a of a stage play for film ever the graduate which was second film his second film shocking. JFK transformative you know and Oscar worthy. And then there's all all the stage work Tom Stoppard's the real thing David Raves hurly-burly streamers. Yeah camelot and S- Pamela camelot idle. I mean it's kind of prodian extraordinary range of of gifts that that he I mean. He Directs Spam Lot. I I think two years after doing angels in America for HBO. I mean that's range. I don't WanNa go too much into his early life by. I think it's important to point out that this was a person who arrived here. Didn't speak English. Not as first language goes to the University of Chicago right he meets Elaine. May let's start there. What was it that made that pairing so extraordinary? What did they do? You said that they revolutionized comedy Elaine may was the dangerous genius that entered Mike Nichols life and and changed him she was kind of a combustion engine and he was the steering wheel a little bit. Steve Martin told us the first time. When you listen to those records those bits or you know the sketches? which is he said that the that I heard irony brock kind of modernity to comics situations and things that comedians did not go? Nya such as the cost of funerals was is the time of Jessica Mitford the the American way of death. And you know I mean these are weighty subjects adultery a- adultery right the previous generation of comics from the fifties where people who came from Vaudeville and the Borscht Belt Nichols and may had a theater background around. And you know both the classical repertory but also as Improv actors and by the way they're also both at analysis and brought a level of psychological acuity to comedy that really hasn't been seen before let's just a clip of them from that period some day Arthur. You'll get married and you'll have suit of your own and honey when you do. I only pray that they make us suffer the way you. That's all I pray to mothers. Okay mom thanks for calling you very sarcastic. I'm doing my best now. You call me on on the telephone I me. I'm sorry I'm sorry that bothered you and look I didn't make you feel bad. Are you kidding I feel awful. Oh honey if I could believe that I'd be the happiest mother it's true. What do you think I feel crummy Arthur honey? Why don't you call me sweetheart? That's the one bit. That's kind of in a way close to auto biography at least for Mike that was sort of his mother in a way and and he had a difficult very difficult relationship with her. Are you know after the death of his physician. Father they were really plunged into poverty into serious poverty in in New York. He I used to have to go in the olden days to the Museum of TV and radio to watch these old clips. But now I I'm imagining that. You can see all of this on Youtube. Yeah there's a lot of great stuff and Youtube I encourage people to also look up there The award for total mediocrity that they did at the Emmys when you're in the nineteen fifties so that's just breathtaking. I just actually making fun of their own mirror. You know I mean they're making fun of show business with a successful right away. They were both part of this. Very heavy kind of avant-garde guard group called the compensator in Chicago and the two of them just clicked as their manager. Jack rollins later said there. They were like ham and eggs. They were a local will hit first then they came to New York. He signed them up his clients started booking them at local nightclubs and they were hit right away and then they started going non Jackpot and omnibus and they were hit nationally. So yeah it was. It was really just like that. It was that quick. How does it get from that to? Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf well well they had a great success Nichols and may on Broadway at the Golden Theatre was an evening with Nichols in May ostensibly directed by Arthur Penn.. You know but not really and Elaine was just sort of tired of doing it and in a way was the comedic version of of the Beatles. Breaking up people were just. I just chop fall in. You know it's tragic. Yes yes yeah. It was kind of a loss in a way They would wind up working together. Other eventually you know as a screenwriter and director but but Mike it kind of put him in in the wilderness for a while He was really at see if we rely on a little bit. When he's got that evening on Broadway with a lame the theater? They were in shared an alley with a theater where her camelot was on stage with Richard Burton and they would kind of hang out after after the show and that's how he kind of got to know him and it was. It's essentially through that meeting Richard in that alley and threw him Liz. They were the ones who hired for Virginia Woolf. When you think about the collaborators he had the people he got to work with you mentioned Arthur panel the you know lately Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor Dustin in Hoffman Jewels pfeiffer on carnal knowledge? It's just you know on and on Meryl Streep the biggest names and your subtitle is is Mike Nichols as remembered by hundred and fifty of his closest friends. Did He. Frequently form friendships during these professional collaborations was. He's one of those the people that everybody felt like they knew. And we're close to make exactly this actors and and many was writers really kind of fell in love with him. I mean we could have called the book seduced by Mike Nichols you know Natalie. Portman really wept recalling. Her work with Mike Sue now. Yeah and that was much later and the closer yes. Yes but also they did stage work together so they were totally devoted to him. I I mean Tom Stoppard. For example said I think his advice memorial you know he thought to himself who is there to to write for he so he was kind of an Avatar to all of these. She's tremendously gifted complicated. People and the friendships were very deep. And Very Real Maureen Dowd. Your colleagues said that he was a null coward figure with the Jersey Kaczynski past and unlike a lot of other people who had a really horrible childhoods he did not kind of wear it on his sleeve and he we've talked about it and didn't particularly want to spend a lot of time thinking about it and I I mean I think this is kind of the key to his career. Longevity Eddie is that he was. Somebody really always wanted to be living in the moment. And kind of looking forward to the next project even up until the end of his life when he had several things that were in progress including masterclass terrence. McNally's play that he was gonNA adapt for. HBO With Meryl Streep. Yeah I mean in a way. Our title is taken from a a model of Mike's life isn't everything but it's kind of a misnomer because it was everything to him. You know in a way I mean he could be difficult to and and some of the people in the booker occur quite open about yes. That Emma Thompson is one right exactly Thompson who who adored him. You know said we're not talking about some saint here so you know and in fact Mike toward the end of his life felt that he had been cruel to people and had betrayed others. You know but he did develop a music also about someone who sort of as much of a genius as he was you know he was also complicated difficult cat and felt like there were people to apologize to. Some people presumably wouldn't talk to you Elaine. May of course wouldn't what about Diane Sawyer and were there other people who you pursued and just said you know what no now. We did approach. Diane we wouldn't have done this actually without her been addiction you know and she gave us the same response that initially initially Sam Beckett gave to digital bear you know which is. I'm not going to stop you but I'm also not going to help you all that much. But when push came to shove and we needed the people such as Meryl Streep she was helpful behind the scenes and Elaine. She did. Give us a blurb. Although we didn't use it and the blurb facetiously officiously said well I I would tell you all I know. But they're going to pay me millions of dollars to write my memoirs something. You'll never do you know. She meant it as kind of a joke before before we go one final question what do you each of you. Thank was Nicholas's greatest work and then also so perhaps a personal favourite may be less known or just something new especially leaden. And why. Let's start with you ash. I would say probably the graduate. It's not the most original choice but I just have seen the movie so many times and I think that it it just has held up so much better than a lot of other youth movies of the time that it was sort of lumped in with that plus the the comedy albums is sort of where my original enthusiasm for him started. But you know I I think catch twenty. Two for example is a movie that has not really gotten. It's do. I think it's actually kind of a brilliant movie that was overshadowed by Mash at the time though it is I see no reason why the existence of Mash prevent people from enjoying it today not an easy novel to adapt to know and but I think him and Buck Henry and we did a credible job adapting it. Sam will I mean. It's so hard to choose. My mother would choose working girl in or Silkwood you know an but are you. Seeing your mother would be wrong. My mother never wrong But for me it's you know the stage work is kind and of extraordinary. I mean the Philip Seymour. Hoffman death of a salesman at the end of life using that was really just is an extraordinary unearth accomplishment. Really it brought him Full Circle Because that streetcar with the two original productions that changed his life really all right. I'm hoping that this interview. If nothing else forces everyone to go to youtube everyone to go and stream every single thing that Mike Nichols did that was available. He was such an incredible credible talent ash. Carter Sam cash. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much thank your new book is called. Life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred

Mike Nichols Mike Elaine Meryl Streep Virginia Woolf Charlie Wilson Carter Sam Richard Richard Burton Elizabe Tom Stoppard Youtube Virginia Neil Simon New York HBO Arthur Director Sam Ash Mike Sue Julia Roberts University Of Chicago
Saudi Arabia: Drone attacks knocked out half its oil supply

BBC World Service

05:13 min | 3 years ago

Saudi Arabia: Drone attacks knocked out half its oil supply

"Now the US secretary of state Mike Pompeii has been blaming it ran for the drone strikes that set fire to two major oil facilities in Saudi Arabia who's the rebels in Yemen say they carried out the attacks but missed Pompeii said it was instead Teheran who launched an unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply meanwhile the Saudi energy minister said hall for the country's oil production will be temporarily halted. the Arab kite could plant was one of the sites targeted Robert McNally is a former energy adviser to the White House it is the most valuable piece of real estate on planet earth that nobody's ever heard of not only does it control about five percent of global supply but more importantly it controls most of what we call spare production capacity that ability to bring on extra oil if there's a disruption so what might this mean for the global oil markets on the line now is John stocky anarchists director of economics research at the Gulf research center in Riyadh and a former economic adviser to the Saudi minister of finance John welcome should we thought of this before that you can bomb a single installation or launch a drone attack on it and it disrupts the whole world's oil supply. well we have gotten glimpses of that in the past that holds the rebels all right to attack or the facilities in Saudi Arabia and they have been re Pentel quite successfully this one seems to be quite big and important for the oil markets and for sure for Saudi Arabia but there were instances in the past where we've seen such things such attempts by means in smaller scale being tried out by the who sees right so it was the who these was it. well we don't know and most likely it seems that the whole these were involved somehow the Iranians seem to have been involved in providing intelligence it seems a bit of long distance for the hope is to be flying drones but yet again nobody knows the attempt was there in the Eastern Province if you weeks ago and they could have up to their intelligence and capability but they do have the technology so I think they did a lot of damage to global lawyer this time around what information does Mister Pompey the US secretary of state have to prove that it's it's the Iranians old these that what he means that Iranian intelligence could have been part of something behind this attack. definitely I think it's very difficult to say for sure but yeah I'm in all the the only bad guns in the region who want to harm Saudi Arabia are the Iranians and then with his right now so all the fingers are being pointed towards them one way or another unfortunately the the American petrol buying public possibly months much of it hasn't heard of who the rebels so putting it on Iran's a bit easier. definitely and it has to do with the with the with the whole convincing element of but yeah Saudi Arabia has will in waging a war for a the last four and a half years against the movies I implicitly the Iranians and damn I think ale and the rest of the US administration wants to do I killed was with evidence that the Iranians are behind all these negative developments in in the global Lloyd Marcia immediately in the wake of this attack president trump has aligned himself firmly with Saudi Arabia no surprise that says says that American stand side by side with the Saudis is that just out of economic motivation what's your take. no I think it has to do with also politics the ideology of perception who is a friend and was a fault in the wider region and definitely are the American Sir but I seem to be very very close for the last seventy five years with Saudi Arabia managers the merger of **** all because shell G. in in Turkey is ancient history now that that little row is over what's my microphone. well you know president trump seems to have an opinion and he's very strong about his relationship with Saudi Arabia and so for him it's ancient past what do you think the impact on world oil markets will be it sounds very significant attack. I agree with you I mean for some reason for some lucky readers and it happened on a Friday or Saturday sorry and markets were closed so today markets are closed again on Monday once we have a little bit more clarity of what's happening markets good spike but the spike would be lessened by the day and a half that has already transpired so we could see a temporary spike over a few dollars which could have been much higher had that this happened during a week day so let's see John so I cannot kiss whose former economic adviser to the Saudi minister finance many thanks for coming on the

Economic Adviser United States Mike Pompeii John Seventy Five Years Five Percent
"mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And I'm with Darcy McNally the director of oncology support services and community outreach and Boca Raton regional hospitals Lynn cancer institute we're gonna talk about some new programs to help patients cope with cancer that's right Jennifer the institute developed that be useful and him to image enhancement programs for patients undergoing cancer treatment both programs provide demonstrations and offer tips on coping with skin changes hair loss hand and nail care score camouflage and other cancer treatment related conditions so what's the difference between B. UT fall and him to the beautiful program addresses the issues of women and him to program is tailored to teach techniques Pacific command such as selecting the right wake and offering basic because medic to Tory else in who's leading the sessions we recruited trained image professionals who are licensed cosmetologist with over thirty years of experience and the beauty and wellness field to volunteer their time and why is the Lynn Cancer Institute offering these programs well as you can imagine undergoing cancer treatment is a difficult process for our patients both physically and mentally the body changes and it can be quite overwhelming by helping people cope with changes in physical appearance we can assist patients and living their best lives during these tough times so is there a cost to attend the link Cancer Institute is proud to offer these programs at no cost to our attendees in fact all participants will receive a complimentary because Medicaid to take home and put their teachings to use every day so how can our listeners learn more B. R. R. H. dot com slash L. C. I. events or by calling five six one nine five five five four zero six Jan here we are more systems in the Caribbean this way to protect your home and this is why you need to call our friends it writes impact window and door five six one five six six five five eight seven because they'll keep you your home and your family safe here's the thing about rights and that's right with a W. by the way they do it the right way they've been in South Florida for years they are trusted the are known they are.

Darcy McNally Lynn cancer institute cancer Medicaid Caribbean South Florida director of oncology Boca Raton link Cancer Institute L. C. thirty years
"mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And I'm with Darcy McNally the director of oncology support services and community outreach and Boca Raton regional hospitals Lynn cancer institute we're gonna talk about some new programs to help patients cope with cancer that's right Jennifer the institute developed that be you to fall and the him to image enhancement programs for patients undergoing cancer treatment both programs provide demonstrations and offer tips on coping with skin changes hair loss hand and nail care score camouflage and other cancer treatment related conditions so what's the difference between B. UT full and him to the beautiful program addresses the issues of women and him to program is tailored to teach techniques Pacific command such as the leading the right wake and offering basic because medic to Tory else in who's leading the sessions we recruited trained image professionals who are licensed cosmetologist with over thirty years of experience and the beauty and wellness field to volunteer their time and why is the Lynn Cancer Institute offering these programs well as you can imagine undergoing cancer treatment is a difficult process for our patients both physically and mentally the body changes and it can be quite overwhelming by helping people cope with changes in physical appearance we can assist patients and living their best lives during these tough times so is there a cost to attend the limb Cancer Institute is proud to offer these programs at no cost to our attendees in fact all participants will receive a complimentary because Medicaid to take home and put their teachings to use every day so how can our listeners learn more B. R. R. H. dot com slash L. C. I. events or by calling five six one nine five five five four zero six. AT.

Lynn cancer institute limb Cancer Institute cancer Darcy McNally Boca Raton director of oncology Medicaid L. C. thirty years
"mcnally" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"So excited to be here with Joanna McNally. I'm in your agent's office, very fancy it is lots of. Very famous people on the world's lots of famous people in the walls and lots of trophies and lots of DVD's. I now I have none of them just to clarify. Well, I wanted to say for the listeners and just said it to you person that you and my favorite thing. Edinburgh. Fringe was so good. It was hilarious. The crowd loved it. I just felt like I went home and instantly as what one-star remember John show the hundred percent. Remember, so many bits of it. And for me, that's a show. I remember the bits that I that really stay with me. Yeah. I think that's a good sign. Yeah. Yeah. Wind thima Weinheim or. Yeah. It was a bow sexism it was about feminism. It was about dating. Finally. I mean there wasn't. It's not to say like I spoke better than the show was in kind of pressure and Adan. To have a theme show, which actually helps you when you're writing it because it's easier to reut around a theme than chills rice around nook down. And just kind of like pulling jokes out of the sky. But there was no real theme to wine timer. It was. It was just a base me having been living in my mom's Arctic and then falling in love and then moving in with him. And then realizing how difficult that was. And then Clinton like weather to have babies and still fight us. It was very relatable. Yeah. That was the one just women in the audience. Everyone's like, yeah. This is this ULA telling the truth, which is what comedy is saying the stuff that none of us can say think about learning as well..

Adan Joanna McNally Edinburgh Fringe John Clinton hundred percent
"mcnally" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"mcnally" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"Hello and welcome back to control out delete. My guest today is the brilliant. Comedian Joanna McNally who is one of my favorite comedians who I recently discovered at Edinburgh fringe festival in two thousand eighteen she was one of the standups who I really remembered and consult thinking about some of the stuff she said, and she really stood out say when I message on Twitter saying come on my poll cost at turned out. She was already a listener. So it was very exciting to meet with her real life. She burst onto the Irish comedy scene back in two thousand fourteen and within less than a year. She became the co host of Artie ease flagship comedy Artie is like the Irish BBC, and she also co wrote and starred in stage show separated at birth which is a comedy all about her adoption. She is sold out sodo stand up shows all across Dublin and she's been nominated for mull. Multiple Dublin fringe festival awards including best performer and best production, and she's now come to London and she's gigging around London. And it's really exciting that she's now living hair, she is such an energetic and laris performer, and I got to sit down with her at off the curb, which is a brilliant comedy management company. And we talked about so much we chatted about how to write shows how to handle tough crowds. How she go into comedy kind of by accident how struggles with body image. And also some of the breakup the turned into really great comedy material. I absolutely love John. I think she is just hilarious as cracking up during this into a lot. And I think you will have a giggle as well. So I hope you enjoy it. Thank you so much listening. Please remember to rate and review the poed cost. If you enjoyed listening to it. Thanks again. And here it is..

Joanna McNally Edinburgh fringe festival Dublin Twitter Artie London BBC