21 Burst results for "Mckinsey Global Institute"

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To helping those that are affected by a transformation to a low carbon climate, resilient development to be paid more attention because otherwise we would not have the public support for what it's so essential to do. 2021 can be a transformative here. Thank you so much Crystalline will be back in just a moment. First, we're gonna hear from McKinsey managing partner Kevin Snyder on why health is so important to restoring the global economic recovery and growth. Until a pandemic economists focused on health care costs. Rather, the economic benefits of good health. The year long study by the McKinsey Global Institute suggests that that was a mistake. Her health before the pendant reduce GDP by about 15%. To put that in perspective, That's twice the experience of impact of covert 19 this year. The cost of her health were driven by Young people by people dying too young by conditions that to come out of the workforce to meet them, socially and economically isolated, so there's a real opportunity and I actually need to rethink healthcare as an investment. One that reduces disease burden by as much as 40% by 2040. Um, interventions that largely exists today and that can in turn bring rewards in terms of global growth..

McKinsey Global Institute McKinsey Kevin Snyder managing partner
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 8 months ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

03:52 min | 11 months ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Excuse me we have a sort of. Kovic Publishing Task Force which coordinates all these things Since this has happened You know there's been a tremendous demand from our clients and public in general about what's going on and what it means to the economy for different industries Different Different other constituencies. That might be. It might be affected. And and so you know. We've got people many practitioners myself included Thing well how does this affect my area of expertise and you know we encourage people to write about And then it goes through Big editing process. We have Like over fifteen thousand employees around the world so and we have people with expertise in Everything for myself in in sort of say Valuation and Strategy Working with investors. So I wrote an article about. We're about where we interviewed. Investors and said what do investors think company should do by people who are involved in Iowa? Change will be talking about that. People who are involved in helping companies liquidity and re restructuring will be writing about that people who are involved in our McKinsey Global Institute Who think more about the economy as a whole and what's happening. They'll be writing about that. We have industry experts analyzing What's going to happen to your district. What's going to happen to the retail industry and writing about that so it's very day. Spurt dispersed to experts in their various fields And then we bring it all together. Publish on the website brother. I appreciate you so much for for joining us today. End for the listeners. Out there who are on the fence about picking up the newest addition of your book who should pick up a copy of this book in your in your opinion in and pick up a copy of our book Book Is Relief. And one of the reasons it's been successful for over thirty years now. No sold over. Eight hundred thousand copies is that it appeals to abroad audience right. It brings together Strategy brings together finance it brings together accounting and in a way in a very accessible way So that you can you start off the book and you can understand how the company's value what what does it mean to create value What can managers due to increase value? That's a big chunk of the book in part of the book is much more technical which you don't need to read if you're not interested in it so if you're a senior executive you might skip the more technical parts parts on Action that you can take. How do you think about planning and performance management? How do you think about mergers and acquisitions So it it it. It covers quite a range And so it's really a we we think of. It is more of a cookbook rather than a than a been a novel in the sense that you can read the parts that are most relevant to you but it brings together the best of sort of strategic thinking financial theory counting the latest trends in the world into one place. We think it's pretty. Broadly applicable if used by a lot of professors in their classes juice by investment banks to teach their bankers is also used by senior executives to get an education about sort of how companies great value markets. Tim I appreciate you so much for joining us today. Just a powerhouse of knowledge and and I hope you have a great rest of your day. Thank you very much. Good Day yourself take care and now without further ado three..

senior executive Tim McKinsey Global Institute Iowa
Jobs and Skills of the Future

Automated

11:54 min | 1 year ago

Jobs and Skills of the Future

"To get into today's core idea. I WANNA start off by referring to a two thousand fourteen questionnaire by the Pew Research Center so here. Some two thousand experts in the field of technology both those building the actual technologies and businesses as well as those who report on. It responded to questions about the impact of automation technologies so this was actually quite a high level questionnaire and some of the experts for the chief scientists of say for example SALESFORCE DOT com. There's also the vice president of Google. Even the principal researcher for Microsoft. So I wanted to refer to this questionnaire as I think it really highlights the goal of these last two episodes and the podcast as a whole so we can start off with The first group so forty eight percent of all the experts envisioned a future in which robots and digital agents have displaced significant numbers of both blue and white collar workers with many expressing concern that this will lead to vast increases in income inequality masses of people who are effectively unemployable and breakdowns in the social order. But on the other side of this the other half some fifty two percent expect that technology will not displace more jobs than it creates by at least twenty twenty five to be sure. This group anticipates that many jobs currently performed by humans will be substantially taken over by robots or digital agents by twenty twenty five but they have faith that human ingenuity will create new jobs industries and ways to make living just as has been doing since the dawn of the industrial revolution. But does this second group of experts have any lakes stand on so we know that through history jobs and the skills required for those jobs have been changing drastically due to the technological advancements bringing about large changes so you can think about the large changes that we as a species have gone through from hunter gatherers to use an agriculture to the first industrial revolution electrification computerization and the start of the Internet as well as today's fourth industrial revolution. So each of these epochs or eras are I think easily visualized having massively different jobs and tasks and of course the different skills attached to them but have these shifts created more or less jobs. I think that the answer is quite apparent but The net impact of new technologies on employment can really be seen as strongly positive and this is shown in a two thousand eleven. Study by Mackenzie's Paris office and they found that Looking at one of the main technologies that was Believed to destroy Significant amount of jobs the Internet had destroyed five hundred thousand jobs in France alone in the previous fifteen years but at the same time had created one point two million other jobs. This is a net addition of some seven hundred thousand or two point. Four jobs created for every single job destroyed so furthermore one third of new jobs created in United States. In the past twenty five years were types that did not exist or barely existed and these were in areas including It development hardware manufacturing APP creation and IT systems management so think that the argument is quite similar anywhere. You look and is really based on historical fact as mentioned during this podcast if you follow this historical perspective the future has new and emerging technologies constantly creating new jobs that humans will need to do. But what is predicted about how? Tomorrow's jobs and skills and how they look like so. There are dozens if not hundreds of reports out there looking at trends and predicting what these changes will be so I specifically looked at a number of reports ranging from two thousand fourteen till eight two thousand nineteen made by some of the big hitters like the McKinsey Global Institute the World Economic Forum the European Commission the Pew Research Center and others as always links will be in the show notes. If any of you want to look more into depth in these issues I will attempt to point out. The main issues presented with a focus on two ideas. What are going to be. The main new jobs of the future and to what specific skills will be required to perform them so new jobs related to the development maintenance and upgrading of AI. Or artificial intelligence as well as big data infrastructures are among those expected to grow. Significantly so digital technology can also enable new forms of entrepreneurial activity workers in small businesses and self employed occupations can benefit from higher income. Earning opportunities and this leads to a potential. New Category of knowledge enabled jobs becoming possible as machines imbed intelligence and knowledge that less skilled workers can then access with little training. So I've used this podcast even a number of times to illustrate a similar point for example I am putting together a monthly newsletter that I hope to have ready in a few weeks rather than having to design every single part of it online tools with prebuilt templates make the process significantly faster and allows someone without any design experience to produce something with a good level of quality or at least I hope granted this is a very simplistic example without any embedded intelligence but I hope it helps to illustrate the standing on the shoulder of giants picture. This future scenario is trying to push so one of the central themes that runs through many of these future. Job Scenarios is how much emotional intelligence and human to human interaction is in the changing environment so as the routine and Monday jobs are more and more done by automated systems. This will open up the opportunity to have more human interaction than we do today or at least this is what it's forecasted to be so cognizance feature of work reports have actually been quite interesting in this regard as they build this idea into a future scenario. Where over forty new jobs are imagined up to around twenty thirty so you can look at the show notes for links to the two reports. That will list all the jobs but some of the more interesting ones. I'll list right here. So the first one is something called an augmented reality journey. Builder and this future job is envisioned to collaborate with engineers to create the essential elements for customers to move through any sort of augmented reality experience. The second one here is the genetic diversity officer and they are envisioned to construct and encourage adherence to a company wide genetic equity policy that includes an kind of forces genetic diversity The third one is something called a data detective and they will uncover meaningful business answers and recommendations by investigating data through sensors devices and biometric monitors as well as other things that are used in organizations one of the last ones is smart home design manager and they will help customers design and integrate technologies into their smart homes of course. But then again with this increased digital connectivity there is also the increased hacking and security threats and thus positions around this are bound to increase in number as well as in type so one possible Position for seeing that I thought was quite interesting. Something called a juvenile cybercrime rehabilitation counselor and their jobs will be to help the convicted cybercriminals to redirect their online talents towards ethical behavior for the betterment of society. So I think it'll be really interesting to see whether any or all of these envisioned positions will be created over the next ten years. I'm pretty sure that very few people were able to guess the new kind of positions and jobs that are created through the internet or through Ai. So I'm happy to see that cognizant was able to creatively come up with some potential jobs of the future but this leads us to the next point regarding skills if we assume that new jobs are continually created but also significantly change. Do we currently have the skills needed to take on these new shifting roles so the OECD two thousand nineteen future of work report estimated that thirty two percent of all jobs will change significantly in the future though it was quite unspecified as a half that timeframe extends to McKinsey estimates that globally. Three hundred and seventy five million workers may need to switch occupations by twenty thirty but many adults do not seem to have the right skills for these changes. And they say that six out of ten adults lack basic. Ict skills or even have no computer experience which was quite shocking for me to hear. This is compounded with the fact that out of all jobs that are done in the OECD. Highly skilled jobs have increased by twenty five percent over the last twenty years. And this is further compounded by fact that the jobs that are most exposed to automation appear to be those that require relatively low levels of formal education those that do not involve relatively complex social interaction and those that involve routine manual tasks so the World Economic Forum actually highlighted a list of the top ten skills needed in twenty twenty as compared to twenty fifteen. So list will be fully available on the website but all Name a couple the more interesting ones here so these actually fit quite well in what was talked about above so A number one. There's complex problem solving followed by critical thinking and third being creativity. Then four five and six. I'll have to deal with interaction with people so you have people management followed by coordinating with others and the six one being emotional intelligence so I think this is kind of interesting especially in taken. In contrast to the top ten skills that were listed in two thousand fifteen although a number of them are still the same. There are some like active listening or quality control. Which don't even make it into twenty twenty at all and this is just an a five year period of time. Which I think is quite astonishing as you would need to be constantly learning in order to keep up with ever changing New Skills that are needed and I think this is a good segue into one of the last point of this podcast episode in that in all of these Studies and reports that went over for this episode. One of the main central ideas that is pushed forward is that a constant lifelong attempt at learning new skills. new ways of dealing with people is perhaps the most important thing as we go forward into this new and constantly shifting future so to sum up those jobs growing the most by twenty thirty appear to be those that require higher education intensive use of social and interactive skills and at least a basic knowledge of

Pew Research Center Google Microsoft Vice President Principal Researcher Mckinsey United States Paris Oecd Mckinsey Global Institute Mackenzie France Twenty Twenty Self Employed Officer Design Manager European Commission
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Provide transportation to patients new studies find more towns may see climate change hurt their property values he's one of the most at risk states where the reports say eroding natural barriers and lots of rain or particular threats to real estate values one assessment from McKinsey global institute says flooding could devalue coastal homes by as much as eighty billion dollars or some thirty five percent by twenty fifty hurricane storm surge losses could increase to four point five billion over the next thirty years and a separate report from Jupiter intelligence as the same time frame could put as much as ninety eight percent sure of Miami Dade's oceanfront properties at risk of flooding I'm Jim Johnson I'm in Kate's here's your four warn weather forecast what do you call life force across the mid state temperatures will settle down to the mid thirties waking up on Sunday Sunday afternoon about a chance for rain moves in but it doesn't look like a wash out heading into next week a little more sunshine here in there slight chance for rain on Wednesday but for the most part the dry temperature wise will be in the forties during the afternoon thirties during the overnight from the former the center I'm meteorologist Cody Murphy the show's the best coaching job.

McKinsey global institute Miami Dade Jim Johnson Kate Cody Murphy
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Died new studies find more communities may see climate change impacting their property values he's one of the most at risk states where the reports say eroding natural barriers and lots of rain or particular threats to real estate values one assessment from McKinsey global institute says flooding could devalue coastal homes by as much as eighty billion dollars or some thirty five percent by twenty fifty hurricane storm surge losses could increase of four point five billion over the next thirty years and a separate report from Jupiter intelligence as the same time frame could put as much as ninety eight percent sure of Miami Dade's oceanfront properties at risk of flooding I'm Jim Johnson I'm in Kate's mattress firm right now see with the four hundred dollars in America's best selling brands like a sort of perfect sleeper queen mattress now just four ninety nine you can also take over for you just will base with qualifying matches purchase visit matches firm dot com or store near you to find your perfect bed today these amazing deals end soon your budget stretches further at mattress firm offer both of my get an extra twenty percent off at macys winter we can tell when you Macy's card and that's on top of incredible deals for you in your home like forty to sixty percent off women's coats and sweaters fifty to seventy five percent off during the men's event and sixty percent off clearance fine jewelry Macy's star rewards members got star money use it on anything at Macy's except gift card services and fees that savings line up now at macys winter weekend savings off regular and sale prices exclusions apply if you're thinking the UPS store is only about shipping here's something you should know mailbox in services with a real street address I thought.

McKinsey global institute Miami Dade Jim Johnson Kate America Macy
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"People have died new studies find more communities may see climate change impacting their property values he's one of the most at risk states where the reports say eroding natural barriers and lots of rain or particular threats to real estate values one assessment from McKinsey global institute says flooding could devalue coastal homes by as much as eighty billion dollars or some thirty five percent by twenty fifty hurricane storm surge losses could increase to four point five billion over the next thirty years and a separate report from Jupiter intelligence as the same time frame could put as much as ninety eight percent of Miami Dade's oceanfront properties at risk of flooding I'm Jim Johnson I'm in Kate's the rocket mortgage Super Bowl squares sweepstakes the largest official game of Super Bowl squares ever with millions of dollars in prizes and best of all it's free to answer every store change during Super Bowl fifty four pays out fifty thousand dollars that's right field goal safety even extra boys will draw one lucky winner from the corresponding squared away and fifty thousand dollars want to read prize winners will win a half billion dollars they could use toward their dream home one way to enter two ways to win the rules and enter now at a rocket mortgage squares dot com then to need February second to see if you win rocket mortgage official mortgage sponsor of Super Bowl.

McKinsey global institute Miami Dade Jim Johnson Kate official
How Reno, Nevada, turned its economy into a small powerhouse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:12 min | 1 year ago

How Reno, Nevada, turned its economy into a small powerhouse

"Berlin Wall came down thirty years ago tomorrow. As we've been reporting this week Germany opted to spend a fortune uniting the lagging lagging east with the more dynamic west. What if the United States opted to spend this kind of money nearly ten trillion dollars over thirty years adjusted for population size to unite the strongest strongest and weakest parts of the American economy McKinsey Global Institute this year analyzed which US counties towns and cities will thrive with more technology hitting the the economy and which areas will fall further behind without rethinking or new investment? Today let's get a snapshot from place that's turned itself into a bonafide technology hub in the space of ten years. It's the Reno sparks area in northwestern Nevada once known for a fading Casino Vibe. The region gained nearly fifteen thousand thousand jobs in just the last year. Hillary she is the mayor of Renault. Welcome thank you for having me now. You have land compared to the San Francisco Bay area. You got low rent. You've got three hundred twenty days of sunshine a year. I'd like to say that Reno just got lucky but give us a sense of the ways that you got the boom to come come to you. Well you have to remember. We were the highest in for closures and unemployment during the recession. So kind of hate to say it but really there was only one other way to go. And that's up but I think we really looked at our city really sort of played upon the things that were already here but were sort of not really being highlighted and some of that was arts and culture we have one of the biggest and best events called burning man which brings in seventy million dollars of economic impact so I reached out to them. We did a lot of soul searching with entrepreneurs small businesses businesses. Those things that we really feel that make a difference in Reno and could diversify our culture. So it's been pretty amazing. You know we really can provide a lot of qualities that you know other cities can't and also it's a great environment for companies to be able to grow and and expand here. Let's talk a little rough because not just about like the big Kahuna that they got about fifteen miles west of you. The Tesla Panasonic Battery Factory. That's going to open and next year. There's the Big Apple Facility. There's that giant data facility the biggest one in the world but me you got fourteen thousand eight eight hundred more jobs year over year in that region. I mean that is dramatic you must have done something about fostering and entrepreneurial what we call it ecosystem absolutely and. I think that that's critical. You really want to have that mentality of yes and a culture of yes and how do we get out there. And I think that that's really made a difference by opening up the doors to city hall and also bringing in residence and saying what do you WanNa see in your city. We surely there must be some local tensions though because although your rents are cheap compared to northern California southern California. They're going up. Because of the new businesses moving in law supply and demand and some people are going to find the rising rents a hardship. Sure I think you make make a great point you know. Every city is struggling with affordable housing and mental health issues and addiction issues. And those are all things. Is that cities that are certainly on the rise. have to deal with Because as you know you know housing doesn't pop up overnight and we've reached out to developers and said hey this is the time to build build now because we need housing now and remember in the recession. Many of those developers Were wiped out. Many of them went bankrupt. And we hope that initiative where we put some of those fees those development and building fees on the back end that. They don't have to go allow embargo as much money. So we're constantly working on different ways. that we can solve those issues that you know. They're very complex issues and that's just one little tool Hillary Chevy mayor of Reno Nevada. Thank you so much.

Reno Hillary Chevy California Berlin Wall United States Nevada Reno Nevada Mckinsey San Francisco Bay Germany Global Institute Apple Panasonic Hillary Renault Thirty Years Three Hundred Twenty Days Seventy Million Dollars Ten Trillion Dollars Ten Years
69% of us struggle to cope with distractions at work

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:54 min | 2 years ago

69% of us struggle to cope with distractions at work

"So I don't know about you. But do you find yourself getting ready to do a task? And then the phone rings. And then something else happens and the next thing, you know, here down this other road and the task that you were going to accomplish not only did it not get done but days later, and you're still trying to find time to get it done. So my question to our first guest today is Scott's Scott starring who is the CEO of the learning difference and author of leadership hacks clever shortcuts to boost your impact and results, and you have worked with thousands of people. So tell us how do we how do we tie the app our work life? How do we get back on track? So that we don't have these leadership hacks. How do we clutter our work life and achieve more in less time? Scott. Scott. Are you there? Scott there. It Frankie I'm here. Good morning. How are you? Sherry well. Thanks. That's a great question. It really is. You know, there was a study done by Houdini in debt, a twenty eight teams that showed that workplace distraction hit about sixty nine percent of employees at work. You know, they're going just can't get distracted. Just like what you said. You know, I'd wanna do that task in another Email comes in. And now I'm off track. And it's happening everywhere. Right. So what do we do about it? Scott. Yeah. I think there's a couple of things that you can do a, you know, a big thing is the aware of what I call the distraction. There are five many distraction that get people off track. One of them. Kind of a surprising one is what I found in the research. It's about lack of energy. What I'm finding is people are traveling so quickly. Yeah. Yeah. Don't have the energy to keep up anymore. You know, they're tired. They're exhausted. I've got so quiet that send emails at midnight, one o'clock in the morning. You know, so you know, everybody being bombarded. So what about going to be aware of that distraction and get the rest that you need? They productive and take some time for yourself. That's a really big one. What are some other things that we can do? The other one is being aware of what I call time fellows and the biological to be busy. You're really famous experiment in the nineteen fifties by James Olsen. Peter moth Miller, and what they did is they put ball electrodes on the brains of rats stimulate the part of the brain that were these dopamine whenever the rat. And it was interesting what they found is as they get this little hit of dopamine, which is the same that we did in chemically in our brain back. You got this little positive response this good response. And it is so addictive that the rats would push the lever up to seven hundred times in our and what the research is fine as we as humans have assuming the response mechanism to dopamine. So why are people always checking their Facebook checking their Instagram checking their Email glancing at the phone, that's because we've got this biological need? Because we won't that little hit of dopamine. And I'm actually seeing it tremendously in the younger generation as well. You're younger generation they've grown up on the digital devices. They're always on that, you know, h in Australia. But I was just in America, you know, and I brought the family along as well. We're in LA, and we were in Arizona, and you know, the kids when they had some downtime. They're always on their devices. And I think it's being able to control the technology rather than the technology controlling you. And that's the other really important thing. I think we know distraction, I know of a friend who's son got fired because he was constantly checking his Email and his phone and his messages. At work. And they and they apparently were watching him. And they said, listen, you're you're spending this amount of time every single day doing this. And we can't have it. And they fired him. And it's getting serious. You know what I mean by serious? Here's the thing that I'm finding as a lot of businesses and companies are not teaching people. How do you manage these skills? You know, even even the McKinsey global institute did a report that showed employees spin on average two point six hours per day reading and answering emails by that's thirteen hours a week of lost con-, but nobody's teaching people. What do you do to actually hack? Your inbox

Scott Dopamine Sherry Mckinsey Global Institute CEO James Olsen Frankie Australia Peter Moth Miller Facebook Arizona America LA Instagram Sixty Nine Percent Thirteen Hours Six Hours
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For you news comments and insights from bloomberg opinions worldwide team of editors and columnists jim also coming up on the show we examined which country will reshape global norms as the us retreats into isolation plus why nato can be viable without the united states that's all coming up but first last year the mckinsey global institute estimated that robot automation could replace between four hundred million in eight hundred million people by twenty thirty which segment of the population will be hurt most by automating who to tell us more is noah smith a columnist for bloomberg opinion no we've all seen the movies where the robots takeover and people become obsolete are we facing that in reality well not so far i mean job openings per unemployed person are at record highs unemployment is way way way down and you know employment to population ratio is red around where it was you know in two thousand five at least the prime age employment to population ratio and in fact when we look at the evidence we see that companies that invest more in it tend to hire more people not fewer and so all of this basically says that the robots take our jobs scenario hasn't materialized yet i mean someday it might but it hasn't materialized yet what about jobs that have become automated like assembly lines and the prospect of driverless cars in our future is there any support for a fact that unemployment might be caused by automating or that people will be stuck with different kinds of jobs lesser jobs well there is that fear so in terms of people being stuck with worse jobs the big fear is that basically automation is going gonna produce a bifurcated employment situation nation where you have some people who are kind of the robot lords and they own the robots or program the robots and they basically tell about what to do and then everyone else is kind of doing all the extra stuff that the robots can't do like you know provide quality service in restaurants and being friendly to people or you know sort of like run around carrying things are robots that i didn't have to carry those things yet and and so that you'll have some people who are you know sort of lowwage precarious workers constantly shifting from job to job is there as their tasks are automated by next generation of of ai algorithms and then you have some people who are just living high on the hog owning all the algorithms and reprogramming algorithm so that's really.

united states mckinsey global institute noah smith bloomberg jim
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bring you news comments and insights from bloomberg opinions worldwide team of editors and columnists i'm june grasso coming up on the show we examine which country will reshape global norms as the us retreats into isolation plus why nato can be viable without the united states that's all coming up but first last year the mckinsey global institute estimated that robot automation could replace between four hundred million in eight hundred million people by twenty thirty which segment of the population will be hurt most by automation here to tell us more is noah smith a columnist for bloomberg opinion now we've all seen the movies where the robots takeover and people become obsolete are we facing that in reality well not so far i mean job openings per unemployed person are at a record highs unemployment is way way down and uh you know employment to population ratio is red around where it was you know in two thousand five at least the prime age employment to population ratio and in fact when we look at the evidence we see that companies that invest more in it tend to hire more people not fewer and so all of this basically says that the robots take our jobs scenario hasn't materialized yet i mean someday it might but it hasn't materialized yet what about jobs that have become automated like assembly lines and the prospect of driverless cars in our future is there any support for a fact that unemployment might be caused by automate or that people will be stuck with different kinds of jobs lesser jobs well there is that fear so in terms of people being stuck with worst jobs the the big fear is that basically automation is gonna produce a bifurcated employment situation where you have some people who are kind of the robot lords and they own the robots or program the robots and they basically tell us what to do and then everyone else is kind of doing all the extra stuff that the robots can't do like you know provide quality service in restaurants and being friendly to people or you know sort of like run around carrying things for robots that aren't enough to carry those things yet and and so that you'll have some people who are you know sort of lowwage precarious workers constantly shifting from job to job is there as their tasks are automated by next generation of of ai algorithms and then you have some people who are just living high on the hog owning all the algorithms reprogramming algorithm so that's really.

grasso united states mckinsey global institute noah smith bloomberg
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can los angeles on reservoir wednesday twenty one february it as always to have you along everybody with the caveat that yes this is to some degree retrospective economic kremlinology we begin today with what the federal reserve was thinking at its last meeting the minutes of which were released this afternoon the short answer is as i said in the open the central bank thinks there is some substantial underlying economic momentum going on out there also that the initial bump the economy is going to get from the tax cuts might be bigger than originally expected probably three interest rate increases next to your keep it this year rather if keeping track the white house meanwhile offered its own official economic prognosis today the annual economic report of the president president trump's first and it agrees with the fed economic growth is gonna be just fine the administrator russian says three percent or more in part because the white house is assuming worker productivity is going to grow as well of course regular listeners to this broadcast no the big economic bugaboo for years and years now has been that worker productivity has been basically flats and if workers are producing more it is tough foreign economy to grow the mckinsey global institute is out with a new report today though seeing the era of low productivity growth might finally be coming to an end marketplace's tracy samuelsen is on explainer duty so frank recently sent me a recipe for blood orange olive oil cake fats till recess but a ton of work you have to cut each little section of blood orange out of its membrane the first time i made a it took a forever ages at the second time i was a little faster more efficient and lean appelbaum codirector of the center for economic and policy research says there are a couple of ways bakers or other workers can become more productive either that they become more skills or that their employer invest in technology and equipment and that it helps them de more efficient some kind of separating machine would make that recipe a breeze meaning if i solely delicious gigs i could make more of them sell more bickmore more money have more money to spend wala economic growth if.

los angeles trump administrator mckinsey global institute tracy samuelsen codirector official president frank three percent
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KCRW

"In los angeles unkind resolve wednesday 21 fair where it is always to have you along everybody with the caveat that yes this is to some degree retrospective economic kremlinology we begin today with what the federal reserve was thinking at its last meeting the minutes of which were released this afternoon the short answer is as i said in the open the central bank thinks there is some substantial underlying economic momentum going on out there also that the initial bumped the economy is going to get from the tax cuts might be bigger than originally expected probably three interest rate increases next year if keep it this year rather if keeping track the white house meanwhile offered its own official economic prognosis today the annual economic report of the president president trump's first ended it agrees with the fed economic growth is gonna be just fine the administer rations says three percent or more in part because the white house is assuming worker productivity is going to grow as well of course regular listeners to this broadcast no the big economic bugaboo for years and years now has been that worker productivity has been basically flat and if workers are producing more it is tough foreign economy to grow the mckinsey global institute is out with a new report today though seeing the era of low productivity growth might finally be coming to an end marketplace at tracy samuelson is on explainer duty south frank recently sent me a recipe for our blood orange oliveoil cake that's till waste f but a ton of work you have to cut each little section of blood orange out of its membrane the first time i made a it took a forever ages at the second time i was a little faster more efficient i mean appelbaum codirector of the center for economic and policy research says there are a couple of ways bakers or other workers can become more productive beater that they become more skill or that their employer invest in technology and equipment and that it helps them being more efficient some kind of separating machine would make that recipe a breeze meaning if i sold my delicious gigs i could make more of them sell more make more money have more money to spend wala economic growth if productivity is increasing than our ability.

los angeles trump mckinsey global institute tracy samuelson frank appelbaum codirector official president three percent
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"No the big economic bugaboo for years and years now has been that worker productivity has been basically flat and if workers are producing more it is tough foreign economy to grow the mckinsey global institute is out with a new reports day though seeing the era of low productivity growth might finally be coming to an end marketplace's tracy samuelson is on explainer duty so frank recently sent me a recipe for blood orange olive oil cake at delicious but a ton of work you have to cut each little section of blood orange out of its membrane the first time i made a it took a forever ages but the second time i was a little faster more efficient i mean apple bomb codirector of the center for economic and policy research says there are a couple of ways bakers or other workers can become more productive either that they become were killed or that their employer and bad and technology and equipment and that outcome de more efficient some kind of separating machine would make that recipe a breeze meaning if i sold my delicious i could make more of them sell more bickmore more money have more money to spend wala economic growth productivity is increasing than our ability to throw the economic pie is increasing to mix speaking metaphors problem is productivity growth has been slow for a while now james many gut chairman of the mckinsey global institute says one reason is that after the financial crisis companies didn't want to invest in new machines or software that may improve worker productivity because they didn't know what the future held or if customers would buy their products that uncertainty is finally leading up and he thinks a new wave of technological changes coming everything from self checkout kiosks and stores to remote monitoring of electric meters loosing digital to colleges everywhere but is yet to quite full payoff in terms of transforming the economy many ca says the us economy has only realised about twenty percent of its potential digitisation i'm tracy samuelsen for marketplace speaking of that digital occur.

mckinsey global institute tracy samuelson codirector chairman us frank apple james tracy samuelsen twenty percent
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To get on the resilience pieces on cyber and this isn't it the level of ai or the more sophisticated parts of technology the fact that more of us are connected things and people last year over half a billion people were badly affected by individuals by having information stolen about the surfaced about them what i worry about is the is the ability now to be able to shot systems down if you think about our logistics systems trade systems which are run what happens if you can't communicate internally in an organization and this has happened to people like maersk and others running the global supply chains if you can't communicate anymore that's what this technology can now the attack side can do you have an issue so that even at the basic level i think resilience on cyber has got to be a high priority for all of us number five us iran relations of course we were talking about the unrest tell you expecting this unrest to to to become bigger in iran i'll i think it's very clear that trump wants to burnish his anti iran bona feet is he's done that with a much stronger relationship with the saudis and traditional gulf allies than president obama has is also done about going after the iranians going after the iran nuclear deal going after what they have done with us support for hezbollah the terrorist organizations and most recently given the demonstrations in iran coming out and saying we we we oppose the repression which we support what's happening on the ground there i think that there is a about a coin flip that the us iran deal doesn't make it through twenty 18 and if that's true then you could see the iranians start going back towards their nuclear plans but even if not the relationship between the two countries clearly heading into rocky you 20th anniversary or because he's been around since abraham lincoln surveillance has been doing it's it's it's frightening longley but do winners and let's tie in these two ideas of technology and the international relations challenges a run down barton mckinsey global institute we're linking in politics and freedoms and democracy and information transfer along to our technology as we we've never done here i mean the the worry or the benefit of technology it as it's going to allow knowledge to go everywhere and everyone gets to participate and.

maersk trump obama us longley mckinsey global institute iran president hezbollah abraham lincoln
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The context of nobody else in the context of trump i think if trump has had one major impact on the global order in his first year so far and he has it's been what he's done the road that he has created for she should pay the opportunity for chinese should just really occupy some of that vacuum but the last time we had a big transformation of global order was the uk to the us special relationship great allies fought the war together now this transition from the united states not going to china china's creating an old and both technologically economically and also in terms of values it's a very different modelled in at number five you have usiran relations of course we were talking about the unrest to you expecting that they sunrise to to to become bigger in iran oh i think it's very clear that trump wants to burnish his anti iran bone a few days he's done that with a much stronger relationship with the saudis and traditional gulf allies than president obama has he's also done about going after the iranians going after on a nuclear deal going after what they have done with us support for hezbollah the terrorist organizations and most recently given the demonstrations in iran coming out and saying we we we oppose the repression we we support what's happening on the ground there i think that there is a about a coin flip with the us iran deal doesn't make it through twenty 18 and if that's true then you could see the iranians start going back towards their nuclear plans but even if not the relation between the two countries clearly heading in iraq are you sure your mckenzie's been around since abraham lincoln surveillance has been doing us it's it's frightening how long you've been doing this and let's tie in these two ideas of technology and the international relations challenges overrun down barton mckinsey global institute we're linking in politics and freedoms and democracy and information transfer along to our technology is we we've never done yeah the worry or the benefit of technology it as its can allow knowledge to go everywhere and everyone gets to participate and.

trump uk united states china obama iraq mckenzie mckinsey global institute iran president hezbollah abraham lincoln
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In the context of nobody else tap in the context of trump i think if trump has had one major impact on the global order in his first year so far and he has it's been what he's done the the road that he has created for xi jinping the opportunity for the chinese to just really occupy some of that vacuum but the last time we had a big transformation of global order it was the uk to the us special relationship great allies fought the war together now this transition from the united states not going to china child's creating an alternative and both technologically economically and also in terms of values it's a very different modelled number five you have usiran relations of course we were talking about the unrest so you expecting this sunrise to to to become bigger in iran it's very clear that trump wants to burnish his antitehran boehner feet is he's done that with a much stronger relationship with the saudis and traditional gulf allies than president obama has is also done it by going after the iranians going after on a nuclear deal going after what they have done with us support for hezbollah the terrorist organizations and most recently given the demonstrations in iran coming out and saying we we we oppose the repression and we we support what's happening on the ground there i think that there is a about a coin flip that the us iran deal doesn't make it through twenty 18 and if that's true then you could see the iranians start going back towards their nuclear plans but even if not the relationship between the two countries clearly heading an iraqi twenty sure your mckinsey's been around since abraham lincoln surveillance has been doing us it's it's long overdue witness and let's taian these two ideas of technology and the international relations challenges overrun dumbarton mckinsey global institute we're linking in politics and freedoms and democracy and information transfer along to our technology is we we've never done yeah i mean the the worry or the benefit of technology it as its can allow knowledge to go everywhere and everyone gets to participate and did miss wonderful wonderful things about it but it also.

trump uk united states obama mckinsey global institute china iran boehner president hezbollah abraham lincoln
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on WDRC

"Study by the mckinsey global institute founded up to a third of the american workforce as many as fifty four million people will have to switch occupations by 2030 to find work thanks in large parts who rapid advances being made in automation and robotic technology martin forward is author of rise of the robot technology and the threat of a jobless future eighty half of jobs that are going to be susceptible to this today more than two hundred sixty thousand robots work in restaurants hotels factories and hospitals performing tasks led armed routine unpredictable but soon experts say del achieve a level of dexterity and visual perception only humans have had in the past we need to start thinking about what that means for the employment situation for our whole economy and for our society some jobs will disappear others will be created and no question the rise of the robots will be a gamechanger in san francisco claudia cowan fox news hairdryers watterson crude apple prevent users from dubna access to radio function on their farms now the head of the fcc vast apple unwashed there featured when power is not jail and the film powers go out the one thing you might have the uturn two is good any fraction radio and if they would unlock those fm chips people might be able to have access to that weeknights nine the midnight on the talk of connecticut wdrc wwco wsng wmmw weekdays at three p m the savage nation only on the talk of connecticut as every right to fire mueller and it doesn't matter what the fallout might be the liberals hate him anyway the liberal media hates him anyway the liberal media will hate him no matter what and so it's time for trump to throw me or out he is acting like a gangster and not like a prosecutor hardening your is a gangster not a prosecutor you don't wanna prosecutor exceedances authority who becomes a criminal savage nation weekdays at three p m the talk of connecticut weekdays at one p m the dave ramsey show on the talk of connecticut i'm pretty convince now based on how many people have become millionaires and how many people have gotten out of that how many people.

mckinsey global institute apple connecticut mueller prosecutor san francisco claudia cowan
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You give us any any insight into what has been going on in china in this effort because you know if you have uh a workforce that is the size of many countries your challenges might be different just on the scale and that speed with which you have to move particularly when you have a demographic challenge coming out of that one child policy think that's exactly right i mean i number one i think one thing that we see in china is era they are trying to adapt it to adopt these technologies as quickly as possible because they realised they'll need the increase productivity which will allow them to continue to grow economically but as you said you know as a country of one and a half billion people its workforce is or very soon will already be declining in his eyes and so again that retraining that retraining imperative ix is extremely strong for them as well quickly your what's the big report you have coming out at the beginning of the year wrapped around davos in them in a museum gign mckinsey global institute he has an important report on a given nation coming out well this this report is global an and we do think that this report will form of some of the discussions that will go nebulous as well very michael she thank you so much michael true with mckinsey global institute here looking at technology looking at the impact you amazingly accessible go to me kinsey mgi they have fabulous charts they have the most sophisticated grownup charts i look at the only one may be the can compete with them is the international monetary fund a great scattered out chart and whose benefiting from technology versus the hinderance no no us appraiser india of a chance pam eight minutes into the market a mix green green on the nasdaq one hundred red on the other other way you see a story out there besides disney in vida and united healthy optum group that four point nine billion dollar acquisition of the defeat of medical group but i've been looking at the bond market for you on mark a little bit of a rally a little bit of a bid there across india sixteen sixteen.

china davos michael mckinsey global institute disney india international monetary nasdaq nine billion dollar eight minutes
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Premier who says he feared for his life in lebanon has denied he was pressured by the saudis to step down police have stormed a full toss straight into tension sent on knee sign in papua new guinea to forcibly remove four hundred asylumseekers men have refused to leave despite australia cutting all food and water three weeks ago the group says he didn't feel safe for the community but albania says they must move to new residential facilitate and ukraine's economy is set for a boost amid a government revamp pse west rade system lawmakers will spend up to one point four percent of gdp an old soviet highways next year with the mckinsey global institute saying every dollar spent on infrastructure could lift longrun gdp by twenty cents global news 24 hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm sandra kilholf this is bloomberg caroline thank you so much sounder for that update now joining us this morning due 'cause they senior economist for europe at picked hey wealth management good morning frederick thank you for speaking to us especially when we've got quite a lot of data out this morning german third quarter gdp we have the french pmi and german pmi figures in the eight am hour and also uk second quarter gdp reading so so not seen the agenda this uh uh drugged begs the eyes to be four november um i think the can we can make a case horse flight uh slowed down in the pace of economic expansion in europe moving forward it hasn't happened yet uh to be fair issued there has been.

lebanon papua albania ukraine mckinsey global institute sandra kilholf senior economist europe australia uk four percent three weeks 24 hours
"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mckinsey global institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of him and then the delivery person takes it to the customer we looked across every occupation in the global economy and found that food service was one of the industry's with the highest potential for automating its activities michael chewy is with mckinsey global institute and he coauthored a big study on automation two he says you can see why the food industry is right for automation at zoom for one thing much of the technology already exists there are sensors for instance which could measure the temperature arms that can move and pick up food like brunell still true he says it's going to be a long time before robots totally replace humans right now the wage within fastfood restaurants tends to be relatively low and four to make economic sense the brain and robots you would actually have to see these robots have a lower cost per hour so until robots are willing to take a pay cut humans are safe i'm i'm quina kim kqed news you're listening to morning edition on kqed i'm devin katayama more news is just ahead looking of the weather forecast for the bay area it's a spare the day to day so it's a good data consider of public transit if you can it's also a heated visory that will be in effect from eleven this morning till nine tonight were expecting temperatures to range from the low 70s of the beaches to just over 100 degrees inland 630 now joe mcconnell brings us another day to toward the commute a jo latest problem seventeen northbound before the summit crash car to pick up left lane block traffic backed up to old santacruz highway i would four westbound at railroaded substantial of a report of a a pallets spill in the middle of the freeway sixcity northbound but he should bridge all jammed up because of a crash one cars admits span and the other cars closer to seven eighty and it's backed up to the south into the span and the bart delay continues twenty minutes between milbury.

global economy mckinsey global institute food industry brunell devin katayama michael chewy joe mcconnell bart twenty minutes 100 degrees