35 Burst results for "Mcmanus"

Two Dead, One Officer Wounded in San Antonio Shooting

Richard Eeds

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

Two Dead, One Officer Wounded in San Antonio Shooting

"Following an officer involved shooting in San Antonio Chief William McManus. The driver, pulled a gun and started firing at the officer. The officer was hit in the hand on my understanding is once in the radio is on the radio as well. He retreated backward. The officer returned fire, killing two suspects and wounding a third, The S and

Chief William Mcmanus San Antonio
San Antonio police shoot, kill gunman at airport terminal

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

San Antonio police shoot, kill gunman at airport terminal

"Up the wrong way in a San Antonio international airport. Until Thursday afternoon. When we had there was the start of an active shooter situation, Antonio Police chief Willie McManus said. The man shot at police at the baggage claim area and around the terminal road. The park police officer who was working overtime at the airport, shot the man killing him. I had goes off to the to the officer who stopped him, McManus said. This man is believed to be the same man who was fire a gun from a top of Highway flyover ramp in northern San Antonio earlier in the day. In the end, only one person died that being the gunman In this fully ABC News SAN Antonio The mind an administration is hitting Russia with

Antonio Police Willie Mcmanus San Antonio International Airp Park Police Mcmanus San Antonio Abc News Russia
"mcmanus" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

"The recently invited sean. Alison to come on. Today is that they have a brand new book coming out called growing plants and flowers. And it's a perfect topic for a perfect time. I don't even think you could have predicted why it was so perfect. When you first told me you were working on this book but with covid. It's so perfectly timed. So why don't you give us a snapshot a little snapshot about the book. And then we'll we'll talk about all the things we love which is growing flowers. All those new gardeners out there especially from and our our book is called the first time gardener growing plants and flowers all know how you need to plant intended outdoor areas using eco friendly methods. I love it. It's just a catchy for his roles off you're right. I didn't mention the first part of the title is the first time gardener. And that's sort of been your audience all along through your your youtube channel and your podcast right. We definitely want to help beginning gardeners but we feel like the book can also benefit a wider audience. Well oh totally learn. Well i i think so too. And we'll we'll share a couple you know. Interior spreads for people to see on the On the show notes for today's episode. But i was looking at it too and thinking what you've you have. It is updated information even for people who think they know how to garden because maybe they have been. But you're integrating a lot of sustainable practices. I noticed in in also like a dish. Additional information pollinators. Maybe people who've garden for a long time just haven't gotten caught up on those those practices. Yeah that's true. Our book is such a range of topics really. You know. it's it's very broad view of a lot of different guarding practices. An older view of someone coming into gardening wanting to know more but not really understanding really how plants grow what they need to grow have had a handle them what to do. What impacts on the environment surrounding them. And how that impacts them versus how the impact themselves and the environment again an all hourly it. It's an interesting thing. A lot of people don't understand that as were soil moisture. and he. it's it's just it's amazing to think about things so he tried to come from broadview green all those things together to explain to a new guard. Yeah i just at the table of contents here. It's just kind of a natural progression of how you would get started and work your way through you know. I'm sure that people just want to get started and plant right away. But you're slowing slowing down a little bit and saying let's talk about the basics. I that is so true. I get a lot of questions on youtube and they're just want instant gratification. Instant answers and they're they're great questions. It's helpful to understand more of that broader scope of that foundation. Really just jump in. Let's do it's like well you're going to get more out of it if you understand that a little bit more i. Yeah it's interesting. I mean. I think people do maybe cheat a little bit and just go by that flat of primrose at home depot. Which is what we're seeing right now and you can do that. But that's a little bit different than committing to a garden or yeah so it's interesting. You really zeroed in on ornamental gardening. And there's no vegetable to be seen in this book right. We don't really speak to. I mean we love growing vegetables and then it's not what we teach

sean youtube sean alison Mcmanus march spoken garden past year today one lucky listener first first time alison mcmanus duo
A Book for Beginning Flower Gardeners With Allison and Sean Mcmanus of Spoken Garden

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

03:48 min | 3 months ago

A Book for Beginning Flower Gardeners With Allison and Sean Mcmanus of Spoken Garden

"The recently invited sean. Alison to come on. Today is that they have a brand new book coming out called growing plants and flowers. And it's a perfect topic for a perfect time. I don't even think you could have predicted why it was so perfect. When you first told me you were working on this book but with covid. It's so perfectly timed. So why don't you give us a snapshot a little snapshot about the book. And then we'll we'll talk about all the things we love which is growing flowers. All those new gardeners out there especially from and our our book is called the first time gardener growing plants and flowers all know how you need to plant intended outdoor areas using eco friendly methods. I love it. It's just a catchy for his roles off you're right. I didn't mention the first part of the title is the first time gardener. And that's sort of been your audience all along through your your youtube channel and your podcast right. We definitely want to help beginning gardeners but we feel like the book can also benefit a wider audience. Well oh totally learn. Well i i think so too. And we'll we'll share a couple you know. Interior spreads for people to see on the On the show notes for today's episode. But i was looking at it too and thinking what you've you have. It is updated information even for people who think they know how to garden because maybe they have been. But you're integrating a lot of sustainable practices. I noticed in in also like a dish. Additional information pollinators. Maybe people who've garden for a long time just haven't gotten caught up on those those practices. Yeah that's true. Our book is such a range of topics really. You know. it's it's very broad view of a lot of different guarding practices. An older view of someone coming into gardening wanting to know more but not really understanding really how plants grow what they need to grow have had a handle them what to do. What impacts on the environment surrounding them. And how that impacts them versus how the impact themselves and the environment again an all hourly it. It's an interesting thing. A lot of people don't understand that as were soil moisture. and he. it's it's just it's amazing to think about things so he tried to come from broadview green all those things together to explain to a new guard. Yeah i just at the table of contents here. It's just kind of a natural progression of how you would get started and work your way through you know. I'm sure that people just want to get started and plant right away. But you're slowing slowing down a little bit and saying let's talk about the basics. I that is so true. I get a lot of questions on youtube and they're just want instant gratification. Instant answers and they're they're great questions. It's helpful to understand more of that broader scope of that foundation. Really just jump in. Let's do it's like well you're going to get more out of it if you understand that a little bit more i. Yeah it's interesting. I mean. I think people do maybe cheat a little bit and just go by that flat of primrose at home depot. Which is what we're seeing right now and you can do that. But that's a little bit different than committing to a garden or yeah so it's interesting. You really zeroed in on ornamental gardening. And there's no vegetable to be seen in this book right. We don't really speak to. I mean we love growing vegetables and then it's not what we teach

Alison Sean Youtube Home Depot
An Apple/Hyundai Car?

Techmeme Ride Home

03:29 min | 4 months ago

An Apple/Hyundai Car?

"Hundai has confirmed that it is in early discussions with apple on collaborating to develop a self driving car. But in case you're jumping ahead to apple may be buying hyundai or anything like that. This seems to be just a partnership right now and also hyundai says apple is talking to several carmakers about a bunch of things right now so quoting. Cnbc we understand. That apple is in discussions with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided a representative from honda motor told. Cnbc's cherry king. The statement followed a local report from the korean economic daily. That said apple suggested the tie up and honda motor was reviewing the terms. The report said both electric vehicle production as well as battery development were included in the proposal. And that the car could potentially be released in two thousand twenty. Seven apple declined to comment on the report and quote at the exact same time in bloomberg mark. Gurman has a piece up saying yes. Apple is developing an autonomous electric vehicle. But the timeline for release. His sources say is five to seven years. Also this quote a key. Differentiator would be apple's ability to integrate. Its driving system a pricey initiative that has spurred the company to develop its own software sensor hardware chip technologies. The goal is to let a user input their destination and be driven there with little or no other engagement. According to the people familiar with the project apple doesn't manufacture its own products and it will likely take the same approach with a vehicle. It's unclear which company would assemble the car. Though in its first attempt about five years ago apple worked with engineers from magna international a major auto industry contract manufacturer apple has continued to investigate building. It's self driving car system for third party car partners rather than its own vehicle the people said and it could ultimately again abandoned. Its own car. Efforts in favor of this approach in assign it has now rebooted development of a vehicle apple in recent months shifted in executive known for his work on vehicle interiors and exteriors to its car team in twenty nine thousand nine apple hired former tesla engineering. Vice president steve macmanus but he initially worked on projects unrelated to the car. Now mcmanus leads a development. Group was several employees focused on car interiors fabrics car testing and vehicle manufacturing people with knowledge of the matter said he reports doug field a former top tesla vehicle engineer. Who runs the apple car project. Day to day apple also recently hired jonathan seve a vehicle engineer from bmw ag tesla and alphabets as a senior manager on the car projects in two thousand nineteen apple. Tapped michael schwer kuch tesla's former vice president in charge of drive systems adding to a growing list of former tesla employees working on the vehicle effort late in two thousand twenty apple also hired another former tesla vice president stuart bowers. According to a person familiar with the move. He led tesla's self driving technology team until mid two thousand nineteen and was an executive in residence at venture. Capital firm grey lag partners until july. According to his lincoln profile apples car team is filled with dozens of other x tesla hardware and self driving car. Engineers in total apple has several hundred engineers working on the project with most of them developing the self driving car system rather than the full fledged vehicle and

Apple Honda Motor Hyundai Hyundai Motor Tesla Gurman Cnbc Vice President Steve Macmanus Magna International Bloomberg Doug Field Jonathan Seve Bmw Ag Michael Schwer Mcmanus Stuart Bowers Alphabets Grey Lag Partners Lincoln
Julia Gillard on the year that was 2020

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:32 min | 4 months ago

Julia Gillard on the year that was 2020

"Hello listeners will here. We are at the end of twenty twenty. Finally this is year any of us wanted. And if you feel as though you're limping through to the end of it you're not align wave face challenges individually and collectively as a result of covid nineteen. It's been a big adjustment for all of us to navigate life in this you way. I now familiar. Normally spain. the traveling the world for the different roles zion to take for organizations like the global institute for women's leadership and the global partnership for education. This year. I've been very much at home in adelaide. I've missed face to face. Contact the new places in the energy ideas and excitement that generated in a room full of people but there have been some upsides to not traveling. My bay my life. And i've been to sing more of my family including baby here for the start of my new great nieces life. Baby gwen joined us july. I've come to both the lies and love digital platforms and new ways of communicating and fortunately with global commitments paying online in the middle of the night has been far too common experience this year. Podcast of oncein reflected the new normal chilly while i haven't been to travel my conversations of still traverse the globe back from the safety of my home. Many of my guests reflect on the pandemics impact on gender inequality we have discussed women. The workforce and how we structure working lives leadership. And what. We want a nate from our world. Latest now they seems to be a race thinking of the traditional styles of leadership and a focus on the need to incorporate other traits like kindness empathy and compassion as we approach the end of twenty twenty. I've gone back through the many episodes we've released the and picked up some of my favorite discussions for you to enjoy someone. I've always admired. Is sally mcmanus of non sally. For many years three professional life an always fantas style of ladyship refreshing now is head of the australian council of trade unions. Sally is leading the conversation about the impact of the pandemic on the economy and working life unlike earlier disruptions often major adjustments in the economy iran manufacturing affecting time mile jobs covid nineteen disproportionately bang about women's work. We saying the impact on part-time casual work the hospitality travel and tourism industries. Sickness where the workforce tends to be a feminist one. It's become clear we need more secure jobs and less sick maintained light before the new ways of working we a pioneering now could and should stay with us and give us more flexible and gender responsive workplaces. My conversation with sally took place before curving really made an impact. So we didn't discuss these issues but i conversation went in directions. I hadn't experienced before in podcasting and really experienced in conversations with other women seven said she done things she was white for it. good at. It's so unusual to hear a woman. Say good things issues telling me a bad childhood soccer dreams. Well this is why back in the dice obese. Would've been in the early eighties. And i was really good at soccer. And i had two younger brothers so sort of used to roughing it with my brothers and always the name to stronger than them to until i hit puberty and that was something i was happy about but anyway i was. I used to play soccer at lunchtime with the boys. The boys doing so. I used to play soccer after school and the coach would just let me join in and always the best in the team and really really wanted to play because it go to the way candid that be the match on and i couldn't fly because ridiculous rules saying that goes couldn't play in the boys teams. They ended up taking it to through the hierarchy of the soccer club and they had a meeting in that. Assad no goes cop. Line the team and for me as a ten year old it just same so ridiculous but so deeply unfair like this is something that i love but not only did i love. I was better than all the like. Why couldn't i use that skill at a my simple child mind back then. I thought well it's just because i'm not a boy. Well that's it so. I bought my brother's school uniform and i went to school the next day and are lined up in the boys line and i said i'm no longest sally shine and that's it. I thought that that would as a successful way of getting into the soccer team. Now did that word. Disaster a total disaster. That school didn't react well. My parents certainly did not react. Well i think thought it was probably more than it was. It was just simply may wanting to play soccer. I'm sure schools would deal with this much better these days but they did not deal with it. Well so i remember the next time on the sent me to school with the clip. Some buzzy my hair which julie ripped off the minute. I got around the corner but unfortunately it didn't make it into the soccer team

Global Institute For Women's L Baby Gwen Soccer Sally Mcmanus Australian Council Of Trade Un Adelaide Spain Sally Iran Sally Shine Assad Julie
"mcmanus" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"The media asked me questions about this. The most you've ever seen of this dad or anything you know. And i can't usually can't think back through my years in the nfl weather. It is risen but as relates to these. The injuries you know definitely was the worst season that i've had for you know because they started early and it continued in. It started with the key players so it has been the worst season for that. But we've gotta make do love the fight that our team has shown and we're going to put up good battleship the last two weeks and we're looking to wins in speaking of injuries I'm sure you're expecting this house bradley. Chubs ankle do you think. We'll see him today and brian. Mcmanus told me last night on the afternoon show that he expects to be back out there today after not an injury but being on the covert list last week with the close contact. We expect brandon. We'll be back out there today and you'll be good to see him out there Bradley probably won't practice much today if at all but we do like the progress. He's making and we're hopeful that he'll be able to play coach. Obviously it's not the team results that you wanna disappear but but you've got to take solace feel good especially with your defensive bona as they you have to defensive pro bowlers bradley. Chubb justices simmons making it. What are your thoughts on those guys and you must be happy for them to get recognized for for having outstanding plane. What's been a tough year. Yeah i think. I'm very happy for both guys Injustice case i think it's a reflection of his body of work over two years not just this year. He played very well force last year to put himself on the map last year and people took notice and he continued that this year so really happy for justin and bradley really happy for especially coming off the injury that he had last year. I know how much work and dedication he put into his rehab. How we had the fight. Through that. I would see him over here in the off season many times and we talked about it many times so for him to come back and play the way. He has particularly satisfying for him. And and i'm really really really happy for him. Ronald thing that we have for you here thanksgiving you told us is going to be pretty quiet. You and your girlfriend. Do you have any christmas plan. Your kids are going to be able to make it back and it looks like you've shifted the schedule around are you given the guy's a little more time on christmas and adjusting the week. We're not going to practice on christmas day. You know we're going to Practice today and thursday at a little bit more place to practice to make up for that and then have a normal practice on. Saturday was a few more plays out to that. But you know. I think you know when christmas falling on a friday and with the year of the way it's been i think it'd be nice for the guys to have the christmas suspended home and for myself. You know when my kids will not be able to come in and they got the my daughter's nursing she's working christmas day and my son staying on the east coast broncos head coach vic fangio. Thank you so much for your time. Merry christmas to you and yours and and good luck on sunday. Thank you appreciate it. Happy holidays and hopefully we'll be happy. Holidays with broncos win over the chargers brandon. Mcmanus is trying to make this happy holiday for some.

bradley Mcmanus nfl Chubb brandon Bradley brian simmons justin Ronald vic fangio broncos east coast chargers
"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

06:29 min | 4 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Game to get a better. Nfl package and it's all an endgame to get into the super bowl rotation and like. That's what jimmy. Taro was charged with and everything else. Sort of in. Some sense doesn't matter You know beyond sort of rights inventory and making sure that the nfl is happy and I don't know what. Espn is going to be heading forward. People who say like espn's gonna fold or it's dawn. Just that's just a foolish take to be the case. But but i don't know what it's going to be like can in two thousand thirty. I don't know if like espn pluses like sort of what espn alternately is. With some you know maybe some fewer games remaining on the old. What we you still think of the old espn but Sure rambling go ahead. Well let me let me add. Though i think you know after taro or you know if if somebody else comes in you know i think of how connor shell was able to come in and drive a lot of really great prestige projects. Thirty thirty things like that. The podcast series. All of that And you know who who knows who comes in. Maybe somebody wants to come in and make the the the atlantic kind of content for sport or five thirty eight Type of thing in a in. A different vein. I mean they do like to start these kind of prestige project products every once in a while. So who knows what the next iteration of that is going to be. I don't think. Espn is going to abandon the idea of journalism. I think it's a shame that they've done it with the products that they had that were so recognizable and so reliable. But again you know if you're if you have a place like You know ot l. that is looking every week to talk about. You know the lsu sexual assault scandal. Then that means that you're going to be talking about sexual assault on your network every week or you're going to be talking about you. Know whatever the the next thing up is or or the ui or league overlooking a particular issue or some sort of You know whether or not college sports or ethical like different things are gonna get discussed. And i just think they got to a point where they were like. What's the advantage of that for us and our broadcast partners. Yeah i mean the the end of the day like d. There's not really a lot of financial advantage for them when it comes to journalism. Which is what one of the things i always appreciate. It from them is that they were doing it. Because of the it was the right stories to tell and these were important stories. I mean if they were just looking to create. atm ultimately what you do. Is you buy all the rights upright. You just put like you know you put shows around at that. Essentially service promotional vehicles for these sports and then occasionally you know when you have to point out the ills of the sport but usually those ills are about you know players or coaches sort of doing something wrong as opposed to the institutional issues of the sport. So we'll see. You may have more optimism than me here i. I'm not so sure that they'll be prestige projects every now and then but i think they'll be sort of more thirty for thirty prestige projects then on the On the journal number you know. Maybe we'll be surprised Is there anything else. You wanna add jane. Before i let you go. I kept you far longer than i thought i. Would you know your time's valuable. Yeah i know but we have conversations and and so we we kinda keep going This is free for both of us right now. I just i just appreciate your podcast and appreciate that you talk about these issues. I'm i'm a listener in addition to talker so Just you know thanks for joining. Are you enjoying the podcasts. That you're doing you like it very much. Yeah i mean. That's really the reason that i said. I went to deadspin the idea of doing this. Podcast that julia had a lot of respect for julia. Over the years for sure and thought we could have some interesting conversations about stuff. And and i think that's what's happening and i really do. I i miss. They're saying kay fagin terribly As still obviously you keep in touch with both of them very closely but But yeah that was the trifecta radio show on. Espn radio with them for definitely for about four years ago it was one of my career highlights for sure so being able to kind of get behind the microphone again with julius than it has been a real gift. I've enjoyed it. Yeah you guys were sort of pioneering and that know the interesting thing now. Is that if you three were. Let's see three were not affiliated with anyone an obviously you know. Sarah has a recipe and contract. And kate is now doing some stuff for assign a book coming out and you have your jobs. I think now you would actually be able to take you three and pitch like a podcast company and try to do it independently now. You wouldn't have the distribution than espn. Does it would take a while to obviously get some kind of audience. But that's sort of at least twenty twenty. That's the cool thing is. You don't necessarily need a mega place like espn to actually do something like that. Now now you know your help. Obviously their distribution and their marketing might. But that's kind of the cool thing of where we are as you. You know like the future does exist where you could. You could actually independently do something like that. Find your own on and eventually built bill podcast brand. Yeah well absolutely. And there's so many great podcasts. That are out there that are being done. i think. Burn it all down and a lot of other great podcast. I if the armor has been it today so there are a lotta podcasts. That are kind of focused on women force. Now you're right when we were doing that we really were. I think the only game in town in a lotta ways For that particular sliver four four hundred per year total respect to the burn all down. Podcast i mean they totally totally independent. They did that and scratch They're now at lake Ten thousand followers on twitter. I mean that that's a really impressive. job by them. And they don't you know they're sort of unapologetic about what they cover and they know that they're not gonna get lake. You know a mass audience the way you would if you were just like breaking down like you know. James harden the traded from the rockets or something like that so good on them are j mcmanus. Let me give. Her resume will more time. Although literally i think i just forwarded to page that I had all right your director. What is your what is your official title amassed director of all is.

espn Espn connor shell nfl Taro taro super bowl kay fagin jimmy lsu julia julius kate Sarah j mcmanus James harden twitter rockets
"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

07:53 min | 4 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Top we bring in jane mcmanus one of my favorite people in the world all my god. The title she has at the moment is just a little annoying. But here we go the director of the center for sports communication. She's a calmness for deadspin. She is also the co host of ladies room. Which is a podcast. With julie de caro. Check that out there. among their Opening guests. i think they've only done. Four episodes is martina navratilova so The definitely getting some high end Some high end guests and j. Mcmanus joins me on the sports media. Podcast jane how are you. I'm good. that's a great intro. Also read i. You know what you could have just stopped at one of my favorite people in the world and that would have been enough for me. That was reading. The of those are pretty good read. I thought off the cue cards that were written for me. That was pretty awesome. I didn't write that that would be. That was the improv you. Jay literally sent an email saying please like read the following all right. So let's start with this one of the things. If people who follow jane on twitter at jane sports Y- jane you have even very vocal about how you feel about college. Football being played during the pandemic and this is obviously an issue that It's been really interesting sort of media. Why it's it's you know it's i would argue. It's a little tricky for the college. Football press to cover and let me tell you why you're certainly welcome to counter because on the one hand. Their livelihood is based on the game in the sport and the game is playing. And so you know you want to cover the sport sort of the way you have and then on the other hand of course there is certainly a philosophical and moral argument like as to why these games are being played at all what i've said. I'm not sure. I've said this on this podcast but i've certainly said online and i've certainly said and on the radio show in toronto is To me what's the most outrageous of this is that these are essential workers. they're not student athletes. they're essential workers and thus like it's infuriating that they're not paid for this. I have no problems with the pros playing to me. That's an adult decision you're compensated for taking that health risk in this case these guys are just going out there at the To to financially. Take care of Television contracts conferences and the money that flows into athletic department to counter argument. Which i've heard certainly from coaches and people i respect is well the safest place for them on earth will be on campus and so if if they do happen to contract ovid nineteen. We have world class medical facilities and they will be. They will be Treated here better than they could be Outside of here. So that's my whole long setup chain Where do you stand on this. and why. why has this been such a passionate issue for you. Because i think that this is the place in sports where there is just such a complete disconnect between the values that we talk about sports promoting particularly in college football where you have a lot of coaches in invoking religion talking about teamwork and leadership And you know pulling together and community and the sense of pulling together for a larger goal when the situation pandemic the larger goal should be for everybody did not get sick And to have college football be discussed in a way where it is. The most important thing is to me it. Just complete abdication of responsibility by those coaches who you know and and look everything that you said is something that that i've said as well and i certainly agree with is that these players are not compensated in a way that they could you know used to buy a house or to get medical care after they're done with their playing careers or in any way that we think of currency in a capitalist society being something that compensate you for your labor. They don't have it and so to me limits their choices. Let's be honest. Most many of these players the best players are in college because his because it is the only way that we funnel players to a professional sport where they can be paid for their output. That's the only way it happens in this country for the most part and i covered you know as you know i covered the nfl for years very rarely even on those days where they pull in all the undrafted free agents to give them workouts. Very rarely do you see a player trying out who hasn't completed some kind of college somewhere so really. This is what this is the exchange. We're asking them to make if you want a future career in the sport you have to play now we've already seen There's been coverage in the times of of a player who died Who contracting covid and died we've seen coverage of a player who opted out and then mysteriously. There was an issue with their scholarship. And they were dropped They were dropped from their scholarship at that school. So the idea that there's that there's no there's no issue. There's no challenge that the risk for these players When it comes to playing college sports is is a fallacy. There's also new information of course coming out about long cove it about how young people are being impacted by covid Which you know. I think a lot of certainly when these decisions are being made to actually play college football. That's when there was a lot of signs coming out about myocarditis and potential heart issue rather than take seriously and wait for more information to come out. There was a lot of you know. Scott atlas esque clinging to whichever medical professional within saying dot to worry about it and then going forward with playing despite the risks. So i think that And the other thing is we know that college football doesn't happen in a vacuum people gathered to watch it in a home or on television or in a bar which could possibly mean that there's transmission also. You know it's not it's not necessarily the players hills are going to catch it and die right there immediately. But it's more that this leads to bread in the community again. There have been new york times articles about how college campuses and communities around college campuses have the return of college led to greater spread. And then also you have college football teams. That are playing when their college. Campuses aren't even there when they've closed down the actual campus and they're still putting these players out there to play. I think it's to me completely discordant. And i watch coverage watching a little bit of the selection show on espn and they paraded. These college coaches out there like brian. Kelly talking about how you know. Our students are are. Our players are going to be missing christmas. 'cause we have to have them in a bubble they can't see their families and voyeur. They overcoming adversity and in the adversities completely manufactured by these college teams and by the college institutions that need the money and by the broadcasters that need the money so they can't be honest on these broadcasts about what's actually happening and about the cost being inflicted on these students and the community and so to me. I just have a very hard time with that. And i also i struggle with the coverage around it. I struggle with the conversation around it. It to me feel very gas lady And i i don't know i just. I am really struggling with college. Proposed the concept this year. No that's i think that's well said when you look at the coverage And the most prominent player in college football coverage is espn just given all the inventory..

jane mcmanus center for sports communicatio julie de caro jane martina navratilova football Football Mcmanus Jay Scott atlas toronto twitter myocarditis nfl new york times espn Kelly brian
"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

06:49 min | 4 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"But whatever so like i actually find it interesting that you are actually even getting direction or management telling you they like or who they don't like i when i did the the last year of the sl media podcast when i was doing. Jimmy i honestly. I don't think. I remember any editor or any manager. Even saying anything to me. Good bad or indifferent it just it became. Its own self like sort of self silo so if actually bite though it's paying attention that's great is no no. It is still that way and no one. No one has ever said really anything to me about my guests. And i've never i mean i i you know i pretty much do what i want i. I don't get any feedback like that. At all or criticisms but i know in order for sis sorta promote the podcast. It helps more if it sort of yet angle to it on social media etc. So that's within my head. More than if i had a podcast with an after and there was no sports and meeting involved no one would say one word to me but it's hard for me to go to the sl social people and be like please tweet this fifty times when there's nothing about sports or media in the podcast right. I will say though you know it is The one thing at least in my experience that i've found is you know. Twenty twenty has been per. I don't know if it's a challenging year for the joe rogan's the world and the barstools the simmons's etc but in in our little world that is you know because we are at least i can only speak from my experience. You know you. Do you know i find that. I've lost a lot of people because of the lack of commuting. You know i i think my guess is and it's just it's more of a guest than than than analytics. I probably have more people than not listening in big cities cities that have commuting like new york or chicago. Philly and i think you know that's where co code has absolutely i think impacted this pockets. I wonder if it's i wonder. If that's the thing about all niche podcasts. If the commuting angle really hurt like a niche podcast as opposed to one of these gigantic mega podcasts. That have you know whatever millions of listeners. Anyway so so if you haven't hammered one hundred thousand you're still gonna get pretty good numbers. Listen no commuting way way way. Less people in gyms where a lot of people would listen. You know Yeah i'm thinking about you know people at home with kids. Doing virtual school from home parents need to be on top of their kids. Doing the schoolwork not easy to put headphones on listening to a podcast. And i i don't maybe this is just main. I feel like a bunch of new. Podcast started up during the pandemic. You know joe buck started one and You know nbc was doing one with like tariq. Oh i think they're like it seemed like you know because you are limited in what you can do. As a sports company for content. More people started podcasts. And there's just the competition is insane. There's so many out there. I don't know how you breakthrough right now. without some massive media company behind you the push everything. But i find this. Just you know if you're on twitter all day like we are. I mean every five minutes. It's like here's my here's my podcast is my visit right. I don't know if i was just you know a regular consumer. I'd be overwhelmed by it all i mean. I don't know how you pick what you listen to all right. One more podcasts related thing. Then we'll get some nfl stuff in. How often are you hearing from sports. Media companies and that's a very sort of capitalist capitalism so espn and fox and nbc. Sports would be all all on that. In addition to you know whatever fhu or the athletic or whatever Are you hearing from a lot of those places in. Are they pitching you for their talent to be on your show or you generally booking on your own meaning year. The pc the person who out and tries to get somebody. I mean i mainly book on my own but i get pitched as well from companies You know regularly. So it's it's just i try to. you know. Want to be a little timely. About things. Like steve kornacki on last week. Because he's doing the nbc pre-game so it was me reaching out something in a timely fashion. But i'll get someone from espn or fox will reach out or and say you know we've got Whatever the big ten tournament do you want to have. The you know person on and you know we go from there And even non i. I can't believe about to say this. But i you know about people starting podcasts. During a pandemic and not doing sports. Steve sharon early from the sopranos started sopranos podcasts during the pandemic them on the espn media. Podcast and then like a few weeks later. I got pitched very early again for like some. Tv show movie was doing actually turned it down to that. Like i never would have thought i would turn down a kiss member from the sopranos but he was only four weeks beforehand. So you know it's as you know your booking. The podcast is a puzzle so basically any way you can't. Let's let's starting at september you know. Let me give you some. Jimmy's big names here. Dan patrick and september michaels in september Ernie johnson in october curb treated october. Paul heyman november gymnasts november. The wow look at that. Paul heyman jim nance and the undertaker back to back to back. That's i mean who knows how it did. But that's that's good book. And chris long who i know you have a good relationship with. I like that guy. I think he's a good to rico kornacki and christmas. Chris yeah. I don't don't make me sort of over hyped out one if i can plug something but if i can put something quickly. The undertaker podcasts was the first one that we put on youtube. We started to put the podcast on youtube out every show me the undertaker. One did very well and You know kornacki last week did well. We'll see russo. I figured that that was partly why. But resurfaced week. I figured he'd play well on youtube because he's always flailing his arms and screaming and yelling. So we'll see how that goes off the off the air. Let's talk because i feel like he might have to do some negotiating with your bosses to get a little bit. More for this podcast. Holiday season means stocking up on some essentials like decorations and an ugly sweater.

nbc joe rogan Jimmy espn joe buck steve kornacki simmons tariq Steve sharon fox Paul heyman chicago new york Ernie johnson nfl jim nance twitter rico kornacki Dan patrick michaels
"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

06:50 min | 4 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Retrain of course writes the Train of thoughts calm well at sports illustrated and we get into a number of things in this one on state of nfl broadcasting in the monday night football booth and eighty w versus wwe peyton manning as broadcaster. It's a lot of sports media talk so hopefully joy that he is followed by jane. Mcmanus the director of the Center for sports communication. She also writes As a columnist for deadspin and was a longtime. Espn staffers. well jan. I taught together at the graduate school of journalism at columbia and we get into the coverage of college football during the pandemic. How the young people in her program look at sports and Naturally which he thinks of the espn layoffs and and many many journalists leaving that place over the last Three to five years. So jimmy trainer. I thought by j mcmanus coming up on the sports media. Podcast all right as i said at the top. Jimmy traina writes the hawk clicks column for sports illustrated sl dot technically hot clicks. What is it called. It's called train of thought Train of sorry. I haven't gotten hot. Quake since two thousand thirteen i know at the top of the podcast. It'll be correct. Jimmy trainer writes the train of thoughts. Column for i dot com and he is the host of the podcast. I have not heard of that jimmy. So if that's a new podcast. I'd like to talk about that. And he is He's a longtime sports illustrated staffer as well as Former fox sports staffer and he joins me on the sports media. Podcast jimmy houria hanging in there. I wanna talk about. I won't let me talk. Let me give some promotion to the sports. Illustrated media podcast. Which oh god if we draw we draw if we drop the comedy here. I think people know. Obviously that that you know Before i love sports illustrated i started that. And you have taken it over and done a fantastic job of changing she say but morphing it into your interests so the podcast has gone from what i would say was very much straight sports media for the most part to your interest wrestling. We saw the undertaker on there too. Big get john cena. Did a very memorable interview with you. You do a lot of new york city media stuff. You know the mike francesa chris russo kind of thing and then you still do your traditional sort of sports media discussions so let me ask you how do you. How have you found sort of the shift. Incompetent you've done has that is has. Did you do that for personal reasons. Because you wanna you just need to talk about that or do you think that was a good sort of strategy to get more More downloads etc. Okay few things here. I wanna address everything you said. I just wanna be clear when you say that you know i took over the sl media podcast that you created and did a and did a great job creating is not just not just a lot of people created. That was part of that. Let's let's be here that marston ben. Eagles should get some credit on that as well. I'm thinking you left. Sports illustrated dan lewis and dan bloom. I feel like damn bloom should get some credit to if you remember that. I don't even know where that is. So okay go you started it. You created it right turns it into something that a lot of people listen to you for the athletic and right to me and asked me to take over. I don't want to the people that guy was angling to take it over from. You feels like a little. Bit of steve young joe montana kind of feel to it but okay i trust us right number. Two about the wrestling have you. Didn't you have wrestling people on the podcast as well. It's not all haley like y'all hey for sure renee thompson. Never conrad thompson. That's true although i feel like conrad thompson who for listeners. Who don't know who he is. he's he has five very very successful. a wrestling podcast or nostalgia so he has jim. Ross in arn anderson and eric bischoff Tony giovanni people people talking about previous wrestling. But i feel like jimmy. That conrad is as much. Don't you think he's as much sort of a media story as he is a wrestling story. Yeah i mean the the undertaker. The undertaker roman reigns by the way. I'm not criticizing you get. These are great yet with the but that's very straight wrestling. Yeah well. I will say this. But i used to try to do pre pandemic and kobe and taping. The podcast from home is if i did have a wrestling. Guess i would also try to have a media guest. I wouldn't try to just have a solo wrestling guessed but given cova taking taping from home. A lotta restrictions. It's harder to do the double guess thing so that's really I mean if you look back. Because i really would just have a straight up wrestling gets it always be someone else on So and then to answer your question. I mean listen. I think anybody who does a podcasts. Whether they're starting on their own taking over that this was the gate your your likes and interests are gonna come to the forefront. I mean i'm not you know as to maybe interviewing you know the eighth ranked sportscenter anchor like you are I would actually do way more way more celebrities entertainers So do it do it. Well there's a there's you know. Listen the people. The most of the people listen to podcasts are listening for sports media stuff but like for instance like if you notice. I don't know a couple of weeks ago. like matthew. Mcconaughey was literally on every podcast in america for about two weeks. I don't know if you were pitched him or not i. I know i was not pitched him but he probably did fifty sports podcast and a two week span like. I don't want guys like that. Who were doing the rounds. But it would. Also if i did get pitched him. I don't know if the sl higher ups would like be like okay so doing immediate podcast and your only guest is matthew mcconnahey. Maybe that's a bad example. Because he's a big name but he has nothing to do with sports. Nothing to do with media. I would like to do people like that and have them on. But i think you still have to mix in. You know the you'd have to like maybe double guessed it and have someone from media on so are so. Here's something interesting to me. Be interesting like six people..

wrestling Center for sports communicatio graduate school of journalism j mcmanus Jimmy traina conrad thompson jimmy jimmy houria chris russo football marston ben dan lewis dan bloom peyton manning Mcmanus mike francesa steve young joe montana renee thompson Espn
"mcmanus" Discussed on Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

05:31 min | 7 months ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

"Creed kind of like the Green Berets and have their own pretty sure we were challenged by a Green Beret to develop our own Creed and we did it and it's it's a really cool thing every Monday morning after our meeting we just talked about this is what what we are and this is what we're about and it helps transfer culture to the new people who come in that, you know, we're we're known because we lead by example, you know, we adapt and overcome and all those kind of fun things and that's that's pretty cool because it's like you can just point at the wall and go well for championships off. We're probably not wrong. Yeah national championships, right? That's right. It's almost like you've got the Vince Lombardi crib behind what you're talking about. But we have banners hanging in the foyer said I kid you not a home, you know how they hang banners and Coliseum. Yeah. We did this. We did this real nice Fair appreciation lunch for him and I didn't tell any of them what I was doing and I had these banjo Rolled up in the rafters. And so at the end of the celebration was over we were all upfront getting our pictures made and I grabbed the mic and I said in two thousand and three landscape you thought Ole Miss one national award and the guy went over there any ripped. He'll pull the cord in the banner drops down like a you know, 2003 National Championship how to do it again a 2009 Newsweek name's Ole Miss most beautiful campus in the nation and another a pulls down the next one. And so now we got these four banners hanging out there and it's like yeah baby person a ride. Yeah. Yeah. That's yeah, that's that's all part of the college scene to yeah. Yeah, so like winning a game. Yeah, you know, that's those guys are so passionate about sports. They all are in the SEC southeastern conference is just a porch a sports driven culture. So we I leverage that I use that as much as I can whatever image Takes to get people to love what they do. This is funny a guy was working for me and he says Jeff I hate putting out pine needles around the plants pine needles is our mulch here kind of like wood chips or Cypress to pick up, right? Yeah. That's true. Yeah, and he goes, I hate it and we put out a lot of it. I mean we put out lots of and he goes but I do it I do it because it helps our head football coach recruit the next Dexter McCluster in the next Eli Manning in the decks. That's awesome. But you know, he was connecting with the fact that that's fine needles helps the football team. That's true true. Yeah because we get our coaches to come we get our coaches to come to our meetings on Monday and and just sort of brag on the guys. We want them to we want them to feel that long in that importance and lift up their job. So that's a lot of fun. So your website is Jeff McManus speaking. Com. Yeah now you speak for not just in the Landscaping wage. So you're all over the place. I know you give us some more examples of the folks that you've you've spoke for. Well, I've I've spoken to a few in the green industry. I've gone to Caterpillar Chick-fil-A Chick-fil-A. That's good. Yeah workers or they I mean they yeah, they need a lot of help or no..

Green Berets Eli Manning Vince Lombardi Newsweek SEC Jeff McManus National Championship head football coach Jeff I Dexter McCluster football Cypress
The Podfather launches a new, open podcast directory

podnews

02:33 min | 8 months ago

The Podfather launches a new, open podcast directory

"Wouldn't it be delightful if we could just keep the platform open for everybody for anything, carry has launched a new open podcast directory for APP developers working with developer Dave Jones, speaking on a new podcast, curry and Jones worry that apple is starting to tinker with their directory. Here's alternative. The podcast index traumas that the core categorized index will always be available for free for any use you can sign up to be a developer on their developer portal and we support this initiative. So as of today, news uses the podcast index for our main podcast search. IBUKI has opened the voting for third edition of their audience awards. You can vote for your favorite podcast in a link you'll find in our show notes newsletter. Today you've until September the twentieth to vote meanwhile, the virtual ceremony for the Latin podcast awards will be on October the tenth with Speaker. You can see poets, dot events your local time. spotify is working on a set of new features to their APP including a method to save your favorite podcast episodes. The companies also advertising podcasting and a new campaign running in twenty three markets and a TV commercial running in sixteen markets globally. Rachel Corbett has joined Australia's commercial radio broadcast and Nova entertainment as head of PODCASTS and digital content. Acosta Australia's hired six new people and SCA Australia's largest commercial radio company and owner of podcast one Australia has entered a partnership with spoken layer, which creates automated short form audio content for smart speakers. And podcast news changes with Anne McManus returns for a Second Series Radio Presenter Anne mackinaw, using her full name, his to interview extraordinary people including actor Michael Sheen American singer Songwriter. Beth Ditto, and our first guest is novelist Zadie Smith. Mothers ourselves interviews, the children of extraordinary mothers. It's a new podcast from longtime New York Times reporter Katie Hafner who started the podcast around Mother's Day this year while covering the pandemic, it aims to offer something a little more uplifting in the midst of so much grimness. Telling US and tomorrow WNYC and history releasing blind spots the roads to nine eleven bringing tonight's lights the decade long shadow struggled preceded via tax.

Developer Dave Jones Australia New York Times United States Acosta Australia Beth Ditto Katie Hafner Wnyc Ibuki Anne Mcmanus Zadie Smith Sca Australia Spotify Anne Mackinaw Rachel Corbett Michael Sheen Apple Curry Nova Entertainment
Hasbro Troll dolls almost broke the internet

Take it or Leave it

06:16 min | 9 months ago

Hasbro Troll dolls almost broke the internet

"Figured we talk about a couple of stories because I've gotten I have gotten questions about both of these topics, email to me and message to me. So we ran a story over unfiltered free parents last week about the Hasbro troll doll. Did you see this tiffany? Yes, I did. Okay. So this troll doll, which is based on the character poppy. Basically it it has a button on the belly where the belly button would be, and it sings and it has like ten different phrases and sings different songs and then what parents noticed was when they opened up the doll box and they looked at the doll, there is a second button betwixt poppies legs in the. Spot and when you push it, she squeals and giggles. And that is not noted on the box. That anywhere. hoppy has a special upside down mix up park button where she's giggles and squeals. But this mom just Jessica McManus started this petition online saying. This isn't appropriate for a lot of reasons. She started a petition on change dot org where she got well over two hundred, thousand signatures at this point she says, this troll doll is basically conditioning kids should we do a trigger warning trigger warning? D. Say. Those words that could be triggering to people in regards to abuse. Okay. Is that what you have to say I? Think I. Don't know if we're GONNA talk about it. We should at least put it like on the caption of the thing when we post it is all in Oh for the for the episode. Yeah. I thought you meant right this minute we'll. Yeah, it doesn't hurt. Okay. All right. Do it now to they'd call I didn't think that near correct. But what they're basically saying is this doll and the placement of this button and the sounds at the dollar makes when you touch the button. are conditioning our kids towards A. Pedophilia being okay with being touched or molested or pedophile pedophilia, and they're saying that that's okay and some parents on the other side of this or saying we're really were really reaching. This is such a canceled culture. This is such a this. This is such that, and then there are lots of parents that are saying, well, why are we putting a button in that spot? Anyway. Like what is the need for a child's toy for a button to be there? So I just thought we'd have a conversation about that. Well and from what I understand. There isn't an actual button correct me if I'm wrong. There isn't an actual button on the dolls stomach. Like there's no, it's inside. So you so her stomach is flat and you touch it. It's right. It's like a squeeze I, guess. Yeah. Whereas on the CROTCH. It's an actual protruding it is there is. There is a cut out. You can see the button it looks it's a circular button. That's exactly what it looks like that. You would rise and so that's my point is that why I don't know anyway so I was interested in what they had to say about it. They said, this feature was designed to react when the doll was seated, but we recognize the placement of the sensor may be perceived as an appropriate. Does like what does that mean like when you slam it down it goes When you sit down at does it like gasps and giggles? and. So. It begs a few questions for me personally number one I'd like to know how did it get through? So many marketing and production meetings that nobody was in the corner raising their hands saying hey. Quick. Question why are we putting a button on poly? What's her name Poppies Vagina like why are we doing like? Why would we put it? They're like why? If we want poppy to sing an extra song or doing extra giggle? Do we not put it on the hand? Are we not put like like you know what I'm saying like there was nobody in any one of these because you have to think. I don't know much about big business but what I can tell you. Is that there had to have been how many marketing and production meetings and prototypes built of poppy prior to going to production and being in the local Walmart and target Right. There have to. There's no way because I I just know how many times I have to get a sample of t-shirt when I'm just printing my own t shirts where I'm like, you know what I don't like I don't like the way the t looks there. I don't like the this or that, and you play with it and you go back and forth how many meetings did they have? Where people were sitting around a table and looking at a prototype and think note the vagina that's where the button should be, and even if it was for sitting how often in reality are you actually like sitting? Adul- down I'm trying to think like I feel like when my kid plays with dolls, they're standing and just be beep and then thrown like it's never like. Seated so much that there needs to be or it would make sense. It would make sense if it was one of those, like, do you remember the dolls that the ones that you feed the Plato or the bottle with, and then you sit them on the toilet? That makes sense to see to have a seated position for the doll because I have I have taken a bunch of Plato out of out of that dolls. But before because what was it baby alive? That's stupid. Baby alive was you'd feed it Sophia would feed it. There was little plato things where you could make it look like peas or carrots or baby food or whatever, and then it would eventually make. Its way into the diaper but mostly, I was just pulling plato out of dolls but right. But it would sit on a potty and you could make p you'd push its belly and the P. would come out. Yes. So that would make sense for a seated thing.

Hasbro Tiffany Jessica Mcmanus Crotch Walmart Adul
5 injured in shooting at San Antonio flea market

Sean Hannity

00:29 sec | 9 months ago

5 injured in shooting at San Antonio flea market

"People were wounded today when gunfire broke out during an argument at a flea market in San Antonio. There were multiple shooters to include a security guard return fire at one of them. That was shooting. San Antonio Police Chief William McManus is the five who were shot were all involved in the argument. And then no one else in the flea market was injured. Multiple weapons were recovered, and police say they found more than 100 shell casings at the scene and investigation continues.

San Antonio William Mcmanus
Miami Marlins Outbreak Wreaks Havoc on M.L.B. Schedule

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 10 months ago

Miami Marlins Outbreak Wreaks Havoc on M.L.B. Schedule

"Major league baseball season got underway last week. But so far it's been rough. More than half of the act of Miami Marlins players and several coaches from the team have tested positive for the Corona virus. As a result, Marlins games have been postponed through at least Sunday. But despite concerns over additional outbreaks, Major League Baseball officials have so far balked at the idea of canceling this truncated season altogether. Here's MLB commissioner Rob Manfred discussing the Marlin situation on ESPN on Monday. I don't put this in the nightmare category. I mean, obviously, we don't want any player. To get exposed. It's not a positive thing, but I don't see it as a nightmare. We built the protocols to allow us to continue to play. That's why we have the expanded rosters. That's why we have the pool off additional players. And we think we can keep people safe and continue to play. I've got J. McManus with me. Now she's the director of the Maris Center for Sports Communication and a sports columnist for the New York Daily News, Jane Great to have you with us. Oh, thanks for having me it. Rob Manfred, who We just heard MLB commissioner. There sounded pretty confident at least that he was going to be able to keep his player safe. But the Marlin situation sounds quite alarming. Tell us, you know how things have developed since the first cases were identified on the team. The proof is in front of him hasn't been able to keep his players safe. So the question is, what do they do now? The way that this developed was after a game in Sun on Sunday, where the Marlins were playing the Phillies before that game player had had tested positive for the Corona virus and the team of wanted to play that game anyway. And so I went ahead and played and of course, that Opens the door to exposure not just to the Marlins players, but also to the to the Phillies. And to anybody who's been working in that clubhouse. And so what you have, then is you know one test, turning into multiple tests in an outbreak and a team one of the 30 teams not being able to play going forward and quarantined in Philadelphia. Until they can figure out how to move this season forward

Marlins Rob Manfred J. Mcmanus Commissioner Major League Baseball Baseball Phillies Jane Great MLB Philadelphia Espn Maris Center For Sports Commun New York Daily News Sports Columnist
Senate GOP chairman criticizes Trump withdrawal from WHO

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Senate GOP chairman criticizes Trump withdrawal from WHO

"The chair of the Senate's health committee in the United States as well the president trump's withdrawal from the world health organisation could interfere with clinical trials to develop a vaccine against cove in nineteen John McManus reports on Friday president trump announced that he was terminating the USA's relationship with the world's foremost health organization in the middle of a pandemic Mr trump had already suspended funding to the World Health Organization accusing it of failing to reform and being controlled by China what's a senior member of his own Republican policy Lamar Alexander the chairman of the Senate health committee as well the move could endanger U. S. citizens by making it harder to both develop an effective vaccine against Kobe nineteen and to stop the spread of the virus to the United

Senate United States John Mcmanus Mr Trump World Health Organization China Lamar Alexander Chairman Senate Health Committee Kobe President Trump U. S.
"mcmanus" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"My guest today is dying Sally Davies. Who until October last year was the chief medical officer for England the my senior government advisor on health matters? She was the first and only woman to ever hold this raw. She's also a member of the World Health Organization Executive Board and now serves as master of Trinity College at the University. Kind Bridge Sally. Until recent weeks many people would not have thought much about the chief medical officer. Now we find ourselves hanging off their every word and I met a way we are in the world. Can you describe the role of the chief medical officer what it was like to hold that job? Well it was an incredible honor and to bear flagbearer. I think as a woman actually does put more pressure on. You definitely meant that. I was called the Chief. Nanny of the nation which was sexist. But what we have to do is think hard about the public's health and most of the time for me in Britain that was not about the NHL services. It was more about the preventive health health improvement and health protection and so of course lamentin agencies came onto that I was the one that with the backup of scientists had to advise government. When we have the NAVA joke poisonings in two thousand nine ten. I was not there for the first wave of the flu. Pandemic I was actually running research the chest but I was there for the third wave when we had even more deaths and drank back from holidays by ministers for a bowler in West Africa to talk about what needed doing where we responding effectively and to talk to the public. Some people call the roll. The nation's doctor so it's complex because it moves around and I'm a hematologist specialist in sickle. So and then. I became a researcher so I have a broad background but I'm rather pleased that my successor is an infectious disease specialist so he has called the president horrors of covert and he is expert. And can you imagine what the Chief Medical Officer in the U. K? Or INDEED OTHER CHIEF. Medical officers around the world are going through now. Can you give us an insight into what would it be like well? It's very pressured because what you're trying to do is stay on top of the signs on one side. What should we be doing the services on what's going on and the limitations because no one is prepared for something as bad as this and then the crushes which come from ministers because they clearly want sorting out and they want to show they're in control the media which again is pushing and raking over every little thing and the public demands? Put that beside your own desire to get it right and to save lives and it's a very pressured role you refer them to people not saying something like this coming. Did you ever imagine that the world would be where we are today? Well we did a lot of practice. As did you in Australia of pandemic planning but it was always a flu. So that tastes in respiratory born virus and we thought that would standards in good stead. I think it's shown that we didn't practice everything we didn't think through the testing well enough and the other things. We clearly didn't have ready but would anyone have ready. It's a question of how much clamming can you do and we did a lot and we some really good planning song quite proud of what we did but then how fleet of foot can you be when it happens and how anticipate can you be as you watch it develop and what's giving you hope at the moment on one thing that certainly in world war odd claims the scientific and medical communities coming together and focusing on the research and vaccine other things that are going to make a profound difference at all of that. What escaping you spirits up? Well the first thing is of coal some actual nature that we historically have epidemics and pandemics and survival of the fittest as nations and society. We come through. Interestingly here. I am sat in Trinity College and the where the plagues in the mid sixty and hundreds. Which aren't she because we close down as we have done now. Pasta spy but newt of gravity fame is famed for having. Actually it's not quite correct story having discovered gravity during one of the plagues. I think the way people are coming together whether it's about the sun some working together on treatments vaccinations whether it's in the service stories of heroism of nurses doctors on the front line but also the volunteering the support from people in the community for the vulnerable taking medicines. Taking food and everything. So it's how society is coming together and working together whether it's on Sundance or to support others. Isn't that wonderful? The way it's happening and I am loving the means and the little videos and everything on facetime what SAF and zoom I mean are now doing masses of things by zoom. We were cooking supper with our daughter on zoo last night. She was cooking hers in the House. And we were cooking up unfortunately onsumer. You can't lane in enticed they can't particularly better. I'm GonNa take you back now to your ties when you grew up and when you first start to think that you might want to be doctor because I'm sure one of the things that struck people as we've watched the coverage of the pandemic is had. Jane ended idiots most of the experts most of the politicians or their podiums breed. I telling us what's going to happen next all men so as a girl growing up. What made you decide you so I wanna be a doctor. Well actually. I'm an auditory because I didn't know what to do. I got to the age of sixty nine had quite decent exam results. I was better at biology. Had I remember my mother saying you? Good biology you quite like people that you do mince father who was a medic. No one else in the family so I talked to him and it seemed a good idea so I went off to do it and actually after the first couple of years and it's on record I found it quite brutalizing. I think in the way that the doctor's now will find it. The people were. We had Russian health system particularly at that time in the mid seventies where I can remember. Oh young woman. For instance. Not being allowed renal dialysis because there was a choice between patients. And she didn't win. Am I thought this was so unfair? And how many things were handled. I was so brutalized I actually gave up for four years and then giving up discovered I had of the -cation and I think what our young doctors are going through. The moment that was on the front line is very similar. Not Enough ventilators. Who Do you choose seeing? People die in circumstances where you can't hold their hand and their families can't be there I think they're experiencing some of that brutalizing and harrowing things that I saw in the early and mid seventies and I fear many of them will say after it's over. I can't do this. I hope like me I went off. Married diplomat went Madrid as a diplomat's wife. I wasn't the good diplomat's wife but I realized I wanted to do meant and then came back really energize and I hope that if they do give up then come back energized when they've found themselves again. Do you think we'd be a bit better now at supporting the main to help us. And we'RE OBEYING OF AIR FRONTLINE. Doctors Enosis as they go through something like this. Would they be more understanding? About how spirit crushing making. Those choices are literally between. Who lives in dollars? I think we're more understanding but talking to on younger daughter WHO's a first year doctrine. The front line they are so stretched so rushed that the extra services aren't available so it is a question of kindness in a team and supporting the team. I had that too. It wasn't enough for me. I would rather a gentle soul that stage. I don't know I think we're going to have to do an awful lot of catching up later on and when you look back on those days I mean. Brutalizing is a very strong word. Was that really perspective about the system. Did you think that they was agenda? Element and win offered in your life that if I said to yourself. Jay is something different that happens because I'm a woman. Oh the walls gendered element was in medical school. I think thirteen women at the year of one hundred ten. I mean looking back very inappropriate thing so when we did surface anatomy I was made to stand on a stool while they drew on my legs where the muscles were. I mean you know and I thought that was normal at that stage but you wouldn't allow that now getting back to starting on the walls. The word very few women. The nurses were not used to women. Doctors remember the system. I I would saying well. You think I'm here to ally was no. I don't and she said you're here to make mighty and it was actually quite difficult environment and I was definitely Baltimore. The pecking order. But I came from a fairly sparky academic background and my father who was a theologian taught me that. I should ask and challenge. In order to get the right answer I mean at the age of six challenging bishops. How do you know God exists and things so? Perhaps I was better prepared. The many women would be in that. I was prepared to challenge and push back but it wasn't easy. Am I do think it was a agenda sexist environment and can you give us an example of one moment of pushing back of challenging? Do Love the image of you as a sixty road. You know it Sunday lunch challenging bishop but in the context of Medical Education or medical practice. Well I mean just silly things like I remember. I did something on one of my early wall drown. Something consultant said. Miss Davis I said in front of the patient and the whole team. I appreciate you think have got this wrong and I'm really sorry but I know that when you're happy with me you call me Sally when you content you call me. Dr Davis Miss Davis not acceptable. And he said Oh. I didn't realize I did that. Said you into the men interesting. It didn't again. Oh so go to resort. Yes I wouldn't be invited to everything because the boys were going for a beer sitcoms. I can't stand beer and I didn't like pubs because of the smoking them so I didn't mind in one sentence but on the other side. We all know that a lot of medical networking used to take place in the pub over a beer so I was being excluded though I think the funniest was my hematologist professor who I was very fumbled. But he would do this long ward round on one morning of the week and at a certain point he would walk into the gents and continued discussing the patients and my friend and I she she and I would stand outside. Arms crossed thinking. What are they saying about patients? We're looking off. And I got so fed up I took to propping. Open the door with my foot and continuing the conversation with the professor while he was in the Jen's that stopped it..

Chief Medical Officer Sally Davies flu Trinity College World Health Organization Exec NHL professor England Dr Davis Miss Davis Britain Australia advisor Miss Davis West Africa researcher Brutalizing Jane president
"mcmanus" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Hat maker my mom. She writes books folks in speaks to cards but she mostly loves talking to amazing people on this podcast every week. Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoyed the show them Hey guys should make her hair. Welcome to the for the left podcasts. Super Glad you're here. We are in a really cool series right now. We talking to faith leaders who have done their work for decades. I mean I'm talking literal decades and so it's so interesting to pull up a chair air to their table and and learn about how they got here what they've learned along the way where they're at now so today is absolutely note exception. Today's guest is one of the coolest is leaders. The faith I've ever had a chance to meet to counter to learn from He's just well if you know who he is. You know what I'm saying is true he's just his whole vibe is so unique and he's been kind of on the front end of alternative ways as to gather in a fit community communicate messages of faith for thirty years and more way back when nobody else was doing stuff like that way back back when people were not asking questions that he asked where some of those processes may be a little bit more ubiquitous. Now we see them more. There's a lot more faith leaders taking different sorts of risks and creating different sorts of structures. He was sort of on the front edge and still is. He is super into. Fostering Art and creativity ativity in entrepreneurship at his church. Through all kinds of cool mediums. They very much highly value film and written Word Spoken Word and performance art and painting painting and cultivate that in the end. They're not just in their community but really activate their people and in the communities that they're in as artists so of course talking about author and Speaker Pastor Erwin McManus. So Irwin is the founder and the lead pastor of mosaic a community of faith breath born in Los Angeles and now all around the world with his very specific culture For people who would never go to like what you would consider an ordinary church. We talk all about this One thing we didn't even talk about that. I wish we would have as the way. The links to which mosaic has gone to serve the city and the world is just unbelievable. I mean you just would not believe the stuff. They have innovated in service to mankind brandon. I have learned from their example for years and years and years cost they are out there doing it And so I talked to him today. Like where did you come from. Wait till you hear his background. This guy by any means on paper was not headed toward leading a church. Church The stuff that he has overcome The things that he has learned the way he thinks about God and the Bible and people in the world world is just very fascinating like this was a really stimulating conversation He Discusses Postmodernism and postmodern Christianity. A Lot hot and then obviously writes and speaks leads into culture and identity in arts and change such an interesting leader His latest book. which we're gonNA talk about is? It's called the way of the warrior and ancient path to inner peace I'll tell you right now. He gets super real. The whole book is essentially about Sort sort of centered around mental health. And he said some really frank things on this recording today about his own personal battle with mental health and what he struggles with as recently as last week and so I really appreciated his candor and his vulnerability in leading in this way. So we're GONNA talk a lot about mental health today. And and what he has learned some of the paths to peace that he has discovered and is holding out to us And just all of it I just your this is just. It's a lively conversation and so I am so glad to bring you this great conversation with the one and only Erwin McManus Manis. It feels like we should have already met by now I we have so. Many people are sort of ancillary worlds. But here we. We are having our very first conversation Erwin McManus Welcome to the PODCAST. Glenn finally connect. I know we've got a lot of people in uncommon. I've actually heard she speak. This was years and years and years ago. So like how long would it been when when one of your sons. I was in high school while I only have one son the one now. Okay so that'd be about thirteen fourteen years ago. Yes yes I heard you talking talking one time and I'm sure that your whole talk or sermon was brilliant. I'm sure it was but this is the one part I remember the one part of remember. Is You telling the story about how your son came to you. One time like really earnestly very sincerely interested you know. Would you ever like knowingly. Put me in danger and you were like yes. Of course I would hard up. So that's what I remember. Thank you for dropping that bit of wisdom right into my young head. Yup that actually did happen. You came on behalf of his sister but a lot of it was actually rooted around Y2K and then nine eleven and A lot of things can happen in that world he remember when they When people are saying the whole world's GonNa fall apart and each part of that was I talk talk to resist hysteria and and I was really disappointed in how Christianity seem to be some of the most terrified Christmas some those terrified people in the nation and And we had people in La that were literally selling your home's moving to the desert believes the world. What is going on? So we did that as a declaration. You should lie. I told my wife. Hey if we're wrong then you know it won't matter nobody can tell us for uh-huh so we just raised our kids that you're gonNA make decisions based on fear we're danger. I love that I learned that from early on and I would. I think I think my husband and I have chartered a really similar path. That we're not very risk averse and and we don't make a lot of decisions based on fear at all and so does it means our kids get a lot of panics. Because apparently they listened they picked up the message so now we really got line the bed we made but we I I think we live our life pretty similar so look I've told my listeners. A little bit about you and who you are what it is that you do. And I'm cited in the minute you and I you're really gonNA dig into the themes in the last book you wrote but if you wouldn't mind just for a minute can you take us back a little little back to Before you are a pastor and a speaker and teacher and here a little bit more can you tell my listeners about where you came from and ultimately it Kinda what shaped you toward the path that you later followed in life. I'm from El Salvador. Some first generation immigrants Spanish is my first language learned. English publisher states became an American citizen. about ten years ago and I grew up in a kind of a religious ECLECTIC ECLECTIC environment. My grandfather was an atheist. Who believed in reincarnation and my grandmother was a Roman Catholic or never went to mass and my mom SORTA was A curious person brought a boo the home for a season Then studied Judaism decides. She was Jewish. And then my step dad was He was basically criminal and and came out of Relationship with organized crime and things like that in class and so he's just a good solid Hagan. I don't think he had any religious inclination in any direction whatsoever other than he was like a brilliant conman and so that's the world I grew up and I began reading science fiction a really early age. The age of nine or ten I connected to Isaac adds an often ray Bradbury and Andre Norton and Robert Heinlein and so a lot of their writings kind of blending physics with imagination and you kind of stretch ristic perspective perspective kind of shaped my view of the future and and on site just gripped with a really vivid imagination and just Really felt like there's no boundaries the possibilities of the feature and and then I read every mythology book in the library by Time I was twelve years old. I was really interested in like human mythologies and the stories we tell tell each other about God or gods and and then it became a philosophy student in college and and didn't have any real knowledge of Christianity at all. I mean I knew the name of Jesus and I think I had warm feelings about Jesus. Yeah you know and I was never an anti-god person person or an anti Faith person but I was probably an anti establishment personnel was sort of an anarchist so I was against religion against government against Touche's against fraternities. And anything bet that tried to conform people and say I was pretty much against that and And so it was the middle of all that that I found faith my whole family came to know. Jesus my mom I my My sisters sisters then. My brother was an atheist and and I was the last one and and and it wasn't that It wasn't that was unwilling to believe in something it was that it was really hard to wrap my mind around what I think a lot of times. I think are really easy things. The believe sure. It's a great point. Yeah we saved them with so much confidence because we've known them all of our lives you know and I was I and I may. I looked looks like I was probably but I was. I was actually trying to make sensible this and And when my brother became a Christian I was really confused because he it was a hardcore atheist. Now Yeah and pretty Pretty dark like hardened person and also I see him going to church and carrying a Bible when and then they all are now believers and they're telling me and my little sisters are going into their crying we don't want you to hell and I'm like what what is happening. And I felt like they absorb Kinda Colton and suddenly. They're all in and I'm out and I'm going doing well. How do you know I'm going to help all of your in and I'm out and that it was very confusing and they're still not living? I would consider like really noble lives so I told my brother God lets you wouldn't have. He has no standards an excellent. That's a little bit of my background in Came to faith in the middle of that journey and I wasn't really sure what to do with my life. I was a straight D student for a twelfth grade was College actually didn't get in touch. I finally begged my way to college actors. You know yeah. I walked into administration office US and And convinced them to let me have a chance because I could qualify to go to college and they did it. Yeah and it changed my life and and so many positive ways. And that's why I discovered saucy discovered. I love to think and in that you know it was called so different than elementary school. A career you grew up in education is about conforming and memorizing and learning. What everyone says is important? And then it's almost like if I could just skipped right to university were were was for me about exploration impossibilities. and and thinking edit more complex level and and that's I felt like I was at home but I was really searching for meaning I didn't know why existed. I wanted to know if there's any meaning to life I didn't care about heaven or hell. Eternity was irrelevant to me. I I just wanted to know if this life mattered in if I mattered. And that's what really drove me. Search for God. Well how on earth did you go from being a philosophy major at reluctant convert them come to being a church guy being.

Bible Speaker Pastor Erwin McManus Erwin McManus Erwin McManus Manis US Irwin Glenn La El Salvador Hagan Touche Los Angeles founder publisher Isaac Robert Heinlein ray Bradbury Andre Norton
Several people stabbed in London Bridge incident

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Several people stabbed in London Bridge incident

"British police say several people have been stabbed need to London Bridge and a man has been detained the news came after witnesses reported hearing gunshots in the area Sky News reported that police had shot the apparent attack at the Metropolitan Police force at offices will call to a stabbing at premises near to London Bridge the say a man has been detained by police and that they believe a number of people have been injured BBC reporter John McManus was in the area and said he's we'll figure is a grappling on the bridge he said I thought it was initially a fight but then shots rang out London ambulance service said have crews on the scene Syria Shockley non than

London Bridge Sky News Metropolitan Police Force John Mcmanus BBC Reporter London Syria Shockley
Several people stabbed in London Bridge incident

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Several people stabbed in London Bridge incident

"The news came after witnesses reported hearing gunshots in the area Sky News reported that police had shot the apparent attack at the Metropolitan Police force at offices will call to a stabbing at premises near to London Bridge to say a man has been detained by police and that they believe a number of people have been injured BBC reporter John McManus was in the area and said he's we'll figure is a grappling on the bridge he said I thought it was initially a fight but then shots rang out London ambulance service said have crews on the scene Syria Shockley lawn then

Sky News Metropolitan Police Force London Bridge John Mcmanus BBC Reporter London
Scientologists buy dozens of properties in Clearwater, Florida

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Scientologists buy dozens of properties in Clearwater, Florida

"Clearwater Florida there's been a quiet series of land purchases over the last three years a hundred and three million dollars worth made by the church of Scientology and its pressures a doubling of the church's footprint near its international headquarters that's the findings of a story in the Tampa Bay times it's headlined clear takeover trees McManus is a Scientology reporter for the paper she joins us now welcome hi Lou thank you for having us explain to me why the the paper hasn't Scientology reporter I mean how big is the church of Scientology where you are yeah that's a good question I think it's comparable to save it's kind of like if there were to be about again reporter in Vatican City we believe it's important to shed light on a powerful institution that's very controversial and plays a big role in our community so tell me about these land purchases can you give me a sense of the scale and how they we have have made this happen with the relatively little fanfare over the years it kind of started in early twenty seventeen we reported at that time that a handful of limited liability companies bought about six downtown properties and Scientology leader David Miscavige had presented a retail plan to to city staff officials and he was going to build an entertainment complex with Tom Cruise and he was going to recruit high and retail to some of the empty store fronts because downtown clear waters pretty depressed so we kept our eye on the downtown purchases once we dug into the data and pulled records we found that LLC is tied to the church of Scientology had bought about one hundred properties and the properties cover about one hundred acres and it's all surrounding the city's downtown waterfront who they buying from and how and how much are they offering brokers representing these companies were approaching downtown property owners many of the properties weren't listed for sale and our analysis found that these church officials were offering two three four times what the property appraiser said the properties were valued so clearly they wanted these properties a great deal why does this matter well our reporting shows that Scientology has a big interest in preserving its downtown campus flag is what they call it and it's the international spiritual headquarters of the church and it's also basically that financial nucleus of the entire organization there's prisoners that come here from all over the world to take courses in high level auditing that's not offered anywhere else the other side of that is flight is run by the sea org Scientology's full time work force these workers signed billion year contracts are paid very little work around the clock and Scientology has an interest in keeping that insulated according to former executives that we've interviewed what you mean billion year contracts the reason Scientology has such an outsized influence is because of the the cash and assets it has which is estimated to be three billion dollars part of the reason for that is because they have this sea org that works full time and is paid less than fifty dollars a week they keep their operations it's the type of servitude yes exactly and I guess the larger concern is that this could really thwart the city's plans for redevelopment if the Scientologists organizations are are going to have all this property that they're gonna keep for their own purposes right because the city officials have said that there's only so many factors they control one of the factors they do control is the waterfront land that's protected by city charter that they are in the middle of a sixty four million dollar plan right now to re design and develop into a park with gardens and a concert venue businesses might see this city project and say yeah let me take a chance on downtown and open up a business but now these LLC's tied to Scientology control the retail district they have control over what businesses of any come in what is the view of the local community I mean do they view it as helpful for the community at large to have a major religious organizations centered in their town or not you know Lou I spit from my reporting I've learned that there's a lot of mistrust and suspicion still in the community when it comes to Scientology because a lot of the residents here were living in the city one Scientology arrived in the seventies and they remember the tactics Scientology use just out of curiosity when you see the tactics that they use in the seventies what what were those Scientology arrive in downtown Clearwater nineteen seventy five they came in under a fake name to buy the fort Harrison hotel a historic hotel right in the center of downtown and the mayor at the time gave stars really raise the alarm he demanded to see their financials our board of directors he publicly asked why they were security cards with Billy clubs and mace on the roof and in nineteen seventy seven the FBI raided Scientology's had orders in LA in DC and then covered hundreds of thousands of memos and documents and inside those findings was a plan that Scientology operatives had had created and written to establish area control and the tactics they were using to establish Kerry control included infiltration spying smearing and a means it was a very turbulent time so the fact that the church is now buying up these properties through proxy organizations would maybe bring some alarm bells for the community because of what what has happened in the past yeah I think that the key here is the uncertainty we don't know what they're planning to do with the property is a lot of them are vacant lots vacant buildings empty storefronts we don't know if they're just going to continue to squat on them because they haven't done anything yet they haven't submitted redevelopment plans they haven't started construction or are they going to redevelop them and bring businesses and and contribute to a vibrant downtown

Florida Clearwater Billion Year Sixty Four Million Dollar Three Billion Dollars Three Million Dollars One Hundred Acres Fifty Dollars Three Years
Labour Party asks about Dominic Cummings' years working in Russia

BBC World Service

01:23 min | 1 year ago

Labour Party asks about Dominic Cummings' years working in Russia

"In person just days off to politicians agreed to a general election to break the political deadlock surrounding brexit one of them and this is claimed that may be security concerns over the prime minister's close the St Dominic Cummings has been up Boris Johnson site since Mister Johnson became prime minister in July but a senior member of the opposition labor policy says a whistleblower has voiced concerns about Mister Cummings Paul stealing is in Russia Joe McManus reports Dominic Cummings is a divisive figure in British politics in twenty sixteen he helped spearhead the official campaign to get the U. K. Arabs of the European Union now he's by the side of the prime minister Boris Johnson working to make bricks is a reality was an opposition politician Emily Thornberry says she's written so the Foreign Secretary citing concerns about Mister Cummings which have come from an unnamed whistle blower in the lecture which was copy to the heads of Britain's security service MI five and the foreign intelligence service MI six miss liberty describes our concerns these relate to relationships Mister Cummings may have developed with individuals involved in politics and intelligence when he witty rusher in the mid nineties missile berry admits she doesn't know if the claims are true but is no reason to doubt the whistle blower was motives and she wants to know with the prime minister's top aide has access to Britain's most secret files John McManus

Prime Minister Dominic Cummings Mister Johnson Mister Cummings Paul Joe Mcmanus European Union Emily Thornberry Foreign Secretary Britain MI Russia Official John Mcmanus
"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"I think you will enjoy this conversation j mcmanus is a columnist for the daily news the new york daily news she's the director of the center for sports sports communication at mary's college she's a former ESPN ESPN w columnist shed bylines in many many places including the new york times we worked together at columbia university school of journalism where we taught a class together for a number of years katie strang is a national writer for the athletes nick and one of the best people if not the best person i work with at that place she is a former NHL and dan MLB writer for ESPN and if you're a fan of sports writing or sports journalists these are pretty much names that you already no and we had immediately to our conversation j mcmanus katie strang welcome to the sports media podcast record or jane i'm going to start with you and the topic of this podcast is sort of how mental health is is discussed and written about on television and in sports journalism and a couple of weeks ago this is not really knew of observation but jane i'm always struck by just how little discussion there is this winning the sort of parameters rommedahl sports television whether it's pregame shows whether it's the sports chat shows you know whether it's sportscenter types and i got to just sort of wondering why that is so let's start there in that like for something that's really a national crisis in the united states of america why so little of this talk when it comes to flex i certainly think that sports writer of our generation and didn't come into sports writing thinking they were going to have to cover anything than what happened happened between the lines like occasionally there'd be a scandal occasionally there'd be a DUI but really they got into it because of a love sports and wanting to tell stories in that way and i i think as the years have gone on and as i think the public has demanded a more in terms of transparency as social media means that we get to see people's state of mind in real time i think it's become clear that this job really requires knowledge that goes beyond john that of what happens in four quarters on a football field and that is something that's where mental health comes in but i still think particularly particularly sports writers of our generation a little bit older deeply uncomfortable with having to do that and and sometimes there's resentment with having to you know cover cover are these issues like you know domestic violence or mental health substance abuse these kinds of things can get i i don't think the people necessarily have educated themselves the way that they need to be able to tell these stories and talk about this effectively i think the second issue with a generally is that you have athletes former athletes analysts who have the kind of parrot the mentality that team develops and that's very much about ignoring issues that are going to possibly detract from performance and i think we see this in the way that people talk and the way they answer questions and it's very much about what did you what were you thinking on that play well i just want what's best for the team very much get these performance responses and so talking honestly and openly and in the context of sports is still something that's very difficult for people to do shady yeah and i i mean i totally agree with what james jane says and i and i think we'd be remissed also just you know point out that i still think there's a tremendous amount of stigma around mental illness and mental health and i know for me particularly i've covered a wide range of sports but hockey's always been sort of my bread and butter and in in hockey specifically there's a certain amount of value on stoicism right and playing through injury and playing through pain and hiding pain hiding injury and it's been sort of fantasized in a way of you know what can guys endure you know throughout the course of their career and in in their line of work for the sake of the team and getting wins and so i think that has created a culture in which transparency and openness is not always encouraged i'd like to think think that changing in hockey at least a little bit and i think the greater sports world at large but i i agree with jane in a very broad context i think the main reason jozy so little dialogue and discourse about this issue and about other difficult issues such as you know sexual misconduct sexual assault sexual abuse domestic violence is because it's uncomfortable to talk about and i think a lot of that stems from people's fear of getting it wrong and people not quite being advocated in ho how to talk about it in a way that makes sense in is appropriate and conveys the i think appropriate appropriate level of gravity and sensitivity to a situation so i think the more we learn about this moore we'll take steps to educate ourselves sounds about this i think we'll see those conversations becoming more frequent and hopefully more robust kidding i wanna stick with you and and this is probably this is clear bias on my part giving where i currently work the fact that i come from sort of a magazine culture everybody on this call sort of comes from i you know i would sort of say a print digital culture and i feel like that world has done better when it comes to these discussions you know whether it's you know the athletic or the new york times or ESPN dot com like ah feel like there's been a significant advancement of how these issues are covered to mental health issues and just the serve the openness and adult -ness of those discussions but yet i don't know if that's filtered over per se television and it certainly has not felt that over yet to sports talk radio so katie how can how can in your opinion how can that change and is maybe the only way changes just with with a generation coming up bull behind us where the stigma of talking about mental health is nothing like it was thirty forty fifty years ago sure i certainly think you know that the generational change will help in in many different arenas in terms of what are you know the kids now and our children will grow up you know sort of feeling comfortable talking about and open talking about is it will be vastly different than what we did i also think it's important to point out that i think print journalism to some degree has has an advantage in the sense that i think there's more room for more new on when you have the luxury of articulating your thoughts in writing and going through editing process and really being deliberate and thoughtful well about how you wanna convey certain point or you know established you know the context of situation we should and i think that's more difficult to do on television and i am very limited television experience jane certainly has more than i do i find television very difficult the it's not natural to me right in and i it's it's hard for me to have a natural difficult don't sophisticated conversation 'cause i i'm really nervous and i i understand most people on sports TV or not but the nature of television i think are ars sort of you know these sort of shorter segments shorter stunned bites things that are a bit easier to digest and so i think think that print has the luxury of going longer going deeper providing that nuance but i don't think TV outside of you know a long i'm for television segment has the luxury of doing jane you you want to add to that i completely agree with that and i think of of you know sometimes i think if somebody like mike wise you wrote a really impactful and long piece about his own childhood trauma for ESPN i think you know it gives you the license to do that and to find those points of commonality and to really get into an issue and understand it and so you know mike piece was not just about about his childhood trauma but it was also about the reporting that went into you know finding out more about you know issues of sexual assault and and you know how it impacted him and what what what happens in the burden that victims and and kerry into their adulthood and it was very moving to get something like that and there's there's really it would be very unusual to find find something like that on television and television i think it hasn't it converts reporters into talking about whatever issue generally because you have the same four people in pre game show or the way that you have it set up and and sometimes though in certain cases and i think of like tiffany ability kin who is somebody with a deep background injuries news kind of brought into talk about injuries but now she talks about everything and fantasy and has been expanded or my career career at fox was brought in to talk about rules and official and officiating and to be their nose points we don't really have people who are brought in with a mental health background around who are brought in with kind of a background some of these issues and how they respond to sports and can talk about those in real time without having to do a lot of homework in a breaking news situation and i do think that that the conversation really suffers because of that hell music and i'm excited about a brand new music documentary memory podcast out now called long may they run which explores iconic touring bands which have had a lasting impact on music culture the industry they're fans and beyond the first season focuses on the legendary band fish and is now out on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right right now stick around because at the end of this episode will give you a sneak peek of what to expect in the series you know one of the things one ask you both about is how do i get into this you know katie i have no doubt out that there are there are people within organizations who will hear from fans who say i don't want this kind of talk when it comes to sport i don't wanna have to think about depression and athletes or athletes becoming addicted to certain to certain things or i don't wanna hear about sexual assault door harassment and i wonder i guess just in your personal experience whether working ESPN or elsewhere did you get any kind of push back on that because i would imagine that there are executives at least you you know who here from fans who don't want that as part of their sports coverage my god we sort of are over run by people claiming you know no politics on my sports where it's the you know we all know that's bullshit but like there is a segment of people out there and you certainly don't social media who don't want to have to deal with this within the you know the prison mom athletics exc no i actually haven't encountered much of that in in terms of these specific issues now once i think you start going into like you know more more stories that are more broadly sort of sports intersecting intersecting with cultural touch points in sensitive issues i i find that you know you have people really really against like you know they don't want the social justice warrior sportswriter take they uh-huh has they do just want the nuts and bolts however i have found an almost overwhelmingly positive reaction when you do a deeper thirty five story about someone that is struggling with an issue relating to.

j mcmanus new york daily news director ESPN new york times mary columbia university school of thirty forty fifty years four quarters
"mcmanus" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

14:57 min | 1 year ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"I'm not dealing with a wheelchair. I'm going to live a normal life. It's another thing to decide to run marathons and to complete marathons the boston marathon often because i've covered it for years and i the van i mean i've been seeing these and i think how much of a challenge it is to even run half marathon or a quarter of marathon. It takes a lot of dedication occasion and timing and an exercise energy and practice and dedication. So how does this happen. Where does the what does this idea to put on nikes and take off comfort yeah. That's a great question jordan. So i wrote this poem. Writing poems. I go through outpatient <hes> therapy at spalding rehab and then then as zorin deputy would have it. I met a personal trainer and i said do you think i can get a little stronger. Can we build on what spalding gave me and she used the henry ford quote whether you think you can or you think you can't. You're right and so. She took me on as a client six months after we work together. I come out of my leg brace 'cause i even though i wasn't in a wheelchair i still had a leg brace to support my left leg and she really excited. I did with my progress. I'm thrilled with my progress. I can now get off of a sofa without holding on or without somebody pulling me out of it and so might might functional abilities. These were improving and she says what are your next goals tonight said well. I wanna i wanna go outside. I wanna walk. I wanna feel free in my body. I wanna get rid of this leg. Brace brace and i would love to dance again. 'cause i was vallario before polio hit and she's writing everything down and getting ideas and just got her hand on the doorknob an icee wait. I have one more goal and she says oh okay. She puts down her things. What's that and what came out of my mouth next was. I'm going to run the boston marathon for spalding rehab. I hear they have raced rehab too so the people say that that's a bucket list climbing a mountain running that marathon <hes> but it seems to be as you say serendipitous that you met this woman and it just happened. I think this is what i need it. You weren't thinking about that. No prior no okay no not at all i would joke jordan because we live near the marathon wrote and i've been in boston for years ears and so we'd watch it and i had several lakes surgeries reconstructive leg surgery and it always would be around the time of the marathon and so i- joke okay and i'd say i'm not going to run it this year but other than that i i'd never run a day in my life and i that wasn't even on my bucket list. That's really fascinating. Let's talk about about the marathon that you did run complete and and violin and how you train for that because i know anybody trains aggressively for months. Was it any more intense because of what you've gone through it had to be right yeah absolutely so we started indoors that february and just building up cardiovascular strength and <hes> also with a lot of weight training and just getting the muscles and nerves and getting those connections and and then i bought my first pair of running shoes and we went outside in april of that year so it was a full year of intensive training and the first time that it was running for one minute and walking for four my heart rate went up over like one seventy just from one minute of running so his pretty intense but janine was amazing and she just believed as i believe that we could do this and then after i made that declaration i told my husband and my daughter that i have new goal and they said oh you know what's that they were enthralled with my progress and i said i'm running the boston marathon i o o we'll run it with you and the joke is they've really didn't thank that i was serious and all these years later they're still running. You're still running. I want to go back to what we promised we talk about that is the psychological and emotional trauma and i firmly believe in this also scientifically drawn out that we store everything in our bodies our bodies our messengers and it's reflected pain. Psychic pain is reflected in our bodies but it sounds to me as though you really didn't deal with this until well into your adulthood. Did you have any <hes> help or assistance as a youngster getting through any of this and and if so what have you learned learned since adulthood about how to deal with this so i did not deal with it. I just tried to survive as best. I could i- harnessed my intellectual prowess. I i was down yeah. You're completely pushed it down and i was national honor society and even <hes> when i got my masters <hes> i was alpha sigma nu <hes> jesuit honor society but in graduate school so in my thirties i saw a wonderful therapist but we weren't dealing with trauma. We were dealing with just being a woman in my thirties <hes> who had survived trauma but i was trying to get pregnant at the time and so we were dealing dealing with a lot of <hes> what's it like being a social worker and being a trauma survivor yourself a called a doing some gardening but not deep digging thing right. You'd want taking weeds. You're simply pruning if you will let a beautiful analogy yes that's so true i mean and to go in. Dan is is hard work so there was a point though when you did do that weeding yes yes absolutely well. It was such a wakeup call for me. <hes> with the post polio diagnosis and interestingly enough the way that i did it was through mind body therapies and so i i did a lot of body work that brought out the trauma <hes> and at the same time the the running and the poetry poetry it was all organic in the way that i was healing and journal and then i meditate and so all of that together there was at the same time weeding and bringing it up and yet also a healing ball you mentioned the woman's name janine who at the spalding balding great organization by the way i friends who work there and it's interesting to how the people that come into your life when you're on this journey whatever journey it might be and over the years when we did radio together when you come in after or before an event that you ran or whatever you would actually introduce me to some of these amazing people people in the boston area. We're doing the the body work and the yoga working. It's incredible. When you open yourself up what you're going to find. Oh absolutely the the people that come into your life is just phenomenal and it's as a trauma survivor. You're right jordan. The tendency is to push everything down but there's no escaping it and there's a line in one of my poems about the body remembers what the mind forgets until it's time to heal all right and the body. I believe you believe you know tells you okay wakeup. Call let's go with this finally and it's not easy but boy. Is it worth it. Oh yes yes yes absolutely worth every every moment. I think of it like you know you have a band aid on a wound and it's going to hurt the pull it off and it's gonna also hurt when you debris the wound but man wants that healing happens it's fabulous it is indeed we haven't mentioned a silent partner. Who's in the studio who is very silent and a good good boy but <hes> tom is your wonderful husband and some and he's running up a storm still these days as ours. Are you and i just talk a little a bit about what is meant to heal blush. It's okay. It's it's radio. Doesn't it's podcasting talk a little bit about how important it's been to have him mhm particularly am by your side well. We've been married for four. We've been together for forty. Two years. We celebrated our forty. First wedding anniversary interests. Thank you thank you very very blessed in. I don't know where i'd be without him. I really and truly don't he said okay. They're telling you to quit at your job. It's a no brainer like what about health insurance. What about my salary. What what are we gonna do and there were a couple of times when we were white knuckling it financially and he held total faith he said don't worry about it. We'll make it through you know. Just you just focus on your healing. Which you know that's pretty pretty remarkable. <hes> for anyone that was the greatest gift he could have ever given me and he's just teasing amazing partner on and off the roads he runs at my pace and then we schedule racist for him so he can shine and run in his pace and it's just it's it's truly truly a beautiful partnership. We met on a blind date. Okay a blind date while i give you a fist pump if i could reach their tom virtual fist pump to who <hes> to hubby tom who's who's a great companion and great partner in this exercise. So you see yourself. I mean the book is terrific outlines all of this to the present day but you see yourself yourself on a mission and i don't wanna get too corny here but the mission is not just to heal but you've been doing and continue to do i think when you go through a healing process and you keep going. It's even more fun to even make you feel better right than you talk about your goals in the future you know in trying unreach- other people in what you're doing yes so basically i one especially women jordan although my messages for everybody of every age but i think against women we tend to lose our power especially when there's a white coat sitting before us and we tend to really take on the diagnosis osas the prognosis and we give away our power and i feel so important for especially women to realize that they have a say and the also that there's a lot of healing power through the mind body connection and as you said the science is there and on my website and in in the back of my book i have the healing resources and i have the science that's there and it's such a blessing that they finally are doing studies on in this and <hes> one of my favorite studies of the mind body connection is that there's one group of people who <hes> practice piano and and they they do it with your hands and then another group imagines practicing piano and the muscles grow <hes> almost to the same extent whether the person his imagining it or whether they're actually playing the piano think of <hes> the grade larry dossey dr dossier and the power prayer. I remember chatting with him. Over the years john cabbage in and of course bernie siegel who is terrific and so many of these people thirty forty years ago were were talking about this and others scoffed at them mm-hmm and didn't pay much attention but now they are doctor herbert benson yes here at harvard and so many others so good for you for being a layperson really mitch pointing out that it can really work. It does really work and you know you mentioned layperson. The other thing too is i'm not well. I am celebrity in my own right. But what i'm saying is is that i'm i'm not. I'm not like a famous person kind of thing that i'm i'm just your ordinary extraordinary. <hes> sixty five year old woman who's had this incredible journey and i think the fact that i don't have like a big celebrity makes it relatable for paul well. If people will read the book or any of your work including poetry by the way i mean poetry can sometimes be a little tough to negotiate as a reader it's very clean and understanding and and <hes> a heartfelt but no i agree and we should mention the website which is such an original name w._w._w. Dot mary mcmanus dot com come here and and by the way on their <hes> thank you for plugging the fact that we were recording this on a particular date. I appreciate that and there are links to all kinds of things and you're speaking taking occasionally in the area. Yes absolutely and so when you mentioned you asked about my goals. I definitely want to get out there and do more more public speaking and motivational speaking speaking gig for you all. I'll tell you off. Mike okay okay. It's gonna be fun. I promise mary it is so lovely to see you. <hes> the the adventures of runner girl nineteen fifty three. I don't think this will be your last book. I'm sorry to say you've got more books than you. I think this was trilogy. I call this. My trilogy of transformation mission has like i have two before it <hes> so it's yeah i'm i continue to journal. I continued to have a blog <hes> which is also you know. That's let's also a way of getting my message out to people so yeah. It's it's a great time in my life and i i love running and i if i could just point out that it for the months of may june july all proceeds of my book are going to the joseph middlemiss foundation to support my partners run for the foul meth road race so it's a great time to buy the book and i'm just delighted to be able to support that it's also available of course on amazon and barnes and noble right and all those places yes and also so <hes> in a brick and mortar store at paper fiesta which is on mild ten of the boston marathon row however po the one more question for uh-huh and if you don't do this you really oughta start when you say goodbye on the phone or you head outside the door. Do you always say gotta run. If not oh you should start. There could be your tagline definitely said vay without a doubt. Yes well girl run. Thank you again mary. It's lovely to see you. God bless and keep up of the great work. God bless jordan. Thank you so much for having me. It's been great to reconnect with you and to share my journey with your listeners. Mary mcmanus's quite an.

boston spalding rehab partner jordan Mary mcmanus janine tom spalding henry ford vay amazon Dan joseph middlemiss foundation larry dossey bernie siegel Dot herbert benson paul
"mcmanus" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"You need to apply for the ri- because you can't use public transportation <hes> i had to not talk while i was eating because i would sprayed food into my lungs and that was the verdict note. We're gonna talk about runner girl because that's the title of the book but it's not to say that many many people who have this condition wouldn't do well with those the pieces of advice because unfortunately a lot of people not marry mcmanus but a lot of people take what they've gotten deal with it and they have a tough go. This is not an easy thing to deal with in your case no wheelchair for you. Well i like to say i didn't take the diagnosis sitting down and so as i've done throughout my life is still and will i. I got really angry. I was i was beside myself and and after all i'd lived through as you pointed out it's how's this even possible that this is happening to me and so then i got after i got angry i i went through all the phases of grieving and everything and then i said well. I'm just going to get still ask for divine guidance when i was paralyzed is it as a child i had vision and i felt it was my guardian angel who had come to me and i have always had a very very strong on faith. Which is what's gotten me through so i got still an. I ask for divine guidance. I was reading the new age <hes> the new age old age wisdom system from dr bernie siegel and from dr wayne dyer and i had all these papers spread out on my dining room table and this phrase is just jumped out at me about i am so happy and grateful now that i can thought the dodd and one of the the ways the sentence was finish. The sentence had had been finished was i am so happy and grateful now that i can create and it literally jumped off the page and i'm thinking create create what i had. My children might career. They're telling me i need to quit my job. So what am i going to create and uphold flowed out of me in and that's the start of many poems right as the first of many and of course here you are with what could have been a lifelong sentence sentence and whether it's totally divinely-inspired or what is internal which is energy and and strength you've overcome overcome a lot and used these poems and use your story to to help others haven't you yes yeah and so the title of that first poem mhm was running the race and i was absolutely astounded and i was curious and when i wrote that poem i felt a shift happened within me and then i had to have paper and pen by me at all times because it was like something turned on in my soul in started inspiring firing me to heal and what does did was it was the mind body connection and as i imagined myself as healthy whole and free my body body was transforming and this is a message that many people don't understand and they because everyone's so oh entrenched in the medical system and yes we need western medicine without a doubt but we also have a lot of power within us to heal ourselves and that message has touched so many people's lives i've been so blessed and so may as to receive emails or for somebody on facebook to say oh my god i needed did that message right now and i share my poetry and <hes> my anthology of poems is feel the he'll and it's all about feeling the healing within you and feel how when you start thinking about yourself in a different way than your diagnosis in your prognosis watch what you feel.

mcmanus dodd dr wayne dyer ri dr bernie siegel facebook
U.S. vows first oil lease sale in Alaska Arctic refuge this year

BBC World Service

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. vows first oil lease sale in Alaska Arctic refuge this year

"The US interior department says it's determined to sell the first oil leases in the ecologically sensitive Arctic national wildlife refuge in Alaska this year, congress passed a mandate for the exploitation of the largest wildlife sanctuary in the United States in two thousand seventeen John McManus reports four hundred thousand acres of land will be available for development under the sale of the leases with the potential for companies to extract up to sixteen billion barrels of crude oil, the US, fish and Wildlife Service, Voces address. Review with the environmental impact fail to adequately. Consider the danger of all spills climate change, all the welfare of polar.

Wildlife Service United States John Mcmanus Alaska Congress Four Hundred Thousand Acres Sixteen Billion Barrels
"mcmanus" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Done done. Thanks to squarespace for making this episode possible. Remember go to squarespace dot com slash relevant for free trial. When you're ready to launch your site use the offer code relevant to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain many things to earn McManus for joining us. His book the way of the warrior is out now. Go check it out. Okay. I guess we'll wrap things up. This was a lot of fun Bianca. You always you always take it up. We love having. Thank you. It's always so much fun. Okay. Hey, if you're in southern California tomorrow morning at nine AM finally, neat coming Kamran, their special guests, come eat four hundred and forty-nine women in one guy. On rabbit. I'm Cameron Strang from Chandler, Shree Jesse Kerry Tyler Huckabee Bianca, what is old up. We'll see you on Tuesday have a great week and everyone. Thank you for listening to the relevant podcast. If you like what you heard be sure to leave us a review on ITN's. Check out other shows from the relevant podcast network in the podcast section at relevant magazine dot com. And while you're there, bras exclusive podcast merchandise at our online store, make sure to subscribe to relevant magazine. Info is available at relevant magazine dot com Ford slash subscribe. Mora view. Now the ladies. Relevant podcast network..

Shree Jesse Kerry Tyler Huckab squarespace ITN Cameron Strang McManus Mora California Chandler ten percent
"mcmanus" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"And I think you should all right. We have a great show is sore few today, coming up later. We. Talked to urban McManus. He's the author of the new book, the way of the warrior, and he'll discuss the importance of self care while also trying to make an impact, what he does not discuss his sneakers, we didn't ask him about. Richer. Sneakers pre pre preacher sneakers, when they say, I think he is somewhere past, Jerry. Lorenzo is like his pastor and or Gerald faster. So I'm pretty sure he's been gifted his, you know, Nike air fear of God says his hard to come by Nike air. Don't let him off the hook bogeyed him on here. We don't need to give to give him an out before he even shows up. Also at the at the end of the show, you don't wanna tune out. You don't want to now go out earn with great. Let me just click stop. Now, you don't wanna do that USA tuned. Because at the end of the show, we have a game called screen saved. What's it about? So listen. It's that time of year it's blockbuster season everyone's head to the movies watching their ING games or professor detective Pika choose what have you for. So. Professor Pika to professor. I went to lex professor Pika. Just all these looking for ten years. Patches now glasses. It's basically the plot of God's not dead with Pika chew. I in. Harden, atheists Pok Mon, who meets an, you know, who meets his match when he gets taken a court threw in a battle for the religious soul America. The game. Going back to the game. It's ironically Gaza because listen, there's a lot of entertainment options out there. But of our, our listeners wholesome choices, they want stuff that say for the little ears. So what I've done is, I've compiled the ultimate trivia game, involving Christian movies and TV shows. And listen, this game is so hard Bianca. I want you in Tyler to be on the same team against our listener and the listener going down. It's going to be savage Tyler, you're pretty good at like trivia, and stuff like trivia nights, aren't you? Yeah. I do I go to trivia onto, I'll, I'll be honest, most attributes that go to pretty light. The Christian cinema. Promise that I've learned. Pastor's kid? So I got you Tyler I got. You're both home schooled. Oh, yeah. We're going to slay we're gonna win. Bianca catch us up. What's been going on in your world since you since we talked to you since we actually went in and had three conferences in Lubbock county jail. And this is the fun part. You know, you never hear the stories of transformation because you go in and you're just not too sure with going to happen to a lot of the inmates. While I got a chance to go back and this time we went to a halfway house that was sponsored by local church, there in Lubbock, Texas in I got to connect with an amazing woman, by the name of Bridget, who when I first met her two years ago, the for songs there we prayed, because she was like I'm getting transferred to federal prison and I don't wanna go there. I want to reunite with my daughter, wanna get right to that. And she was having a lot of issues, but the local guard their long story short. We prayed, I firmly I rare. I really personally felt like she had gotten counter while she was transferred to a local prison shoes. Very less than. Seventy two hours..

McManus Professor Pika professor savage Tyler Bianca detective Pika Nike Bridget Gerald Lubbock county Lubbock USA Gaza Harden Lorenzo Jerry Texas America Seventy two hours ten years
Missing baby's "abduction" staged to hide foul play, police say

24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Missing baby's "abduction" staged to hide foul play, police say

"In Napa San Antonio police say the reported abduction of a missing eight-year-old boy eight month old boy was staged to cover up foul play involving the child police chief William McManus declined to elaborate on whether he believes king. Jay Davila is alive. He would only say that investigators in San Antonio believe there

Napa San Antonio Jay Davila William Mcmanus San Antonio Eight Month Eight-Year
Missing baby's "abduction" staged to hide foul play, police say

Glenn Beck

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Missing baby's "abduction" staged to hide foul play, police say

"San Antonio police cheaply mcmanus's. Detectives have concluded that what was presented as a car theft. Wear. An eight month old baby was taken oh is actually an elaborate ruse to cover up perhaps foul play involving the missing boy, the chief is strongly encouraging the family to start cooperating with police you were not directly involved in this withholding information that you have lied to the police charge you at the conclusion of this investigation. Mcmahon is says Chris DIVY LA the eight month olds father has spent more time talking to reporters than to police who are trying to determine what happened

Chris Divy La San Antonio Mcmanus Theft Mcmahon Eight Month
How Did a Family Feud Spawn Adidas and Puma?

BrainStuff

06:00 min | 2 years ago

How Did a Family Feud Spawn Adidas and Puma?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, Ren stuff. I'm Lauren vocal bomb. And I'm here today to talk about how family feuds can change the world. For example, if only two brothers named and Rudy dos. Ler had learned to get along Germany's kgab route or dos. Ler might have bested Nike is the world's top sports footwear company today. Instead, the brothers bitter feuding resulted in the brood Ostler brand that's German for dos. Ler brothers being split in half and reborn as a Dita's and Puma which today are the world's second and third top sports shoe businesses eight off or Audie dos. Ler began making shoes and his mother's laundry room shortly after returning home to the Bavarian village of heads Coon oka- following World War One his business did well and his older brother Rudolph or Rudy dos. Ler joined him a few years later to help shy. Audie was the creative force and brains behind the business while extroverted Rudy was these salesmen, the brothers Dassler soon gained a claim for rolling out the first track spikes, but the company really took off after the break. Others persuaded American Olympic athlete Jesse Owens to wear their shoes in the nineteen thirty six Berlin Olympics. He did and he won four gold medals while doing so yet it wasn't quite the triumph. It should have been for the brothers. As things were beginning to sour between the two the bad blooded started a few years earlier in nineteen thirty three when Addy's sixteen year old wife tried to interfere in the business Rudy was not pleased. It didn't help that audience and Rudy's families live together in the same town, home and their wives didn't really get along. But the breaking point came during a World War Two air raid Rudy and his family were tucked into a bomb shelter and as audience family entered Audi said, the dirty bastards are back again. He was purportedly commenting on the Royal airforce planes roaring overhead but Rudy was positive. Audie was referring to his family from there things quickly unraveled when Rudy was called up to serve in the Nazi military in nineteen forty three. He was sure that Audie had arranged it to have him sent away from the factory. Anxious to get back Rudy deserted his post in nineteen Forty-five later when arrested for desertion. He again, blamed ATI who it appears did snitch on him after a few more scuffles. The to split up the company in nineteen forty eight moving assets and employees into one of two competing operations located on opposite sides of the off river that flowed through the town ATI renamed his business. Adidas combining his first and last names Rudy did the same dubbing his Rueda though. He later changed it to Puma soon. Most of the town's citizens were employed by either Adidas or Puma in these siblings, intense rivalry spread throughout the town. If you worked for one company, you did not socialize with employees of the other marrying across enemy lines was strictly forbidden. You only shopped in the stores on the same side as the river as the factory in which you were employed overtime. Adidas far surpassed Puma in sales, thanks to audience creativity and technical acumen, though Puma also did quite well. But while the two were hard at work competing against one another they. Paid no attention to another shoe company Nike that was quietly gaining market. Share today Nike is king of the sports shoe business with thousand seventeen sales of twenty one billion dollars compared to Adidas as ten billion dollars and 'Pumas two billion the brothers did speak to one another a few times later in life. But they never reconciled. Both died in the nineteen seventies and were buried at opposite ends of the local cemetery their feud finally ended in two thousand nine when employees of both companies played together in a friendly soccer match. Nonetheless, the dos liberal epic fight was named by time magazine as one of history's top ten family feuds alongside such notables as Cain and Abel and the hatfields and mccoys. Today's episode was written by Melanie, red Zeki McManus and produced by Tyler plan for more on this topic. Check out our sibling podcast ridiculous history. They have a whole episode audit. Call Adidas versus Puma a tale of two brothers. And of course for lots of other contentious, topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hello. It's me Academy Award winning film, actor Christopher Walken of stopped by today to tell you about a friend of mine who is a new comedy podcast coming to this network. His name is Kevin Pollack. You know, you may even claim to you POWs. He's your favorite never mind. Favored what the point is. You like them. He makes you laugh while his new comedy podcast is called alchemy vis each episode. He's like a puppet master he sets the scene and then five of his favorite funny, friends, and he improvised, all of it. Wow. The sound effects and music is crazy. Do yourself a solid sample. Kevin Pollack's new comedy podcasts. Alchemy. This starting October eighteen exclusively from how stuff works celebrity voices impersonated by Kevin Pollack that guy who's talking right now.

Rudy Dos Adidas Audie Dos Puma Quicken Loans LER Nike Kevin Pollack America ATI Jesse Owens Germany Soccer Berlin REN Academy Award Ostler Audi
"mcmanus" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"When you downloaded all the documents because that was on like radar whatever but did you get more stuff about read was there more style no that was it that was in there was one story that i saw that actually quoted what reid is email said and it said that she said like please tell me it's not true but i actually couldn't find that in the documentation anywhere but that's the gist of what everyone's emails were apparently like please let me know if this is just like a joke if it's a rumor blah blah blah blah blah bus up to it's really sad that's documents always was like she was really prince was like a thing for her they were like they talked about each other it wasn't like it was one of those things where you casually reference you namedrop in it's there's no back like he liked saturday we're friends supported her so very read is having like a bleak few months thank god she is still okay enough to get laser hair surgery laser hair for move laser hair removal cold electron trials but i guess with that we're done right so thank you for listening to us this week thank you to god stuff thank you i know who to thank thank you to all of all of you who've been writing reviewing rating interviewing us on apple podcasts and for subscribing for calling six when i knew them thank you also to jeff alan mcmanus for supplying us with more maranda lambert content and to say see felker's dad for answering the phone when radar call because that really helped us out personally and two things one i am really excited if you wanna go check it out i hosted the first episode of net flicks is new podcast you can't make this up i interviewed two directors of wild country it wou.

reid felker apple jeff alan mcmanus
"mcmanus" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Did she cheat on him to or allegedly to that's wild right yeah i kind of again you kind of avoid it then blake shelton tweets this which is super super super super vague it doesn't necessarily mean any no but like the high road it's all he's saying like once a cheater always a cheater like burp he saying here it is been been taking the high road for a long time i almost gave up but i can finally see something on the horizon up there wait could it be yep it's karma so the implication of this tweet is that oh my god my ex who cheated on me and ruined our marriage just got called out for like fucking married man and ruining another marriage and she's about to be the subject of a lot of controversy right that's how that reads to me felker i was right felker's has been opening for lambert since february yes okay okay thank you so the guy i can't even i know it continues it gets crazier fuck ign elson filed for divorce stay okay okay right stacey felker also stacey nelson that's her maiden name lindsey i forgot the biggest partly one that tweet that blake tweeted got sent to this person who i haven't even talked about yet a guy named jeff alan mcmanus now jeff allen mcmanus let's go even further back why allegedly jeff alan mcmanus is the person miranda cheated on to get with blake so blake shelton was the original other man in this relationship even though jeff allen you know says that like everything's all good and like he's being very vague about it but anyway so that blake shelton tweet where he's talking about karma get sent to jake mcmanus and jake mcmanus response and he writes you know to blake tubelike.

lambert stacey felker blake jeff alan mcmanus miranda blake shelton stacey nelson jeff allen mcmanus jeff allen jake mcmanus blake tubelike
"mcmanus" Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"mcmanus" Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"What's it gonna take for our world to improve everything rises and falls on leadership if you don't know what you need to work on his leader you know who does everybody off way too greatest potential straight through your greatest fear of you want your team to stay relevant leisure team into the unknown hossa was going to be would be we have four feet of the right to make taking responsibility for your leadership development so that you can be the best leader you can be welcome to the global leadership summit podcast where we provide fresh actionable and inspiring leadership content for leaders on the go thanks for joining us as faith centered leaders god has entrusted us with his vision to create a better future in this episode of the podcast erwin mcmanus challenges us to move purposefully into the future impacting our communities by cultivating human talent irwin is an author futurist and founder of mosaic a community of faith in los angeles recognized as one of america's most influential and innovative churches get ready for a message that is inspiring as it is deep here's irwin there are moments in our lives where we are inspired to act and we start looking for incremental ideas or approaches or strategies to help us what's really necessary is a mind shift a reform ation of our mindset the way we understand reality and i am so convinced that one of the greatest challenges for those of us who are in the faith.

hossa founder los angeles america erwin mcmanus four feet