20 Episode results for "Mckim"

Ep 334 - Confiana e Encontros Amorosos, Chato Radioactivo

Túnel de vento

21:13 min | 11 months ago

Ep 334 - Confiana e Encontros Amorosos, Chato Radioactivo

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Episode #006 | Taliye Zarraby - Regional Support Services Manager at Swinerton

The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

29:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Episode #006 | Taliye Zarraby - Regional Support Services Manager at Swinerton

"Welcome to the future of buildings with joe. Havy joe is a nationally. Recognized industry leader in building design construction operations and maintenance. He is an expert in energy efficiency building optimization indoor air quality and occupant comfort. Are you currently a professional. In building design. Construction property management or facilities management. Stick around to listen to groundbreaking conversations on critical industry issues. These issues address acute shortages of blue collar labour stringent energy efficiency regulations expanding diverse hiring and so much more. We'll welcome to the future of buildings again. everybody. I'm your host joe haiti today. I'm very excited to have tally as a robbie on the show known. Tell you for a number of years. And she's based in. San francisco was swinnerton. The very large multibillion dollar general contractor she is a regional support. Services manager was swinnerton in northern california region. Welcome to the show talia. Thanks so much glad to be here. Well this'll be a great conversation and Right off the bat tally. I wanted to talk about kind of your roots. What inspired you to pursue your degree in mechanical engineering and and going into the construction field overall. So it's kind of funny. My family both. My dad and my brother are both engineers my dad the structural engineer my brother chemical and kind of odd. But you know if you ask me. Probably in the third grade. What i was gonna do. I said mckim clinch theory. I don't know how i picked it. But that's that's what i was gonna do. So kinda singularly focused to that degree. I grew up in new mexico. And my mom actually worked for los alamos national lab so at the time that was financing. Run by berkeley. So we actually were qualified for in state for all the uc schools. So kind of went through looked at a bunch of different. Uc's went and visited a few of them went to berkeley scared. The bejesus to me. So i was like berkeley's not gonna work. That's the way too big. I come from a small town so landed on davis and it was a great fit went through the mechanical engineering program which was great and about you know the summer of my junior year or so just kinda was look at around looking for you know maybe some soda pop money and that kind of stuff and and a general contractor was doing some buildings on campus so signed up with them an intern and just all of a sudden i was out on site and they were asking me to do different tasks and that kind of stuff and i just i was having so much fun i was like man. This is absolutely what i wanted to do. Every once in a while. I would each class to go to work. I was like well that that that kind of says right so yeah continued. The internship went to work for barnes construction and was with them for a couple years. They ended up shutting down because they had some bad jobs. And i went to work for an electrical contractor. Stayed with them for about six years and wanted to get into something bigger. And so that's kind of how. I ended up with swinnerton wonderful. Well my company works with swinnerton on a number of projects around the country and With some of the colorado swinnerton folks and other parts of the country ended. I've always enjoyed working with you guys and we work with a lot of big multibillion dollar g. sees and it's very challenging job that the large. Gc's have building these complex hospitals data centers. So i have to commend you for what you do with the swinnerton. It's a good culture. Swinnerton has a really good culture. It's still kinda maintains that family oriented feel that hundred percent employee owned and that kind of stuff. So i like it. It's i can't see myself anywhere else. Well in this day and age. That's says a lot because it's there's a huge shortage of people with your skill set and a huge shortage of skilled trades and so people bouncing around from company to company is is problematic for these large companies and so retaining your employees and having that employee ownership is. You just said that's very important. Let's go onto the next question. I have for you so you've been with swinnerton now for almost fifteen years and i probably known your close to ten years now in the bay area. Tell us about your mentor At swinnerton tony williamson and and the impact that his mentorship had on you. yeah tony. Was our field ops manager and he actually came up through swinnerton as a carpenter so came in apprenticeship carpenter Swinnerton for i wanna stay thirty years and just salt of the earth. Eat dug in with the teams. He really no matter what position he got to what elevation he got to he was always just right in the trenches with them and basically enabled me to do whatever i wanted to do and that was pretty exciting so as as the woman coming into the construction industry back early two thousand or so it was. It wasn't as advanced as it was now and there were some hurdles but tony really paved the path to basically have me be able to create my own position. And that's kinda why. I've done which has been knee. I mean i went in as an emmy coordinator. And i said tony. I want to develop the department and he said well show me. Show me how you want to do. And then he enabled me to do it. So this really fantastic person. Well you know the people like tony. Stand out because the whole emmy p. coordination piece of any construction project from my viewpoint is super critical. And what we've seen with some general contractors over the decades is a you know it's a challenge for general contractors to have people like you on their staff and to have enough of that we've seen some general contractors where the entire you know two three four five billion dollar backlog have one or two emmy coordinators in the entire organization and these people and they get spread very thin and are bouncing from project to project and there's a there's a serious shortage of mvp coordination backgrounds like yourself in the industry. Yeah and it's something where it just pays forward on the project so much. I mean if you don't put the time in the effort into the coordination piece at the beginning you're just going to be fighting that battle the entire length of the job. No question yup when we talk about the smart buildings and making long term decisions towards the life of a building and Really having a building owner focus on life cycle cost and making an extra investment in different technologies. That have a good life cycle cost. And that me. When i say good a low life cycle cost the initial costs might be high but the life cycle cost is lower than other technologies. Can you talk a little bit about how you look at that. And and how you communicate with your clients about cost and how sometimes spending less and being a little bit too tight with the budget and not taking life cycle costs into account how that can actually be detrimental to a project. It's funny because i we just went on a job walk with a proposed development with one of our clients and we walked their new office. That one of our competitors had just finished and they have the big. They're calling the big server room server labs basically and we walked into their new server lab and they had big half sized fans blowing out of the door because they value engineered out there redundant cooling and something that they specifically mentioned was. We were all intense on looking at cutting initial costs and they're paying the penalty. Now i mean there's just think about the way the purchasing goes to and lee times and everything else these days. You get a nice package of equipment whether it's the cooling equipment for a server room whether it's the control side of it. What have you even if you're looking to cut costs initially you know you're gonna have to add that back and you're gonna pay twice as much to try and retrofit something down the road and they're seeing them the detriment of that right now. I think what swinnerton tries to really focus our clients on is the help them do. The full cost analysis in the life cycle study. And we'll grab you know our partners in engineering and that and that can run the modeling and just show the owners you know. Yeah you may spend another twenty five percent up front but one if you have to do it later. It's gonna cost you one hundred percent and number two is. Are you really using the value of the building that you're trying to build. It's definitely something that the owners need to be convinced on because they're looking at that bottom dollar at the initial outlay. Yeah yeah well. I like your server room examples. Talia i don't know how many server rooms i walked into. Over the decades data centers may distribution rooms intermediate distribution rooms. You know whatever the server room is right and there's a movement cool. There's incorrigible moving. Cool with the discharge heat duct outside or or it's -ducted up into the ceiling and the moving pools blowing cold air into the server room. That would have an actual air conditioning. System that's functioning at a dozen yeah. It's not uncommon to see that in server rooms it is. i mean that's exa- and this was a brand new building. That's the thing that kills me is and you guys had every opportunity to fix this at the outset and if they didn't have somebody advising them from an emmy p standpoint or somebody that had that technical background and they were just starting to slice cost. It hurts them in the long run. And that's what they're seeing. Yeah how do you engage stakeholders on your projects relative to the startup of the new buildings and the commissioning process and the planning and making sure that all. That's done early enough to make a difference. How do you go about dealing with stakeholders on these issues on. Start up and commissioning. There's certainly swinnerton has kind of a template commissioning plan that we utilize at least from our end and having the conversations with these developers and building owners early enough to where they're able to participate even in the design side is so important getting the commissioning agents on board early to do the reviews of the plans. I mean once you're installed you're kinda set right. It's not something that's easily pivoted away from after you're already purchased the equipment and after you've already gone down a path i mean it's still valuable. Don't get me wrong but the earlier you can get people involved. The more sets of is that you have on it. It's a cheap spend for the value that you get at the end and not only that but just working with companies like yours. Joe is is coming up with that commissioning plan so that we build in enough time at the end so that we go through and we do. These interim checks during the construction. So you don't get to the end of the day where it's like okay. We're gonna do functional performance tests but you don't have access to any of this stuff. How did that happen. You know mean it's just making sure that the value is known the more sophisticated developers guys that have the permanent facilities guys on board the guys that have some more sophistication. They certainly see the value but it takes a little more convincing to maybe the less sophisticated clients. We've got a healthcare client that this is the first time i've heard this. They tied are substantial completion to the completion of the third-party commissioning. I've never heard that before. It's always been life safety. it's always been systems. Turnovers going through testing with the fire marshal inspections. They tied it to third-party commissioning and i was like. Wow that's that's actually great. That's very unique in. That is great So that commissioning actually can have enough time to do a good job. Yeah and not only that but it decreases our warranty calls if you walk away from a system and you know that it's operating as it's intended and it's not just kind of patchwork together to get through life safety inspections or what happy. You're just not going to have the call backs i mean. That cost us a ton of money and subcontractors a ton of money to have to come back and troubleshoot stuff at the end. You're not to mention your reputation. Oh yeah it's still last five percent right. I mean that's the like you could do. Great and then that lasts five percent if you fall down. That's what they remember. That's what's remember the up. Well it's interesting when you bring up the kind of the design review piece that you just mentioned and having various viewpoints review the design so if you have a degree in mechanical engineer doing a design review and then you also have an ace controls x. Johnson siemens honeywell controls expert review the design. Then you have an ex mechanical contractor that understands tested justin balance inside out that person reviews designed to get all these different skill sets reviewing the design all these viewpoints catch more issues and add more value to design review. Doing that. absolutely. I mean we do. Swinnerton has really good process of doing like a lessons learned at the end of each job. And it's funny. Because i'll tell the guys that i work with even internal or external tournament and i said you know lessons learned a result of pain in my goal is to keep you guys from having to experience the same pain. I already did right. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah lessons learned. That's a nice way of saying what was painful. And what did we learn from the paint it. China incurred go through a different piece of pain every job. I learned something i understand. No i i'm with you. Were still in kovic. We've got that delta variant. It's raised at snugly head. how can general contractors like swinnerton. Make sure that you know that. You're keeping in front of the systems technology and paying attention to where technology's going relative to kobe. Relative to energy efficiency and energy efficiency regulations that are coming from various cities at states and federal. How do you deal with that. Yeah so cohen. Obviously threw a big monkey wrench. And everybody's playing and conversation you and i had about that is how do we help. Mitigate that we've been involved in conversations with some school districts going through and retrofitting hvac units to have you know the uv treatment on their the different filtration systems. Obviously that's kind of the no brainer stuff. The interesting part for us specific ovid was just the different ways that we had to deal with our job sites. They put some this. I'd never seen before. They actually put some different air filtration and uv type stuff in our man lifts so that we could go through and make. Sure those states sanitized. Obviously we did all the normal wipe downs and that kind of stuff but go in through and making sure we engage all our partners as well our engineering partner dr contracting partners and just getting in front and staying in front of this stuff as it comes up because people are developing stuff every day. But we like to. Have you know we do lunch and learns with our contracting partners. We do lunch and learns with our engineering partners with guys like you and companies like yours to go through and just be able to present these things. Too concerned owners. I mean you've got the school district's writer is a perfect example. They absolutely want to go through and further enhance the safety of their buildings. And if we can provide those alternatives that you're not ripping off air handlers. You're adding a section. There's things that we can do. That are smart expenditures. That i think we can help our clients a lot. Yes so a lot of the retrofits and part of what we've seen with kovic with some clients and other people out there is. There's people trying to take advantage of the situations. There are some out there that are trying to make a quick buck so that are trying to sell technologies that don't necessarily kill cove in the airstream they might kill covert in a petri dacian laboratory. Technology is not proven to kill cove. Ed in an actual hvac system in a building. So we're seeing kind of the smoke and mirrors and the little bit of the wool pulled over some people's eyes. That might not understand mechanical. Well enough to make a decision on. Should i spent a million dollars. Retrofitting these air handlers. Or should i only spend fifty thousand and you just go job my way of looking at the world. There's a building owner and still being a building. Owner today is The capital that all owners have for discretionary capital to do roof replacement to do various upgrades is extremely limited. Who and when. Somebody tries to take advantage of kobe situation. You have a salesperson trying to sell you something. That's a million dollars. You probably don't need to spend a million dollars you could probably but but now you're concerned about getting your kids back in the school or your tennis back in the office building your guest back in the hotel etc and. You might overreact. So i always you people be careful about how you evaluate these technologies and be careful about the money that you spend on them. Just don't throw a bunch of money at stuff and expect to make life better. I mean the funny part is is you think about some of the simpler stuff that maybe doesn't even occur to people that going to one hundred percent outside air. I mean that's something that it's like. Oh well you mean not just a programming change that we can go through. And now we're not recirculating. Any of the air inside the antastic right. Exactly it's some of this stuff that if you think through it and like you said if you know the systems and you know what the capabilities are you can. Just you just better advise your clients. I mean we wanna keep ryan's long-term or not in for the big influx of cash in one shot. Make everybody bad and then go through. And then they'll say well we're never going to eat swinnerton. That's never run at right. Yeah you want to repeat business absolutely absolutely all right. Well listen pairs the next one. This is more of a general question for you tally. You what are some of the this is just a real open ended question. What are some of the challenges that the industry is facing. Today that you're dealing with. I think a lot of what it is is. We're losing the knowledge base of some of our skilled tradesmen. I'm seeing a lot of our general forman for hvac for our controls electrician's the retiring and it's tough. It's a lot harder to see. Those skill sets being passed down. It's different people are so i think people get so narrowly focused on like a task oriented as opposed to expanding their knowledge base. We had so much work here in the bay area for so long. I mean people were just pulling in overtime hand over fist right. I mean it was but they could go for two years and only run branch conduit and they never understood a one line or just sling in duct up and never go through a startup process figuring out how to disseminate that knowledge to the younger staff is a challenge and we're also seeing just. The skilled tradesmen has been a challenge to. We're seeing that as well. And i'm not sure what the solution to that is yet. I mean the bay area still has a really healthy a union presence so they deal with the wages pretty well but like i go elsewhere in the country and it's tough to find skilled tradesmen. That aren't single task oriented people. I think that's our biggest problem right now. Honestly yeah that's a great example of single task oriented and the person that just knows how to run conduit or the person that just knows how to run duct but the person running the condo at doesn't understand electrical and the person running the duct doesn't understand. Hvac they know how to run the duck and hang it and spring spring isolated. Whatever but i agree. This is a huge area of concern. That i have as well and i think everybody in the industry and and it's not just the design and construction industry. It's anything tied to skilled trades. Blue collar workforce for auto mechanics. You name the trade. There's a short supply of people going in and the older ones. The baby boomers are retiring. And the way that i personally dealt with it with my own company is we've put a lot of our younger. People millennials with the baby boomers for many years. Absolute ahead them work alongside the the senior expert for multiple years. Not just a week or two right and then they become the younger people. Become that more skilled person wrapping exactly there on a trajectory that is much more rapid than a normal trajectory within five or six or seven years. A younger skilled trades person in my view picks up ten to twenty years of knowledge from a real season expert. That they're working with all day law absolutely the other thing too that we're starting to really pay a lot more attention to is just that grooming from within and taking maybe some of these younger product engineers these entry level engineers and they may not necessarily have one hundred percent the background that you're looking for but if they've got the right attitude and they wanna learn and they see that path and they start to get excited about it and they start to itch classic to work. Then it's you know it's it's something you can foster. You can teach the skills that something that you can absolutely teach. You can't teach the attitude in the excitement about it. And i think recognizing that is going to be a big deal for us to yeah agreed. Many people associated future buildings with automation of buildings and You and i've talked a little bit about how you see the future buildings and what you believe is the most important factor for the advancement towards you know a clean energy future. We know that we're moving towards a clean energy future and automations part of that. But how do you view the automation piece. So i think there's a lot of bells and whistles right. I think a lot of people get excited about having an app on their phone that can control their house or whatever they wanna to do and and that stuff will absolutely continue to develop. I think from a construction standpoint and from an industry standpoint storage is a big deal and we're seeing quite a bit of bike solar requirements in some of the bay area counties now so some of the different municipalities. They require having capacity for solar. They they require having capacity for renewable which is great. They need to work on the storage. I mean again. One of our health care clients down in southern california. They end up paying a penalty during their peak hours because they have to put more into the grid than they want and really defining what that storage is gonna look like in just the battery technology and that kind of stuff. That's where i see the biggest bang for the buck. Honestly the apps and the an automation and the tracking is absolutely going to be important. And i think that will happen. I think there's enough smart people out there that are doing that. That are seeing how to integrate stuff. There's a lot of computer scientists that know how to integrate all these different programs together. You know it used to be in back that right. It's all it depends on what you grew up with or whatever but i think that's the next biggest thing honestly joe is gonna be. How do we define that storage. I agree roderick jackson whose the lead phd at the national renewable energy lab and golden. Colorado i had him as a podcast about a month ago and he was talking very similar terms of energy storage battery technology and he also elaborated on kind of the smart great and the interactive grit of the future. That buildings will speak to the grid and the grid will speak to the buildings and so we'll have all these electric vehicle chargers at home and at buildings and these ev chargers are going to require a lot of connected. Kate w i'm selena order to have power to charge a car and so it's going to put more strain on the grid when we're charging all these electric cars and the existing grids going to see even further strange from that and interactive -ness of cars homes and buildings are all going to have to talk to each other so that the grid is not overloaded. So that the grid knows. When there's six and a half million vehicles charging right now the grids approaching overload. It's going to be a hundred degrees today. It's going to be too much air conditioning. Load in a grid will be smarter to help help. Avoid some of these blackouts absolutely problems. We've had in california and other states and other states definitely there's been a big push specifically for infrastructure to go through and just kind of expand the way to utilities can go through and switch their different wines and give themselves redundancy and just making sure that you're not hemming yourself into a single power provider or a single power connection to where you can actually utilize these switches that they're installing. Go through and move things around. You know. I mean it's a big deal and there's going to be a lot of work out there to continue to beef that up. I think yeah. I agree i agree. Well listen. I think we're going to move towards wrapping this up at this point talia. I just wanted to kind of ask you if you have any final thoughts for our listeners. Today or any Vinyl opinions or anything that you wanted to mention towards the end here. I think just for me selfishly speaking. Get into 'em ep. Get into the coordination if people are listening to this that maybe don't know which way they want to go. There's a lot of opportunity and it's neat to me. It's really neat to watch a building kind of come to life and you can put in whatever fancy finishes yuan and you can put in all sorts of paint and everything else but to really watch the building. Come to life and start to breathe and operate on its own. It's a neat thing to be a part of and to be able to carry that through to the end and know that you're walking away and having that client inhabit a spot that you helped make comfortable and do what they want it to do. It's pretty rewarding. Yeah i agree. And i tell you i think all these younger people that were trying to attract entity industry attract into the ep side and building operators building controls technicians. You name the trade and skill. My view of the future is. I would like to see a lot more women in the skilled trades. I'd like to see a lot more women in the building operation profession and let's get all these diverse viewpoints and backgrounds and educations skills and widen that pool of where we recruit and attracting younger. Men and women into these professions is going to be very good for young men and women because they're going into a business and a profession that is short on help and they're going to be very rewarded. They're going to have more work than they could ever imagine. They're going to have more challenge than they could ever imagine. And frankly they're going to make good money absolutely and so it's to me. I think we're going to see a big influx over the next ten or twenty years driven by the green building coach driven by climate concerns driven by new energy efficiency regulations. And such. and it's going to be a great profession greater than ever. I think in the future breath always evolving here always kind of at the forefront to. It's something that there's always avenues to look next. Cool thing yup exactly exactly. Well i think that's it Telly i think listeners can connect with you. I assume through the swinnerton website and so they can contact you through the swinnerton website. And no you're downtown san francisco at their main office. So that's where tally is located. And i just want to thank everybody for listening to today's episode. Our next guest is john gambrill. Who's the managing director and principal with gansler in denver. And he has a going to have a lot to say about the future of building these he was referred to me by one of the biggest developers in colorado said. Joe you've gotta get john gam brill on one of your podcast episodes because he has a lot to say about the future of building so stay tuned for that one next and until next time i always close with the same comment. If you go out there and help somebody you did something. Good as my grandfather used to say so. Go out there and help some people help. Somebody come into skilled trades. Help more women come into the skill traits. Then you've done something good thanks again. Thanks for listening to the future of buildings. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast in your favorite podcast app. Please rate and review the future of buildings with joe haden the podcast inspiring innovation and change in buildings.

swinnerton Swinnerton tony berkeley Havy joe joe haiti tony williamson carpenter Swinnerton uc talia mckim Johnson siemens los alamos robbie northern california
Attack Communiqu 3

The Open Podcast

17:17 min | 1 year ago

Attack Communiqu 3

"Llosa for sponsorship presents of injuries to uncle. Yeah, so if you're comment about uncle, the easiest way to make podcast. This free to record an editor what goes right from your phone computer? You can't. It can also help you distributed and then also make money from it. It's everything you need to make book cousin. Gone download the. Defeat, uncle up a good song that FM gets the tip, thank you. This is. I feel like I said. To myself like know me now you've been for all. Six episodes. Also This is season one episode seventy. Seven. We we started your talk about. Poor communication, from episode four. Talking about our people, the meaning can put downs and everything so. Do to develop to check upon foams. Gotree Schrudem before you get excited. FOR LAST SHOOT Talking about how poor kitchen affect also the society and as individuals and like. The all in from no absolute forward. involve. Demeaning impotence of communication how. And the information sector and everything. So Was In episode six I guess sorry I'm going to get seeks. talked about the premium of communication and now compacted to this is seven two seven. are going to be talking about like. Definite solutions to. These. took him out solutions to. On. Paul Communication in Nigeria in everybody. Omb. From. Stopped last episode recurring by very well last episode I kind of started talking about solutions same mentioning I'll. Be June can be used to solve the problem of communication in. I'll. Religion used to. Greet Quick Channel. From company from from from the information given to the information received. Muscle does dwell too to. Fresher cellphone receiving. Just. Four. Six announced is three episodes. Of some and watching wave sued five isn't. Volume made him now. So, today. I am going to be talking. No, if we are going to be talking about. Possible Solutions. To to. Improving communication in Nigeria and I said we because. I am going to be talking with you on your end there. Listen and you're going to be figuring out. How you can also be useful to. L. Ping is communication should truck. Dodd. collapsed. ELP visit of back until. Just diving to. Pink. Yes so. First off like. First of all. We should know that walk of improving communication gap is resting mostly in government. I don't really save I'm students say? The idea wants to have kind. Of this point, So so most of the walking repairing this is based. Mostly, on what the do two for one of the ways one of the ways the can help me help me is by making forms of an. We you know we you can buy for size money on on any communication there's. Too Much ECON make phones for for infrastructure improvement to come make phones for putting in place Incensio as show transmitters tools for for for making commission of. The council make funds available for eighteen. Information dissemination. Become make phones, avenue, four people, and just just A. Lot of things when you can do. Go of by by mckim did forms. Team. Solutions The of communication for me. Government is them. The government be more transparence ECON- tried to be more transparent. Transparency costs, four openness and accountability from the. No. This should be able. They should be open and issue. Del Folk stories to protests from. Unto to avoid, but that from seeking or does sources new. If get the Fox this, you get you get. And side, they should get answers to questions. Get the is right. On beating about the Bush. Beekeeping. Fact from Republican should be able to disclose vulnerability as well. To tell the public what the Osu non you? Know. The realities. Coffers transparency from government is shootout some factor. Factors. And be going through. You fuck those got. One No. Cofer respite from the government should jump Et. Of the government. To to tell its story well. Is No points. All. Talk about transparency when government cannot be opened when government can no, this is also about your opponents I mentioned. There's a point. About. Point transparency in government when when you need us cannot engages will lead us. Giving, US multiple story. On event when when when confusing you, media, confusing every put an undoubted confuses the information to be passed to everybody. So One is. Government should be put. To hear not his. Co. for transparency from the government. On the ability of the government through see the citizens to see the media, people as the ally announced the adversary. Many many many governmental structures in Africa us, no being tuned with which. The media guys as A moment. He made the House leaders. Are we not? A good relationship between the media and Importants. Of You know of decision making processes in. AFRICA NIGERIA IS IMPORTANT FOR Dinning. Corporation that's needed to find. Solution to situations on ground and institutions year. Kim bobbies poke. So. It will be good. Government can see. Media houses report US as. Well. Onoda unloved. fucked all that transparency governments is. Standing on is the ability to creates assist channels for the shop process to evolve. Anything the government on notes. Actually Greg listen all. Over eating or meeting news that is getting out, so you should be able to create assessable channels for the communication processes to evolve, and this is a very. Still initial. National Communication Beautiful. When Wendy, news, we ought to gift from government is is gotten from someone. From some auto since. It's kind of Greeks, the reputation and integrity all of the information we want to get. Food I this is fucked coast to mind. Resent our Carey. was was interesting. Yeah out, everybody was. Used I from an autopsy outside you put the problem private. Before even in from Tacoma. Youssou Bom. Before. This is this is a two week, I? Talk about government and is it. Out into dose to. Prove. Prove communication up to say if you can't remember. I said like to to go months ago, I said. Communication gap not walk of improving the. Rests mostly on the government and that shows the. Does no protests in. The government is this your partner? Citizens and individuals as youths should plead the thou should plead. Improving on getting social service. To these. is enrolled to play a suits on citizens of our respective countries. On seriously speaking like. The role of each and everyone was as in specialized source cues and autonet an out to. Discover DOTS in his left for every individual to figure out to to the points, we talking about a not the full rips additional vetoed. Shows with the government on individuals on vk. Poor competition in this is everything. This. is in fact the premiums I mentioned all depressed. Solution I'm going to? Do Silo odds. To Shove talked about Donald. Solutions Down Mole that can be given the more. Depends on each and every one of us to saturated ourselves and. Our, libere, which gets solution out to this hour. Let you get. To Professor Shawn outs distinct. So now speaking on your decision to poor communication by individuals and just. Most of these things is left to. Polled in order to walk. Probably things we can do as youds is new one. We should try as much as possible to walk manned in and the government getting. Governments do. Down with the government in John Preached. Get. The France needed DD getting in distressing rightful information together. Getting the phones that government are dispersed into. I needed places and getting communication press' on channel across to everyone in just just by L. Pindi government. In. That to. Another team. Or individual can do. In improving communication. Problem Africa. We, we should try or we can't. Dry gets a what information sources rights you know we should. We should verify where an hour we get our information turn. Try to improve on its. Also. Try Educating on new sensitizing people on this thinks we should. Try. Ill people walk. Problems around those. It's not so much 'cause like. I enjoy new as. People we. EAT Is Long We. In those New Ghauri put together on. Them I'll. Crosses walk. Out To, get done. An excellent to go along with can kissed this. So I'm. Guessing this absurd? I hope it's it's been fun. To be engaging since stuck there from episode four. Gotcha up with viable, all Butkus Jamea we'll put. On 'cause which. On. Book it costs. And also follows on Tita and. His? View. podcast one. Open podcast one space between. One. Swallow. Just like. Shares out of the ordinary. That's known. Owes like fighting lemming. Just give you. Drop one. On Yahoo. Metallic. giving. Thoughts. On tonight. New. To Likely Poon de Olmeta open seeking. It's been. You know it's very alarming to see women and like no way. Generally. People been molested. It's shameful on degree like I said I don't want to. This. Begin like me I don't feel like. Everybody is concerned about people have been exposed like. staged. For a lot of people that these things I'm did nor. The. I like Ninjas. Burn, you probably won't be able to. Be Able to gets even up to fifty percent of together are. All people in this audience. Wanting to see like seriously. Does anybody? Listening to this yield that want I, don't want hidden. Wanted to listen to my podcast atop what I. Think you're listening to it. It's. Montlake. On US Dahlia. Don is like a crime. Do you money alike shy and? Seek forgiveness from appropriate catas-. Sausalito for you. For Giving US from God and from people also depressing. Die Of. John! Submit your self therapy all. Just. Be Accountable for the. Guy. Whatever? As. I. To. All also. Become you reap Mathausen. You guys want to lend more. Some. Was a book. Does this Friday? So the topic was. Originally like three times yesterday. So if you. Want to get the. Same. Thousand. Plants! Weakness in my weakness. Canadian you get shoot. Music. Watch you. Just. Missing. y'All my undo old glitzy town. Send Ibrahim missing to podcasts. Just Voice Message Trust me will find you to get into, PDF oh. Thank you.

government US Africa Paul Communication Nigeria Gotree Schrudem John Preached editor Mathausen Tacoma NIGERIA Youssou Bom L. Ping mckim Incensio Tita Dodd. Osu Importants Bush
Rebel Mettle Cans, And Makes It Fun To Be A Lager Fan

CincyBrewcast

1:09:55 hr | 6 months ago

Rebel Mettle Cans, And Makes It Fun To Be A Lager Fan

"Burn burn burn ladies and gentlemen boys and girls. I'm the gnarly nome. This is since hebrew voices. Cincy craft You guys can't see the chaos that has What is happening. At least i. Remember to bring microphones and something to something to actually capture noise But i've forgotten memory card. So i hope you guys are hearing this show right. Rebel metal. I have not sat down with you on show. I've been here a few times since but Since right before you guys open your doors you in the middle of the different type of chaos then absolutely Introduce yourselves tell people who you are and what you do here. Jonas europe man jonas lock Director of quality here metal the organizer of chaos and all around awesome dude and mike brown the president and ceo. But don't tell anybody else. So you guys opened in what's september twelfth and i think we're what if month seven going on seven curry. Wow time flies. When you're having fun in the middle of a pandemic. I keep finding myself like thinking about things that have happened like in the last couple of years even and like the time doesn't make sense at all to me anymore. Like i'll think of somebody call. You did that last spring like no two years ago because last spring didn't exist. That's right there was no no. We have a lot to talk about tonight but the well we'll we'll get to the big news of the day or the week. Let's start with how you guys have managed the last seven ish months. It was a crazy time to open a brewery. Still people would say is a crazy time to open a brewery yet. You guys manage to make happen From everything that. I've heard people have been really happy with what you guys are doing here. They're loving the concept loving the space. How has this been for you guys. So i will just raid out in the open. Say it right. Up front is started with the beer with me but it's turned into the people so to speak. I get to me and we get to me. People from every walk of life in cincinnati almost daily and. It's incredibly awesome. So that heart is my favorite part of this job and the second part about that is like we wouldn't be here if it wasn't for the people coming to visit us like is it perfect. Are we had one hundred percent capacity. No but i am grateful and we are grateful for everybody. That's walked through the front doors and had a beer with us instead high. So everybody that. I've talked to that is came in here. It is That places amazing. The people are great. The space is incredible. My god when things are actually happening again. That place is going to be phenomenal right. We're killing right there right. Let's let's be clear what we were talking about before. We didn't take a break for everybody. That's listening to the first step. I think we were talking about what it was like opening during kobe. Right right so very quickly. We'll get drinking beer now. I'm going down another rabbit hole very quickly after you guys opened You decided to start home delivery also which is a whole other can of worms of trying to make that work and make it a good experience for beautiful talk about that a little bit of how trying to connect with people in the middle of pandemic when people can't get out and get your beer maybe as easily as you would like them to one of my favorite jobs and the reason being is it took me all around cincinnati right so like on the ohio side of the house. Because obviously we can't deliver into kentucky. I was able like if somebody ordered something online. I could do the van. Halen ice cream and delivery right and plugged your front door with beer so to me. That was a lot of fun and in truth be told you know. We were talking about gratefulness earlier without us delivering throughout the wintertime. We were struggling. There's no question about it right so us wintertime for anybody that is not in this industry. Wintertime is always hard for breweries. it is. It's it's tough people. Don't go out of the house. They don't go out drinking as much throw a pandemic into that and throw a new business. That is trying to kind of get on their feet. And get rolling. I can only imagine it was a little. It was a little stressful but at the same time we're incredibly grateful. The fact that we won had the infrastructure and the resources to deliver the way we did and not only that we had the customer base that was ordering from us. So we're not talking like substantial amounts here we're not talking thousands and thousands of dollars here. We're talking hundreds of dollars but at the same time that allowed us to carry on throughout the wintertime. And we're incredibly grateful for the people that just click the link. Said you know what. I'm going to give these guys shot. I also think that there's a whole other aspect to all of this that we we won't really is measurable. I don't know if we'll really ever kind of see. How much did this. But you know some of my favorite memories throughout the pandemic throughout the shutdown and all of that stuff was some of those home deliveries from places. When you know you're you're having one of those weeks you're desperate to sit down in a bar in talk. Somebody sees somebody going to have that that that little bit of shared connection over a beer. And can't you know to be able to get on and you order beer from your. You know your favourite barrier local brewery or whatever it is and have them pull up and have that little moment where you're connecting with those people that you know to me and i assumed a lot of people listen to a show like this It's a huge part of our lives. It makes a difference or social beings so to speak right and that socialness is kind of taken out of out of the equation. We all kind of long for something. That's a little bit normal taken taken out of it and then even now like it's different than it's weird and it's not it's not the same go out places and everybody's wearing masks and you're you're used to see people just by their is now and you can't see the is it. The whole thing is just so strange. We've definitely stresses me out. Even more now hopefully been taken out of our comfort zone in the past eighteen months. There's no question about it I was talking to craig. Mickey from channel nine today and one of the inspiring things that he to me was to see how people have adapted and overcome. We both come from a military background. And that's kinda the motto on the back end. Is we adapt and overcome. And you know that's kind of what we had to do throughout this entire process is not only. Are we a brand new business. We're a brand new business open. During the pandemic we had to find ways of moving our product so to speak In some of that is being is loud as proud as possible so to speak in life just yellen so to speak like. Hey buyer beer. The other half of it is the word of mouth that we got by developing a good product and delivering a good product. And the gentlemen to my rate are solely responsible for that. These two gentlemen are a dynamic duo. Well speaking of your product and moving your product. Let's move into my face gum. What should we drink here. I tell me. I don't know what any of these are so so that i one. That's beautiful collar. That is our colonel copper. We called cooper d'appel bach for its color and mike. Is this story about how the name came to be. Ooh that's good. So the colonel colonel. Brian copper was before before you get into. The story described this beer really quick. Stop walk. s I assume this is a little higher than than it. Looks like it. Be d'appel box five ogata times you get these dapo box of mayor super super dark and you. You're expecting that that that punch to them. This is deceptive. When you look at it is beautiful. It should be like a champagne flute or something. And it's it's definitely adopt. This is great. It'll do the trick to this is. This is great so not interrupt. I'm i'm glad you did that. So the colonel colonel. Brian copper was not only a friend he was a mentor Prior enlisted man. That i served with in the air force. He met a significant amount to me as a young airman. He pulled me aside and was like you're dude. The only thing that's holding you back is yourself. What do you want to achieve. And you know that mentality. That he kind of distill are instilled in me I carried with me through the rest of my life and unfortunately this past summer in in twenty twenty he passed away And i couldn't think of a better way to commemorate his memory than naming a beer for him so to speak so i i reached out to his wife. Tammy and i was like hey. Can i name a beer after brian and she was like. Can you like yes absolutely so colonel this beers for user. You know there's. I don't know how much people really there are. Other places in town. Celebrate this very loudly i think. But everything's got some kind of the story behind it. We sometimes we miss out when we just walk into a bar and we sit down and we just grab a beer and dump it down our throat and then you know go home and jump back into our normal life you know everything from you know where the idea for beer comes from where the recipe comes from to the names of 'em to you know it's it's all coming from somewhere to the people that created these things and i hope people appreciate that as much as i feel like they should. So sometimes it's silly and fine. You know sure fine usually inside but every now and then there's one or two that touches your heart and in this is one of them but even cillian fund things are still part of the story. It's just sometimes the goofy side of things going on but it's still and still holds as much to me importance to kind of the the bigger story of what places and this. This is a good example of it. Damn good beer. I really enjoy it. Thank you we'll go ahead and we'll dive into Kind of why. I'm here today Here because i need to sit down and talk to you guys but has been busy. Today's was very busy. You guys are kidding dear. We are canning beer. I'm sure that the people that are listening to the show are paying attention on social media. You probably saw people talking about it this weekend It was in the plans the whole time. We probably even talked about it a little bit that it would becoming eventually on our last show. Anybody wants to listen to that. Last show Volume six episodes twenty-five if i remember put lincoln the show notes but they probably won't remember so go back to that one because it tells the story of how this kind of started bit cans. Were always the plan i mean to you guys are a logger focused very heavily. Logger focused. There is something about a logger in a can. That just makes sense. Maybe it's an algae thing maybe it's You know the portability of getting a drinkable beer. Wherever you are. I don't know what it is but it just makes more sense to me than than a lot of other beers do so of course you guys are kidding. Talk about why now if it was easier to make the decision to do it now to help get beer out to more people or if it's harder because you want people in the yes and yes to us. The decision was kinda easy. Pu is always in the works so to speak Injure you've known me. Now for or mr gnome. Excuse me you've known him now. For about seven eight months now and i guess you could probably tell that a little competitive so to speak so you know having cans out to market with something that we always had our our on and with the help of the team you know it was. The decision was easy to make it. Was we need to this. It's not a one. It's a need and i'm glad we did it We did it accelerated. We've been in business now. Since september twelfth were seven months into business and we now have three loggers in cans ready to rock and roll and that to me is a special thing. So you guys has been tiger. Which is the the light lager One of my favorites. Which is if you had told me that. A light lager would have been one of my favorite players. You know ten years ago. I would tell you you're crazy But it's fantastic. It's drinkable but still tastes like real beer. So fantastic choice. You've got the metal mayhem and that's the right. Yep everybody has to have have an appeal And then the volume which is the juniper sorts. Beer which. I think when people talk about this place that is definitely one. They always talk about takes super traditional style. Kinda gives that style little bit of Kind of modern twist and some kind of craft beer spin to it with the addition of juniper berries There's a lot of germans that would yell three percent avionics right so you're going to see that when you see a poured you're going to think of guinness immediately pissed super dark but right up front. You're going to get a slight coffee note in a smooth multi finish and i tell you what it's slowly but surely becoming one of my favourite. It's a fantastic beer. It catches up with you. Real quick though agreed agreed it drinks drinks really easy and man. It's a fun beer. So three absolutely brilliant choices to Start things off as far as cannon goes. Where does it go. How do you guys plan on kicking more cans out as time goes on or is this more like a you know. Our core beers are what we want out there. Want something else. Come into our tapper. Our distribution plan right now is we're very fortunate. Have like a group of professional folks that are really interested in getting our beer's out into the public so to speak so we've got teams working at lake. Jungle gyms we got teams working at kroger. We got teams working at. Udf's to try to get our beers in those in those doors. We got teams that are working on getting into drive throughs. We got teams that are working in gas stations. So we have empowered our sales staff to go make it happen so to speak right and obviously they're getting incentives for such but at the same time they're in power to do it and it's it's really kind of fun to see this process happening like like i don't know about you guys. I take my family out to eat right. And you see a rebel metal handle. I can tell you that i don't do that. My kids are little tiny horrible people right now so i've got three daughters and they're all under somebody. We see a rebel metal tap handle that. I didn't even know about really. I see it and i'm like i gotta think map for that. I gotta think casey for that. Or i think pat for that. We're all gonna think josh for that. So or doin so like we have a core group of professionals that are really like chomping at the bit to get this product out there which is fun and exciting. The other thing is cincinnati in general. Really doesn't know who we are. So maybe they see our cans on the shelf ago. You know what i'm gonna give that a shot and then all of a sudden they're like holy crap. This stuff is fantastic. And we've got like a rebel metal like rocker right there. Ready to rock and roll for ever. So we're pretty excited about being able to distribute The way that we are in the cans. Obviously we've been distributing an indicates. We're roughly lakeway. Eighty commercial accounts across the cincinnati. dayton area. Somewhere in that ballpark. Which is great. But at the same time being able to push this out for everyone to see would that marketing on it absolutely. We're pretty excited about. The labels are absolutely gorgeous. Thank you very much I love the That was a die cut. Whatever they the you know the it's not just a square label slapped on mckim I loved the cam shows through and kind of becomes part of the look to it because a great kind of fifties rocker kind of look third grade. It's kind of exactly what we're going forward exactly who you guys are. Absolutely i the only criticism i have. We got an. I don't think it's possible to do this with the cans is that it doesn't scream loud enough that you guys are this lager. Brewery that Enough metal mayhem. I think in the description says something pretty good about it but if i remember ape you know that to me that is such a huge part of your personality especially in a city like cincinnati where you know we as craft beer. Drinkers have been yelling at our breweries to make us more loggers share and they just keep telling what we try. And you're not buying it or you know we try but it doesn't take too long and we can you dig it too much. Whatever their answers are there just you know nobody has really fulfilled that need that we have. We'll get their one piece at a time. I think you guys are definitely on track to do that. In a very. Pc's johnny cash said we can shift gears a little actually. Let's let's drink another beer. Before schiff years i have Some hard hitting questions coming. What's next That is a bach flavored beverage products. A pineapple marshmallow. Milkshake row bach. All right so kind of similar on the way that there are germans probably yelling about the volume. There are a lot of people that are yelling about this one. I haven't tried yet It's from what i saw. an untapped. People are liking it. So how did this idea happen. And joshua were riffing in the brewery. I think we were filtering. Are other route beer and we just started getting. We tend to make fun of Some of the trends in beers that are out there. We just started thinking about like ridiculous things we could make and put in a beer for the hype and we just started like thinking about like. Hey what would go. What a churches things could we do to a row beer because we we wanted to stay on brand with the lager. They're like well. We like grilled pineapple delicious Yeah there isn't pineapple in iraq beer because and then we're like yeah and you know what else is great on a girl marshmallows. Because what is good with roque throw in some lactose show. Sweeten it up and they were like yeah. Let's just do it and and like we'd came up with so it was supposed to be a joke and then like mike to great heck. Yeah let's do it. And does the star was born. This is the This is one of the one of the stupidest beers that i think. I've ever read the description for an on this. It's stupid good so good. I'm ashamed that. I love this beer as much when you again going back to when you hear you know kind of how it came about a makes perfect sense and it kind of plays with the idea of some of the crap that people are doing. It is fantastic so tasty and they have it on tap my god. I have a great afternoon. Yeah there you know with a burger. If i'm sitting around a fire pit at the evening when it's not snowing outside in the middle of the spring right. My god like this beer is fantastic again. Really really well done guys. I hate you for it. But it's really. We hate ourselves waking up at three am. What is that. I mean there are. There have been people that have tried to kind of play. Around with odes trendy. I'm going to they don't execute it. They don't take it seriously and make a crappy beer be in. It's okay because they're making fun of the crappy beer. This is this takes some of those trendy things and takes it seriously still to create a good beer with it. I don't tell anybody we're being recorded. I don't actually know if we are. That's the red button system so you didn't hear the whole story. No there is no red button. There's no memory card we are. Yeah it's so this pretend it might be. There have been in the history of hebrew. I think four episodes that got recorded or done that never saw the light of day for various reasons. I think one of them was a memory card that got corrupted. And then there was one Shoutout to bc's for taking part in the one show that i recorded the we did the entire show and i didn't hit the red button. You gotta go check out the pathological harder. We got it out there right now. The montgomery our liberty liberty liberty. I need to make it stop. Sorry i'm going to be leave I'm talking like she can hear me or like she actually listens to. The show is up so going to kind of a little bit different topics we we know that the pandemic is is has been hard for a lot of places. It's been really hard for some places. One of them being christian morlin who Right fairly soon after you guys opened near doors they had. They closed their production. And dr right before you guys opened rock bottom over found square. Close their doors. It's arguable probably extremely so the both of those were not necessarily a result of the pandemic or the current state of craft beer More of the how they got to where they are today but Seeing two places in downtown that are breweries. Show their doors. Does that give you guys a little bit of a pause. Does it make you a little nervous or is it just didn't even count. I'm going to be candid with you. Like even if they were to stay open. I didn't count them as a because there were is produced. Offsite not all of it. No not all of it. Well i never well on throwing gonna throw. I was never a fan to be honest with you. And i frequent that place more than once over the years and never one point in time was i like you know i'm gonna go back right. Hey it was more along the lines of circumstance so to speak so that's just strictly speaking rock bottom price recipe. I was never a huge fan and candidly. I don't think brewing was their main business model. We're standing is. the restaurant. was their main focus spending. It depends who you ask there. I think there were some people there. That were very passionate. It turned out some great people around town that are still working in the industry around town. But i agree with the Bigger concept of. Oh here's i i just i i. I enjoy the concept of where it was at. I enjoy the restaurant in the camaraderie that they had there so to speak. Because we're every time that i went there. There's people there and it was a dion goal. Do you think they failed more as a restaurant that failed as a bigger business outside of just cincinnati. That that that failed. Or what do you. What do you see. Their downfall is being so beer wise. I was never huge fan. I'm going to throw that out there and people can attack me for if they want. I don't really care. But i was. I was never a huge fan food wise. I didn't have any complaints. What i will say on the macro level if you're looking at one hundred and twenty thousand foot view is look at craft breweries right. People are looking at cranberries is in their non corporate entities. You look at the rock bottom of the world that seem like they're very corporate entity so don't necessarily hide it either chain owned and cookie cutter type situation and people are including myself. I'm not interested. I can't tell you. The last time. I went to a restaurant that was chain owned graham because i have no interest We've we've talked on this show a lot in the last year about applebee's is always the one that i go to. And how is apple. These still around. Ray who goes to applebees wire going to applebee's Kind of the same same idea as chain is chain can i. I personally wise like just me. Speaking had zero interest in going into a cookie cutter establishment that might have cookie cutter beer and granted. There might have been a couple of brews out of that joint. Were which were top notch by personally. Didn't have them. And i don't feel any shame and saying you know what i'm not. I'm not really surprised More line on the other hand Yeah i mean that's all you know yeah. I think that we're entering a time when like people have choices now and you play in a burry needs to i mean. The fact breeze need to engage with their customers. Whether that be people walk into your taproom door whether that be retail accounts or bars for draft handles now more than ever. And so that takes legwork and a lot of it's it's it's not like boom times or over of the early odds and if you're we i mean if is this it's not easy money anymore. That's why three points became braxton. That's why would burn so to march first organizations that figure things out and are willing to put in the work and frankly maintain a good reputation are gonna do okay and the ones that don't are going to fail. And that's kind of a natural business cycle So you guys don't look at the places that have closed down here as any anything other than just the wrong business at the wrong time. It just means we need to be on. Our game agree same as everyone else we we who we are. And we're gonna make product and deliver experiences to our customers that reflect that and that's what we need to focus on. How do you stay. Dialed into your making air. Quotes here. Game as the industry keeps changing as drinkers. Keep changing how do you how do you. How do you stay tuned into that. Because i i would argue that a one time rock bottom was exactly what people wanted with craft. Beer would argue the christian more arms. Exactly what people wanted with craft beer one time some and they didn't. I'm going to enjoy volve. They didn't they. They weren't in tune with what people were yelling at them. In my opinion to to do one is staying interacted. Like with you ray. You've got your finger on the pulse of what's going on right so having an interaction with you and following you and seen you on on on the interweb so to speak whether it be facebook instagram. Whatever rate youtube dot com slash than early so paying attention to us one way. The other way is all three of us here. Spend a significant amount of time talking to our customers in an asking for their feedback. And i i begged to find somebody. That's come to this this brewery and said hey. I wasn't approached by somebody to say. Hey how was your experience here today and asking for feedback because the feedback is what's going to get from point a to point b right. We might be able to come up with a ninety five ninety five percent solution right but if we get some feedback back we might be able to come up with the a ninety nine percent solution or one hundred solution. So i'm in the feedback from our direct. Customers is key to that. I can't edit out any background noise by the way good. I'm fixing the labels on the cans that are a little skewed. And that's just part of part of managing quality is making sure your labels will be on instagram. So it's not a bad idea. So i was talking about the but hustler feedback feedback feedback in itself isn't isn't the way to. Its listening to the feedback and being able to be work at into who you are. Because you can't always just listen to people you're not going to please everybody. I mean you guys know who you are and there are gonna be people that walk in and tell you that who you are is not what they want in a craft brewery gotta find where you listen and where you don't also so with that aspect all right. We have a very good team dynamic here. As far as i'm concerned and we take criticism on a team level and we we. If we received some criticism we will push it out in team environments. Say what do you think what do you think what do you think. And between the group we either decide to act on it or we decide not to act on so I love the fact that we are a team. Here and candidly these. Gentlemen ray here. If they say i need to move in one direction. We're going to move in that direction. I trust their judgment. I've empowered them to to trust their judgment. And unequivocally i trust their judgment if they see we need to move in a direction they tell me to jump and i asked how high absolutely it's a it's got to be difficult. I mean you wrap so much of your identity and your what you want from brewery her for all of you guys you you wrap so much of that into this place to have to kind of shift that nevil of that over time. That stresses me out. Everything stresses me out right now. But like i can't i can't in my head i would have a really hard time Creating something birthing something like this knowing that this is something that can succeed and then having to shift any part of that i maybe. That's the control freak guy. i just. I would have a hard time with that to me. it's all about blinders right. A mindset where you're emotionally attached to something and you wanted to go the way that you planned in your brain rate. I have trained myself over the years that leadership is is not about your emotional response to something. Leadership is more along the lines of trusting the people that you have around you and that trust is what i have given these gentlemen as well as the rest of my team to guide us in this company in the right direction so if they give me a suggestion not only do i think about it. I think about it hard and go. Is this the direction that we want to go and nine out of ten times. It's going to be there direction. I really can't tell the last time that i said no. We're not gonna do anything about this. you know. Most of the time if they give me feedback it's like let me think about it for twenty four hours and will make a decision. And that's what. I like to me when i envisioned this place out. Envisioned like having rebel metal burry link. I never imagined myself being here all day every day going. This is what you need to do. This is what you need to do. This is what you need to do. Never did i think it was more along the lines of. Hey i'm gonna trust in empower the people that are here to make solid decisions. And i'm going to trust their judgment and i hope guys that i've done that is yeah. I can confirm yeah. yeah sure. So they're not gonna say say worse things like i just. I hope that like at the end of the day when our folks go home from work they go. You know what i like being here. I enjoy doing what i'm doing and i can't wait to come back tomorrow. So they have a different response to their workday than i did. So hopefully nobody listens is possible. We've tried to make it as fun as possible at the same time. It is a business. That's being run so we do have to discuss like seriousness from time to time but for the most part. I think that we're all pretty happy. Where talking about that the evolution of business or or not. Where do you see this going It's so hard. Ask that question in the middle of a pandemic or the end of the pandemic. hopefully but Do you see this idea of lager focused places growing around town juicy do you do you think that there's maybe you that's. That's you guys year. The lager brewery kind of like urban artifact. Is this hour brewery. That's exactly the model that i was thinking. In my mind's eye so going into this project at first it was oh we'll produce more. Ipa's right that's what we'll do heart heavy rate but as the situation morphed i realized that there is a deficiency in american craft logging and we absolutely want to be a trend center in american craft lager absolutely want to be that person in that company in that products so like urban artifacts. That's the sour beer. We wanna be rebel metal brewery. Oh that's the guys that produced damned loggers right. Yes we we wanna grow like expand upon that so right now obviously. We're concentrating on the cincinnati market and in limited distribution into dayton which due to his efforts have been incredibly successful. Thank you we are starting within seven months. We're outside of cincinnati and we're in different like metropolitan statistical area which is fantastic. Our next goal is columbus. Let's see what we can get done. You know they just keep spreading the wealth so to speak But we absolutely want to be known as a trend center in america craft log on. What i think is fun. Is that when you look then. I'll just speak to cincinnati around at what people are doing in the logger. Realm i mean. They're great loggers happening everywhere. Their their loggers and lots of birds. That are amazing. But there is this this move to kind of replicate light mediocre kind of american craft from american logger. Come in a little craftier way. Be tasked with gold boy or braxton with garage area. You know there's this movement to create a fifteen pack of cheap cheaper logger ask. Do you think that hurts. The perception of what logger can be or do you think that helps. Kind of bring people into lager. Or how do you think about it. You know we were talking about this earlier right about this. I chain restaurant to non chain restaurant right. We've had the big dogs out there. For how many years now. Hundred years obviously our generation the generation before us in the generation before us or after us. Excuse me are really not interested in that right so like having that differentiation. Point is probably a good thing. And i'm gonna use the analogy right when you go to buy a car. You have like four or five auto dealerships literally like in the immediate area right. These are the same analogy when it comes to beer rate. Braxton has their garage feared the other light beers that are in town. Cool boy from task Who do the delight if it's still made so those are all out there right that to me. Looks more like an opportunity than a threat to me. It looks more along. The lines of people are not only buying it. They want to buy it. I've bought garage. Beers bought fifteen packs garage beers like when we were like building this place. I always keep something like that in my garage fridge right around so the goal for us is to get to that fifteen. Eighteen twenty four paca of steuben tigers. It'd be like yo dude. That's our thing you know. And so when that was always the goal it just small steps getting there obviously just now selling into six packs our cases which is incredible rate. But yes the goal is to get to that point for sure and i look at the other people that are doing. It is more as an opportunity because it's introducing a larger crowd to the craft beer market. It's not the same market as our fathers had ryan rate so like if you dip into the craft beer history so to speak right. So like before prohibition there was like forty seven hundred craft breweries operating across the united states. Right prohibition happen by one thousand nine hundred seventy three. There's like forty two breweries in the united states. Only forty two great that kind of limits. What our fathers and our fathers fathers had to drink from our fathers in her mother's excuse me had to drink great nowadays with the help of fritz maytag in nineteen seventy nine who passed the house resolution abreu home rate. We're now able to have such a variety in such like a wide breadth of different beers. It's totally citing. You don't have to be shoehorned into one beer. You can't say. I'm a excellent guy. Or i'm a i'm a guy it's i'm a whatever tastes good guy or whatever tastes good girl you know so to speak. So that's exciting to me. The fact that it's wide open is awesome. The fact that other craft breweries are able to put out a light beer and people drink. It is exciting to me because it means we have a chance of doing the same thing i mean. There's a reason why everyone wants to make a light lager. And how many f bombs do i have. Is this pbs. Oh it's fucking delicious right. I mean light lager took over the world in less than one hundred and fifty years because it's delicious and you can drink it when it's hot outside when it's cold outside when you're tired when you're not tired thirsty or not thirsty. It goes with every meal. I think that's the important part is like there is always light lager in a fridge in my house. Always there's there's not always a fruited sour. there's not always a double ip. There's not always a juniper sports beer it but there's always light lager posing for pictures. So yeah i mean i think we so. So that's why you see it and you know you you. Berries that are putting out like baller. Authentic like super flavorful. German styles like west sides pills. Aaron swartz beer are fantastic. Chain fantastic obviously gustav from tafs is delicious so like yeah we were seeing kind of both and we want to We want to push the envelope. A little more is lyndyk. Dogs become successful. All it does is open the opportunity for us. He does a door opportunity. I think what's weird from a win win. Light craft loggers. I started happening especially not like craft loggers specifically but when they were being priced and packaged. More to compete with the big guys. If it felt strange to me it felt like we were shifting to kind of their model a little bit. Not that not that. That's bad but like it. Just it felt weird In the same way that seeing seltzer on tap in breweries feels weird to me right right. It makes perfect sense. Takes a step back and you look at it. But i just can't still can't wrap my head around if it's good or not soon. Sir time sue stoops. let's take stoops for. I think the it feels and this is completely absurd but like it feels more normal for me to somebody. Come walk in and buy a case of it in six packs. Been to by a couple fifteen packs like it does. I don't i don't know what just like it's something about. It doesn't make any sense. I i don't know comparatively speaking to the big dogs. You're not gonna get any corn syrup. You're not gonna have any adjuncts right so stoops. Correct me if. I'm wrong. John then but i mean it appears to the purity law. I mean it's it's made with about ninety percent skittles. Ninety percents skittles change the recipe. I mean it's i mean it's just yeast water hops and barley and we just brew it the right way to make it light refreshing and ready to rock and roll with those other beers at. You're talking about you know beers you're gonna get corn syrup. You're going to get Adjuncts as far as rice's concern and candidly going into this. I was completely against that now as we're starting to grow we'll see what happens. If we produce a good bear with an adjunct not opposed the idea. Well i mean there's you guys have plenty of grey beers with his drink something with marshmallows and those are adding. Let's let's drink another beer. What is this one here. That is our pathological lager. A double cascade. Ian dark lager. That's not a thing well percent. Ab melting well. Beer styles are entirely made in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s and we are just cribbing the nodes of a dude who was able to travel the world and made made shit i. I have not tried this yet. I haven't smelled this yet. I've heard about this. I'm heard i'm good at this I will tell you that even before trying it. You guys have the best Cascadia imperial dark lager with. I miss something in their descriptive In the world damn straight come. How did how did this come about. Why sniffen taste so. So i mean the. The name is ridiculous but Sorry it's basically our take on a black area which are also termed cascading dark lagers because black india pale ale is a stupid name but basically it's dark. It's hoppy so i think this is. This is twelve percent. Ab it's like ninety and it's an ib it has more than one ibm. And it's it's made with one hundred percent idaho seven hops. How did why did we decide to go. Twelve percents eight nine and we can now be targeted eighteen. We do that back. This is really good as everything has been It it it drinks like a beautiful cascadia dark l. and then right at the end. There's this little kick of alcohol right there. It's a business. We dissipated yet. Good yeah Again very dangerous. That packs say a wallop behind it. That that's fun that that's there when you when you when somebody says. Hey you know. Welcome to cincinnati. We've got this really great lager brewery opening up downtown. It's gonna be. It's gonna be great that that sounds awesome. Sounds really fun when you start to see this stuff. And then the bach flavor beverage. Whatever that's called You see stuff like that coming out of this idea to do a lager brewery. That's really fun to me like it's not it's it's it's taking it to a different kind of place than the maybe other places would have thought to do it. We also have a baller german pills nerve sherve. In an amber lager that's straight to style dams. It's not all ridiculous but like when you when you look at the world of beer. There's a lot of really great pills nurse. Guess that's important. And that's probably what i'm going to sit down and order but that doesn't doesn't doesn't get people Doesn't give talking about. You doesn't get people It doesn't mean it gets people excited but in a different sort of way like this is the kind of stuff that kinda showcases a personality to place like my apologies to a lot of the oldest in the world but a pills nerd does not give you the personality that box flavored beverage with marshmallows and pineapple. When smoke mall does. I'm i'm gonna i'm gonna throw this out there for the latest strike me. You can correct me. If i'm wrong on this but a lot of the dealing that we have is pulling as much flavors we can without having the stringency right. Nobody wants to taste straight grain alcohol right. That's you know a couple of times in my like. If i'm gonna enjoy a beverage right like i want to actually taste the beverage and not the alcohol and to me. The pathological logger. When initially they pitched me the idea. I was kind of like all right is it are are we gonna taste the alcohol or are we going to taste the beer right. And they're like just just trust me. Just got it so this one eight is sweeter than i imagined right but it's fantastic. Uses the alcoholics that you want to. It's not that you want to hide the alcohol and high abeer. You want to take that and turn it into a part of. What is the beer in this. Does that really really well. I have nothing. But trust in these. That i need this in a in cans phrase with for those nights. Where it'll knock you on your. That's for sure. Six hundred forty four twenty. When i have to watch another episode daniel tiger i need so i mean like this beer to to me right now right in our establishment is kinda pentacle of what we're able to accomplish. We have a twelve percent lager rate. That's dark super flavorful. Super high in abc so to speak. But it still drinkable and awesome and people enjoy it. I can't tell you how many times i've seen people on the interwebs facebook instagram. This is my favorite beer. Cincinnati that makes me feel fantastic. But i'm sure it makes these feel these guys feel fucking fantastic as well. Sorry i dropped the yeah see internet. They can't kick us off right now. I don't think i mean. These guys are the artists in their painting. A picture and that is the picture. That's it. I've i've never had anything like this. I've never had anything like that flavored beverage. Whatever i've never had anything like those and that that is really really hard to do in twenty twenty one in the united states with craft beer being what it is. That's that's difficult and I i'm impressed. I'm really really impressed. You know one of my gripes about this is kind of going down at another weird little hole but not One of my gripes about contests and like you know gb and things like that is. You're you're judging to a style your you know there's there is an example of what the style is supposed to be like. That's always the best example of what this is supposed to be. Because you're building style off of. Are you leading yourself you are. You're trying to recreate something. That is already there where you're saying when you put stuff like this out it gets you sit down and you don't. You might have an expectation but you probably shouldn't you sit down and you're just taking that experience and a writing the experience and just finding out what it is even if it's a marshmallow pineapple. I don't think the competitions can contain us. that's all last year contain us. I think there might be some stereotypes and some bias involved and we do things a little bit differently and candidly over the past fifteen twenty years so to speak it's been all about l. production and how many people out there are really connoisseurs. When it comes to larger production it depends on how you how you put that connoisseur tag on it you know. My my grandpa was quite the connoisseur of fantastic. You know so i. I'll put it to you this way. If i had anything to bet on the farm on it'd be these two guys. I mean auto as he did oops. I have zero regrets. Let's drink another beer. I have no idea what time we started recording. So i have no idea how long michelle was so if this one. This is one of the only ails that we have available. It looks little it's wolf okay. So this is wolf hype. Wolf were more So so is our hazy slash new england and every batch we showcase a different single hop on this case. We use a steering wolf. We've used idaho seven in the past as well as hvac five eighty six. And i think next up is holler towel blank and it's fantastic and he's it's fantastic. It's like everything else leans into the drink ability side. I mean to do a hazy juicy new england whatever you wanna call something like this is actually very on brand for you guys instead of going you know the complete opposite end of the spectrum which you could but like fits with the really easy drinking kind of side of your personality not that twelve percent is easy drinking orders or you can easily drink. It's really good. He's and That kind of world has been bastardized a little bit by a lot of people. i think. There's there's a lot out there. And i think that by there being a lot out there. There's a lot of not great ones out there. This is good. I like it to be honest with you is probably one of my faves. I i have taken a shine to it. It's good i. I still like i when i walk in here. This is not. This isn't what i expect from you in. This isn't necessarily. would i want you know i. I want wants dubin tiger. I wanna i wanna twelve percent dark lager I recognize that that is not true for a lot of people just goes to show that we can do the normal routine pretty well looking at the trends in craft beer And maybe longer being one of them. Where do you see that going in the future. Where do you what do you. What do you see people kind of latching onto that. Maybe they're playing around with right now. So we're talking about a twenty two billion dollars a year industry right right on the macro level in the cincinnati level. You're talking about Three hundred million to foreign dollar a year industry With us if we can sell enough to stay like above water on golden so like let's start at the small steps so to speak lake. Let's start at the lowest level. Lowest level is gaining a foothold. As far as people go. And hey i. I enjoy this beer. We'll see what happens. But what do you see that thing being that kind of drives all of that for for people in cincinnati so seltzer has been kind of the breakout star of the last couple of years as far as growth goes although. I think i saw numbers today. That imports outpaced seltzer. Which doesn't make any sense to me. I need to figure out why that happened but Silly three is seltzer. In like that kind of i still don't completely understand why everybody drinks seltzer. It's a health thing. I don't don't really like beer. But i'm here thing. I have figured that out but do you think that whatever that reason is. That's the secrets all of this. That's a really tough nut to crack. But that might be the secret to a lot of the things that that are happening here to like. And not that this is comparable the seltzer. But if if easy drinking and comfort and things like that are important stupid. Tiger is is that it is it is. I'm not gonna say the beer is healthy but if you want a healthy drink i'm gonna guess that stupid tiger is not any worse for you than a seltzer is am inclined to agree with you Seltzer celtics gluten. Free that that's is that a real is that a real health thing it is. It is for people who have gluten out but that is not a large majority of people their diets and whatnot. That are completely gluten free and it is a big thing to taiwan on still. There's usually zero zero sugar remaining. It's a reason. I drink ourselves are here If i drink too much of beer period man my my skin starts falling apart. I'm just getting old and i. I don't pay me speaking to a lot of other older people who are in industry in their bodies. Just just don't like the beer as time goes on. And i'm i'm seeing that myself unfortunately and i hate to acknowledge it but once in a while i'm like you know what i know what my skin's never looked like in the morning if i have these beers and have the seltzer. I don't you're telling me you're seltzer. Drinker i drink seltzer. Sometimes instead of one of my beers everything's good in moderation. So but i will say that like. They're they're really on the seltzer side of the house. If you're really looking for like nothing abnormal like as far as like gluten or or other ingredients way to go is just sugar alcohol so to speak watering alcohol at that point in time On the beer side of the house like how good is it just to have water yeast barley and hops. That's it there's four ingredients just mixed those the right way and you formulate them the right way. You boil them the right way you come out with a product that's spectacular. That's that's where we're at and comparatively speaking. I'd bet these two against anybody here in town. I mean seltzer seltzer is basically. It's functionally the same as cider or wine or even beer. They're all process Beverage is made do taste good a little alcoholic and Make you feel. I like as a category. It is easy to understand why it's taking over it. They're delicious they're not terribly challenging and they're super cheap and easy to make and then the marketing takeover is it a sign of bigger trend. That we're just not know understand. I mean i think seltzer is eating late. Like eating macaroni lager. Slight ch is is what we're seeing. Why where people drinking crappy macro logger. Why are they now drinking seltzer. Why are they going to drink that. If there is a next thing. I mean they're delicious very delicious. It's delicious some people just want things that taste good. Yeah i mean without any other judgement or or they're delicious. Some of the mar- yes so with all of this being said tomorrow for us on friday for you if you're listening to this week after post if you're listening to future i don't know when i did a Opposed on youtube about seltzer. Because i went to the cincy seltzer festival. Which was eye-opening was no. Cincinnati seltzer and Nobody noticed nobody cared It was it was very very odd experience to me but Watch the video. You'll you'll get my my take on how you have. A cincy seltzer festival. Felt since the seltzer. I am not a seltzer drinker. I have to say that before. I make this next statement but between is out there when i it's for research purposes when i do drink a seltzer The best seltzer that i've had are from the smaller local guys in verses. Truly your white collar any really. Just as just as the. I've had i've had some bad ones i do too. I but but as far as the base actual seltzer the the the cleanness of it. I've had better shots from small local places. I love the truly lemonades. They're great but it's got a bunch of sugar and stuff dumbed down there. It's not the same access. I that's kind of what i would describe that as as i ease their everywhere you know. They're says speak a dime a dozen you know when it comes to local craft breweries. That are maybe dipping into the seltzer level. Damn to you. They're going to take a bit more care do it. I mean maybe that's the secret to it. All was that you know light. American macro lager was so popular for so long or is so popular the availability. you always walk into any bar and get yours air bud miller coors whatever it is. If you're a seltzer drinker you have that comfort of you can walk into any bar and get your whitecloud. Truly whatever it is. I mean maybe that's just the maybe that's the trend is availability easy The world is strange agreed. You guys want people to know about rebel model. That you think don't already know we kick ass think. They think they know if they've had the beer they know that. What are you guys. Say you could have a lot more fun here than you expect way more. Yeah i mean you are. Taproom is really great. It's base. it's yeah. We we only hire the nicest friendly's people damn straight myself excluded mary. You'll feel like family so to speak and yeah if you're looking to have a good time drink some beer and enjoy some sunlight. We're and we have some exciting developments on that coming along on the sunday. Yeah in the sunlight. Yeah more tell we. We are going to have an outdoor space in the next couple of weeks. We releasing that tonight Why not we are now weekly. It's really tonight. We're in the future so so by the end of may we'll have an outdoor space on perry which is fantastic By that point time. I hope the doors are open. You know every day could go either way know especially right now being april twenty second and there's snow on the ground this morning Bs but Yeah come out and see us have a great night and i promise you you won't be disappointed. I agree with everything that you have said. Except that people don't know you guys kick ass. I think people know that already. If you've had the beer it is it's fun which is sometimes hard to do. When you decide to start a lager brewery. It's hard to keep things fun and exciting. And and you know. Be be what you want out of a modern craft brewery while paying a mas to Traditional lager brewing. And somehow you guys are. You guys are doing it. I love it you some of that. Yeah ya thank We'll be back if you liked the show. You like all the all of the stuff that i crank out there. You can always support the show by going to the gnarly known dot com slash support. Have to give a huge shout out to this month show sponsor. Sometimes i forget to To do that i'm sorry. But that's that's what happens when i do appear podcast. Brett cullen baker. Is this month sponsor. He works urban artifact. If you don't know that it goes to their Their their websites have an online store. You can get beer delivered right to your door. So thanks brad. Thank you all of you guys. Who support on on. It makes this all word because my wife gets grumpy if it just eats. Money's oh thank you very much. We'll be back next week. Since he broadcasts the voice of he graft.

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125 - Chainsaw Man (ANIME) Initial thoughts/assumptions

What The Flip Podcast

46:00 min | 3 months ago

125 - Chainsaw Man (ANIME) Initial thoughts/assumptions

"For those new to the cost dive into hilarious. The interesting and explicit conversations about anime games mysteries and huda sexiness fee culture. For that said get ready now will. And you're listening to what the flip. Let's go been out scorpion. Amazing how our hope you're super heights. You're pregnant i'm not seeing what the flip me and alex or pregnant together. I will call him junior so happened. I wanna get your reactions to it. It's the enemy the next next big enemy to review chainsaw man. Ooh we didn't. We knew reviews on this one are we. Yeah i reckon this will be the next big one and we should do review because it a while. What did you think of the trailer and a you hype for it and you wanna do review based on that trailer. Yeah okay yeah okay. I think i think yeah. I think i'm happy doing reviews we do for those coming to this episode. For the first time we will do my reviews we then ju jitsu causing reviews. We tend to be Do anime reviews for episodes at a time So i feel i that full matt last now. If you don't if you to a bit more frequently maybe two to episode time was something laos no because we. We just want to make this good for you guys. Yeah chains woman We both seen a tradable on. I knew nothing about this percents preface. It nova's i've not read them up region of not red mango either. So i'm i'm the same as you. I know nothing about chainsaw on either yet. This is all rule reactions. I guess am i know. There's been a lot of hype on line about chainsaw. Man because i i keep seeing images on twitter and staff of different things but yet swell the trailer and wow like the the first thing that stood out to me. We'll was the animation looks. Amazing lucky is absolutely like it's on par with jujitsu carson in terms of quality. I'm this is what i'm loving right. Now we've got. We know you just came out and the animation of it was something that really stood out to me as being something amazing. I haven't really seen and you have anime like Punch man or you have meyer academia. You have. We know attack. Anti whatever is and the actions were too good the irishness cool and stuff but not in every episode. You get this high quality animated where they're flooring sixty frames a second year hand-drawn beautiful animation. And here you're seeing this and you saw in jujitsu cousin was seeing it now in manned on the trader at least anyway on already hope this is becoming a trend because tutte tutte. Aw in two d animation. When done beautifully is better than any type of three d. animation you could ever get and eight lays ya. You appreciate it as well. It's something that you really appreciate. The effort put into it like stop motion. You can saw tell light the such an end of just karen attention into it and with his trailer. It looked like the had that much attention point to it. So we don't you. We don't know any about chainsaw. All do something really fun is know how we like to all this persons. My favorite car to this is going to be my favorite character and so on might require for is just not knowing anything about the characters apart from the name gonna go through each of the main cart. I'd go with them. And i was like okay. These are the these the popular characters people like. So i don't know if these are villains off. They're good guys or anything. I don't know if that's going to be rapists or ever. And i wanna get your life. I want to to discuss each thing kind of go. Why are they going to be our favorites. Who is to remind you of what you think. Personality is gonna be a a nephew like we can always go back to this episode and see who's predictions run riot and he's kind of got instincts araya out saying characters and designs and yes. I'll just going to say for those businesses episode as we go through these images that haven't seen yet by the way they are going to be on our show notes on our episode out. What the flip po cost. Come so if you wanna have listened to it there. He's good and you can follow along so the first To we're going to talk about is a character code dungy. i'm angie. I'm assuming he is the the main while he from maurice saatchi don't like you to main character and he is chairman okay so first of all another bloody orange head main carta s each ago asked. This may already is that. Good luck chom to it. the attorney. I actually liked the chainsaw man design. I find it really horrible light. If he doesn't look cool. It just looks demented. Doesn't get he doesn't. It doesn't look like he kinda own. Like transformations look cool and like different. Like do two supervisors when they will coup and this is like him his showcase of what you can do and it's just always just he's got like a big big chain saw coming out with ford and i don't. I don't think like just based on this image image one that we're looking at I feel like his character. His personality is gonna be a mixture between like hawk from for my hair academia. Where he's kinda got that laid-back kind of five to him but at the same time. He's really cocky and overconfident. Does that make sense. Yeah got i got my just from late. The way he's is sitting he's kind of he's like he's not got lot saw fire fire in him like never taha's you know you can see is a how i wanna be. I don't think he's going to be the hair. Not the hair that way us to see in june. I mean yeah. He's definitely not a you know a typical hero like he's not he's not yet go. He doesn't wanna make a difference. He's more dislike young. An hour off. Yeah and he's back. might be slightly demented. Oh slightly disturbed in the sense that he likes to fight. He likes the feeling of of this ripping people upon yeah walk. Yeah i think so. Yeah chainsaw you know there's gonna be blood and gore on in the animated trailer. It looked like they weren't hold him bucking. It wasn't friendly like it looked pretty fucking gruesome. So yeah i think kind of like tote toto from jujitsu causing the guy that likes to fight you see how his enthusiasm in fighting but mixed with a bit more arrogance and a bit more of a darkness. I think that's kind of like what he's going to be like. The p thinks he's the ship as well. Yeah and i think there's going to be people that are going to try and get him to be more of a hero. And he's calm buffets us wants to do anything that's why i'm game from this anyway. Yeah i think. I i worry about is that he's the main character and i'm not going to like. He's not going to be the one that everyone likes. I kinda got up. Maybe maybe not because you know people like this type of douchebag achieved kind of a lot of time so maybe you know. Maybe i might know like him but like the know. You're like none of these. I got a they have a guy that goody the heat while the main character hasn't got the goody two shoes are it looks like hasn't grade for the mind. Cracks is that on just goody two shoes retain towards no no i d like the the boy scout carter's bought the not the not the any type occur ally character if it carts is designed well into personality works and i'll end up liking it but and sometimes it's is the x. Faxes or just end. Up like nympheas regions of identity. Understand his design. I don't like is designed with the chain. Saw a thing like is designed without without the moscow. The helmet transformation. What's going on there like either visually. Don't like how he looks either way. So that's a big turnoff for me but we will see how as the as the enemy and kind of quickly read the Change on plot according to. Oh yeah so. We just got a a brief idea of what we're dealing with ray. So so the plot is when his every three thousand years trojan alleged not the overseen to show how love to revisal father dies. Dungy was struck with a huge debt. No way to pay it back. Thanks to a devil dog. He saves named posture is able to survive through odd. Jobs kidding devils for the coosa behind jobs for the rotten kid off all the yakuza members. So that's what they started to makes about. I would still watch desalination amazing making shots. So budget god just chainsaw powers come in handy against these powerful demons when the accuser portray him in a and he's an he's killed by the zombie devils posture sacrifices himself to save his former master. Now dungy has become reborn. A some kind of weird. This is ricky bedie's kind of not rid in the greatest of ways is is he somehow transform reborn into some weird devil human hybrid. He is now a chainsaw. So yes yes she dies in comes back to life as chain so my so that's how he always looks yeah. The i doubt about honesty that i really hope it's not intrests like for face. I've seen his teeth on his image. Rana maybe addow. hopefully not. yeah it would be funny. I'm not gonna lie. Be quite dynamic thing but we'll will see. I mean what from wausau the trailer. This beautiful faces dump seeing animated. No so after. After his transformation after transformation he quickly recruited by mckim a- to join public safety demon hunters under threat of extermination. Now that he's technically a devil now that he's living comfortably for the first time in his life done district determine his dreams and for meaningful relationships relationships off killing devils or working alongside the eccentric devil hunters rock and tell you that the reason why he conned form meaning is nothing to do with the fact that he's job is fighting demons or anything. It's all to do with the fact that he's got a chainsaw for a hand to massive blades chainsaw. Blades is not the most approachable of car designed to and i feel like depending on how powerful he is he might be a perfect contestant to go into the. Let's fight database. We might have. We might have a string of new characters that ludden. Okay well the next car to hopefully we built in stews is a girl and chirp. Her name is just simply power. Okay right this is number two now for those of you that are on the website and see the show nights so i think alike the like so in the plot they said donju dungy joins like a demon hunting group. And i think at a cost. You is just soups. Like black tie. White shirt just plain suits like it. How how's the same. Looks like i got a freedom. Power is paul arnold musician yeah as as dungy the main car to what did you think of power. She was like well the picture. I'm looking at that pose that she's doing What's going on. She got hired on us. She's kind of a Go with devil. Whole new site is siphoned off. Like little the looks like this is made out of blood like she can perhaps generated from blood or something like an actual physical objects. it is. She can manipulate her blood. Or some other ni- something like that. 'cause you got the red is red. Hawn's i think he's part of her the horns and the cycler like they're the same material may maybe like head double power like that diaz by his polish chainsaw and had double powers manipulation and she can change weapons. Alba la's i think her blood poisonous to someth- to some degree in anything she slices with the science gets affected in some capacity. Somehow that that this kind of her personality she looks like she might have the same characteristics as dungy. Like look she's like. She looks very lackadaisical like she doesn't look like she wants to solve safe people. She didn't like i. I got the people. Don't want to do things for the good of mine might. They'll they're like on the community to me service is it. yes she sees. She seems very much like The hit in female that she's not soft issues like the fight she likes to pain. She likes to induce pain. She i adventures. And i gotta feeling like. I think she'd be like the main like i think she might. Little of it. If there was a love. And trust which. I don't know i think she might be the love interest jonah. Either i i think she's i think she's too similar to him. I think she would just be like another character. The group by also. I think she's going to be that powerful. I i i've got feeding. She's not going to be that powerful. Because i was i think with. I've never seen a blonde female in anime. That's like one of the powerful ones or the big main love. Interest is normally is only black hair or like orange hair or some kind of crazy hair was something she she looks a little bit to run of the mill in some ways for to to be the main the main. Yeah okay. i didn't think about okay. The next character we're going we look at is a girl code makina one. I was looking at images for like for her and looked like she had so like chains. She i don't know what the change did she. Just by which. Lots of pictures with her and kim chains and our partners amine going around. I don't know why ballpark She's got the boop seeing her boobs. Boobs grow something. Like i've just as as as the episodes go deep. I don't know when i was reading the comments in the In the trailer they all said mckenna. And there's out wolf wolf astir fiber so i. I don't know what that means. I was like. I don't know she's a good person but person i was like kyla. She's she's definitely good because she's got the same kind of see on the other. She's wearing mcteer. Yeah but looking at image three for for those on the website and cheat Why i get when i see. This image is a character that is very gentle in their demeanor Very light on their bit. Milta- their bet one unhinged psychotic psychotic but but not not like crazy psychotic little darkness to comex line. Really nice kind of Angels but actually she's fucking sado-masochists yay yay. That's that's kind of what i'm getting here. I got as well are plus. She's also of comedy reddish hair so she might be loving. I think in just you third. I didn't think so. But i'm just saying i'm just noticing. The color of ahead is the free. Mike based on people say which. I don't know why. I got the feeling like she's the one that everyone is it like. She's like everyone's attracted to issues like the the pretty one out the group if there's a group like well she's she's definitely i think she definitely looks more appealing than the other because she looks more human more normal like. Yeah but yet again. I have no idea what house all she thinks. The yellow is making me feel by. She's a bit psychotic her powers. Are you prefer empower or very makina to our ip fm makina. Right now the next car do we got is what you do is so to is in the description. The devil dog about saves ngo dingy dungy so porches. I'm assuming is like the moscow of of this anime on his light dungy's psychic comic relief. Get yeah you can tell this. Cairns is going to be beloved by law. This could be loads of Keychain yeah autrement on kids finds stop by like yeah like i yeah you can tell. The the character is cutesy. Probably gonna be funny to think of voice like a human what you think. I think it would be like I think so. I think so i call. I think he's cute to without a human voice year. The i gotta finish the cover early. Thought kind of Fatima is going to be dark and he's brightens for mexico. Yeah friendly yeah but design. The designs of these carts is a very unique. Our yeah other necessarily like the art style are then like the designs of the is so far what you mean. They look a bit mat like the dug it up. They don't stop. Whoa that one's from well for me. I think power looks carr's book she just sees my favorite look. Ashy my favorite looking mckie's macki macki cool. But she looks like shekhar character. That you'll see in a persona game spended Kevin next car This character looks pretty cool. And he's called a key high while coa hockey m cole. I think i think on the trailer he pays around. I think for four seconds. Who'll seconds of something. He looks like he's quite serious character. he's kind of like he takes his job seriously. Yeah that although this image doesn't portray that. I've i recognize him for a trailer. He's on mason on sascha. Jobs of is just yeah. He's got he's the blue oni so he's gonna be. He's got the dark. Hey he's a lot more mellow dow whereas the main characters Passionate fiery but have angie yet than so. But he's got he's got sold roy suits. Everyone likes i'm roy saw He's already cool. Yeah double dot you know like Dungy's got lucky turns into a change faced. I doubt now if he's all no. I'm assuming in the group on abso- don't know why he's powered by inches to see what what they are like. He's the one that i think he's the one i think everyone will gravitate towards like the eh cohen bike. He's the megumi that making meal. Yes he's mukubi people. I kind of like dungy's like the main character people like. Yeah i think i think. Initially i'm going to like kim the best but over time i will probably end someone else and i think i think i think i think he's the one that everyone was always cool. And what's broody cooling brooding. Everyone's gonna like this guy and that by the instant light can then. Once she gets another car does or the ones will stop becoming off apis but yes i think he is content the coolest one i were like off the i'm annoyed that the car too so far have human faces apart from the main carta who lives like a pile of tools. Prayer in the tomb is a yeah. It's weird character. The next one doesn't have apparently there's one is a Female and she's code reason. No easy say they do transform them. I think i don't think like this is I think about her as a human there may be that she she turns into a i. Why no he's announced will like kind of guy vo ever where they transform into these of these not steam punk but kind of light rex. How does not like persona where they summon the months that i know they turn into the one year they can turn into. I liked that. I liked transformations in encourages. But don't if they stay a lot though she definitely my favorite female hardly space with this image of looks like her. She's a bum for a face like missile about and she looks alright. She got live venom tentacles as well which could be pretty good interesting. I and i think i think on the trailer. She's the one that's in bed with with. I think it might be aki. But she's in bed with some rules. Also kim her accuracy. You're gonna be a bit of trust. May be night but i think that's her in bed. I think she's a bit. I think she's the flirtatious one. Yeah she's she's the the The sexy the one that kind of is very openly sex life. Yeah yeah i think. That's that's what she's about and everyone his Makina i will come. Discounts a certificate personality is going to be like flee to ben light. It's going to be less tripe one of the flake higher tunes. She's she flavor guam. But didn't you'll probably have blacker kind half for a genuine are much in reflects power. So she's got like a bomb kind of explosive about two now assault. So i if. I'm trying to see what those ten schools on her arms others tendrils on. How they look like they could be something cool though like they could try like. I can't help vitamin they can transform into like weapons and stuff flat bow and no yeah could be just more miss out like they just translate into more missiles. Missiles roms yet. It looks like i don't know what that is behind her where it looks like. He's a string of light. Bullet will shells or something then. Dynamite string of dynamite may be explosive maybe she should bums. She's maybe she's a weight version of your explosions of other night. But i kind of like us a full outfits pre pre hall. Yes she could be the one the next card we're gonna gander is a character cold. He meno this level. You managed A nice high Everyone likes it could be like a Attached not touchy sorry. I'm she was taken onto that. I think she's going to be the sensible. One of cars is seen. I think that this character seems to me like they're going to be the most down to earth sensible one very strategic one. You kind of like is kind of like taking the place of the viewer. So we're like no this the logical thing. The rational things to do this do this whereas we have a cartoons come have high that they're bib their Their lhamo pantomime me they're more. Naturopathy characters the one. That's kind of grounded. I got this. I like he not hugh not to he. He sorry narrow like she's quite shy and cheap bushes a lot. Yeah you mean Trying to think of a compassion carts. The i'm thinking of. I wouldn't say when it comes to mind by. I get what you mean or she could just have that kind of shy. Be untrue thing. I'm thinking more Mika son of Was vibes as well. Like i got. I got the feeling she's quiet anyway. Yeah i think she's quiet. But i think she's quite sound of in a sense like this is gonna sound really weird but you see like was a face if i go if i'm in your hair here caravan kind of like she's she's not overly talkative but she when she does talk. She's quite sensible. She's quite straight laced. she's she probably bad ass in some suspect. I don't think that's what i can make a case all about dingy and aki the saudi. I think it's about them and she's just like background car. Don't yes he's like. That's why i think she's gonna quiet because i just don't think she's a main. She's not main while i don't get those vibes from anyway. You think she could be Sister okay that'd be all maybe the the bomb goes a system. That just incessant dot com. Why did she like like a younger sister or someone one of them's gone be assistant anyway. Like one of them. Assist the to someone you caught like the if we're there into the tropes on ask to be assist though someone or watching the you know they could be twins like the Aki could be difficult. Green is in eastern and the black and green is the bomb risi on a human. Oh could be. Twins may move. Bet you whatever. She transforms us if she does transform have actually they don't have faces due to have is those can say whatever she transforms as you'll get to is by not wonderfully one walk-off face becomes an eye. She's a big is camera or something. Okay yeah 'cause. I guess is archie. You're right because i think i get the faded not the the devils is sort of like the mechanical all kind of whole vibe to them. Yes knows something to do if i played in in transaction. That's how it could be like a five without which just like a sob story. Where she had. I doubt by double She wants payback on thought about. Yeah what i went to a when she's fi in she takes off a blindfold. The is special. Like kim patchy or some. Yeah some special piece of food. Is that pops out. Says the next Interested in code blue devil so unique name. yeah. I like the went. She's wearing those. Were the person. I don't know if my feeble finest book the wearing the same suit as so serious male arrogance millionaire. I think it's a fee montana book. I think he's one of one. These drugs males. Yeah like Like a mahita in digitizing where he's kind of like he kind of caught your eye. So i'm thinking i could be wrong clearly. That's why i'm working right now. I think this might be a villain you know. I don't know why. I just. I think is well. I just think is flat. Twist you know. It's our angel asked either the main villain but thing is they will got suits on so they will belong to some type of cooperation but maybe there are some corporations that are dark or their liars. Toronto something no. And it's not just gonna be one corporation demons good. There's going to be some out of fighting in between the different groups and stuff. Yeah he or she would definitely be some type of antagonists in some capacity. i just icon. I don't think that is going to be a good guy. A good angel just help. I think there's a twist where this person is. The main villain law is not the main vol- also yet others. The main macy's is like a yes like a just someone who has no emotions and they kind of like kevin nato. They kill they deported. Be like a scene of this person like looking at. I don't know a squirrel l. something or a mouse and then just killing it having having no motion. It's like kinda analyzing life. This is what happens when i drown or kill. A bird Yeah maybe she's like an angel whereby you know like the god so they don't. They have brussel complex where they don't see bashing the higher than humans. Yeah yes there's going to be some type of witness going on in in the mind of this character it'd be interesting one i. I think there's more to his character than like a good angel there. Then that character. We're going to have a look at is another. There's lots of females in here. Most sexy ones Jason that face whether the beaches on them soon It's one is a member of the like on south that's cabrini. She's looking okay. She just standard girl she. This is a normal person. you can see 'em knowing. She looked through the super shy. Like husband's is the opposite cheaters. Really like for me i like. She's very fiery dr dario vibes of. She's a bit what she's a bit gothi but she's into she's she's just kind of get on social former anyway. Yes she's not. She's not pleasant to told him that much. We can agree on. She's got like what will he took in the knife in hand. Yeah that might be a power. I don't know i've got a feeling. She's actually quite aggressive. And i say that is a suggestion that she's a bit shine a bit timid. I've just something about this aggressive very year. And the fact that she's got that as a weapon. That kitchen knife is very intimate very long. I'm gonna stab you to today. Is not like a of chainsaw is very up close and personal very like hacking slash aggression. Aggression microbes won't kill you. I knew like that's geographical. A switch machine switches in mental psychotic. Or she just very angry. Visceral doc person one of the i get i can see why yokoun from i. I think different. I think she might add it to more of the tropes and she'll be like the timid one thus the like whenever she sees benji she's like gets really shy and fancies defoe carbon but like she's kind of. I mean the most read document to buy. Maybe she'd like kind of so in love she wants to kill him source sourcing. No one else can have him other now. She i i Vibes on she's. I'm not gonna like particular. She's just a character. I got my safe. Aw designing been one character. We should i go. The i think is generally will announce good a nice person every other character. Has this kind of like the not or evil. That just talk messed up. We see that hatch prostitute them and yeah think yes anyone that seems to be legitimate legitimately. Good okay that's interesting. I kind of agree can't agree final blue. She's probably glue. That's keeping everyone together. I kind of agree with you there. I think all of my thing like she's the most normal nice one in the restroom are secretly. psych oppression so year brockie. Might aki might be kind of nice. But he's probably too self absorbed in these goals to really do anything by anything. Akis demented or like dark. I think he's probably goes i in troubles but they're very much like since that is freddie personal to him and stuff. Yeah get pipe for him. The final guy we're going to be talking about is a guy which looks pretty cool. Looks slotting me. This guy is me this guy as code yoshida on t. is little guy heaters. Bada on sorry If there was anyone that was york today would you. It would be. He's on his co. He looks like the the the kind of the taganrog. In a in a was it was the enemy in yoshiki. The lost hero with the old man and he goes into a robot. Yeah with that. That kind of he kind of looks like that and he does. He co a friendly. I think he could be the. If i was to get south all them he could be angel devil as my all him some like he. He's definitely not a nice guy. And i'm also i think he seems villainous characters are seen for might be the complete opposite. Might just be a twist. And he's the nicest yeah he's like. I'm assuming he has to policies. Got the octopus double in him. He's eight tells tells ya i dunno. I think he's yeah. I kinda got together. All of these cards are really like. I don't know anyone. I i got the virus animates not going to be. The most happiest wants to this is not going to be over. World being laid at the beginning and dashing in the supermarket shopping mouland won't be heading the opening of the song point of view. Stray kids or something else going to be taught music thing. He's going to be like angsty thing. Is i mean. I'm looking forward to it. Like characterize who are think in going to gravitate towards no is it's really hard Through no nothing about them literally. Nothing began I think my first impression is like okay. If one's gonna like aki weber's name is bong Females in this in. And and things. I don't i don't normally warm two females in the sense. That ought my favorite cartoon animated hours men. Because i'm a male. So i kind of someone who i think is cool. It in my eyes is a man. I'm i've got feeling on. Probe noah no. I'm taking back what i said. I've got feeding on like liking the main card. So a lot. More than i think. I just i i well. We'll stay cool. I feel like from shula. The character lot more than i think But who's going to be a favorite direction. I think i think is going to be a key. That's the obvious answer to be on his ear. What was not many men to jay from us Like to maybe angel angel devil is off. The octopus guy arch could be pretty cool. He is he's a villain than our. He can't be my favorite. Be my favorite. Because i just. I refu- For villain to be a favor over here yet because i and dungy walkie keno is going to be a guy like he just he he might be abreu deco guy but you know he's guy yeah Hold on the lost image of that guy. He's the only guy not wearing a suit. So i'm pretty sure he's a villain in my. I'm not he might be your guess. So yeah you might archimedes event and also you don't see close up on his face and so it's kind of like the mysterious nece the thought instead. Everyone knows i think a good people good. Is everyone interesting. I think the main character going to end up liking more than i think i was. Think power on. Might like more than i think right now. I don't think like i think. Lean on my life. I think she she looks like she's got chewed. And i just think people will gravitate towards. She's she's she reminds me all like a more extreme version of Who's the juice kaizen go. Cold name The one barra navarra. Yes she reminds me of navarra like she solving in independent woman. Yeah yeah in. I get that. I get the vibes vibes. Going gonna be interesting. When does it come out. I thought you know what shape what we will do. Well if if we see if you guys want it will do a review but like yet you've got to send your likes and of requests into Calm and there's a contact form there or you can send it directly to us that contact out with the flip across the assist. Give us some information. If you guys want us to do reviews. I think i think we'll watch the first episode. If we like it we can do a an opening opening episode review by first thoughts impressions. And then we'll go back to our kind of off standard review form hours every four asses unless you guys really want it and demand it we will see. I guess it'd be like a first impressions and see if we like on. Yeah okay this has been interesting. It'd be interesting to see who's run run for the most part. We kind of agreed on most of the characters hop from the well the angel devil person will be quite interesting to really understand that and incurred think the lawsuit the last the last three characters. The las re image is of the characters the angel devil the one with the butcher knife. The ultra sky will be interesting to see how they pan out in the episodes. Yeah i mean. I don't know where they they might be totally spoilers. I dunno like these like the top. Does everyone sees the top favorite characters in chainsaw among are the popularity poll. So hopefully like they'll be cool that the way. I introduced soon. No older so. I don't know who would the most popular one is book. Yeah be interesting to see to see. You won't be like and if if we like change. I've heard i've heard nothing but good things about it. So hopefully i'm hearing is one of the people talking by being one of the big. The big three's lake. I mean you get that with everything. Get bloody go of high school in an emmy animated comes out. That's promoting the kind of popular. They say is going to be one of the night three a but we'll see we'll see so far identify. She like any of the designs of the characters that much but according to the animation the anime looks very different to these images that we have to pay here which i'm assuming from the manga for for the most part And the ad that the con- to the styling in animation cam kind of change a lot from anime to anger and but from from what we see from the will. i'm on pump. so let me just. Yeah yeah look out for an episode one review of the hopefully. He's going to be sooner rather than later. I think it's gonna be a late late. Two thousand and twenty one so Later on this year. Maybe maybe around. October i think he might be might be releasing but we'll see we'll see we'll have we'll keep you guys updated and again if you guys like what you hear and you want to hear some other episodes psalm. 'pray city foul language from will always go to what the cost get access to all of our exclusive content videos news update sure nuts on episodes including this one way to interact with us. We can suggest topics ask questions and more. It's been another good one amid that ivan. Alex will i wear out.

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Fires continue to rage in Greece

The World: Latest Edition

48:48 min | 2 months ago

Fires continue to rage in Greece

"This episode is supported by owning media's carbon valley. I'd like to recommend another series. I think you'll enjoy. Carbon valley is a funny sentimental and informative show about the future of coal. it treks wyoming's dream of creating. Its own silicon valley. But with coal host cooper mckim tells the story by following one startup. That's developing carbon capture. Which something could save coal and the climate to if they do enough they could win millions of dollars but will any of it helped cole cindy carbon valley wherever you get your podcasts. The world is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet. It works just the way it sounds. You help aggressive. How much you wanna pay for car insurance and they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of five new auto customers recommend progressive progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law the previous. Un climate report was eight years ago. Maybe the most concerning headline of today's report on the time of the next report. It's too late also on the show. The canadian border finally reopen for people. Heading north americans were ready. We actually met quite a number of people on the road on the us side of the were planning on crossing at twelve am but canadians. They can still only fly south to see loved ones that safer than getting in his car and making a forty five minute trip by himself as maxine and i don't understand we'll try to make sense of it and one of the greatest soccer players of all time is getting a new jersey fans and barcelona our morning what they're losing lionel messi the guy can accelerate from you know one twenty five miles an hour faster than a great house used amazing. That's all ahead today on the world. I'm marco werman. This is the world. Thanks for joining us today. In greece dozens of wildfires are still burning out of control for a full week now firefighting crews and local residents have been battling the forest blazes on greece's second largest island. The international community is responding. The situation greece's getting assistance from france. Germany israel turkey. Us and others but thousands of residents and tourists have had to evacuate. Meanwhile many locals have decided that the only thing they need to be doing right now is helping any way they can. There was lydia elite who has our report from athens on sunday morning. Volunteers gathered a small warehouse in downtown athens. They're sorting through donations bags of rice and pasta. Bottles of water as people trickle in to drop off more supplies rate outside on the sidewalk some volunteers or cooking a big pot of lentil soup and backing up other freshly made food. If mama ksi makeup book does he nastya gaba. She owns a car and she's here to deliver supplies to the athens. Suburbs where fires destroyed dozens of homes and businesses most of the wildfires around the capital are contained for now but in other parts of the country. That's not the case manager is changing minute by minute and volunteers are on their phones. Frantically trying to figure out what's needed and where we saw different bush on newstalk grab many people one dollars and we hit with everything we have twenty year old nicola nikolai. These owns a moving company. And he's here with his ban. People are loading it up with meals. Pet food clothes and other stuff ladies will drive more than three hours about one hundred ten miles to the northern tip of via. It's an island that's accessible by car. And it's where fires have been the biggest and most destructive nicolay. These has family members from their who had to evacuate. Many people lost their houses. Combs lose their cars their animal's everything we do. We see brady on. Greek tv and social media at constant stream of videos shows forest villages and towns in every being devoured by flames as locals plead for help on how we're burning. Everything's burning one. Man yells from his village on the island. This was last week when the fires. I broke out there called. We need helicopters where are they. Why aren't they dropping water. From above he asks greek authorities have sent said the wind and smoke make aerial firefighting efforts to dangerous at times and even with international help crews here have been stretched thin battling wildfires across the country but locals say they feel abandoned. So they're doing what they can sometimes alongside firefighters sometimes on their own battling blazes with garden hoses buckets and whatever else. They have over the weekend. Teams from vienna showed flames tearing through pine forests and olive groves reaching dozens villages. Woman calling in live to a news program as flames surrounded. Her town where evacuees from other areas had been taking shelter. The woman begs news anchors and anyone listening to send help by sunday the evacuation of was in full swing. People in their cars rushed to the nearby port where lines to get on fair. You stretch for miles at first. The ferry companies were making people buy tickets to get on board but that's sparked outrage and reportedly an intervention from the greek government. Eventually people were allowed to get on fairies for free. The coastguard also assisted with evacuations. She boarded him about exit. Mika ketosis amid mounting anger greek. Prime minister geico's me tacky. Says there will be a time for criticism. you're much in abundance processors jewish but he says for now the priority is saving human lives. There's been one fatality so far. A volunteer firefighter in the athens area. The government is also urging people to follow evacuation orders. Many are choosing to stay behind though and take a risk to save their homes and livelihoods for the world. I'm lydia mainly in athens. The taliban onslaught continues in afghanistan. The militants captured another provincial capital. Today that now makes six under their control since the us withdrawal began in may so why does the afghan military seem unable to stop the advances retired. Us army colonel. Christopher columbus served in afghanistan and as a high level advisor to the department of defense. Chris when you see this happening after twenty years of struggle to prop up the afghan government and its military. What is your reaction. Well my emotions. How i feel about. It are combination of frustration. Embarrassment in anger. I spent a lot of time on the ground in afghanistan. Six my soldiers were killed in action fighting against the taliban and other insurgent groups scores. My soldiers were were wounded. The a lot of spend a lot of blood sweat and tears So to speak in afghanistan we poured our heart and soul into this effort and to see the taleban gained so much territory and the afghan security forces not be able to rally is frustrating during your years of service chris. What were you concerned that this scenario would play out if the us ever left afghanistan well the afghan government had to do one thing to be successful and that's earned the trust of the people in the by from the people and they haven't been able to do that and as a result what you're seeing are afghans who are supporting the taliban. The african government in fact not only didn't earned the trust of enough of its people to prevent an insurgency. But because they engaged in predatory and kleptocratic behavior they actually turned a number of afghans away from them and into the arms of the taliban apparently the afghan forces are having. Some success is stop. The taliban residents of car for example still had to flee taliban advances but apparently significant casualties did incur were incurred on the taliban side. They're still six provisional capitals under taliban control. Why do you think. Afghan forces are having difficulty. Subduing the enemy. What what's at the heart of this failure. You've got leaders within the afghan security forces at their soldiers. Just simply don't want to fight for us. Soldiers don't don't believe in them. Unfortunately prices in the afghan security forces in many positions have gone for sale. The expectation is that they can use the position to make the money back and so that this undermines their leadership so the training and supporting the afghan military was supposed to hold the country after two decades by by the us. Were those efforts inadequate what went wrong while part of it is the leadership and the and the corruption problem. Big problem number two is that they've got a strategy that simply does not work. Unfortunately through much of the conflict the us military officers would write the afghan security for strategy and then it would be translated into dari and pashtu. Afghans needed to develop their own strategy. You know this idea that we would develop forum and then translated into their language. Just meant that they had no buying ownership was it was primarily that problem where the afghan security force. She's didn't have the by and didn't get the repetitions of developing a strategy and trying it adapting and being innovative. None of those things happened. So how do you see this. Playing will the afghan government be able to hold on and if they can't what happens next. I think you've got three broad scenarios for how this plays out the first one in the most favorable one is the afghan government and security forces. Sideline these toxic leaders rally and fight the taliban to stalemate and if they can do that then you're going to get serious. Peace talks scenario number two. Is that the afghan security forces collapse and the taliban has a takeover and they managed to get the indisciplined problems under control so that takeover is is successful. The scenario that concerns me the most is the third one in which the afghan government security forces. You know sort of fracture Continue fracturing and then the taliban experiences catastrophic growth and. They're on the cusp of this right. Now where they grow beyond their ability to manage it and they begin to a fragment from within due to internal you're seeing some of the indiscipline that's a leading indicator of catastrophic growth. Now if this happens you get the government and the taleban both imploding. Then what you're going to have the rise of these of warring fiefdoms and if you get a warring fiefdoms scenario in afghanistan then this could be worse than in one thousand nine hundred civil war personally for you chris. I mean as someone who has invested a lot of time and energy in afghanistan is the country a us concern for a while i remember talking with haji ibrahim in two thousand ten and just looking into his eyes and you see the the frustration and the sadness of afghanistan's afghans have been at war for now for over forty years and at the same time you see the the disappointment in all of the things that have tried to not work and then the hope all of this in his eyes at once. He's one of the people that you know when when i wanted to stay involved in afghanistan. It's it's relationships with people like him and and many many others that said you know what this is. This is worth fighting for. You know we need to have this partnership for a long time and and it frustrates me that the united states missed so many opportunities and the afghan government missed so many opportunities to bring this war to a successful conclusion out. And now here we are with the taleban taking six capitals in the last few days in poised to take a few more retired army. Colonel chris. kolenda the author of zero-sum. Victory what we're getting wrong about war. He's the first american to a fault. The taliban as a commander in combat and engage them in peace talks. Chris thank you very much. Thank you so much for having me. The world's sharon jafari was just in afghanistan last week you heard her report from the western province of herat and the voices of afghan women who fear for their future. Find your reporting and the rest of our afghanistan coverage at the world dot. Org a possible banks deciding today. One never knows where the mystery artists work will pop up next this time. It appears there's a bank on britain's east coast in the town of great yarmouth. They've got a tourist attraction there showing life back in medieval times a village with cottages. There's a small castle and stable with a thatched roof about the size of shoebox that lasts tiny scale. Structure arrived today says the owner of the attraction. It's got banks. These name spray painted in red across the front. If it is the work of banks. He's been busy. Other banks like artwork appeared nearby over a bus a spray painted mural of an elderly couple dancing next to a broken of sidewalk a child shoveling up sand and on the side of a bridge. Three boys playing in a rowboat boat with a caption where all in the same boat painted above. Authentication will not be official until photos appear on banks. These instagram account. So far no word from bank say or is it mr banks. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world army rulers in myanmar have a tight grip on the country supply of steel oxygen tanks as we know for people with severe cases of cove nineteen oxygen is a matter of life or death and right now myanmar getting hit hard by covert. There was patrick. Wind reports that oxygen tanks are being hoarded by the military while six citizens struggle to breathe one thousand bucks in myanmar. That's the going rate for a chest. High cylinder of oxygen on the black market and for many thousand dollars is like half a year's income and still people with dying relatives are willing to pay even higher amounts. If you and you're the key person. Kim sundar lives in yangon myanmar's largest city a city that is collapsing. Under army rule. The generals can barely keep the electricity. Going shops are closed. Food is getting harder to come by on top of that by some estimates half of myanmar's population is expected to get cove nineteen. The word on everyone's lips is oxygen. Cova depletes oxygen levels in the body and people with bad infections often need it to survive but oxygen is scarce in myanmar. So people are dying in large numbers. Even those who have dodged cova when they look on facebook all they see is grief by number. I is social A slight advertisement my friends and they have family. There are dying. Every kim sundar helps run a general strike committee. Students bureaucrats truckers shopkeepers all refusing to work until the military backs down. Some of the more diehard strikers are actually doctors and nurses and they are now running illegal oxygen clinics against the orders of the military who Very careful if militiamen fault that they can't be arrested. It sounds surreal. Doctors getting arrested for giving patients oxygen or oxygen sold on the black market like drugs but this is the fallout from new army rules. They say citizens cannot possess oxygen without special permission. That's not always easy to get from a paranoid military government. Soldiers will even show up to oxygen factories where people wait outside in the searing heat cans. Dr says troops will tell everyone. Okay hand over your phones. Mostly they check social media accounts if they follow people are against them and they can be arrested. Soldiers have also taken over. Privately owned oxygen factories. The little that is imported from other countries they can seize that to ask for those underground clinics. In a few cases troops have pretended to be patients than stormed in and arrested the doctors with fewer doctors and the oxygen shortage the cova death rate in myanmar is the highest in southeast asia video from a crematorium and yangon it looks overwhelmed bodies on the tile floor people in biohazard suits clamoring to keep up. Some families even have to keep their loved ones bodies at home for days. Meanwhile military leader general men online has said quote. actually we have plenty of oxygen all this talk of shortage. The general said is just. A rumor created by oxygen dealers. Drive up the price. Here's what can sundar the strike organizer says about that. You'll leave that for sure. No one leaves that navy. Maybe it's important for them not for the public. The best way to get oxygen for a sick relative mar to already be a military officer seems everyone else is mostly on their own but this strategy treating oxygen. Contraband criminalising cova treatment. It could be risky for the military because it doesn't just harm a small circle of dissidents anyone could potentially watch a loved one die of preventable death leaving them enraged at the army. That's like crazy now. Like sometimes i thought they had brains. What the army does have guns. Several weeks ago in yang-gon it actually fired rifles over the heads of people lined up for oxygen. They had to be dispersed and official said because gathering outside during pandemic. Well that just wouldn't be safe for the world. I'm patrick win for those of you who don't follow soccer. Listen up because we are sitting atop a historic moment in sports argentine lionel messi and the end of his two decade run with his team in barcelona. Remember when michael jordan let the chicago bulls still on top of his game. It's probably bigger than that. Messy spoke to the press yesterday. John you with tears in his eyes messy said. This is very difficult for me. After so many years to live my whole life year. I am not ready reporter. Jerry had and has been following f c barcelona for a long time. He joins us now not far from barcelona where he's on vacation but this he had to talk to us first of all jerry. Why is messy leaving. Barcelona fc nutshell. The club couldn't meet his salary demands. The guy earns roughly dollars about eighty million a year and the club happens to have spent a lot of money over the last several years on a whole stable of great players and they got to the point where they just couldn't not only meet the eighty million but they asked him if he would take a fifty percent salary cut. He agreed to that. You know we all thought he was signing my son text me and said dad messy staying another year and then the next day suddenly thinks fell apart and it was because they've just spent too much they couldn't even meet his offered to take half the money he said i tried. I tried to do everything. I could short of saying. I'll play for free. Yeah so he's moving on so tell us about mris long run with f c barcelona. I mean i think of michael jordan joining the bulls as a skinny kid. Right out of college mets. He's been with barcelona since he was thirteen. How would you describe him as a player. Yeah thirteen he started playing club games at sixteen. I actually think of larry bird more than i think of jordan in the sense that remember when bird had the ball when when he let go of the ball it would either score two or maybe three points for the celtics or he would just make the most unpredictable. Incredible pass to somebody else. Who would then send the ball home. Messy was the same kind of player. he's still is. He makes goals that you just can't believe or he dropped off to somebody else. Who finishes the place. Amazing to watch unpredictable so talented. He's taffy small he keeps running gets up. And he's just been you know an inspirational. We've lived here almost exactly the same amount of time that messy has. We've watched career. We watched him when probably all thirty four titles with barsa most of his seven hundred. Fifty something goals. Everyone's so sad that he's leaving so since you're not far from barcelona in the orbit of barcelona. Fc how are people reacting to his departure there in spain. Most people are are shocked because it looked like he was about to close the deal. They're saddened people go to watch the games live. Turn on the tv live to watch him. And beyond that sort of general disappointment there are some journalists also asking well couldn't have made perhaps more of a sacrifice we are talking about salaries that our mind bogglingly high but you know. He did offer in his defense to take a fifty percent cut. And you can't begrudge agai. His well earned six figures seven figure income. So it's a mixed bag. But i would say overall people just wish he'd stay. He's very well liked. He's modest as soccer players. Go and he's just been a brilliant player what is next for messy. You mentioned perry senator man. Yeah it looks like they might be offering forty million euros a year. It's a good chance he could end up there. I mean who knows. The story changes every single day and some level. That wouldn't be the worst change for us because if you back. Playing with neymar and name are played with for a few years. Not too long ago with suarez and those three upfront. Were just amazing to watch together. So if he's back with neymar there could be a lot of magic. There reported jerry had and speaking with us about leeann. Leonel messy the international soccer star leaving his longtime club f c barcelona jerry. Sad for you. Thanks for speaking with us. So that play mark. We'll be right back. Your with the world. In england a new report looks at the link between dementia and taking headers in soccer for the son of one former star. The evidence is clear. I think you'll have headed the ball. Train over seventy thousand times so for playing the game. He loved killed to change the rules of the game or not when health is at risk. That's still ahead here on the world. I'm marco werman. You're with a world where co-production of gbh boston and pr x. The earth is warming faster than ever see levels are rising rapidly and the global community is nowhere close to meeting. Its targets to get things in check. Those are the headlines of stark new report published by the un today human driven. Climate change is creating conditions. We have not seen for thousands of years. The world's environment correspondent carolyn. Beale joins me now. We talked climate reports a lot on the show caroline. What's different about this one margaret. This report highlights that climate change is not a distant threat. It is something that is happening right now. Think those fires and floods and droughts and heat waves that we've been talking so about this report was produced by the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change the gold standard of climate science going back three decades and for the first time in history. This body really connected the dots between climate change and specific extreme weather events. It says that heatwaves droughts wildfires and heavy rains have gotten more intense and frequent due to climate change. Hurricanes have gotten more intense and human influence has likely increased the frequency of concurrent impacts. Everything happening at once. This is all at about one point. One degrees of warming southeast about two degrees fahrenheit. So the two thousand fifteen. Paris agreements target of limiting warming to one point five degrees celsius. This report finds that we're going to overshoot that by the early twenty thirty. So does that mean that missing. The one point five degree target is tantamount to game over. I mean is that like throw in the towel time it does not This was one of the major findings from this report. They made some news by saying that. We're gonna hit one point five degrees by the early twenties thirties but the report also found that if every country in the world really start cutting emissions fast and drastically then there is a possibility that levels of warming could come back down below one point five degrees by the end of the century so it is not unattainable but one of the report's authors bill collins from the university of reading told me we just have to act really fast. We wait for the next goal so by the time of the next report. It's too late so this is the key information that governments need to act tong and one more thing here. Marco limiting warming to a degree and a half celsius will bring us fewer catastrophic impacts fewer deaths than limiting it to two degrees. Two degrees is better than two and a half or three. So there's no singular red line here and this report actually spells out what these differences are what they look like in different regions around the world with these incremental increases. I mean we're already confronting ugly deadly scenarios from floods. Two fires does a report offer examples about worse conditions. Yes so for example. The kinds of deadly heat waves that you know a particular region might have gotten once every ten years by now. We're already seeing them three times. Every ten years on a degree and a half of warming that would raise up to four times every ten years and at two degrees of warming. It would be almost six so we're talking extremely deaths everything that's associated with that a similar trajectory exists for heavy rains caused flooding and drought. And if you think about sea level rise right now see levels. Globally have risen on average about a half a foot due to climate change. But whether they rise up to a foot or six feet by the end of the century is totally up to us so when we talk about these climate impacts and what action can actually do how much of it is locked in and how much we still actually change will. Temperatures are gonna keep rising for decades no matter what because of all the carbon dioxide that we've pumped into the atmosphere already. These temperatures will stop rising though eventually if we stop emitting greenhouse gases but there are other changes that will take much longer to reverse themselves centuries or even thousands of years including spikes ocean temperatures sea level rise and things like glacial melt. You mentioned earlier. The abc the intergovernmental panel on climate change and how they're the gold standard When it comes to climate science why is that well. This is a comprehensive study. It's not just one group of scientists looking at one climate phenomena. It is two hundred sixty seven volunteer scientists from all over the world spending years looking at fourteen thousand published studies. Now that means they have this really wide ranging assessment of the current state of climate science. But there are also limitations to this method for example the most recent published studies that are included in their big analysis are six months old at this point. It always seems like these reports are playing catch up with the facts on the ground. This is what michael man. Well-known climate scientist at penn state university told me today he says the findings are also considered rather conservative. One reason for that is that climate models might not be capturing just how much the climate change is impacting. Things like the behavior of the jet stream. These reports really are by their construction conservative. And that's important to understand because uncertainty is sometimes cited as a supposed reason for inaction if anything it's a reason for more concerted action and caroline. I imagine that something the authors of this. Ipc see report. Do agree on that. Inaction is certainly not the answer absolutely. That is the message that these scientists are really trying to deliver. to policymakers. Now there is still time to act but the window of opportunity is getting narrower and narrower and narrower. The world's environment correspondent carolyn bieler. Thank you very much. thanks marco. Even if you're a casual football or hockey fan you've probably noticed something different. In the past few years new rules to limit head. Contact is part of a big push to minimize the risk of brain injuries in sports. Now a leading expert in the united kingdom is recommending that professional soccer make some big changes as the world's orla barry reports from london. Not everyone is on board back. In june england fans experience one if those moments at the european football championships that they never forget canes chantey gone into versus germany that goal a header by team. Captain hurricane have secure england's place in the quarter-finals watching goals. like this is bittersweet for john's dials. his the nabi was part of the last england team to win an international football tournament. That was the world cup in nineteen sixty six million one victory afterwards. Nobby stiles famously danced jay on the side of the page holding the world cup trophy in one hand. His teeth in the other last october stein's died with advanced dimension. His john spoke with me on the phone. it was aware was losing his memory thankfully in his last years. We wasn't aware of how poli wash now. Besides began to develop symptoms of dementia. When he turns sixty john is convinced the practicing headers every day in training was what caused the brain damage. Our out doubt conservatively. I think he will have headed the ball train. And over seventy thousand times so for me playing the game. He load killed him. It's not just a hunch. That has john stein's blaming football for his dad's death after he passed away. John donated his fold his brain to science. The results showed knobby side suffered from chronic traumatic in steph allopathy or cd it's a neurodegenerative disease that's linked to repeated blows to the head most often seen in professional boxers styles isn't the only one from the england team to had brain disease in fact out of the eleven players on the pitch that day five develop dementia and four of those men have already died from neuro pathologist willie stewart is with the queen elizabeth university hospital in glasgow. He says none of this is a coincidence. Couple years ago we showed that for football for soccer players. The risk of death with degenerative disease was considerably higher three times higher than would expect so. You're you're times more likely to develop dementia as a professional food. Bola as you wear a population stewart decided to investigate further in his latest study just released he had more bad news for professional footballers he found that the longer. Your career is the greater the risk of brain disease and for players who had the ball a last like defenders. The risk of dementia is far higher. The research was funded by england's football association. The group appears to be rattled. A few days ago issued new guidelines recommending. The players should only carry out ten so-called high impact headers in week's training. Really stuart says he's not impressed. Unfortunately the Based on pseudoscientific analysis with figures from the air. Nobody's gonna be leasing. This was going to be enforcing this is. Just what's i contacted the fa for comment but it said no one was available for an interview. Stuart says the only safe solution here is to ban headers from football altogether. When people say it's the end of the game. I think we need to look at them. In the eye and say which would you rather. We make no change to the game or would continue to see your heroes on the field. Developing dementia and very high rate prominent. Voices say more evidence is needed. Vincent gupta is chief medical officer with v pro. The international federation of professional footballers conclusion that hating is the calls for these higher full long-term neurodegenerative disease is not valid based on this single studio. Each why we need more county chic information about that the logical hypothesis. But we don't have these evidence good barr says banning headers in the english league doesn't make sense if international leagues. Don't follow suit. Johnston says he finds all of this pretty disheartening and not only because of what happened with his father. It is also a concern for me. Because i wasn't as good as i was a professional football for ten years so watching that happened to my dad and i speak to other ex. Players are similar aged fifty seven. We're massively concerned Spoke to annex primarily jumping coupla weeks ago and he said he was terrified style. Tasmania he feeds abandoned by the fa and that he's not the only one the footballer tracy like katelyn as soon as that. No use to the clothes. They don't see any point in trying to help them. I mean how those people how the people in authority can look at themselves in the mirror. And think i'll let all these people had the ball and they're gonna get hill like my dad. Did i don't know how they can live with themselves. Really says the class action lawsuit could soon be in the works. Ultimately professional football bodies will be forced to change their tune but for many players. He says it may already be too late for the world. I'm to in london finally today. After nearly a year and a half the canadian border is open again in one direction anyway. Vaccinated americans can now cross into canada without having to quarantine for canadians heading south. No crossing over as benjamin pain reports from washington state. The new rules are leading to long awaited reunion. Today with some families still divided. Justin moat has yet to meet his six month old nephew in person even though he's really wanted to and lives nearby so close and then we're talking thirty minute forty five minute drive to meet family. Skipped my blood. And i never even laid off in a photograph lives in bellingham washington while his sister and nephew live into austin british columbia. Normally that border divide wouldn't be a problem but the border shutdown not essential travel march of last year when the us and canada imposed restrictions on each other because of the cove nineteen pandemic so an announcement from canadian. Prime minister justin trudeau. Last month was welcome news to moat in his family. On august ninth we will be opening non-essential travel to americans who've been fully vaccinated for at least fourteen days. This is in recognition of our unique bond especially between border communities but not all border communities are rejoicing at some part because the us isn't reciprocating. At least not at the land border. If a canadian wants to visit the us they can only fly not drive. That's frustrating to elizabeth sweitzer. She's a teacher living in the us just outside buffalo new york. All her fiance polack is a student in nearby hamilton. On -tario pocket. Fly here but he had to go through like three airports and spend a few hundred dollars. And how isn't that safer than him. Getting in his car and making forty five minute trip by himself as a fully vaccine and canadian understand when the us department of homeland security ordered its latest land border shutdown department secretary one hundred orcas gave no evidence or argument as to why driving across the border would pose a greater risk of transmitting the virus than flying sweitzer and her fiance aren't alone and their frustration with the mismatch and border policies between the us and canada. It's typical with the way the two governments have behaved throughout the pandemic. Which is that. Their border policies have been wholly uncoordinated. That's edward alden. A professor of us. Canada relations at western washington university. You've created this. Legacy in which a crisis is in excused to close the borders and in the past there was a very determined after given the importance of the candidate. Us relationship to try to really make that a option. Even though canada's once again accessible to americans alden warns that the country could rescind its reopening at a moment's notice especially given the recent rise of the delta variant so at least while he's still can justin moat is planning to hit the road north this week even as his sister can't drive south he's a bit concerned. He might be treated harshly by canadians. He encounters line the border who are opposed to the reopening but that's not going to stop moat from seeing his new nephew of the border wants to give me crap. I'll take it because you know. Do anything for family as for travelers from outside the us looking visit canada. The border isn't scheduled to open until september seventh for the world. I'm benjamin pain in bellingham washington now from somebody who did make it into canada. American kyle williams of under the first today. She drove up from boston and is now north of the border making your way with her mother who is driving to nova scotia for their annual family vacation. Kaya where were you in line. One of the first people across the board of this morning. I think definitely not one of the first. We actually met quite a number of people on the road on the us side of the varner who were planning on crossing at twelve. Oh one am feeling. We were quite far behind in the numbers but there wasn't a long line. There are only two cars in front of us when we win this morning while so i mean you must have gotten there pretty early. How'd you do that. When we heard the news that the border was opening. We looked motel room. Probably about two hours. After trudeau made the announcement. We booked a hotel room the mortar. Yeah right just about a mile from the border for last night. Very good plan. My mom flew into bangor maine. I picked her up on the way we spent the night. Got up first thing this morning and crossed the border all to get up to nova scotia for your family vacation. So i know you spent most of your summers in cape breton. I know it's a special place. What did it mean to miss it last year. I think this is the longest. I've ever gone in my life without going up to cape britain. My family than anywhere else. Everyone in my family. I think has just feeling very homesick so now that you're in canada how does it feel like a great relief. I think we were super nervous about whether we had to get all of our vaccination records in order and make sure that we had cova tests that were negative and recent enough and you know with the driving time this making sure that we had everything set to go before we actually got in. The car felt a little stressful. So now that we're across the border. I think for both feeling very relieved. Starting still not quite believing that we made it when we actually pull up to. Our house will believe that. So i gather you've been looking for and for those listeners. Not in the know. That would be a tim. Hortons or dunkin donuts of canada. Did you find one. Oh with the first thing we did when we crossed the border. Tim hortons but it was too early in the morning for my favorite sweet drinks. So we're going to make a second stop to get an ice cap and a third and a fourth and it's how you doing kyle. Williams is american. She's finally in canada. Thank you very much for speaking with us and enjoy the rest of your journey advocation. of course the pleasure. Thank you back to the latest climate report from the un as we reported earlier. The outlook is bleak at the same time as the brits say we gotta keep calm and carry on but also not repeat our mistakes. So how do we face that reality and still put one foot in front of another. And what does one generation. Oh the coming ones daniel. Sharyl ask those questions in his new book warmth coming of age at the end of the world. Let me just start daniel with your reaction to today's news when you saw the headlines morning about the un climate report and fires raging around the world. What were you feeling. I is just again waking up in the morning seeing that headline just being saddled with the immense gravity of the crisis. We're facing and allowing myself to like sit in that fear and grief. It's immense difficult reality. Simulate how dire situations. I imagine you feel that every time one of these kind of reports comes out. I do but i also feel immense sense of the moral stakes that still exist. I mean this. This report makes very clear that the difference for each tenth of a degree we lower temperature that our planet is overheating. We save millions of lives literally millions of lives. So the reason that i do this work is that the really is still a wide swath outcomes. There are levels of warming that we could get to where literally facing the collapse of civilization as we know so. Yeah it's a heavy try to allow myself to sit with that. Yeah but also not to let it crush me. I mean the stakes that you just kind of outlined or why you wrote this book warm feeling kind of getting the moral strength taking on the challenge. You write that you grew up in a leafy suburban town. Your parents At rutgers university your dad is a climate scientists you write about how he was in greenland drilling into the ice cap when your mother was pregnant with you so the climate emergency has always been around front and center in your family and yet it wasn't front and center. How do you see your parents generation understanding of what you call the problem. I think by parents generation who have a lot of love for many people dear to my heart who are boomer is i think they have a very hard time of simulating the full reality the climate crisis because their schema 's the scheme through which they see the world what the world is and how it works were formed in decades where climate change was. Just not on anybody's line and it makes sense to me that as you get older in life you are schema through which you approach. The world are both more costly to give up and more difficult to change and this is not everyone and not even necessarily blaming people but there does seem to be the sense of sleepwalking and even my own father who's notion aquifer who studied global warming acid effected the antioxidants in the nineteen ninety s. There is a sense that like he brought that information back and we just living in the nineties in suburbia you know. We didn't know how to assimilate that contrast that with gen z. Degeneration below mine include. This is the water. They've been swimming since they came into political consciousness. Well there's a conversation you had with your father. Your father remembers it You're eight years old at the time. It's a talk you don't remember having with him though. Can you tell us about that. The way he tells the story. We are watching some nature documentary. I think on television and it mentioned something about global warming. And i asked him what that was and he sort of sagely explained and i was sort of apoplectic. I was like wait a second. If what you're telling me is true. Why haven't i heard about this before. Why isn't everybody talking about this constantly. And why having you told me about this already. Because i have i was eight but i was like i have been doing something about this. He says that conversation happened. I was very young. I don't have a memory of it. Maybe it's something that he subconsciously. Invented in retrospectives feel like we had gotten into together but even if it happened i had nowhere to bring that strand. It wasn't till i got to college and met some amazing fellow students who had already been radicalized around the climate crisis that i was able to kind of situate- and build on my values here and not feel so alone in them and i think that is just so crucial for human life in the twenty first century is going to be processing this thing not alone in our bedrooms on twitter but like together with each other over the dinner table physically and emotionally holding each other so if gen z. Has been swimming in climate. Change in these deep pools of sorrow. Say and the boomers maybe not so dialed in as you would like them to be. How's it tragedy so different for your generation. I was born in one thousand nine hundred year. The first big climate conference in rio. And it's sort of like our coming-of-age has directly tracked the emergence of the climate crisis into public consciousness. But it's also been a kind of emotional whiplash for us to sort of. Come age on the premise. That like okay. Welcome to the world. You get to be an architect or a doctor. Whatever it is and your future is bright and then like as we emerge out of high school into college. It's like wait. It's our future bright and suddenly there asterix's in question marks over everything we had plan for the future. And i think a lot of us are still trying to find avenues through which to process that and process that in a way. That doesn't just drink the sedative of blind optimism but also doesn't like deflate into despair. Because i don't think despairs actually a rational response to the situation so once we sit with that reality allowed to fully settle in and see what the future demands of us. What do you want to convey to the next generation and those of us trying to cope. Psychologically with this grim reality that hangs over us. I just want people to feel okay. If they're feeling grief or confusion or overwhelmed like those are deeply rational response to the dire situation. We're in but i also want to convey to people that we don't have to suffer through these things alone that we live in a social web. If we build it can establish links of emotional solidarity and political solidarity that can actually be saving grace in this century of people. So you know. I think a lot of my friends in and out of the climate movement described feeling very alone in there feelings of overwhelm the climate crisis. Not knowing where to take them and this book was an attempt to give people place to take them and to start having difficult. conversations will need to have with our loved ones. I go out. What the next century. It's gonna look like daniel cheryl's new book is called warmth coming of age at the end of our world. Daniel thank you very much for speaking with us today. Thanks so much. I really enjoyed it. The scar and reggae song book has been filled with some curious cover songs over the years. Scott version of the big. Hollywood opening to the nineteen sixty film exodus or a jamaican rift put on dave brubeck jazz classic. Take five but when you think about french composer. Maurice rebels bolero being recorded at bob. Marley's legendary tuff gong studios in kingston the mind kind of reels. And yet this is what nine jamaican musicians at. Tuff gong came up with it. Works great would maurice revolve. Appreciated prevail himself was unhappy that all his compositions. It was a simple melody of bolero that got the most attention jamaican version could be so far from the original that he just might warm up to it as much as we do. Kingston valero was recorded in jamaica. This summer and it's just been released. The world comes to you from the nanna bill harris studio at gbh in boston. Thanks for listening. Today we'll be back with you tomorrow.

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Ethiopia calls on civilians to fight against Tigray forces

The World: Latest Edition

48:18 min | 2 months ago

Ethiopia calls on civilians to fight against Tigray forces

"The world is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customer can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today at progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed in twenty twenty. Potential savings will vary discount very and are not available in all states and situations. This episode is supported by owning public. Media's carbon valley. I'd like to recommend another series. I think you'll enjoy. Carbon valley is a funny sentimental informative show about the future of coal. It treks wyoming's dream of creating its own silicon valley but with coal host cooper mckim tells the story by following one startup. That's developing carbon capture. Which something could save coal and the climate to. If they do enough they could win. Millions of dollars but will any of it help. Cole cindy carbon valley. Wherever you get your podcasts others imposing fresh sanctions on bellarusse putting the squeeze on strongman alexander lushenko but how much does sanctions actually squeeze their targets. You're not going to snap your fingers impose sanctions and then see some dictator. Throw of potenza. And say i surrender. That's not how it works. Also a triple threat in myanmar political instability covert and hunger. We did a survey. In the poorest areas of yang-gon ninety percent of the people had to borrow money just to buy food. i'm marco werman and observant muslim women in turkey are making a fashion statement with their jobs. Because for us as a huge arby's it's the only thing that is showing the jobs. Bright colors and styles or what become legend most in istanbul these days all of that and more today. You're on the world. i'm marco werman. You're with the world. Thank you for being here for months. Now we've been following the situation in northern ethiopia's tigray region today. The conflict took yet another alarming. Turn the central government abbas now calling on all capable ethiopians to join the military and fight to grind rebels. Alex the wall is following these developments. Closely is the executive director of the world peace foundation and joins us today from london. What is your reaction to the ethiopian. Government calling civilians to fight the to grind. So what does that signal to you. It's a sign of desperation. The to grind defense force has inflicted a succession of military defeats on the ethiopian government. Such that it is in a commanding military position but rather than do what one would hope which is at this point. Seek peak is seeking negotiated settlement. Prime minister i'll be outmanned is doing everything. He can to avoid the inevitable so he is courting full mass mobilization which really has no serious prospect turning the military tied its own for heath europeans to kill each other in larger numbers. Wasn't there a ceasefire in this conflict. There was no she's filed. The government announced a ceasefire when it had been driven out of tyrod but in the next breath the government said we will siege tick ride. We will not let any humanitarian aid in an hunger is the main weapon that they've been using in this war so a so-called ceasefire that did not desist from using starvation as a weapon was not very meaning. Alex do you think there's any appetite ethiopia for full scale conflict. I mean do you expect civilians of military age to actually heed the call of government. Well what has been happening has been some have been heating the core of the government and what is instead of the regular arming fighting against the tig ryan forces that turnaround resistance a whole host of different ethnic militia have been called up but in many cases these ethnic militia have been fighting one another rather than finding the tick ryan resistance. So this really is. I'm afraid is a recipe for the fragmentation that complete collapse of Theo pia as a as a viable political entertain the document calls on ethiopians to fight what referred to as to grind terrorists. Are you concerned that this call to aggression could spread to grant civilians. My worry air would be the large number of crohn's who live in samba. The capital city and and other parts of ethiopia who have been Tenny it by the public statements of the prime minister and other leading officials. most recently. They called the weeds to be uprooted or cancer in the state and these calls for violence against an ethnic group smack of of genocidal incitement. It's very very worrying. This national call document really seems to mark another stunning turnaround for prime minister. Ahmed a man who won the nobel peace prize in two thousand nineteen. Where do you think ethiopia and its leader miscalculated in their dealings with two grinds. I think prime minister amit was always misrepresented. Yes that would genuine democratic reforms that were absolutely necessary when he took office but it all seems to have gone to his head and so i think he grossly overestimated what he could achieve and ended up being really in in a bubble of make believe of alternative reality which has led him into a war leading into authorizing the most terrible atrocities. Finally i just want to follow up. How has prime minister appointed blame on the us. Or problems in ethiopia. What he is saying is that the united states is leading a coalition to misrepresent. What is going on in the country to invent stories about starvation about atrocities about war and to impose a solution that He and by implication the ethiopian people do not like it's frankly an absurd setup claims but it does resonate with a particular brand of his followers who seemed to be committed in a very diehard manner to his very particular vision of the future of ethiopia. Alex walls the executive director of the world peace foundation. He's been speaking with us from london. Thank you very much. You are very welcome. When the world economy ground to a halt last year many workers learned exactly what essential meant for bus drivers doctors in grocery workers to name just a few working from home with mostly not an option also on the list was at us own in mexico a partnership between the us and mexico got thousands of these workers vaccinated this summer but some worry. That won't be enough the world. Daisy contrasts has our story. Several large buses glenn and lineup in what looks like a parking lot white tents are set up and nurses are waiting outside order. Patrol officers are also there. We have been here. Ready to receive the buses and date of vaccinating. Workers is about to begin. This is from a video taken by a volunteer last month. At the entry point in thorny your taxes about one hour south east of el paso these buses were bringing in workers from mexico to get the johnson and johnson vaccine then in a few hours. They were back home across the border. The workers are from mckee. Laura's those are mostly. Us owned factories located in border towns in mexico manufacturing everything from car parts to furniture. We're in the middle of the morning. We opened with five in the morning. The idea of a cross-border vaccination program came out of california back in may and then got replicated elsewhere along the border like you've gotta go county in texas officials there save a goal is to keep the economy going especially the supply chain between mexico and the us doggone county judge. Richard cortes insisted these vaccines were not being taken away from eligible. Us citizens whose program is taken leftover vaccines soon to expire in vaccinated makila workers before the vaccines are destroyed. We think this is a good thing and factory. Owners covered all the costs but the vaccination programs just ended in july the. Us hasn't extended the permit to continue and us. Mexico border remains closed to non essential travel only. Us citizens can freely cross some supporters of these cross-border vaccine partnerships. Say more are needed other state. The effort came too late. People like julia king yoenis cheese the director of coma frontier so the overdose. It's a nonprofit organization that works with my co workers in the in the state of mexico. That's right across texas tunas causes. Season is the gator Noticed interests that would was measles vaccination rates but she doesn't think all of the health needs to come from the. Us there are more vaccines available in mexico now but people are not showing up. She thinks that if the us and mexico had started their cross-border vaccination much earlier when mexico that in have vaccines interest would have been much higher. It'll be hotel. They to go to the yard mooch puna synthesis on goethe now many workers are feeling too comfortable. She says some factories have stopped mask. Mandates and social distancing. She says there is a false sense of security. Lydia ikeda is worried that on top of that there is also vaccine hesitancy. She's with the university of california san diego health. She helped with a cross-border program when it began so with adults various. It's even more urgent. That we vaccinated planning that we can right now. What matters is winning over those still on the fence. Ikeda says if booster shots are needed in the future she wants to make sure mikimoto workers will be some of the first to receive them again. Border is this imaginary line to our end. But we're really one community and you can't get away from that mike. Laura's are the bread and butter for these border. Towns and the health of their workers reflects the health of the community on both sides of the border for the world as he contreras in turkey. Istanbul is one of the world's centers of so called modest fashion entire design studios or devoted to a growing market for looser and longer cuts as bruce garin reports the popularity of modest fashion. There is being driven by scores of young muslim. Women who say the industry is finally responding to their needs and tastes when he was a teenager. Shopping for clothes was the worst. When i was little Twas a torture like you need to look really really really closely to find something. Tops from mainstream brands. like zara h. m. Were always too short too tight or transparent. I when i signed the twinning his up it was like something really bad like. I wear a crop up on underneath athletes and then a jeans. It was always about that one. Look you know while they is a mom now. She just got her master's in communication design. And she's probably one of the most stylish people i know her. Instagram is full of photos of her in flowing colors bright fuchsia blue chip fund a mint. Green jacket the look is always topped with a perfectly draped headscarf for sporty turban for us. As a his obvious lack the only thing that is showing to the words you know so it needs to be really again. People like hiba that i should yield. A room started designing clothes for over a decade ago. Her store miss aisha one of the first modest fashion brands and as she shows me around. It's clear how much thought goes into designing each piece bamboo. As an example she pulls out a black and white tunic. I've sold this for three seasons. She says some women want something really plane like this other stay. That's two plane. Where will i wear it. So i pull out this one which has been nice embroidery diving dish in basel and log onto buddhist This is what people are looking for yields says classic personal designs good fabrics according to revenue projections by salaam gateway an analytics company focusing on muslim consumers. Muslims globally spent two hundred seventy seven billion dollars on clothes and shoes in twenty nineteen a sector. That's expected to grow to three hundred eleven billion dollars in twenty twenty four to tap into this market yildirim says major brands and luxury. Stores are starting to copy modest brands like hers. But they're doing it. Clumsily almost audibility shaver. They wanna make money but they don't want to acknowledge that their marketing to muslim women. You'll says it's such a contradiction. you'll durham. Store sits in a shopping mall and district full of textile workshops and wholesalers in his temple but this small is unique even by turkish standards because every shop is designed for women who wear modest clothes. And as you walk you start to realize just how much variety there is a sign that the market is really maturing. There's manuka a dreamy brand of patterned fabrics and pastel colors for young women and manila sportswear. Company that tells a swimming shop and to sh- privee whereas in john zarrella is the creative director young jugular Team the on whatsapp call. She shows me some of her latest designs lighter fabrics cetera breathable but not transparent comfortable in the summer. Small details denver movable pieces that can make the same garment transformed into a new look a two door the other Your columbia that. She says she's not shirt. Why major brands missed the modest clothing market for so long. She supposes they have enough resources to do their research. And recruit co workers but this market is worth embracing. She says Be automated these witnesses. That on quality of a group hasn't always an easy time finding their voice. This can be a way to do it. Gives air says after all your clothes can speak even before you do for the world. I'm gary garin istanbul turkey. We'll be right back. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world a year ago protests erupted in the streets of belarus. They lasted for months. After the fraudulent re-election of strongman alexander lukashenko the west impose sanctions on belarus for the rigged elections and human rights violations. Now the us canada and the uk or imposing another round of sanctions yesterday during an eight hour press conference a reporter asked look shaneco specifically about the uk sanctions time. Medicinal iaea lukashenko said the uk can choke on the sanctions. I'm joined now by former ambassador. Daniel freed he was a state department coordinator for sanctions policy from two thousand and thirteen to seventeen. He's now a fellow with the atlantic council ambassador. What's your reaction to this new round sanctions. I'm glad that the us and uk have joined the eu in increasing the sanctions on lukashenka. The us actions. That came out on august. Ninth are strong. I hope there is strong enough to make an impression. We left some things on the table. I'm afraid but it's important to show the byelorussian people that we're with them not just in words but in deeds and we. The democratic west is determined to put pressure on lukashenka. So what is the goal now with these sanctions. What is the us want to achieve. And what's different from the first round of sanctions. What's different from the first front under sanctions. These hit the bill russian economy. More broadly particularly interesting of the sanctions after business people and their business empires that are tied to lukashenka. In other words the united states knows where the money is and they're going after it. What we aim to do is support a long-term democratic process in belarus. And this is a little bit like the support for solidarity in poland in the nineteen eighties. The democratic movement in both countries is mass not shallow. It's not just a group of isolated dissidents it's a broad social movement and the west stood behind in poland in the nineteen eighties. They stand behind it in belarus. Now there are differences. Of course is the putin is determined to prevent the success of democratic movements in the country. He regards as properly under moscow some but things have a way of not remaining name in that part of the world. We have to look at the long-term be determined. Will how do you think these sanctions will directly impact lukashenko and his inner circle. It shows that we know. Who's in the inner circle. That's important it punctures the niff- of lukashenko's invulnerability of impunity. The us unfortunately left some things on the table. The eu and uk went after byelorussian sovereign debt. That is russian state bonds. We didn't i think we should have but fell be time enough to escalate it shows also the belorussian opposition whose leader To oscar was recently in washington and hit home run. She and her team more terrific. I met with them several times. They captured widespread report from democrats and republicans alike. The european support them so this was a sign that europe and the united states are not going to simply wash their hands of belarus. And assume that it's good enough to let putin habit. Let me ask you this ambassador effective or sanctions when it comes specifically to lukashenka even with last year sanctions. We've seen lukashenka force down a ryan air flight to apprehend a belorussian dissident. We saw belorussian politics with their head and the olympics. It doesn't seem like lushenko is all that threatened by sanctions. Will you've asked a good question and the answer. I'm afraid is that sanctions can work. But they often don't work as fast as you want them to. You're not going to snap your fingers imposed sanctions and then see some dictator. Throw up his hands. And say i surrender. That's not how it works. Sanctions can put broad pressure on an economy and put a dictator under some pressure. But they are unlikely to overthrow him just by themselves so the whole strategy cannot simply be sanctions. If we're serious about supporting democracy in belarus. And i think we should be then. We need to supplement sanctions with sustained outreach to the democratic movement. This doesn't work overnight. This is a policy rule. We often overestimate what we can achieve in the short run but we sometimes underestimate what we can achieve in the long run. If we mean it and in belarus we need it still. We heard look earlier telling the uk to go choke on it. Sanctions could the sanctions. That lukashenko symtas simply doubling down on his defiance may be pushing further into russia's sphere of influence. He's gone all the way back to russia for a long time he flirted with the west. The trump administration with some basis tried to work out arrangements with him. He released some political prisoners. He he suggested that he would be willing to compromise in certain areas that all ended with the fraudulent elections and then lukashenko's subsequent escalation. He's escalated a lot. The notion that were driving him into putin's arms. Hey he's there okay. He may prefer to his own dictator rather than putin's gone but he's all in on accepting russian support which means effectively russian control. The notion that we should ease up on lukashenka because he he would ease up repression. We tried. that didn't work now if he were to offer to release political prisoners are take concrete steps on not saying never talked to him. Fine keep your options open. But let's not kid ourselves. The guy is determined to use mass arrests including torture including merger of dissonance to get his way. Let's not kid ourselves about this. We have to mean it. Ambassador daniel freed was the state department coordinator for sanctions policy from twenty thirteen to twenty seventeen. He's now a fellow with the atlantic council ambassador. Free thank you for being with us my pleasure. Thanks for the opportunity. As i mentioned a moment ago president lukashenko's press conference. Yesterday was long eight hours long. Believe it or not that was not the longest press conference in recent memory. That honor goes to volodin mirrors alinsky the president of ukraine. He held a fourteen hour press event a couple of years ago. They comedian turned president. Kind of set himself up when he essentially said. Ask me anything. He met with hundreds of reporters in shifts. Small clusters of journalists shuffling through the president's table at a trendy food court did not give me not. we'd be voice quality after several hours. It good for that presser. Alinsky said he actually had vocal cord injections beforehand. So he could talk. Longer seriously. ukraine's national records agency declared the fourteen. Our press conference the longest in world history. In fact around the eight hour mark a government official interrupted the presser to announce at the record had been broken. The mark that zilenski clips was held by none other than belorussian president. Alexander lukashenko for his eight hour presser. He held a few years before. Maybe it's an eastern european thing. Russian president vladimir putin has also gone long with the press. He's spoken to reporters for more than four hours on several occasions. No independent body has verified zielinski fourteen hour record for the longest press conference. If there's a longer one you know about reach out to us on twitter we're at the world. Climate scientists gave us a dire warning this week. We need big. Societal changes now but it's also not wrong to think my biking to work can also help save the planet. It's only wrongheaded if it's been seen as a substitute for societal action for government action or our entire economy to take action on its own. What do we do. That's coming up here on the world. I'm marco werman. You're with the world where co-production gbh boston npr x. For the next ten minutes we're going to hear a story about the oldest brothel in bangladesh. The story contains explicit mention of sexual assault and may not be suitable for all listeners. We're taking a behind the scenes. Look at the world of sex work and one woman's experience in that world here to introduce the stories jason palmer host of the intelligence from our partners at the economist. Jason setup what we're about to hear where is this brothel in who's the reporter. So kandahar is on the edge of textile town northwest of the bengladeshi capital dhaka At our reporter korean redfern had been visiting lots of these brothels trying to draw a connection between bangladesh is widespread practice child marriage and its extensive. I'd guess you say industry of of brothels girls are married off their young very often into horrifically abusive marriages so many of them escape. But then what to break off a marriage bring shame to the families. That are often ostracized. They're left entirely alone and as they try to make their way. Maybe cities to get jobs in the textile industry. They're very vulnerable to sex traffickers. Here's from the podcast. You walk through one of three gates and enter a labyrinth of car metal and bright pink and buildings which house hundreds of veterans and more than fifty shots beauty salons and t- stools and this is home to more than six hundred women and girls and frequented by up to three thousand customers every day. And this is where munawar bag game lips and he bad. She's a forty four year. Old women here is traffic. Didn't the brothel when she was about twelve years old and today she's in charge. I really started reporting this story four years ago. When i teamed up with bangladeshi journalist allier san and together we spent several weeks with monowara encounter parapro every evening with it together on upturned plastic buckets than she had chain smoke cigarettes after cigarettes while remembering the past and then when cove it broke breakout last year alley and i reached out to monowara gain to find out how she was coping and over the course of dozens of interviews. She began to tell her life story in it. Complicated and difficult trees. This story of how are came to the brothel goes back more than three decades rally. Critter parents died when she was a child when she was twelve years old. Her relatives arranged heads get married to a man more than twice age he raped and beat everyday and then he invited his friends to do the same after several months. Munawar escaped to her uncle's house but then he tried to rape peres. Well menara decided to run away. A gain should hud about this village near the town of tango. An hour away where women and girls lived align and man visited only to pay them although she wasn't sure why but she took a rickshaw anywhere across town to counterpar and upon arrival an older woman named sufia. Welcome to this day and told her that she could sleep. In how bad on have fourth day in the brothel towed munawar amana. Come to meet monowara. Here is still just twelve. Years old refused but see fear. Wouldn't take night for an answer and went to your members that day. Munawar recoils pain and humiliation nikki cleverly. She told us that what happens. Made her feel like she was dying of shame. Later when the man left munawar ask c. Fear for the money that he had paid to rape pa but the older women told that that money had already gone towards paying her rent. Prostitution is legal in bangladesh but in theory likud officials satisfied that everyone working in a brothel is very teen and fully consent but i met girls as young as twelve thirteen who been trafficked into the sex industry and typically these guys book by wealthier old women known in bengali assata unease and they then have to earn back the amounts of money that was paid for them which can often take years. Munawar is case was slightly different because nobody had actually sold her into the brothel after eight months under. Cps control she found a police officer and made a plea to stay at the brothel but continue whacking independently. Shit stop trying to escape because experience torture that life outside the brothel could be even more dangerous for teenage go. Things really began to change from one of wire in around nine hundred ninety six when she was approaching hurriedly twenties. At this time the women he lived in canterbury were forced to publicly identify themselves sex wackos whenever they went into town. Most humiliating boo. They weren't allowed to wear shoes one day. Munawar attended a workshop organized by a charity and she wanted to look for the occasion. Say she and two other. Women decided to take risk and west shoes anyway. But when they return scans apar- the chief sada any tried to find them for breaking the rule. Munawar have friends outraged and decided to stage of protests. Eventually they organized a meeting with the local police here to their surprise decided they were actually in the right maya from now on the get dress however they pleased outside the brothel and from one. It was the first time in her life that she had sat out to achieve something and one says she immediately wants to to gain a year later. She and her friends attended a conference in india. The sexes right. Munawar told us that she was struck by the realization of how much power sex workers in bangladesh could have if they were only united for the extra then we cannot and now the upon their return to find us the three women were inspired to foam an organization that would look after the counterpart sex workers interests and campaign for that right. Mccarthy organization nari mukti sangha which means women's liberation the most important role of the organization was to ensure human rights with hundreds of women and gals inside the brothel by offering free condoms. Medical supplies an providing such support the organization it's founders became more and more powerful by the time she was in authorities munawar was one of the brothels most high-profile figures she no longer so customers have so instead she took a cut. She collected on behalf of the landowning side earnings. She only had one rule that she would never buy. A traffic girl. Has south Today munawar is feelings about cancer para a complicated hundreds of women gulls. It's still sight of violence rate and the beast but the society with saif few opportunities for women is also protects them from destitution poem. She said that sometimes she does about what would have happened if she'd had a good marriage to a good man she's had children to cook for and eat with. She thinks life would have been so happy then. She pictures the violent man who she was forced to marry when she was twelve years old and she thinks how lucky she is to be here and how lucky she is to be free. That was karen redfern reporting for the economist telling us about her multi year assignment. The story of a brothel in kanda para the oldest brothel in bangladesh. A report aired on a recent edition of the podcast. The intelligence from our partners at the economist myanmar has been under the thumb of army general since the military coup there in february but even before the coup nearly three million burmese were facing hunger now. The united nations world food program estimates that number could more than double by october to make matters worse. Kovic is spreading alarmingly fast. They're stephen anderson is in myanmar. he's the world food programme's country director and joins us from the capital city. Naypyidaw stephen what does it look like in the capital and is it all reflective of of other parts of the country the situation now i would say in myanmar is the most difficult time for the people in living memory. First of all they have poverty combined with political unrest and economic crisis since the military takeover in february and covert. We've had very terrible wave last year but the one that's hitting us now. It's like sue nami. That's hit this country will the uk's embassador to the un has said that half of myanmar's fifty four million people could get coveted within weeks. What numbers are you hearing. And what are your concerns for the coming weeks and months you know that number of course it sounds very dramatic but it rings true with me because people are being put in hospitals. The hospitals are full. There's not enough oxygen unconcerned that it's not only a health crisis but it's going to also have an immense impact on people's livelihood. We're seeing it in naypyidaw. We're seeing it worse in the bigger cities like yangon and mandalay. I mean we did. A survey in the poorest areas of yang-gon ninety percent of the people had to borrow money just to buy food. So i understand the conditions. What happened to food stocks. So how did that get worse. Well there is food in the country. The problem is not so much one of availability one of access so the poorest people do not have enough money to buy the food to put it on the table for their families. They've lost income. Because the economy is in a tailspin. It's been very difficult justifying odd jobs. That were there. In the past. The price of fuel the price of gas the price of food has also increased so cova does he said has had an economic impact on the people of me and more like so many parts of the globe. How is covert impacted your distribution networks in myanmar. We had to really rethink how we carry out distribution for example in the kind of informal settlements on the outskirts of yang-gon whereas before we would line up the distribution and people would come and they would socially distance. We can't afford right now to have people crowding so we're trying to deliver door to door and outside. The big cities like angang nipah dog then more rural areas. Is that aid getting to the families that need well. We are getting assistance to the hinge and other ethnic groups mainly living closer to the border areas of men mar but we have to of course apply on a monthly basis for approval for each of our distributions and covert has slowed everything down because we need to provide evidence that our staff have been tested for cova. Were trying to also get vaccinations for all of our not only our staff but also partners and contractors including truck drivers. But that's also been a big challenge. Where vaccinations have have been very limited compared to you know many countries and it's partly due to the military takeover which setback a lot of public health efforts as a un agency neutrality is important to the mission of the world food program to what degree the world food programme cooperate with me and mars military government. I described the relationship. And how you're trying to balance that you know. Our our focus is to support the people of men maher who are facing hunger and food insecurity. So that's our mission to to get them. we have to coordinate with multiple layers of defacto authorities. We just have to explain what we're doing and explained that our assistance is neutral. And we try to make sure that we avoid any attempt to politicize our assistance. What is your first priority right now. We know the situation is deteriorating. So my objective is to be able to get out and assist those people who are most in need but also raise the necessary resources so that we can actually purchase food and sustained support. Stephen anderson is me and my country director for the. Un's world food program speaking with us about the urgent need for more food aid for the people of myanmar steven. Thanks for being with us. Thank you that big. Un climate report. That came out yesterday was almost four thousand pages long. Needless to say we could not get to all the important points on air so for the next few days. Our environment correspondent carolyn. Bieler will be bringing you a few short highlights. Here's caroline today. We're talking carbon budgets. Scientists can make much better estimates these days of just how much carbon dioxide we can emit before the earth warms up certain amounts like to a degree and a half or two degrees celsius scientists. Call that amount of greenhouse gas pollution. We can still admit before hitting the temperature marks our remaining carbon budget bill collins from the university of reading worked on that section of the report and share those findings gay to be reasonably certain of staying below one and a half degrees. Then we can only about three hundred tons of conduct side three hundred more giga tons. Total ever right now. The world as a whole amidst around forty a little bit more giga tons of carbon dioxide each year. So do the math. That's really only giving as much less than a decades. Were all missions. Left seven or eight years worth of emissions at current rates if you want to be exact. He calls getting down to zero emissions before. Then that will be a really really told. All we have the equivalent of about twenty years of emissions left till limit warming two degrees celsius. But that doesn't mean we can continue emitting just carry on as we were for the next twenty years business as usual for twenty years would then means slamming on the brakes going from full emissions to zero literally overnight aligned like cliff if you were to plotted on a graph. No one is suggesting that instead. Scientists say we have to quickly then the curve of emissions down over the next thirty years. If we wanna hit those temperature targets for the world i'm caroline bieler climate change and what to do about it. It is heavy stuff but there are solutions on the world. We reported on the climate with an eye on the future. Find more of our solutions based reporting from our big fix team online at the world dot. Org slash big fix code red for humanity translation. There is little time to act to save the planet for future generations that is declare an urgent message in the latest united nations report releases week on climate change. But what is the way forward. Climate scientists. william uma has some ideas. He was a lead author of five previous climate. Change reports from the intergovernmental panel on climate change. He's also professor emeritus at tufts university's fletcher school. Bill we know we have to act fast. Parts of the world are literally going up in flames california greece siberia. I mean. how do you understand this moment. In time. we're living through. Its unfortunately the outcome that Those of us have been working on this for a very long time. I began in nineteen if feared new coming. If we didn't act it's come a lot faster than we thought. Because it's very difficult to anticipate and quantify the amplifying feedbacks that occur once warming starts. So what exactly would affect of change. Look like i mean should each and every one of us be scrutinizing purchases we make and deciding went to start the car up or is that just a moot point right now given the need for profound structural change. I don't think it's a conflict between two things. i think it's very much all of the above. We need to act individually because we are the consumers who are purchasing the devices that are causing the emissions. Obviously corporations need to provide us with vehicles we need and with the solar panels we need and the home insulation that we need and we have to work in a coordinated matters a society both in the united states in between the united states and the rest of the world so all the levels matter the messaging around climate that has put the burden on individuals to do things like bike. More take shorter showers. Switch out your incandescent bulbs has been wrong headed. It's only wrongheaded if it's been seen as a substitute for societal action for government action for entire economy to take action on its own. What has been the missing element so far to really jump. Start action on this crisis. I mean what is the holdup the hold up his. We've had a huge amount of false information and interference many corporations who see their business model as being threatened and we have an electoral system in which it's kind of pay to play and so many people in government are doing the bidding of the interest that support their campaigns. And so we need to deal with that as well. A lot of analysts point too late stage capitalism the constant making shipping and buying of goods at an international scale corporate board seeing growth is the only metric. How do you address that. Let's tough one to address but it doesn't need to be addressed free trade for the sake of free. Trade became the mantra regardless of how damaging was to human rights how damaging was to climate how damaging it was to people's health if you prioritize something as simplistic as something i can count like the growth in the gdp as opposed to the quality of life and people's well being. We're going to have this kind of a problem. Maybe this will jolt people into a rethinking how we measure success as a society against on our program yesterday author daniel chanelle said a big part of the problem is generational he accused. Some policymakers in the baby boomer generation of sleepwalking through the climate crisis does understanding this as a generational problem. Help us at all. It doesn't a sense i mean. I've been mentally impressed with the energy of the youth in the greta ton verbs of this world. The second thing is we've focused too narrowly. For example we see this as technological problem with only technological solutions so yes solar panels. Electric vehicles other technological solutions. They are necessary but there's a part of the report that is i think being overlooked it points out that not only are these the highest levels. We've seen eight hundred thousand years and all that stuff that we've all known for a long time it points out. Something is only a few of us have been paying attention to which is in decades the annual atmospheric increase in carbon dioxide from all sources than just forty four percent of what we add in any other terms. That would be a miracle. Where's it going. We'll fifty six percent of what we amount equal to fifty six percent removed every year from the atmosphere by forests by wetlands and by oceans and the largest of those forests and yet we are degrading our forest all over the world even canada's managed forests have become a source instead of a sink. The amazon much of it has become a source instead of a sink. And we just keep on destroying the very systems that are saving us from really a true descent into haiti here. We could do a lot more in the united states. it's not just the amazon. We in the united states could be doing more to protect the forest. That are growing and absorbing the most carbon dioxide and accumulating out of the atmosphere well the biden administration says combat. Climate change is central to us agenda and yet the us has long been the outlier western nations with its inaction on climate. Do you think that's really changing now. I do think it is. I think the administration is making a curry best effort at this point. I wish it were more aggressive than it is. But it's certainly off to a dramatic shift from even even the most progressive actions of past administrations. Nothing comes close to what is being done here and yet i think i'd have to say it's certainly not enough white house. Officials are already curbing expectations about the green parts of the infrastructure package. That goes to the senate today. Some things like rosen. Bridges could be acted upon quickly. But we also hear that we may not see. The more green initiatives like like electric vehicle charging stations until many years. Down the road so given this. Ipcc report came out yesterday. Justice a thought exercise. How would you re imagine the allocation of resources to better address. What's in the report. There is no technological option that can come close to be removing fifty six percent of what we're bidding other than natural systems so we need to up our focus on natural systems. We also need upper focus on technology that will reduce our emissions from energy and and from other activities and also mentioned almost in passing which. I think is shortcoming other report that beyond carbon dioxide which is only responsible for baby right now maybe every year about to be sixty percent of the warming. There's another forty percent coming from other gases and so those need to be addressed as well. What are some of those other sources of gas. The one that gets the most attention because it's the second largest after carbon dioxide methane and the methane is ninety percent of natural gas it's released from many aspects of agriculture and livestock livestock particularly. Yes and so. Those need to be addressed as well. Climate scientists william o. Was a lead author of five previous. Un climate change reports. He's a professor emeritus. Tufts university's fletcher school bill. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you for having me. The work is and will be hard to quote rosie. The riveter we can do this. The world comes from an and bill harris studio. Gbh in boston be safe. Stay strong we'll be back with you tomorrow.

lukashenka marco werman mexico united states Munawar ethiopia belarus world peace foundation munawar lukashenko myanmar Alexander lukashenko uk putin Carbon valley cooper mckim Cole cindy alexander lushenko ethiopian government
Taliban fighters are in the streets of Afghanistan's third-largest city

The World: Latest Edition

48:42 min | 2 months ago

Taliban fighters are in the streets of Afghanistan's third-largest city

"This episode is supported by owning public. Media's carbon valley. I'd like to recommend another series. I think you'll enjoy. Carbon valley is a funny sentimental and informative show about the future of coal. it treks wyoming's dream of creating. Its own silicon valley. But with coal host cooper mckim tells the story by following one startup. That's developing carbon capture. Which something could save coal and the climate to if they do enough they could win millions of dollars but will any of it helped cole cindy to carbon valley. Wherever you get your podcasts. The world is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customers can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today at progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed in twenty twenty. Potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations a our top story today. Another provincial capital falls in afghanistan meantime in china tech worker say enough as a country goes through another metoo moment feminist activist actually see this as a break brew fred. The metoo movement also today. There's only one break in the long road from alaska to the tip of argentina. The darien gap in panama migrants have no choice but to cross dangerous jungle. If they want to go north. Arriving in it really really bad condition. I riding this cold. i'm marco werman and in ireland when you want to clear a historic graveyard you hire sheet t. Mothers and a female anime lamb. But we have to get rid of the male recently because his nickname was. Houdini always jumping the fence. Stories are more today here on the world. i'm marco werman. This is the world. Thank you for joining us. The news in afghanistan is moving fast. The taliban is taking control of more and more of the country. The biden administration is now taking steps for the possible evacuation of american personnel from kabul here state department spokesman ned price today. Let me be very clear about this. The embassy remains open and we plan to continue our diplomatic work in afghanistan today. Taliban fighters attacked the city center of harare the third largest urban center in afghanistan and one of the strongest centers of anti-taliban resistance the world sharon jaffar recently visited herat and has been keeping close on. What's happening there. What do we know about the situation in herat right now. Sharon what we know right now. Is that taliban. Fighters are inside the city the taken over historic sites like the studio and the famous blue mosque. These used to be major tourist sites and they've also taken over the police headquarters. So what are you hearing from people inside herat today so i spoke with a twenty year old student. He didn't want me to use his name because he's worried about his safety. So the affairs. The with homages phenomenal in michigan. Mcdonagh sonar whole mom as wannabe. Thank you better. Make sure that your he says he heard a lot of gunfire. Everybody is scared. He says people are trying to leave to safer areas. But the problem. Marco is that the roads leading out of the city aren't safe either because there is in there fighting or taliban whole days goats so people in harare are kind of stock and they have no place to go. This young man told me that he saw government. Soldiers fleeing from the governor's compound and they were taking all their weapons and ammunition with them. He said his family has now moved to another area of the city and they're taking shelter with his sister because they feel. That's the safest place to be. I also spoke with a young woman. She didn't want me to use her name. She's also worried about their safety. When i asked her how she feels. This is what she said Tastic would you mobile modern mechanically exempt. Ibm for the women who be scared she. She says everybody is scared. Even her mom who is typically very calm and strong she says is not worried about what's going to happen in the city. The taliban advances in the past month suren have been alarmingly fast. What's changed in the last couple of weeks in terms of the taliban control over afghanistan marco good pace reach. The taliban has been able to take over major cities. Enough on his phone has been really concerning they. Now hold at least a dozen of the thirty four provincial capitals in afghanistan and it seems like they might be taking even more one thing. I want to emphasize the marco is that the situation is changing fast. So reports that districts or city centres falling to the taliban could change very quickly and because government forces do put up a fight and sometimes they are able to retake these areas also. The taliban might be able to enter parts of major cities but they might not be able to hold these areas for a long time so we have to be cautious about saying that taliban is taking over a lot of these areas. Sometimes they fall back to the government But what these advances do is that they add to the sense of panic among people living in these areas. And what. I'm hearing from. People in harare today is that they are really afraid about what's gonna happen to the city. The wilshire jafari. Thank you very much. You're welcome michael. Many afghans play some of the blame for what's happening right now on their neighbor pakistan us one. Dr mirror spoke with me about pakistan's role in what's happening in afghanistan mir studies south asia security affairs the united states institute of peace. I asked him why some afghans are pointing a finger at pakistan pakistan has had a long standing relationship with the taliban before nine. Eleven bucks was one of three countries which had recognize the government of the taliban after nine eleven on us threat baucus unsighted with the us in doubling the government of the taliban but soon after baucus done enabled the revival of the alvin insurgency from bases in sanctuaries in pakistan. The government over the years has asked pakistan through denied the bundy sanctuaries to target leadership off the taliban which has been based in pakistan however have effected on that issue and that reality has now been internalized to a point that the us government has essentially stopped asking. Buck stan through excel. The taliban denied him sanctity instead. The us priority has moved to asking pakistan to bring the taliban to the negotiating table. So does that mean that pakistan. Representatives are not pushing hard enough or does it mean that. There's just no amount of pushing. They could do to impact taliban action. There's one of the great policy debates you know how much influence does pakistan have. Cassini officials argued that their leverage has been going down over the last few years. Now they say with the us out their leverage is at its lowest. The taliban made all these games on the other hand. Will we see on the ground. Is that donovan. Had been able to retain sanctuary inside pakistan. They have also been able to marshal resources from pakistan medina resources for the military campaign and then on of that pakistan has provided important political cover to the taliban pakistan has not condemned. The taliban footage stepped up violence over the last year or so so that suggests that box on is not exercising its leverage to the fullest and one interpretation which is won't jabal to pakistani strategists is that they want to regain their influence to sneak view which is pervasive in the us policy community especially among the grinds is that pakistan wants to return the taliban to poverty in afghanistan. The us relationship with pakistan has been up and down but never easy. Where does the us fall in the story i think. Us policy makers have long. Struggled to reconciling On this particular issue the administration is refusing to engage with pakistan the level of the head of state's president reagan planes since has not got the pakistani prime minister hun on with the bucks. Any government is fairly missed and by large what. Us officials say is that if the taliban continued to behave poorly as they have over the last few months. And that in the end Ted teddy do regenerate under the taliban situation want to pakistan accountable for that so the overall trajectory of the relationship is going to be fairly bad for the next few months at the least so as the taliban continues its march toward presumably the capital kabul. What is your best hope for. The role pakistan will take on. I think Baucus on wants to avoid long protected. What by kentucky wants to see that alexander turned to bother taking major share of the political. Buy in afghanistan but does not want to see street to street fighting. Do that extent. I think there is some common ground and bugs sunny in. Us policymakers might be to work towards something to find a soft landing however the alabamian have gained so much entity in the last few months. They are more than spain at any point since nine. Eleven until you know the the taliban's behavior divide lifeguard of sorts and drita means to be seen. How much influence. Stan is brought to able and willing to exercise under taliban in the months to come as with the united states institute of speaking with us about the relationship between pakistan and the taliban your thank you thank you for having me. There's a mass migration going on right now. Haitians and cubans tried to move from south to north america many relocated from the islands to south america for work but the jobs eight hoped to find dried up during the pandemic so now thousands of migrants are heading north and have to deal with one of the most dangerous border crossings in the world report manual. Rada has more from northern colombia. The last stop before the perilous first steps into central america and the colombian town nicopoli hundreds of migrants lineup under the sun. Each day. they're waiting for boats. Take them one step closer to the border with panama. Many wear rubber boots. Wrap their belongings in garbage bags sealed with tape. These people are preparing to cross. The darien gap a wet into rootless jungle that separates columbia from central. America is the migrants. Wait in line. A preacher praise for their safety. Darren deadly many migrants say they've seen corpses along the route while others have been robbed but folks say they're willing to take the risk for those with no visas like ronald to send from haiti. It's the only way to reach the united states. just not going to wear zona. Only god knows what will happen. He says he can't rob one hundred percent of the people. Some will suffer but others will be fine according to panama's government at least forty. Six thousand migrants have crossed through the daring gap. This year and checked in shelters were health. Services are available many are haitians and cubans. Who had been living in south america for the past few years. Some of the haitian migrants say that the pandemic has made it harder to make a living in places like brazil or chile. Joseph dickinson's is traveling with his wife and three children who says that. The devaluation of brazil's currency is one of the reasons he's on the move again picked up the immigrant so that is a great country where people respect immigrants. He says my salary there was only about two hundred dollars a month. Other say that immigration laws made the move doku montre also from haiti had been living in chile for the past four years. She traveled to the us with her small daughter who was born in that country. Anything up espn espn remember. Winter about who couldn't manage to get residency papers in chile mantras and without that. You can't get good jobs there but get into the us risky and expensive for once migrants. Leave nick liam boats. They arrive in the town of couple out. Where the trail through the daring begins. Some find that they're not fit enough to make this seven day trek. Then they will this and her son blaze sale. Originally from cuba have made three unsuccessful attempts to cross the darien in their. I try but this was overweight fell and fractured her tailbone. The couple had to turn back. That really can look real clear. Conceal terrible there but you have to cross deep rivers and walk through steep trails in which only one person fits at a time. Sometimes you have to climb on your hands and feet like a mountain climber. Still many continue to file through the jungle with their children at the other end of the darien gap in panama cruise without borders wants a small health posts where migrants that served more than three thousand people in july arriving at really really bad condition. The projects director round lopez says migrants arrive with injured feet and suffering from dehydration. The road kinda last minimum seven days during the rainy season in some cases more than twelve fourteen days arriving saturday cold by the worst worst team they are facing the death salt. They have been roped. Some of the women have been raped. And this is an acceptable. Doctorswithoutborders is urging the governments of panama and colombia to develop safer routes for migrants passing through their countries. That could mean given them visas to take. Flights were allowing migrants to travel to panama boats. Instead of having to cross the jungle but even though solutions might only cover a small number of people with the moment many will have to trek through the darien gap to make it into panama in the jungle. There are jackets jeans and shoes left by the migrants. They shed their luggage to make it through the demand in trail for the world. I'm manuel the way. They're in kaplan columbia. Just ahead one communities effort to preserve a dying language and later on the show taking a taxi to a gold medal. Your with a world. I'm marco werman this is the world. There's a story about using the right tool for the right job in ireland. There is a particular historic graveyard with a very unusual crew. Excavating the site archaeologists. If you can call them. That are sheep and goats. A local conservation project brought them in to uncover the overgrown gravestones at saint matthews church in the parish of temple brady and county cork. Audrey buckley is a counselor in county cork and a volunteer with the temple. Brady save our steeple committee. She told me how the project got started. So for years ago in wales. I so she actually came before they were just in the headlines roaming around and gives me an idea of how we could manage the one. Hector old graveyards. That's we had next. This church saint matthews in crawford county cork when we say excavating. What are these animals actually doing this cheaper great freezing ross and they get the grass right down so for us. It's an echo friendly way of it an area 'cause we gently and respectfully go in and we kind of caught around the scrub with hunting tools after the sheep leave the goats him and i do the heavy lifting of using the brush and scrub. And what's come out of this is especially because with cova lockdown at the community is all come together so it's an amazing community project and when we had the forego factually originally we have to put up signs for kids and families to stop feeding them because so much food was being brought up to him that they weren't doing their job they weren't easing this scope because they were being fed by locals and then the mayor the sheep we had two mothers and a female a male lion but we have to get rid of the male recently because his nickname was houdini because he kept escaping the we will be getting calls two or three times a day. Saying one of the lambs is so. We're learning as we go. But it's been a great community projects any no finding these uncovering the this part of history. That's you know a lot of in the air wouldn't even have known. Existed has brought the community together at some unit. Volunteers are amazing and the volunteers are exceptional. Work up there. So we're very fortunate to have a strong community across ivan sheep goats revealing history. So the graveyard today no longer use as a burial ground who is buried here and how long ago. 'cause and is the second largest harbor cork harbour in the world's okay so we have a fourth camden mar and in the eighteen. Hundreds when the british were there. There's a part of the graveyards that actually a lot of the royal engineers from For come tomorrow would be buried up there. We found this little lamb. Eighteen seventy two grave of a little girl called maria kate russell. She died october. Eighteen seventy two. We were able to contact her family. Her grand nephew lives in england He was delighted. He had no idea that his great grandfather actually was working here in them for camden. Marin cross savin And as soon as With co guidelines are allowed he will be coming over to visit and we registered all the headstones on historic grade stocks com. So anybody internationally can look to see if they have actually reticence. Burried up in tampa breezy graveyards. Audrey what is the hope for this project. What do you hope to accomplish by clearing the stones. Yeah so we hope is because we've also on earth did a famine grave area. Apparently this two and a half to eight thousand people buried and in part of the grave from eighteen forty six so what we want to do is educate ourselves and to create an area up. There that people will go in. It's not taboo to go into a graveyard mean. It's the best spas in the area. You're overlooking queenstown. The last port for the titanic. So it's a beautiful spot so we want people to come up and enjoy and we're trying to maintain i'm sustain what we volunteers have created up there. Audrey buckley is a counselor and county cork in ireland and a volunteer with the temple. Brady save our steeple committee. Thanks very much for your time. Audrey best of luck to you thank you very much. We're going to take a little dive now into languages at sound different from ones. You might be familiar with. I'm talking about click languages. They're found only in africa languages where the tongue makes a clicking sound that serves as a kind of constant in some parts of africa where few native speakers are left. These languages are dying out. Neil mcquillan rights for the economist magazine. He spoke with one of the last remaining speakers of the disappearing. Click languages of the san people of southern africa one of the earliest humans. They were originally of hunting group. His territory was southern africa. On one point that would have been hundreds of click languages. Button is now one of the remaining ones. When i started hearing about the a three or four remaining speakers. Now it's just one left unnamed katrina s out. When i first heard about i came across the name of sheena shaw who along with her colleague that kind of the world experts on the click languages of this region and i got in touch machine and she was incredibly justic about teaching me about these languages. No is pronounced with an identically consonant. In fact a nasal dental click consonant dental kate continents aw articulated with the tip of the tongue against the avi leverage or the upper teeth. If you wanted to say hello in. You'd say coke in order to ask how someone's doing you'd say gave kabbah and then to respond and say that you're doing fine you'd say not cover. She shaw has come in over the time that she spent with katrina sound community. She's what very costly. How you produce these clicks with the mouth on how to different shake one day of the house forty five click consonants with the dental pig type. You have the word queue meaning nose but the click type you have the word kai meaning springbok with electrically type. You have the word. Meaning milk one of the clicks is noticed. The kiss click. If you wanted to say the word cat in you'd say and this past a nasal labial click constant to put it in a sentence. Now if you want to just say the cat is old in. You'd say walking accordia younger generation. Don't speak because over the years. The sun people persecuted. They went into hiding. They was scotland and they originals. Because of another click languages started speaking out for cons on the white bosses. Obeyed them from speaking. So it's only been in recent years that there's been interesting song. Identity and the nineteen eighty s. A linguist came across a speaker of on. He encouraged her to mak- random appeal from other speakers to come forward and a few on. That's how this very gradual resurgence of has taken place. Wow amazing mcwilliam there. He comes to us from the intelligence. Podcasts from our partners at the economist katrina sa by the way one of the last speakers of the san click language is eighty eight now. She has dedicated her remaining years to teaching language. Her community is even built a classroom next to her house where dozens of students study and learn from her. Today you can hear children in the streets of the township playing and singing in their ancestral language. More stories from around the globe are coming up your with the world. Eighty has been shattered by poverty. Natural disaster now a political assassination. The haitian band like hummus. Zeke wants to know. there's much more to their country. What we hoping to do is to show the other side of haiti. Which is the culture. The love the oneness. That beauty of haiti. That's coming up on the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world where a co production of gbh boston npr x. The world needs immediate rapid and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in other words an energy revolution on an unprecedented scale to avert the worst scenarios of climate change. That is the stark warning from hundreds of climate scientists this week. But what does that change actually. Look like. that's what we dig into this week on the big fix teams. Can we turn this around. We have no adoption. What we do now will profoundly affect the next few housing year. The new report from scientists working with the un says it is still possible to minimize the worst impacts of climate change to keep global warming to a degree and to have celsius. The world's environment correspondent carolyn. Billers been looking at how to do that carolyn. What needs to happen to keep targeting play well. Scientists who wrote this report laid out these five different emissions scenarios. They're basically five different future worlds that we can choose from based on how much or how little we omit of carbon dioxide and things like methane and found that from a pure physical science perspective. It is still possible to limit global warming to a degree to have celsius by the end of the century. Now it would require getting down to net zero carbon dioxide emissions by twenty fifty which means anything that's emitted is then basically offset by planting trees or using carbon capture technology. And then after that we actually have to start removing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Then we put into it before we get to the. How carolyn what happens. If we do meet that target it means the world is a lot more habitable in a lot of ways associate levels are only one to two feet. Higher compared to the worst case scenario of more than six feet extraordinary heatwaves are only about twice as likely as they are today rather than ten times more likely one of the scientists who worked on these scenarios john done from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration told me that even the mid range scenario is not something we want to entertain the message. A three degrees it has got to be avoided all costs because it's just too to staying at higher amounts of warming things like the collapse of the antarctic ice sheet or math diop's forests. Do get more likely many countries and companies. I know have these net zero by twenty fifty goals. What would it look like to actually achieve. It is hard to overstate. Just how big of a change this would require. The first step is that the entire world needs to electrify everything possible and then switch over to renewable energy the international energy agency laid out this roadmap to net zero and found that ninety percent of electricity would need to come from renewable sources to get to zero and just to illustrate what that looks like for solar energy. That would require the equivalent of building. Today's largest solar park every single day for the next twenty years it would also mean stopping approvals for new oil gas and coal drilling this year. Electrify everything i mean. It's hard to imagine. Electric aeroplanes lets smaller caroline electrify everything with that apply to cars. Yes so gas and diesel. Cars would have to stop being sold by twenty thirty five. That means fourteen years. The entire automobile industry would have to completely redesign their supply chains and manufacturing to produce only electric vehicles and to get to your point about planes things that can't be electrified. Planes trucks containerships when mostly have to use alternative fuels and those things are really just still being developed piloted today. Can we use the same amount of energy and just shift to cleaner energy. I mean is that a calculation we need to also improve energy efficiency for example. New buildings are going to have to use something like one fifth of the amount of energy to heat and cool and we also are going to have to change behaviors particularly people in developed countries. And these are just a couple of examples. Were also going to have to change how we grow food. How we build buildings how we manufacturer how we think about forests and oceans as they remove carbon from the atmosphere all that stuff so the planet needs to make all these changes by twenty fifty if we want to choose that lowest emissions most habitable world scenario. Is that still possible. That depends on how much you believe in the collective power of people to make massive change very quickly. The one point five degree target has always been a very aspirational goal. Many scientists say it is out of reach but people. I've spoken to who live in low-lying island nations for example they will push back and say giving up on that target is basically giving up on their right to survive in their current homes and lives so if that lowest emission scenario does end up being impossible if we can't start building giant solar farms every day. Then what happens. It depends how much we can do. The next highest emission scenario and this report is one that keeps global temperature rise to under two degrees celsius and not scenario gives us about twenty five more years to get to that net darrow. Target finally caroline. I got us this. What if we just keep burning fossil fuels at the current rate. If our emissions don't start decreasing for several decades. We are on track for close to three degrees celsius warming which was scientists said the avoid at all costs scenario. The world's environment correspondent carolyn. Bieler with us unpacking more parts of the un climate assessment. This week caroline. Thank you very much. You're welcome nocco each wait. The big fix is our chance to think about solutions to climate change and how people in groups around the planet are tackling. The crisis explore more from our big fix team at the world dot. Org slash big fix the us population is like the rest of the planet always shifting today the us census bureau laid out. How exactly that's happening in america in its once a decade report. The census has been taken every ten years since seventeen ninety in the twenty twenty count. There are a lot of data points to unpack. But it's what the census says and doesn't say about identity. That intrigued us. We invited mark hugo lopez at the pew research center in washington to talk about this. He's the director of race and ethnicity research at pew mark. Gather you've read the initial results from the census findings. But what are some of your big takeaways. What are the first ones is. Of course the size of different groups of americans for example one of the big takeaways of the decline in the number of americans who are white and non hispanic and. That's the first time we've seen a decline in that population ever in the nation's history and that's one of the big top line findings here the other. One of course is the growing diversity of the country countries more diverse than it has ever been. And that's something that we've seen coming for some time. And it really reflects growth in the nation's latino population but also wrote the asian american in the black population as well but the other interesting findings from these results is the share in the number of americans who identify themselves of two or more races in in their background and that number now is over thirty million people that's highest. We ever seen it. And it's a growing number of folks across a number of different categorisations so a couple of other basic things. We wanted to know what what does. The new census tells about shifting patterns in immigration to the. Us like where people are coming from. Well they didn't ask about the nativity so we don't have that data from this release of the census bureau today but pass data has shown that the nations of endure newly-arrived immigrants are coming more so from asia particularly india china. That has been the case in the past which is largely been latin america at least since the nineteen sixties. The biggest change here is the number of people from mexico coming to the. Us as declined over the course of the last ten years and if the census undercounted immigrants or people of color how will that impact voting or preparation of federal funds in the future or remains to be seen. How good this particular sentence cat was. A lot of data is still to be released to assess the quality but that could affect a number of things including noted attention undercounts that might impact how congressional districts are drawn. And that was the purpose of today's released from the census bureau is to provide the information to staged to begin redrawing congressional districts this racial and ethnic data that's available. Today is the first time it's available from twenty twenty but also is going to be important. For how states redraw the congressional districts so mark one problem a lot of critics have with the census is how it frames questions i mean identity is such a nuanced concept and shifts this internally from person to person and it seems checking boxes doesn't fully get it that do you think the latest census fully captures the identity of immigrants in america. It captures some portion or some part of the ways. People see themselves. Are i will say that our surveys of american adults we have run the questions from the census on both hispanic identity and racial identity have found that generally speaking people who are going to say that they're white or black generally do say that the census forms and format actually works at identifying their identity. The group which is oftentimes a perhaps more of a by requires more nuance is for hispanics and there. We found that only about half of hispanic adults. Tell us that. for example. The census bureau's recent hispanic questions together capture their identity. Are there better ways to frame the question about race. Ethnicity on these forms in are surveys. If your research we've tried a number of different thinks no actually gotten different answers on how you ask for example. What if you just ask. An open ended question with no check boxes. How do you identify your racer. Ethnic background you'll find that. Many americans will use the categories of the census bureau provides whites black african american asian asian american but many also particularly immigrants were point to their origin. Country roots like sander filipino. So how you ask. It can matter a lot but even in an open you'll find. Some people will ask that. They're racist the human race right. So what are your hopes. Mark about the next census twenty thirty and out will better define the counter people in the us. What would you really like to see. Certainly some awareness of an opportunity for people to see themselves in the questions that are asked. Now i know. The census bureau already is talking about changes for twenty thirty and a lot of the research that was done in. The last decade may inform some of those changes but as the us officials today noted in their release you will find that the census form has changed of just about every decade so there is a lot of research going on some proposals that will likely emerge that will have alternative ways of asking about race necessity. But it's important to actually try to get the views of the public itself. Marc lopez is the director of race and ethnicity research at the pew research center. And we were talking about some of the nuances and the new census report out today mark. Thank you for your time. Thank you. China is having a metoo moment. Another metoo moment there in fact allegations of sexual assault at the ecommerce giant alibaba more than six thousand employees signed a letter calling on the company to forbid sexual remarks and games at business events. The move comes. After a female employee accused her manager of raping her during a business trip alibaba executives initially ignored her complaint than a social media. Firestorm erupted and the company responded by firing the manager. Several others resigned reporter hsien. Lou has been following the reaction to the story inside china for the online news outlet protocol china. She joins us from new york shenley. This all started when an employee step forward earlier this month with damning allegation. What did she say. How did she tell her story so she wrote her experience in an eleven page. Arctic paul recounted how she was forced to go on this business trip by her manager. Whose name is long lead and she was groped by a client at a business dinner. Wia wong watched and then she thought she raped by her manager one while she was unconscious in her hotel room on july. The twenty seven and her report to alibaba on august second was ignored it and then she took to the company's internal form and then internal discussion got snowed ogre to the wives social media on china's web and then the story exploded and central to the story shan liu and other stories that have been reported in other companies especially tech companies office culture that encourages drinking at social events. How does that impact employees especially young women. The toxic business drinking culture is not limited to the tech. Industry is very common across china. So young women are often treated basically as automated of business dinners and at those drinking. Tabor's the more powerful figures who are usually mad when take great joy in getting less powerful figures who are women drunk and then a lot of sexual harassment and sexual assault. What follow so a social business setting with clients at the company's trying hard to sell can a woman refused to drink and that kind of setting and what happens. Typically if she did. I think most women wouldn't dare to refuse to drink at those dinner tables in this case the alibaba women's women does. She was forced to go on that trip and her manager channel one told clients that he was sending a pretty lady to the clients and if they refuse to drink there could be severe repercussions to their careers. They might be demoted. They might be a sideline in the company. So out of fear of being punished professionally. A lot of women have to drank at dinner tables even if they don't want to so as he said alibaba is chief. Daniel zhang promise this week is firm would establish new policies to ensure quote zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Do women in china believe him. Do they believe there will be actual change. Some people are skeptical about daniel jams clark. It's cnn is simply a emergency response to appear crisis. That alibaba is undergoing right now. But i've talked to minist- activists who say it's a significant gesture because the rape allegations a forced one of china's most powerful tech companies to come forward and say we're going to warm an anti sexual harassment policy and it might not be just a gesture of because alibaba is now under a lot of regulatory pressure as well as public fresher. It's at the center of an antitrust. Crackdown initiated by beijing and the rape allegations have also enraged by employees as well as the public so feminist activists. Actually see this as a breakthrough for me too movement shehu a reporter with the outlet protocol china's speaking with us from new york about sexual assault allegations of the chinese ecommerce giant alibaba chen lu. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. No athlete is an island. Took a village to win gold. At the olympics from coaches to family and friends one jamaican track and field star. Knows how true that is. Hansel partners jim i to win hands on parchment olympic champion. A huge moment for parchment jamaica. But here's the thing. The new crown champion almost didn't make it to the starting line. He accidentally got on the wrong bus at the olympic village and ended up at the aquatic center. No hurdles air. There wasn't time to travel back to the olympic village to catch the right bus. So as you'd expect. He thought on his feet parchment later told the story on his instagram. Big of course load to do much. Give me some money to take one of the taxis. And that's all. I was able to get to the warm object stadium. Close call the parchment made it the race and the rest is history all because of a little help from a stranger after the medal ceremony on the celebrations. That track star returned to the aquatic center to find the volunteer. They had a beautiful reunion. You were instrumental in me. Get into the plan that the that's just who helped me hartman. Repay the volunteer for that all important taxi and also gave her at jamaica. Olympic shirt volunteer posted a selfie on hunt saying it fits perfectly now. Jamaica wants to extend even more gratitude to the good samaritan. The country's tourism minister edmund bartlett told a local paper that the volunteer is formally invited to the island. He said quote no matter where in the world she is. We wanna reciprocate. The kindness shown to one of our own. When you think of haiti what first comes to mind for many. Who don't live there. The tropes are well worn one of the poorest countries on earth a place prone to natural disasters plagued by political instability and corruption. The haitian band lack musique wants to broncos perceptions and highlight the culture and history that continue to define their country. They do that through music. Like who music's new album leave the bones has just come out sebok with the band. La musique joins us. He's an jack mel haiti. I save a lot of the band. Music has been about reframing what you want the world to see in haiti to kind of even smashed stereotypes of what haiti and haitian culture are. What are those cliches. And how do you and the ban want people to think of haiti. First of all. I think that you cannot describe country by only what you see on the news and what you know the the the news shows everywhere so what we hoping to do because nocco musique to show the other side of haiti which is the culture. A loved one ness you know. That's the part of it. The beauty of haiti and up to now you've primarily done that through kind of mining the traditional music canon of haiti correct correct. Yes what we trying to do is stick the old tradition song and bring some new violate reggae hip hop or anything that we can to make. It sounds new and then keep their generation going to keep the culture going. The new album has a very new sounding production at cinematic. You'll like almost. Haiti is calling out to the world. I guess part of the difference in the sound can be attributed to joseph ray grammy winning producer mixer and dj part of the electronic trio. Niro he came to haiti's volunteer teaching mixing at eighties. Only production and mixing school. I guess how. How did you end up involved together in this project. I was teaching and In the school male old you institute hours. A music producer teacher and then jewelry came to visit that first and then into the school to give a chorus about addiction and then we manage it were studio and we started studied to make stuff. He had a lot of traditional songs. Ceremony song voting songs and ben and see for getting blended and incense different demos. And then we'd be like year. We'd this is good. This is what we can. You know it's a whole process. I think seventy six years process before we get the album five or six years. Yeah how about so. It is a haitian bay sound but with a western production sensibility. How do you the band feel about the results. Does it feel authentic. Yes i mean at the beginning. We were like no. That's not gonna work with as much as we listening to it and make sure that you know because music in general is like there's no there's no wars you can imagine that you know. There's wars between between countries or between races everything but no. There is no if we start building bridges and connect all those dots together in you. Step back you probably see that. It's like it's a oneness. That album shows us that if you take out the war than say. Let's take that bridge from here to here and mixed together at first it might be like awkward but as soon as you start making sense in your head you'll be like the perfect thing. So that's our goal with that alba. Steve what has been the response in haiti to the sound on the bones. Os amazing because at first. They didn't think it was traditional music performing and then they'd be like oh this is this is new now. Everybody's like waiting to see how the how be receiving around the world. So i don't need to tell you steve but Haiti has been in the headlines. Lately since the assassination of president juvenal movies for the outside world this again seems to reinforce that haiti is unable to progress. That perception of course ignores two hundred years of various pressures that have kept eighty from advancing so circling back to where we started reframing. What haiti's about can music play a role in talking about that troubled history. I think definitely. Because what i would say. It's culture that never been really touch. Put words like really direct directly to the people because you know every anything else tried it. Religion tried it and all its extracted. Economy is probably the point that the culture that we use the less to show what we really are what we can do so. I'm really thinking that music can do a lot. Because you know everybody's singing children children's singing dancing you know adults go to clubs so that it's a viral place to put words out and i think yes music is. It's one way to change the way of thinking of the world of probably haiti ferris. And then the whole world follows. Steve occur with the haitian band. Lakhubhai speaking with us from jacques mel haiti about their new album. Leave the bones steve. Thank you very much speaking with us. Thank you very much wasn't on if you want more music from knuckle music and other artists featured on the show check out the spotify playlist we built for you. Find a link to that on twitter feed. We are at the world. This is where we leave you on this thursday. The world comes to you from the nanna. Bill harra studio at gbh in boston. I'm marco werman be safe. Stay strong to see tomorrow.

taliban pakistan marco werman afghanistan us panama herat haiti harare Audrey buckley steeple committee Carbon valley cooper mckim cole cindy carbon valley biden administration ned price baucus sharon jaffar
The Taliban takes over provincial Afghan capitals at an alarming pace

The World: Latest Edition

49:27 min | 2 months ago

The Taliban takes over provincial Afghan capitals at an alarming pace

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Which something could save coal and the climate to. If they do enough they could win. Millions of dollars but will any of it help cole. Carbon valley wherever you get your podcast. As the taliban takeover parts of afghanistan with alarming speed afghans. Living abroad are desperate to get their families out and to safety and maybe a little bit naive and being optimistic. But i have to do everything i can for my family to give them a chance to live. Also today to get into parts of europe you may soon need to be vaccinated against coverted and it matters which vaccine you've got to get your ticket punched. It's ridiculous because messages whichever vaccine get tickets now people have to make choices and gas. Prices are steadily creeping higher president by didn't want opec nations to pump out more oil their response there is plenty already which is basically what you're saying. No we're not going to pump war. And don't know what you're talking about marco werman. The stories are more today. You're on the world. I'm marco werman and this is the world thank you for joining us for millions of people in afghanistan right now. The mood comes down to one word. The taliban has advanced across the country so widely and rapidly that many people are scrambling to find a way out of their country. We start today with what that looks like for. One family lena tori. John is a student at oxford university in the uk. Her family is back in kabul mom siblings nieces and nephews in oxford. Lena has been doing everything she can to find a way to help them get out. Even crowd sourcing funds to pay for plane tickets as the taliban continues to advance toward afghanistan's capital city. I absolutely know with the last few days have been like incredibly stressful to say. The least. I look at my phone and every time a call comes. I think that this may be the call that said my family's not alive anymore. I have been on the phone with. I nieces and nephews daily. I asked them how feeling what they're fearing and also recording. Mike communication with them in case. This is the last time i talked with them. Unfortunately been bringing back a lot of traffic memories from my childhood such as when my school was attacked by the taliban and when they killed my teachers and win the taliban men chase women and children on the streets with webs so extremely distressing and heartbreaking. And you're recording this conversation's you sound really worried a definitely an worried. So apparently the families coping by focusing on Doing whatever we can to assist my mother sister and their family to get out before. It's too late. One of my nieces. Who was eleven years old a smart intelligent girl who has hopes of getting going to university getting a diplomat. She's been incredibly sad and she cries but she said when she cries she cries in her heart because she does not want to discourage her mother and one of my nephews who is nine years old he told me he is preparing to leave and has gathered all his textbooks and says i'll soon so i mean the options for people who want to leave. Afghanistan seem really few. What options are there. Actually a thing right now. Well a lot of embassies have closed as well The people could have possibly gone to iran or pakistan but those borders in closed and they could possibly get these us to go to these other countries neighboring countries but again but the embassies close i think the options are very limited I think there's this window that maybe within the next week or the next few days with troops. Us troops and other troops going to help their diplomatic officials coming out. I think that window of possibly getting on any flight that you can get to get out but again. Most americans don't have passports. They don't have the money they don't know how to go through the system of getting a visa. They don't speak. the language. countries of people are just trapped. There are private agencies charged fees to make a exit arrangements for people. What what services do they offer. And how much do those cost. Oh the private agencies unfortunately during a time like this they have seen the opportunity to make money so for visa for a country that would probably fifty dollars before. Now it's up to seven hundred fifty dollars for because people wanna get out now if you want to have any chance to living people getting together to put the money together to get out but a lot of people are not going to be able to do that. You set up a gofundme. Page to assist your family and getting out of afghanistan You're looking at seven people. Your mother sister brother-in-law and therefore children is reaching out to the public. This way for help really the best chance for people like your family to leave. It was really hard for me to even put his fundraising together. but again. I'm very privileged to have people who've stepped in to help us and i think this may be maybe an option for some of us because others in on may not even have bank accounts So yet right now. It's seven members of my family. But we've just got news that might relatives from zar are leaving Some of them have gotten Flyers with information that they need to marry their daughters to one of the taliban. So they're just sending them to kabul. So i plan for seven people but i think is going to increase to nine or ten. Possibly your family is and because of their ethnicity that puts them in even greater danger. Can you tell us more about that. Yeah it's all ethnic minority and marginalized group in on a strong who have been the target of systematic violence from the taliban but also from government and different ethnic groups are noticeable idiotic appearance and our cultural linguistic difference macaws in easy targets for terrorist organizations the dominant ethnic groups and of course the taliban has been carrying marks of ethnic cleansing genocide. Slavery land confiscation. Almost all the attacks that has been planned such as beheading kidnapping had been done by the taliban on isis. Recently you may have seen on the news that in mollison are taliban killed over forty-nine hussars and their only crime because there has ours. How are you thinking about the future of afghanistan right now to be owners at this point. The future's bleak it's stunning. How quickly to the gates of progress or woman for education for ethnic minorities can be erased within days with the rise of taliban regime which currently appears practically inevitable a shudder to think of the rampant human rights violations in the vale of oppression duck will be fold the nation for the foreseeable feature an aid request international community to really think about the decision making their policymaking and really humanize people have coniston and do their part in it. Lena if your family is able to resettle in a new place would that be a temporary relocation with hopes eventually to return to afghanistan for right now it will be temporary with the hopes of relocating them to north america. The my brother-in-law's served over eight possibly in ten years with the us government and his paperwork has been extremely slow and if he doesn't get out who his spending hiding right now It could be this. Could be it for him and for the rest of the family so for somebody like him and for somebody like my family that belongs to an ethnic minorities that's been targeted. The killing of the taliban there is really no glimpse of hope to go back anytime until the taliban is completely removed from power. Is it actually possible to leave afghanistan. Then if you have money. I hope so i think i may have. I maybe be a little bit naive in being optimistic. But i personally feel like i have to do everything. I cam for my family to give them a chance to live But honestly deep in my heart. I feel like they may not be able to make it. Lena tori john as a student at oxford university. She's trying to get her family out. Afghantistan lena our thoughts are with you. Thank you very much for speaking with us today. Thank you so much. As many afghans struggled to find a way to leave the. Us is also reducing it staff at its embassy in kabul. Yesterday the biden administration said it sending three thousand troops to afghanistan to help evacuate embassy employees lieutenant general. Ben hodges is with us to discuss this. He's the former commanding general of the us army in europe. He was also the director of operations regional command south in kandahar ghanistan. He joins us from south carolina. General hodges are you surprised by how quickly events have unfolded in the last few days in afghanistan mark. I am surprised. I think surprised at how quickly afghan security forces have collapsed in so many places. Obviously this is worrying. But it's also disheartening. Because i've met so many quality afghan soldiers that you would expect better. What do you think about the decision to send back three thousand. Us troops will of course the the administration and the department defense Have to do this. they practice what we call. Neo noncombatant evacuation operations a to evacuate embassies or other places around the world in when there's a crisis so the administration. I think this is the obvious. Necessary step to ensure a safe evacuation of our diplomats and other americans are so most. Recently the us had two thousand five hundred troops in afghanistan. Now another three thousand or going in addition to those who are still in country To help out embassy staff with relocation. I it's also deploying four thousand troops to the region. How do you see these numbers. Help us understand them. Well we're we're probably talking about is a marine expeditionary unit or an organization that would have combined arms infantry medical signal perhaps even engineers all the things necessary to carry out. Its kind of mission. What's probably the heart. Because i've been questioned this a couple of times by family members like wait a minute. We had two thousand five hundred. Pull them out now. We're sending three thousand back in four thousand two other places that right. You know the math same strange but of course these are not one for one completed different types of capabilities that are going in and out. Could these troops ended up fighting the taliban. I suspect that's a possibility. Of course when a noncombatant evacuation operation is underway that go in with lots of serious capability to deter her anybody from trying to swim for example or or to The departure so pentagon spokesman. John kirby said yesterday the embassy in kabul will continue to operate and that this is not an evacuation deploying three thousand troops and getting personnel on a military flight out but does sound like an evacuation. Of course john kirby is exceptional not only was a great navy officer. He's an exception spokesman right now and of course our embassy will continue to operate what we don't know is at what levels you know what services in in capabilities will will remain in place. And this is the kind of prudence that i think everybody would expect the department of defense and the department of state to exercise. You a strategist knew that what we're saying was a possible outcome that the us would leave and the taliban would gain strength is what we're seeing now. Just a cold reality of us policy. That's a that's a fair question. When when i think of how much time and energy so many americans and brits and canadians germans and other allies put into helping develop the can national security forces whether it's army or police air force of course this is incredibly discouraging to see a clap so fast at the end of the day the afghans have got to decide that they're going to fight for their own country. We've invested a lotta time money. Blood afghan soldiers have died by the thousands Over the last twenty years. I've met quality afghan officers and soldiers but at some point their leadership has got to give them a reason to continue fighting. We know from history that the the moral aspect of combat is more significant than the physical and the afghans have got to summon their moral courage as well with or without american support. Lieutenant general hodges was the director of operations regional command south and kandahar afganistan from two thousand nine to two thousand ten general. Thank you very much. Thank you for what you guys are doing. Coming up. president biden wants opec to pump more oil. You also wants to lower greenhouse gases. Can you have it both ways and traveled to europe. It doesn't just require vaccine. It requires the right kind of vaccine. Stay with us. It's the world i'm marco werman. You're with the world many governments across the globe or fighting insurgencies right now in mozambique in southern africa. They've been struggling to contain a rebellion for four long years. Thousands of died. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced in northern mozambique in the province of kabo delgado but there is hope that the tide may be turning. Here's the world. Africa correspondent halima condie earlier. This week the anthem of mozambique played on a windy afternoon in pemba. The capital of the kabul delgado province. It marked the launch of a new peacekeeping mission by the southern african development community. Sadeq as it's known is an organization of sixteen african nations. It's sending about fifteen hundred soldiers to help. Mozambique fight a years long. Insurgency major general alani monaci from south africa up described the mission this way to support republic of mozambique to combat acts of terrorism and violent extremism by neutralizing threats to region or to create a sexual environment. This is a turning point for mozambique. The country has been reluctant to accept help and has denied the scope of the problem. Robert wrestling is the ceo of panja. Risk an intelligence company. He is based in south africa. They have been reluctant to do sir one because a homegrown insurgency in the ruling party's home province is deeply embarrassing and has huge political and symbolic reputational damage to its. But that's changing. As attacks in the region have continued last month when thousand troops from rwanda arrived in coupled gado this week the us announced it would train when hundred mozambican commandos rangers. The extra support appears to be making a difference already this week. Mozambican and rwandan forces freed the town of modem boy depri- from insurgents. He was attacked last year. Mozambican general cristovao. Arthur chu may spoke with reporters about who these insurgents are very some was becomes. Does onions somalian's drc and other country who lead this group. But how has it terrorists. Still there are a lot of unknowns about the insurgency in northern mozambique. The region is predominantly muslim and earlier. This year the. Us government said the militants are tied to isis but many experts still are not so sure. Here's bustling analyst. I very much doubt and this is also backed up with very little evidence at the moment that there are strong ties into himself ideology leadership recruitment funding supply between the disparity insurgency northern mozambique and different parts of islamic state in africa. Beyond that one thing is clear about this insurgency. It's been deadly and destructive. Here's mozambican general. Row arthur tschumi again. The acute people destroyed infrastructure. If you go around you will see what they want. They don't want people living in peace. Many people in kabul delgado are happy to see the arrival of international troops. Here's one man. Speaking to rwandan state media from palma a town that was decimated in a deadly attack. Back in march via gigi show we're wand and troops. He said are bringing peace now. He wants to bring his family home but tonight. A machado a senior researcher with human rights. Watch caution what. We would one day on me to do at this stage. That is to make sure that the air is completely safe before they allow in grades anyone to return home. Machado says that the government needs to investigate alleged human rights abuses committed by the mozambican security forces against civilians. They had relatives that way. In force disappeared betrays devastated all ill-treated or beaten by security forces. All somebody executed as more troops arrive in mozambique to fight the insurgents machado says human rights needs to be a top priority for the world. I'm halima condie in nairobi this week. The biden administration turned its sights on a favourite target for american presidents opec the organization of the petroleum. Exporting countries opec controls more than eighty percent of the oil reserves on the planet. President biden wants to thirteen opec nations to pump out. more oil. biden is making the play at the same time that americans are dealing with high prices at the pump and as a us is resistant to tap into its reserves to unpack the global oil game. We're joined by ellen. Walled with the atlantic council global energy center. She joins us from jacksonville florida. How is opec responding to the biden administrations criticisms and demands to increase output ellen. Opaque hasn't issued a formal response. But there were some comments from opec delegates from. They basically amounted to our market analyses. We don't really see a need for more oil right now. So which is basically what you're saying. No we're not going to pump more. We already have plans to pump more oil. In fact we're not gonna put more than than we planned and don't know what you're talking about. And how does the white house does it see that. That increase output is satisfactory. Well it seems like they don't think that this increased output satisfactory but in in effect opec is going to be increasing its production by four hundred thousand barrels. A day each month from now through december and probably farther into twenty twenty two. So it's really kind of confusing as to why the biden registration is pressing opec for even more oil now where they already have plans to increase it wrote so opec does get a lot of criticism from the white house when gas prices are high. Here is this criticism of opec fair. It's not all pex fault in this case and gasoline prices in the united states aren't just a factor of opec they're mostly a factor of of oil prices but there is more that goes into it so for example last year or in say february of twenty twenty. The us was pumping thirteen million barrels. A day of oil now republican much closer to eleven and that extra two million barrels. A day doesn't seem like it's coming back. And a lot of that is due to policies that the administration has put in place that discouraged producers from expanding production domestically. So why do you think the. Us president is saying opec needs to help. What's the rhetoric about. Everyone's favor villain is opec essentially and there's always a way to to want to blame say saudi arabia or russia for what's going on with gasoline prices would in fact some of the issue with gasoline prices is in fact inflation. That is the fault of some of the policies that are going on right now but it was a very convenient way to kind of deflect some of the attention that it's get that inflation is getting and try to maybe shift the blame to opec the biden ministrations demanding opec increase oil-production at the same time as increased rhetoric and action on combating climate. Change can the white house have it both ways here. I don't think the white house can't have it both ways. If the biden administration is really concerned the gasoline prices are going to have the economic recovery than there are other steps that they can take other than asking for more oil to try to to alleviate this issue in a more climate conscious way. So let's bring it back to the punt bill. What can we expect. As far as prices are concerned in the weeks and months ahead. After the summer driving season ends as we shift into the autumn. We can definitely see demand. Go down and chances are gasoline. Prices are also going to start to fall. Are they gonna fall as much as as backed where they were. In years prior probably not because oil prices are still pretty high now. If something were to happen that could cause oil prices to drop like massive lockdowns all over the world that would definitely cause a drop in gasoline prices. Ellen wall is a nonresident senior fellow with the atlantic council global energy center ellen. Thanks very much for your insights on the car and doyle situation really appreciate it my pleasure your with the world. For centuries a large number of jews lived in mozell iraq in the nineteen fifties they fled and their history was pretty much forgotten now. A muslim man is working to make sure it doesn't totally disappear. People deserve to be equal to of us. Anyone that's ahead on the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world. We're co production of gbh boston. Npr wrecks throughout the pandemic. The us has been close to most foreign visitors as prepared for the eventual opening. The biden administration is working on a policy that would require co vaccines for entry. Europe has already established a so-called green pass travelers within the eu show their vaccination status and pass on through. Here's the catch though not all vaccines are accepted. And as the world's alana gordon reports this has implications for vaccination programs across the globe after more than a year mostly hunkering down in her apartment in berlin dare hassle finally ventured out this week. The black beaches of the canary islands participate. I think i'm having like a pretty normal vacation considering considering pandemic on a bus tour wednesday ascending up the volcanic mountains. Everyone masks it assigned seats but getting above that cloud line beneath the sun was all worth it. It was really impressive and beautiful. Travelling to the islands was pretty simple to hassle is vaccinated with johnson and johnson shot so she could register for a digital pass germany. All she had to do was present that on her phone at both airports. So i just showed them. They didn't do anything with it. They didn't take a copy of it or that. This system is part of europe's digital green past program. European commission president ursula von deadline laid out the plan last spring with this digital certificate. We aim to help. Member states reinstate the freedom of movement in the safe responsible and trusted menem the idea to have a centralized way for countries to recognize whether you residents are vaccinated cove negative or recovered from cova so they can easily travel between countries but for people like jihan with family from outside the eu. It's been a mess. We're only using her first name out of concern for her mom's visa application gene lives in germany her mom's in morocco. They've really wanted to see each other talk every day. Japan didn't think it would be hard for her mom to enter because vaccinated. She got the scene afam. Chinese telephone vaccine should both shots. And the it's been two months but the eu pass general only accepts vaccines that have been reviewed by the european medicines agency. So that's madonna visor. Johnson johnson and the answer zenica vaccine made in europe. Japan says her mom hasn't been able to get these because sina farm is not on the list even though the who has approved it most of the countries in africa lease these are the only vaccines they have access to. So then what they stay there. You cannot move freely anymore. What is at stake is the digital. Bring now discrimination dr sodium. When sokha is dean of the school of health. At the university of zambia he each here's the country's covert ethics committee. These green pastures unethical and problematic needs to be revisited and changed when says this goes beyond the science especially when vaccines that got greenland by the. Who don't make the cut that also includes the most highly used vaccine in low and middle income countries the indian main astrazeneca vaccine also known as cova shield for mia actually as a scientist. It should not actually matter. Now he's hearing stories of people not being allowed into europe because they received cova shield. He says it's racist leaders in africa and at the. Who have slammed the vaccine policy. Jeffrey lazarus at the barcelona institute for global health says he understands the reasoning behind it. I think right now at this stage of the pandemic or things actually getting worse in the european union at it makes sense that they only the vaccines that their european medicines agency has approved. Individual countries are still setting their own requirements. And some do allow vaccines like cova shield. That are not on the e. You've lazarus says either way. He hopes countries permit international travelers to present some alternatives. Which could be other ways to prove that you don't have the virus tribute getting tested alternative inside this question of which vaccines count threatens vaccine uptake elsewhere. Catherine took tunji leads. The african population health research center in nairobi kenya. She says policies like the used are setting up a hierarchy a perception of first and second tier vaccines. If it stays that way thing is going to be chaos. Gingy says she worries about growing distrust in the vaccines that are available. Even though for the most part all of them dramatically reduced serious illness hospitalization and death. It's ridiculous because the message is we have seen get tickets now. People have to make choices for chick. Gingy she was desperate to get whatever vaccine she could as her colleagues started falling. Ill with vid in. May she got her. First dose of cova shield. A weight lifted then. She decided to hold off on a second dose because she had the chance to get a different vaccine in maryland. So taking risks fly series was willing to take to get fully vaccinated. Junji came with her husband who returned to his. Us based job this summer there. She's getting both shots of the maternal vaccine which she knows we'll be accepted the world. She's relieved for her family. Yes but she's outraged with this entire situation means for so many in africa and beyond for the world. I'm alana gordon. We've been following the wildfires in algeria. This week those flames remains largely out of control. At least sixty nine people have died in numerous blazes across algeria. Met began on monday. The fires are being driven by extreme temperatures and high winds reporter mayor or may spent time in the most impacted region yesterday. He joins us from algiers. So i understand. You went to a village in the region of tv zoo where the fires have been the worst. Tell us what the conditions were like. What did you see. I think the best word to describe the conditions would be apocalyptic. There was a sort of amber smoke that filled the air could fill in your nostrils in your lungs. It was to breathe. I saw one farm. That stood sort of again puck elliptically sort of seen one farm that stood on its own and all the land surrounding it was to chris. Apocalyptic is a pretty good word. What did people tell you about what they've been experiencing. We spoke to some families that had evacuated their lands They were living on the exterior part of the village. They had feelings of desperation helplessness. They were sad and a little bit angry as well. The villages that had spoken to said that the state hadn't come to evacuate them that they had been relying on volunteers from the surrounding villages from the city of teaser. To come and organiz evacuations by police station. That was completely closed This is one of the first in all jerry that i drive from village civility without going through checkpoints or or seeing even one police officer what has been the government response to the anger of the people you spoke with the president addressed the nation yesterday. He did say that the state was putting as much means as it could into fighting these fires. These forest fires are really ravaging all of northeastern algeria. So the state's resources are very limited. they do not have for example firefighting aircraft like a candidate for. Which is this airplane built in. Canada has capacity of six thousand six seven thousand liters people online were very angry that country algeria. Which has one of the largest military budgets in africa By these candidates despite the fact that we've struggled with these forest. I forgot longtime so president. Bill g tabun has been pretty adamant that he believes the fires have been set by arsonists twenty. Two people have been arrested. What evidence is there of arson absolutely none. That's what activists and journalists have sort of been speaking out about because we see it as a way of deflecting because the government has been so unprepared in fighting these fires. It's a way of saying well we could've. There's nothing we could have done anyways. Lit intentionally for me. These are irresponsible claims from the head of the government's unless they can present evidence. Yeah and if they can't present evidence if it becomes the uncontrovertible declare that arson was not the cause. Could the president pay political price for simply not being on top of the fires. Fortunately not in all jerry. I mean there's no. Real structured political opposition president is backed by a very strong institutions in algeria Honestly don't see that happening so algeria's just one country along the mediterranean that's experiencing devastating fires right now. Is there much discussion. Among algerians about how these fires might be driven by climate change especially with the report that we saw this week from the un. Yeah there is frustration in the sense that climate change is not really part of our discourse here. I can just point to the two thousand. Eighteen presidential debates not one single candidates spoke about climate change. Despite the fact that this is the region mediterranean region but especially north africa this region. That's really been threatened by water scarcity and droughts and yesterday we had a heatwave at throughout the week relief temperatures above forty degrees celsius. Wins of twenty kilometers. Our and that's really. What's feeding these flames mayor missouri. He is a journalist in algeria. Speaking with us from the capital algiers. Thank you very much for the update. Thanks for having me on. Modern iraq as it's defined by its current borders is not that old only dating back to the early twentieth century and the end of the autumn and empire the cultural identities and religious beliefs. There go back much further. Take the area of northern iraq. It's been a religiously diverse region for centuries earlier this week. We heard about the tension between two minority communities living in historically christian town there today. Rebecca collared has a story of the jews at once lived in the iraqi city of mozell and a new effort to preserve their memory in the rubble of muscles. Old city there are signs of a forgotten passed in the concrete doorways of the houses. Here i noticed the imprint of zoos. The small parchment scrolls fixed to the entrances of jewish homes around the world. Like oh yeah. There's this neighborhood used to be called latte elliott. Who'd the place of the jews today. Much of it is in ruins. Isis control the city of mosul for three years. The militant school was to replace multi-religious iraq with a suny muslim caliphate but muslims. Jews were gone long before that most left in the nineteen fifties ending millennia of jewish presence. Here now as mosul rebuilds. Muhammed omar is trying to preserve the city's jewish heritage people who deserve to recognized as equal citizens as anyone else. Mohammed may seem like an unlikely candidate to lead the effort. He's best known for creating most ally where he secretly published news during ices occupation before that he was a history lecturer at mosul university after the city was liberated from isis. His colleagues found something surprising. Some of the officers that were motorist structure of the wolves. We fall into storms with prescriptions in the woods and that raised questions from mohammed. Why why. I don't know who are described in muslim. I know that something called the jewish neighborhood in most but we have avi what happened to them on the whoever they will they were doing in this city. Mohammed says the city's jews have been virtually erased from the history books so set out to find them last october. Omar muhammad organized a virtual meeting. It brought together jews from mosul living around the world and their descendants. They spoke arabic english and hebrew. Who saw more earth monitor doesn't always in the past. Jews in iraq were government ministers businessmen and some of the country's most popular musicians. What pushed them to leave is debated even among the iraqi jews on the call their lift by choice. If you make the atmosphere. So i have no chance to live there. You're forced to leave dot com. That doesn't mean by joyce. As far as i'm concerned they were expelled. With the of the state of israel in nineteen forty eight and the rise in anti jewish violence. Most of iraq's jewish population fled the country that meant leaving the land of their ancestors. Muhammad's plan is to create a virtual museum with interviews with those who fled and photos from the ones vibrant jewish community of moso. He says he hopes in the future. He will be able to send a physical museum in the city. It would become a widely uplift space for the people to know that when you look at most of the jewish is is an essential part of it. There was never a perfect coexistence in iraq but mohammed says the real problem started a century ago when the british carved out on iraqi state with borders. That were irrelevant to the people who live there. Just diversity in iraq was the damaged off nineteen. If the grid the confusion people salted forgetting about bin against this mahama says the newly imagined iraqi nationality didn't match the historical or cultural realities. And he says that's still causing problems today. under the sun. What finishing argon focus on new government was able clearly define what the national comes back in mosul old jewish quarter. It's difficult defined residents old enough to remember living side by side with jewish neighbors. But i mean abdul-karim saleh who's gonna sixties. My friend is school. Joseph was jewish. He became slim. Has some of the. Jews here converted to islam so they could stay. He blames the national iraqi government for stoking tensions between religious communities. Here they meet hit between muslim and jewish. I'm they succeed he leads me through winding narrow alleyways pointing homes. That used to belong to jewish families over syria. I told you belong to jewish. Eventually we come to a dead end with a rusting metal door on this. This is their tumble. This is the door from. The door is barred shot but the neighbors let us climb to their roof to look inside this winter from here. We can see into an ornate synagogue with richly colored wall tiles high arches and thick columns. There isn't much left of the synagogues ruth and it looks a bit like it's now being used a garbage dump. The physical scale of the damage to mostly jewish. History feels impossible to repair and there are still fool swaths of the city to restore for the communities that still live here collins says his jewish neighbors would be welcome back because their home mr tumble. We have no right to prevent them. There's a story about the late salima. Pasha a famous iraqi jewish singer in the nineteen fifties. It's difficult to confirm. Even the stories existence tells of different time for rocks religious minorities. My rookie friend tells me that to other. Prominent jewish iraqi musicians were leaving for israel and they tried to convince her to join them so they went. They visited him pasha and they told her. Hey relieve in. You should leave with us as well she head replay was. This is my home. People are over here. Has she converted to islam and state amid the rubble of their neighborhood. I try to imagine. Muscles once-vibrant jewish community. How people would have sat here in their homes listening to the songs of pasha with the feeling that this was their homeland for the world. I'm rebecca collard mustard. Rebecca's report is part of our series sacred nation stories about religion and nationalism around the globe it's funded by the henry lewis foundation. Check out more of the series at the world dot org slash sacred nation shreds nineteen ninety-five side of the worst mass killing on european soil since world war. Two eight thousand muslim men and boys were murdered by bosnian. Serb forces international courts have ruled that what happened was genocide but for decades serbian leaders. In bosnia herzegovina have denied that now a new law banning genocide. Denial has come into force there. The world's europe correspondent orla barry reports amir's leakage says. The family fled to srebrenica in nineteen ninety-two. The united nations said the small mountain town was safe and under un protection anywhere. Soula liggett says he and his family who are muslim had no option but to flee their home in eastern bosnia. We had to go because they would come to our village roundup everyone separate remitted children to put them some were picked for rape. Men were taken to detention facilities on a number of them were shot. Most of my family members Nineteen ninety two. so yeah. that's why we had run. Sudi leakage was just seventeen when he arrived in shrimp easter and he says it felt anything but safe. It felt like an open open-air concentration hand. I actually I lived in the conditions of an concentration can between may nineteen ninety two and july. And that's when the worst atrocities of the bosnian war were carried out interprets bosnian. Serb forces systematically rounded up and executed pows of bosnian muslims. Today soula gauges the director of the shredder. Needs a genocide memorial. But at the time he worked as an interpreter for the un anti tells me he only survived because of two men lured americans one former american colonel and other young american lawyer. His name is ed joseph. The name was kenneth visor. This actually ruling eagle mammal center to the un headquarters and then they essentially got me and other interpreters suit against went onto report on the international criminal tribunal in the former yugoslavia. It document the full extent of what happened during the war. Serge brammertz was the tribunal's chief prosecutor. At the time. You know we had in court. More than five thousand witnesses testifying about the atrocities. We have videos so execution of prisoners videos of bombardments off churches. Mosques brad says the tribunal had no doubt that what happened to trevor needs to wasn't act of genocide but to this day bosnian serb leaders continue to deny deniers when former serb leader radovan karadzic was charged with genocide in two thousand twelve told the court he should be praised for his efforts to promote peace Some often be. I know nauseam graduates comrade colorado. I did everything possible to avoid war. Courage said but he was eventually convicted of genocide. That's what prompted the top international efficient in bosnia valentin in sco to push for new law banning genocide denial in school with a high representative in bosnia for twelve years. Political scientists yasmine Which is originally from sarajevo. He says in school worked for several years to put the low in place. Ultimately you know it was really literally waning hours of his mandate and it was a big surprise. I think both to informed observers even political actress within bosnian within the community that ultimately mysterious code decided to impose the law today anyone in bosnia who denies the genocide happened or glorifies. War criminals like radovan. Courage could face a prison term of up to five years. We on which says people like kardashian. Former serb commander ratko melodic are still revered by some serbs today so for instance we had a match in the southwest of serbia in part of serbia where there's actually a large at community and one of the two big clubs out of belgrade. These design was visiting. You know their fans in the stands. Were chanting the name of com blockage. They were holding banners with his face. So this will be sometimes called genocide triumphalism while we anna vici is among many bosnians. Who welcomes the ban genocide. Denial still merle ready. Slamming minera dodig atop bosnian bosnian-serb official told reporters recently banned could threaten the country's future. She nailed. The coffin of bosnia. Herzegovina said a week after the ban was announced the parliament of the serb-dominated region of bosnia republic serbska pastula'll blocking us and then a a second law saying that anyone who accused the serb lead entity of genocide could himself face up to fifteen years in jail but this counter ruling is unlikely to be made low nationwide and u. n. chief prosecutor serge. Brammertz says the ban on genocide. Denial is already having an effect since the day. This law came into force where there has been almost no public relation to genocide united. So we see somehow in the public domain politicians are now becoming more careful about what they're seeing and what they are doing. It's not care though if the ban would actually lead to any prosecutions corruption is a big problem within bosnia's justice system but brown says anything. The curbs the denial of what happened in trebinje said twenty. Six years ago can only be a good thing for the world. I'm more bari. Few days bring you highlights from the all important. Un climate report published on monday. As we close out the week one more ipc report takeaway for you from the world's environment correspondent carolyn bieler. Climate change is of course global but really. We all want to know the same thing. So what does this mean for me. This is co barrett one of the scientists to lead the un climate assessments. She says they tried to answer that question. By zeroing in for the first time on regional impacts and this improved regional focus is really very helpful in starting to bring the granular information that decision makers most need a couple of examples. Here the eastern. Us is expected to see more annual precipitation and the flooding that goes with it but the central and western us will have more drought. Northern africa is gonna get less windy while the southern part of the continent. We'll see more wind monsoon rains. In central and south america will decrease but over the long term in asia. They'll increase no surprise that some scientists like to call this climate weirding paula andrea. Rex gomez is another author of the report. She says it's written specifically. So policymakers can figure out how to respond to climate change with concrete action. An put so committee and for me. It's been important that this report with feeding regions nation. That is going to head to make decisions. The report even has an interactive map. Where you can see. Just how much hotter things are likely to get in your backyard. Good timing and a summer filled with record breaking heat waves for the world. I'm caroline bieler on our twitter feed. We just posted a link to that interactive climate map. We are at the world. Our show comes from the nanna bill harris studio at gbh in boston. As you know you can find us online anytime at the world dot. Org i'm marco werman be safe. Stay strong and cool this weekend. We'll see you back here on monday.

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ep 80: The house was built in 1906 by Stanford White (Ragtime)

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

1:19:14 hr | 1 year ago

ep 80: The house was built in 1906 by Stanford White (Ragtime)

"Hello and welcome to you so to show a podcast. We attempt to keep up the floor. Line Murray's pop culture references on Gilmore. Girls Ann Taylor. And I'm Kyla and welcome to our normal boring intro. Because I can't singer play ragtime remember that time. I played the piano APP because of all star Mike. Goodness was amazing. It did occur to me that I could potentially try to pull that out again. I do not really have any Greek piano skills for one in two. There's really no iconic song from the film adaptation ragtime. That was so good that I felt like I really needed to do it. Yeah whereas the songs imminent. Yeah the songs Istar were so great. It was like no matter what I do. It's going to be great even if it's not the best it's ever been you know right sometimes. Just gotTa have a bright intro. Even for great incredible movies and movies that are not as great like ragtime. Sometimes movies are just motion pictures. They're just moving pictures. Put together in a sequence of things. Yeah so per second ragtime not not going to be a favourite but this is interesting details that we are going to pull out of it so good cool and actually Taylor. I haven't told you this yet so I wanted to wait till we were on the air but a little a little surprise that I'm going to pull out for you and everyone a little later into the episode. Is it a red velvet swing? It is not. I don't get that reference. Oh well let me tell you. I went on in the deep dive and I'm glad to hear it's not a red velvet swing. That's all I'M GONNA say. Yeah I guess me too. So yeah tune for that everybody okay. I can't wait for the surprise. Yeah me neither also. I don't know if I'd call us a prize but I did have something I wanted to ask you about end. I didn't remember to do it till we were on Mike so I had a question for you. Just as sort of an icebreaker get your brain noodling on things. All Things Gilmore girls. I read a very friend. Article in vulture recently will share it in our tumbler but they asked a lot of show creators and writers to imagine what their characters would be doing right now in quarantine and they had people who wrote for shows that are canceled now like thirty rock and lost so they kind of just like conjecture about what those characters would be doing like for example Sawyer from loss was probably stockpiling toilet paper in like upcharging it so I just wanted to ask you. What do you think is going on with stars hollow? I just got my brain noodling on that and I wondered if your brain what would happen if it noodled on that too. I like this question. I think that Laura Lie and rory would have watched way too many movies. I think that's an obvious. Maybe they would finally put on some weight from all the maybe a pound or two and then I also think that a lot of people would just break quarantine because they want to hang out by. But it's just GONNA come over of Laura Lion worries but it's probably because she forgot about social distancing not because she doesn't care that's true. Oh what do you think the ad I think Taylor? Dozy is probably trained to keep everyone following a lot of roles in. He's probably added his own rules on top of the CDC's that make no sense about how you probably shouldn't. I'm trying to think because obviously he's also running in essential business Does grocery so. He's probably come up with some very weird rules on top of what other grocery stores are doing these days. Yeah I would have to spend more time thinking about what they are. But it's probably something along the lines of like. Oh my gosh you touch that jar of peanut butter and I don't care if it's expired. You have to buy it because you touched it. Yeah I could see that. Yeah I think Kirk has come up with some whimsical mask. Designs doesn't seem like business all absolutely absolutely they might not protect you from any germs. But you might have Community saying like Beverly Oatmeal fell like Condoleeza Rice's face like in the mailbox. Oh my gosh. Because when z goes with everything? Yeah I also think probably Luke has really had to adjust his restaurant because now takeout workers are probably really complicated for him but does he love the fact that there no customers in the diner touche good point probably the happiest he's ever been That is a great point and I mean Rory has a baby now right so luke and Laura Liar are probably just. They're probably a little annoyed that either that or they're just doting grandparents. Yeah Yeah I think we figured it out. Although lightning game know if anyone else has other ideas feel free to definitely shoot them to us if he tweeted us we can definitely share them out on our twitter. Because I got thinking about this after reading this article and now I WANNA know yes. I hope Amy Sherman Palladino Chimes. Then would love to know all the things. She's thinking about everything but this particular right now. Yes should we talk about a episode of Gilmore? Girls we do know what Amy Sherman Palladino was thinking. I think so okay. Okay okay. On came the episode of Gilmore. Girls were talking about today is Gilmore. Girls were ten the nanny and the professor which premiered January twentieth two thousand and four and the plot summary from. I'm DB is Luke. Hires Lane to help out at the diner. Rory isn't happy Paris's dating her new teacher Laurel. Jason decided to keep the relationship from her parents at least for now and Michelle out of jealousy. Babysits Davey on rolls under the bed. Yes in keeps calling him truman. Hand of name. The funny thing is we're not really talking about any of those plotlines today. Now when I'm talking about a plot I mean this isn't really even a plot in the movie it's just a moment No Rory and Are over four Friday night dinner and it's not exactly explained how this is all setup but apparently. Emily agreed to some sort of house tour so people can walk through and see architecture in. Its during Friday night dinner. It's for like a local historical society. Yeah Yeah and this is something that happens while they're eating dinner much to Richard Chagrin piano. See the sign was supposed to be assigned. Well it's not a very good side. Nineteen by house was built in nineteen o seven and he was getting migraine. So Richard doesn't mentioned ragtime or anything like that but he does talk about Stanford White and you know. We thought maybe we could dive into this. But then Taylor the magical wizard that she is found. Hey there's a movie and Stanford White isn't it? How about we walked ragtime and at the time that seemed like a great idea. Yeah now I made it through the movie but it's it it was better than just doing research for sure. Watching a movie is always better. Yeah yeah that was on paper. It was a great idea I I give myself props for good idea. I don't give the movie perhaps for the execution on that idea. But that's part of the process of this podcast we go in to learn And we can never know what we're GONNA find right but learn we do. Yeah and you along with us but I should really ask. Do you know who Stanford White is like? Watch this episode. No no I mean. I got from context on architect. Yes that's basically exactly where I was at but I had never heard of Stanford white in. Maybe that's not common. I suspect if you live on the east coast. There's a good chance you're familiar with this guy. I have never lived on the east coast. The only architect I know by name is Frank Lloyd Wright who we have covered on the show. We don't ask about architects a lot but we detect about him and honestly same Cadillac. The only Gulf know by name is Tiger. Woods if you force me to you. I'm sure I can't think of somebody else. Who's the guy with the tea lemonade? Arnold Palmer okay. I remember him because of the drink. Though I'm sure I could think of one or two more. There are others out there but Besides those two none of them have had really any impact on my life that I'm aware of should be kicked us off by starting our conversation with a movie that we watched. Let's do it was the beginning of an incredible time when the famous and the pace Lewis made history together bad time. Good time ragtime. So ragtime set in like nineteen hundred nineteen ten. It's a period of time but it starts around nineteen of five nineteen. O Six. I'll go gala. I should know that goes for a couple years. Yeah and maybe we should say this even just to start it. Did you feel the same way Taylor that you watch the first half of the movie? And you're like okay about Stanford White. Okay now about this guy who has to do Stanford White Okay about his wife and then did you feel like you washed completely different movie. The second half I feel like I never figured out what the movie was about. I literally texted you that while I was watching and you had already watched at this point so I didn't feel like I was splitting anything but I was like this movie is over halfway done in. I don't actually know what the story is. It felt like it just was hopping from scene to scene. Finally we started seeing the same characters over again so I was like okay. I guess this person's important but by the end yeah. I would've never predicted where we ended is where we would have gotten from the beginning of the movie at all. No so now you see why my response to you was okay. You're about to find out what it's about but then you also will not know what it's about. Yes yes. Because how do we get there in comparatively speaking? It's not an excessively long movie in terms of minutes but like the length of time feels ridiculous because there's no clear storyline right so here's we restart an architect Stanford White. He made the wrote Cube Madison Square. Gardens you yep and roll. I don't not sure how it got there but Madison Square Garden. And there's having a big party on the roof Owen old film reels. We start off with a lot of film reels at the movie theater plane with somebody playing the piano in Alma Mater. And you get to see Stanford White at the failing of the Madison Square Garden That was a cool way to get you up to speed on. What's happening because I think that was? That was a real thing right before movies. He would Kim some news or you know Info and the just be yachts and someone. Playing music live so yeah that was cool but it. Kinda showed you some of the conflicts that were happening because on top of Madison Square Garden was a sculpture of a woman that was supposedly inspired by a woman who was married to a guy who was not so happy that his wife was in the nude on top of a building in that women would be Evelyn Nesbit in her husband. Harry Keisha. Yeah so you see that. They're angry he comes after Stanford at party knocks down the door and threatens him and then finally he gets to confront him at the Madison Square Garden and shoots him in the head and he did. Yep so they're Stanford White. The whole reason we're watching movie is in the first half hour. Sorry once again. We just like we jump off and see where it leads us. I didn't fully research movie. 'cause I kinda wanted to see where the research go once again. Great idea me. Not so great in execution yes end. Meanwhile we have these other storylines going we have Mandy Patinkin plane a European Jewish immigrant in New York who catches his wife cheating on him. Played by Fran. Drescher the nanny of all people all I didn't realize that. Yeah and he and his little girl move out and he starts designing picture flip books a toy store by the end of the movie. He's not moviemaker. Not Quite sure how we get there but that's another story line and Evelyn. Nesbit meets him at some point. So I guess it's connected and then there's also a storyline which ends up becoming the main storyline by the end. Where a upper middle class family can outside the big city portion of New York. One day they hear crying in the yard. There's a little African American baby there and it turns out his mother abandoned him because she couldn't support him and the father was not supporting her so they taken the mother in the baby in the dad shows up. Coal House Walker Junior. Who's piano player? And he proposes to alternate zero. I think played by Sarah. Abby Alan yes that was fun episode And and the double flashback to our eminem eight mile slash fame episodes and she doesn't WanNa marry him. She doesn't want to see him. She says when he come if I see him then he'll convince me he seemed like an okay guy at at the start and but they give in her or did he abandoned her though because it seems like he was looking for or May I don. I didn't understand how the separated either because she said he's not supporting us and then he does say well. I didn't have a good job but it seems like in the that day and age the right thing would have been to marry her because as a single mom. That's a really bad situation to be in culturally. People don't have a lot of sympathy for you and she obviously couldn't take care of this baby and be working. Yeah but as soon as he came over he said I. I intend to marry her. So yeah so and this family this though family. That's taken in. I the baby and the mom they are very that will they're rich. They will not firework company or a company that also works which the little brother loves to mentioned this Mary Steenburgen who plays the mother in this family her little brother. He's real proud. He's GonNa be a partner a firework company. I mean it sounds like exciting job. Yes but like he loves to bring that up yes and they are especially her husband. The Patriarch of the family. He is very put off by having these people in this house. So uncomfortable does not know what to do. And it's fear that you wouldn't you wouldn't want people you don't know well to be in your house. But the way he feels. There's definitely it's definitely feels like he has a lack of compassion. And there's definitely some racist stuff going on there where he doesn't want a black woman living in his home. Yeah and they have some people over who are even worse just criticizing her having a baby and just looking at them as inhuman. Some good seth. Oh but in the meantime while they're meeting this family and they're coming in and out and figuring out getting married and such the man who killed Stanford White is going through his trial and his wife is deciding whether or not she should testify for or against him because they decide. Hey let's plead insanity. He's a rich white guy planes. Sandy and Evelyn gets involved with the younger brother. Who by the way doesn't have a name in this movie? If you look at his credit it's younger. Brother firework obsessive also. The parents in this family are just mother and father. They don't have names all well and he has played by the same guy who plays Grima worm talion Lord of the ranks. Oh my gosh. You're right. I knew I knew his name. Brad Durham but I was thinking of some completely different. You are right. That guy's grows a wonder I didn't like him a subconsciously. I knew it was someone I didn't like. I love fireworks loser. I know who he was and he gets involved with Evelyn. Nesbit during this trial and she doesn't seem to care too much about him she's getting offers to be taught. Dance how to act how to sing. Because she's getting a moment in the spotlight being the wife of murderer who killed a high profile man. Will we'll talk more about Sanford white later. But he was well known square garden. That's yeah and the trial comes back. Yes plead insanity successful. He goes to an asylum. She starts trying to work on her career as an actress singer. Dancer Showgirl Yada. Yada stuff with younger brother fizzles out much like some of his fireworks. I'm sure and then the story becomes more about Sarah and Cole House Walker. Which is a very cool name by the way yet is and one day. He's on his way to see her and he has turned out. He's made some money and he has a model t car long story short. He gets into a tiff with some firemen about where his car was located at. You know it was in the wrong place at the wrong time. They wanted him. They had their fire truck out blocking the road. He couldn't get through. They wanted him to pay a toll. I mean yes them being jerks yeah whereas while fathers kind of this passive aggressive trained to be trying to keep manners to hide his racism. These people are just out and out to him and when he tries to get a policeman involved they destroy his car including putting excrement in the car. I don't know if it's human or animal. But they do that. Do a lot of damage to the car. And when he basically he tries to go through every legal means he possibly can to get some sort of action taken so his car can be repaired in these firemen. Volunteer firemen can be called out and is denied every time and then Syra who he's about to marry goes to this political rally and tries to get the vice. President of the United States is attention in. She's basically crushed in this crowd. The ash she she just like calls out in his like. Hey Vice President Coal House Walker Junior. Need your help. An and the police just beat her. I mean yeah absolutely. Beat her and she passes away shortly after. And can we talk about how they reveal? That so lying. Yeah Yeah because Kohlhaas Walker Junior and Sarah. They were planning out their wedding so now. She's in a bed. She's their doctors seen her at the mother and father's house and the doctors all right you know put on bedrest. So then they're talking about their wedding so the next scene. You're in church. You see flowers and the cameras panning down and I think Oh. It's their wedding. But then I had a moment of is it though and we start to see a large white. It could be a curtain. Nope it's the open. Casket and Sarah has died. She's in her wedding dress. In the casket awful. Yeah I started to think I was like this is too. I was not surprised it was the funeral. The way things were going back. I agree that was a really like I. DuNno if cleverest the white rude but really the tragedy of it. Yeah as a kind of twist on what you expect right so it was just a little traumatize. You think you're seeing these people get married and you're happy for of and then nope dead. So Mr Call House Walker Junior decides you know going through. The proper channels is not working. So I'm going to take the law into my own hands. And he and some friends starts destroying police fire houses in. I shouldn't have the yes. And they make bombs out of fireworks because younger brother which is not a good thing. Don't do this but also it's a little funny in this context me. It's like okay throughout the movie. Remind viewers file. Excuse me I'm not going to be a partner and a fireworks. Company definitely never talked about fireworks. This much okay. So yes. They are killing firemen. Throwing fireworks in the fire. Houses making false alarm like Reporting fake fire. So they'll come out and yet he's none too happy So our big finale. If you WANNA call it that is there is a standoff in the Morgan Library in New York and Coal House Walker. Junior has basically taken this library hostage with his cronies. Actually cronies is not the right word with his friends and they take over this library including younger brother and basically his demands are that he wants his car restored. That's why you're chief to filed responsible and it turns into this huge thing. Several people are sent in to try and talk him down including father who I think he really does. Show some growth by the end of this movie. Where he's like. I genuinely care about you and I want you to be able to be with your son and I know we've had our differences but I don't think this is really going to help you Alan. Also Booker T. Washington shows up and finally. He's able to talk him down. He sends all of his friends away and he walks out and shot. Yeah he's surrendering but the police. Chief is just like shoot him. An officers like what what it's like. Shoot him here. And that's how it ends. Presumably mother and father taken the baby and raise him. Although that seems like it was sort of up in the air mother wanted to do that. But then the standoff happened in thinks. Kinda got distracted. Evelyn Nesbit is dancer. Yeah there she's in a movie made by the the Guy who made the flip book. Oh Yeah Mandy Patinkin. Yeah Yeah in. Oh and then at the end mother seems to be romantically interested in Mandy Patinkin intricate. That five yes and then it goes no. It's like father knew to yeah just ends. She liked dances with him. One time the end of the movie so keep in mind. Oh and the only other thing. Is that the half Harry Harry Keisha Erique Shari. Sorry here yeah. He gets out of the asylum. He serves his time. Yeah and rose free so remember we start with Madison Square Garden Square Garden. Shot in the head to a completely different family and the like the only connection between those two stories is younger brother. Yeah can I just at least explain to people that watched this movie because on paper it seems like a great idea? Yeah movie came out. In nineteen eighty one it was nominated for eight Oscars. Yeah supporting actor. Supporting Actress Adapted Screenplay Cinematography Art Direction costumes original song original score that Randy Newman compose. It was based off of a really popular book. So even though it wasn't a box office hit like people were excited about this. Because it was based off of ragtime that came out in nineteen seventy five and was a really big hit. And then you have these classic Hollywood people who are in it James. Cagney comes back after not being in movies for twenty years for a role that seems typically made for him. Donald O'Connor from singing in the rain shows up. And then we've got all these new cool people in Hollywood you've got Elizabeth McGovern Howard Browne's Mandy Patinkin. Mary Steenburgen Debbie Allen. Fran Drescher Cemil L. Jackson was in there for a little bit. All Jeff Daniels. This is his first movie. And relevant to Gilmore girls did you who play Stanford White. Yes who is it noren mailer? I'm pregnant Norman. Mailer placed him mid way. So it sounds great but here it makes so much sense as started as it was made from a book though because books can be long we can get into different carriers like have at it but a movie is it just had no direction. It was covered way too much. Yeah end it is my least favorite kind of book out uptaken which is win. The next thing happens because it happened that way in the book and you can tell the writers or like well you know what in the next chapter this happened. So let's just move onto the next chapter whereas in the movie you're like wait a minute. How did we get from here to here like to me? This is really confusing. I even you know here in our state shelter in place days. We watched all the Harry Potter movies. And one of the things I was struck by was like if I have not read the books I would not have understood why. Xyz happened you know like why did where did this thing come from? Or why does this work this way? It's never explained. And so that's something that's frustrating to me but then this is just this whole new level in time where you also have this out of confusion of some people are real in. Some people are not and so you're starting to go like wait a minute. Is this what happened in history so whereas Harry Potter you can kind dislike brushoff. You're like a magic. Whatever that's why it happened. Or is this your trying to figure out what's real and what's not and Why some things are even included in this yet. I was Mandy Patinkin in that movie. No they could have cut that character completely. Yes so not yet. Not a great. Just not a good movie. Yeah I did WANNA share. Also put the full thing in our tumbler. But the New York Times Review. That came out in Nineteen eighty-one along with this movie. I mean that is its whole point of Sometimes I love when I reviewed him the gas. You're saying all the things I'm thinking in some of the highlights are it says. I'm not sure that anyone who has not read. The book will have any idea what's going on much of the time. Or why like the book? The film cross cuts among four storylines. That in the book come together in the way of storyteller dream but in the film meet only awkwardly time itself is totally confused. Years appear to pass but the children don't age. We've talked about that before. I think. Mommy dearest actually. There's no real build up for the occupation of the Morgan Library. Nor the appearance of Mr James. Cagney is the police. Commissioner ragtime works only as a series of vignettes the more the movie races along the less sense it makes until the very end. It makes no sense whatsoever. Yeah Yeah so and they were saying the performances are good. It's a well made the music's great. This movie makes no sense so just want to justify our feelings. The New York Times agree us so we know we're good. Yeah so you know nothing in. This might have been a product of the time but it was like this white wealthy family. I they realized this black baby. Oh He's a human to. It's know we can take him in. And then the black mother comes. Oh you know what? She's human too what we'll take her in. Yeah and the end in a complete shock. This black man the father. He's human to. Oh my goodness of compassion and I was just. Oh just go gagged on how all wow these these rich white people really learn something he admiral. Yeah I don't I don't have any additional commentary to add to that just affirm that yeah so but you know Mandy Patinkin. He's he's Funky. He's up your if if you love to see. Can I tell you at least a couple of fun? Facts to redeem this movie before we go on and talk about Stanford White fulltime fun fact James Cagney. Who played the police commissioner New Evelyn? Nesbit back in the day connection to real life there. Another fun fact. The House that mother and father living was also used as inspiration for the American girl. Doll Samantha Parking TNS House Wow. I'm Tony Eighteen. This house was listed for one point. Six million dollars. It's thirty six hundred square feet and you could either. If you have a strange affinity for the movie ragtime or for the American girl Doll Samantha. The parking in as I did as a child from fact oh Another from fact ragtime opened as a play on Broadway in nineteen ninety seven. And apparently it's much better. It earned thirteen Tony. Nominations and the cast included Brian Stokes Mitchell Audra McDonald in Liam. Shell who you might know from Glee while end one last fun fact for you. Oj Simpson really wanting to be cold house Walker Junior. Yeah it was ultimately deemed. He wasn't strong enough actor for the part in the Guy I think. Howard rollins was his name who was in. The perk was really good. Yeah Good Call Not Picking Oj Simpson. Yeah also OJ Simpson. Maybe maybe that would have helped him get out his desire to shoot people. Well we did Before we dig into Stanford White I will say since we're talking about Oj now. And I doubt will ever come up again in this podcast. I did read. At least in one overview of the Stanford white murder trial that you can definitely make comparisons to how that trial was covered in the media and how OJ's trial was covered in the nineties. Both huge events people were obsessed that coverage so that should give you some perspective on the trial. We're going to be telling you about shortly. Superfund back so Stanford White Real Guy Real architect. Yes he was a big deal yes he was born November ninth eighteen fifty three and I do twenty fifth nineteen thousand six and she to know those exact years but he worked. He was a partner with couple of the guys in architecture. Firm mckim mead and white because I didn't know architecture firms at least back in the day were named just like law offices are named now. Yes PEOPLE'S LAST NAMES. I think architecture firms are still kind of named that way but I am not an expert just like even when the lawyers have the same last night like I've seen where it's like the same last name Miller and young. I don't I Miller Square. I also feel like we just need to fill out some colorful details. On Stanford White here. Did you know that? His father was Shakespearean scholar. Did Not so this just gives you like a little context for his upbringing. Also he had red hair and a really Bushy Moustache. And if you see pictures of it you're like what is on your face. The this mustache is like a plane. Propeller like it is huge. I do not know how the man eight food I'll man like. His mouth is completely covered. I'm so baffled by this. Yeah also he was very artistic. He designed jewelry furniture many interior decorations. But of course being an architect is his main deleo. Any actually really helped a lot of interior decorators. Get their start one woman. She's considered like me. I interior designer and he gave her her first big job so yeah he wasn't at least so it seems course didn't meet the guy but seems like he really helped other people get their start as well. Yeah so the place and this architectural firm became a huge deal in this gilded age as they call it. They erected a lot of buildings in the bow art style. And that's B. E. A. U. X. Arts. So they were really inspired by European masterpieces they for example modeled part of Columbia University of Rooms Pantheon. They also added a lot of this flair to the Brooklyn Museum. The Morgan Library the Boston Public Library and they helped the White House renovation so they did a lot on a really big scale. They used a lot of marble. They had fifteenth century Italian ornaments murals and mosaics. Because they wanted to have this renaissance revival style. I liked this from one of the articles I read. They were saying. They were trying to certify the country's role in the world as heir to the greatest of western civilizations so they're just everything has a grand vehicle to it that they designed. Yeah so I have a whole list of buildings that he is responsible for. The firm worked a lot on the east coast including some homes in Connecticut and the building. He's most well known for it. Is the Madison Square Garden? And I didn't know this Madison Square Garden. There have been four of four versions of Madison Square Garden. Did you know this now okay? I had no idea once again if you live on the east coast. This may be old news to you. But we mid Westerners we just don't spend our time study New York architecture so actually the first Madison Square Garden collapsed and killed four people and injured a lot of others so mckim mead and white had the opportunity to redesign the Madison Square Garden and rebuild it. They combined renaissance in Islamic elements. And then on top of it. They put a tower with a sculpture designed by Sant. Kaoh Dan which is probably a name. I'm butchering I. Apologize of the Roman hunting goddess Diana on Top. Thirteen feet tall. This statue was nude which was a big deal the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice forced them to cover her with drapery. But it blew off of the statue a few weeks later. Which seems like something you could have anticipated but okay however there is no way that this statue was actually modeled after. Evelyn nesbit because this went up before he met up winless bit. So that is one liberty ragtime. The movie took with this building at the time. It was the second tallest skyscraper in the city so they were doing a lot of big things another building he designed was the players. Social Club still around today. People who are involved today are Jimmy Fallon Tommy Lee Jones Ethan Hawke however it was founded by John Wilkes booth brother. So that's what That's gotta be a hard thing to live down as your brother. Also they designed to be Washington Square arch which was designed for free. It was actually built. I with would paper in white plaster. Just to be a temporary celebration of President George Washington's inauguration but people liked it so much be made a permanent one it was inspired from sites in Rome and the Arctic triumph and. I don't know maybe Justin Rory saw when they were in Washington Square Park. I don't know I like to be baited. Also designed the Pennsylvania station which at the time was the largest indoor public space in the world. It was two city blocks in the eight acres of land and it has been torn down today but at the time. It was a huge deal. They also helped design Bronx Community College. The CON Edison Iot Power Plant. Which at the turn was the largest powerhouse in the world. It was an entire city block and another the last one that really stuck out to me in New York was Madison Presbyterian Church. It was demolished. Actually only thirteen years after they built it but you can still find pieces of around the country in different museums and they took stone. Columns and terra cotta flourishes and they actually are now at a former newspaper headquarters in. Hartford Connecticut. Right Diana from Richard Anomaly. This guy also designed a lot of homes. I'm just going to give you a quick rundown of some of the big deal wins. This guy designed a lot of stuff. I'm just trying to give you the highlights. I know it seems like I'm listening. Everything in your grandma but I really narrowed it down. So the real housewives of New York Star Linda Medley actually has a house designed by Stanford White. It's the bluestone manner. So maybe you've seen that on real housewives of New York. If you've ever watched it cancer that I have I haven't either but maybe you've seen it. He also designed the Payne Whitney House which is now home to the cultural services of the French embassy and the Henry Cook Mansion which is right next door. It's over fifteen thousand square feet of living space and he didn't actually finish it because he was murdered when this happened but it was eventually finished and wants you to know. There are a couple things you could consider buying if you are really interested in Stanford white in his architecture. I'm interested so that one that I just mentioned the Henry Cook Mansion Not for sale right now as far as I know but it did go for forty two million dollars in two thousand nine because it faces central park and has many original features. Okay this January. Just a couple months ago. There was a house in Saint James New York that went for sale for one point. Five million built in eighteen ninety five sixteen bedrooms. Eight Thousand Square Feet Three Point. Seven five acres seven fireplaces six and a half baths however. It's a huge fixer. Upper will include link in our tumbler. You can see it it. The pictures look incredible but also this house is in major need of some TLC. So it's not really one point. Five billion you would be paying millions more apt to get a better idea of what you might be paying last October. A house in new Canaan Connecticut went for nine point. Seven five million. That was the asking price built in. Nineteen O five fourteen rooms eleven and a half thousand square feet five full in three half baths for acres at the highest elevation in town. While I just love these houses have names. I know like some of these would lay of rose cliff harbor hill like they just sound so love. I don't know if these have really true names to them or not. I just think they sound incredible but like I feel like you need a name for those houses if they don't already have them. Yeah I've I was reading off some actual names him. Bully long borne. What's the one that Mr Bingley Lipson? Gosh that's GonNa Bother me. It'll come to me. Nether field there. We go sorry spin a minute. Since I've watched Britain prejudice okay. That is a rundown. Thank you for letting me just read that little novelty you. I find his architecture fascinating. I'm went on such a deep dive on. This is one of those episodes. I told you before we recorded went on a deep dive. It's been a minute since I've been done one of these while I on my own. Deep dive of sorts. Tell me more well so the house. Richard Gummer's house well mckean mckim mead and white could have design their house because hey in nineteen oh six. They finished up a house in Southampton And then I don't see anything around that time that they were working on in on the East Coast now guitar highschool they finish in nineteen four. They could've sung by made emlyn Richards House. What as Richard says he was built in nineteen. Oh seven Mr White was already dead by then so couldn't have actually help but their house. The House that you see on the show is based on a real house actually use in a couple episodes. They use the facade of an over real house and then they built the set a set for when emily or for one. Rory Laura were walk are walking up to the House. That's then set but it starts out a real house in. I looked up and someone the address and this morning I took a little drive over to Pasadena and Visited Emily Richard House. What are you kidding me? Not at all. Oh my gosh surprise. Yup so I'm GonNa send you now some photos you can see pay of Tex Open. See it it's not around dry. There's the fountain that they drive around. Oh my gosh. This house is gorgeous. Yeah I totally see it. Yeah Oh my Gosh. Codes got everything. It's got different plants in the planters right now but it's still has. I think the same Scott's that you can you see in the show I can totally see rory. Laura lay at that front door right now and Laura trying to find an excuse to get back in the jeep. So I found I'm not soccer dot com and the woman who goes and finds real film locations where they're actually films. I went back and watched some episodes and in season one kiln. Now they are at this actual house in Pasadena and then also in star crossed lovers and other strangers season one again there at this real life house and I can tell because of the Scots is. The lamp hangs whereas on the set it's Attached to the wall and doesn't hang at all so cool. Yeah and the Fountain Is Different at least when I was there. There wasn't a baby in the Fountain. It was just pretty level and actually in the shots the. I don't think that you can see. Don't fountain is Overdone like that. So yeah I pulled. Rod of my husband drove up. I casually got out of the car walked by across the street. We got some wide shots. And then as I was like okay. I think we're good 'cause this super wealthy neighborhood. Yuck everyone has gates beautiful homes over there. Brad says okay. We'll someone's coming out and then get in the car because I know how that conversation would go. I just was taking photos in front of your house. You might have that. Yeah so we drove off and were the last thing we saw was a woman with her brow. Scrunched up against the gate like wondering. What in the world where they just doing. She looked very confused. shouldn't look angry just confused. Well if by chance you are listening to this podcast because you love that. Your House wasn't Gilmore girls please. No they're known. Various purposes were just really admiring of your house super fans so that was the up that made my day. And I'm so excited I finally got to tell you. That is so cool so you visited Richard Pneumonia. Moore's House that is awesome. That is a great surprise. I am glad so. This House is a nineteen twenty. Four French provincial revival style so not quite Stanford Stanford White Style and the people who built it were Marston. Van Pelt and mayberry architecture firm and they built a lot of homes in Pasadena. They really help develop it into town. It is so that's the real life house that is really cool if you live around if you can go. I'm not going to share the address on our podcast but I will have a link to. I'M NOT STALKER DOT COM. And she has the address so well. It's also funny if you Google Gilmore Girls Mansion. The number one result. Is someone else firm? I am not a stocker dot com taking almost the exact same picture. You did seriously number one. Google images is not you but it is someone doing something very similar awesome. Yeah I mean this and this house was actually used in other TV and movies. It was in Falcon Crest. I have never heard of that. Tv show it rings a bell. But I don't know anything about it. Okay and they use the inside this. Well where's the Gilmore girls did not? It was also in an episode of charmed so two characters house and they also use the inside whereas Gilmore girls never does one I had I got out of there so quickly though but I wonder like do. A lot of people come and take photos. The House has been used in multiple productions. So no know is maybe. I should have stopped and talked to her but in yeah because they must be somewhat friendly to people with cameras or super upset and wanted us to go. You know it just could have been anyways worth. It will share the photos out looking awesome. Well I feel like we have to talk about the elephant in the room. Though before we wrap up our Stanford White story does that. We gotta talk about this trial because you cannot talk about Stanford White and not talk about this trial now. Yeah Oh my gosh. This is a hot mass. It was fairly accurately depicted in ragtime. From what I can tell although they did take that liberty with the statue modeled after Evelyn. Nesbit I did want to read this. This is from the New York Times the day after the murder happened. I just love reading old newspaper sometimes because the language just is so. It's just not how they write. This is just a little bit in the paper about it. Social and financial circles and Pittsburgh were greatly shocked tonight by the news from New York. That Harry K thaw had shot and killed Stanford white the thaws have for years. Been social leaders here. Harry Kendall thaw the husband of Florence. Evelyn Nesbit over. Whom thaw and white are said to have quarrelled has for some years been the black sheep of the thaw family port. That's so interesting Luke. How is that a relevant detail to someone's murder? I don't know also. You can't really say that in the newspaper today than in the unless you're an opinion editorial column yeah also allegedly would have been in there so many times exactly this. Even though people saw directly it's so clear always allegedly. Yes in that. The main star of the story is like people are shocked that this happened. Yeah able family. We've got shocked by something. I must read more. Yes while quick overview of what happens. Evelyn nesbit moved to New York. In nineteen hundred. She was fifteen years old. She quickly became a model. She was considered very beautiful. She was a Gibson girl did you. Do you know what that is? Yes was that in Valley of the dolls. Maybe I had to Google and soon as I googled. Gibson girl drawing I went. Oh I've seen these all over the place I just had no idea. They had a name. They were basically these famous drawings by Charles Dana Gibson depicting a feminine ideal quote unquote in supposedly. She was a model for these in the so just to back up her credence the credence that she was a beautiful woman. She was also a chorus girl. In a show called Flora Dora which is how Stanford White became aware of her he. I guess saw her in the show. He was forty eight years old already married but apparently that didn't stop him. He had had plenty of affairs. His great granddaughter said he had a veracious appetite for beautiful young girls. All my which is just a good summary of all of these events. They went to lunch and he kind of became someone to introduce her to society. He bought her books. He paid for singing lessons and then he paid for her in her mother to stay at a really. Nice hotel also. He had a lot of apartments that he would invite his lovers too and he had a red velvet swing in one of them and he encouraged her to perform on it to swing on it whilst not wearing many clothes and her quote about this was. Don't forget I was only sixteen. I enjoyed swinging and basically sad. Yeah so she basically fell in love with Stanford white this much older man. Then she met Harry K thaw and he was heir to a forty million dollar Pittsburgh railroad fortune. Why outs Pittsburgh Society being shocked at this murder? And he got her interest by sending her red roses wrapped in fifty dollar bills. Which I don't know about you. But don't get Ryan Tundra. And she confessed to him the nature of her relationship with Stanford White but this also included the fact that scene for Dwight had raped her and supposedly he had gotten her drunk on champagne and the next morning when she woke up she had been raped in. This did not sit well with her. Now husband or soon to be husband. Obviously but also he had been dead against Stanford White because he'd been kicked out of his club's yeah he thought. White was out to get him which he might have been if he took Evelyn. You know I don't when it sounds like that had happened before she met Harry so I don't know for sure the exact timeline of things but in the movie though it and maybe I misunderstood but it seemed like Evelyn. I said that thaw had raped her. And then the attorneys wanted her to say that Stanford had raped her to help thaws case agreed in the movie since seemed that way. Yeah but in real life everything I read Stanford White did rape her. They continued a sexual relationship. Which mind you the started when she was sixteen and he was forty eight or forty nine however there this was also mentioned in the movie that apparently hairy also beat her with a whip and she was like covered in welts and she married him because he was wealthy and she didn't have a lot of money she and her mom so they were sort of dependent on these much wealthier men so that was shared in the trial in the movie as part of his insanity plea and apparently that is. True Thatcher. Yeah so on. June twenty fifth nineteen o six at Madison Square Garden. The BUILDING STANFORD WHITE. Add DESIGNED HAIRY. Shot him between the eyes. While the Song I could love a million girls was playing in the background on stage in that was depicted in the movie as well wrong. Okay and then we get to the trial. There was first attempt. The jury was hung so they do a second trial abilene white of being involved with a lot of girls between the ages of thirteen and fifteen and she decided to go along with the story that her husband was insane. Because she didn't want him to be executed but he didn't like this insanity plea he was like no. Don't you guys see? Ya was doing it for my wife. I'm saving a Damsel in distress. Yes and I. It seems like in real life. He went along with it also in the movie. His mom wasn't a fan of it but I read that his mom. Actually it was like. Oh yeah everybody in our family's crazy. Apparently his mom was totally. Surreal life interesting they acclaimed it was dementia. Americana that he had temporarily lost his mind upon learning that the honor of his wife had been compromised which is also bogus because he knew about this before they got married. So I guess it stood for a while however he did say I am a saying is any man on earth. He still spent eight years in an asylum. Although I did read this got a little confusing to me I read. He stayed there for eight years. I also read that. He escaped to Canada in nineteen seventeen. So yeah and I saw that. He was able to keep a pretty posh residence there at the asylum. There is a photo of him like a nice dining table in his little room so he was able to live comfortably. Okay well that's that's not the worst thing I've heard about in this island but I mean it was just because he was wealthy not because it was a nice asylum. Well apparently after all of this trial of the century went down. That's what they were calling it. At the time I think in one thousand nine hundred six. It's a little early to declare that but whatever apparently everybody kind of impacted their lives forever. Aveline really struggled after this. She had a second marriage that did not work out so well she one time said Stanley White was killed but my fate was worse. I lived and she tried to commit suicide two times. Her brother did commit suicide. Because apparently he was a financial benefactor of stanford white as well supposedly by the end of her life. She had a much more stable and happy life. Which is great but she also said that scene for. White was the most wonderful man I ever knew at the end of her life and I don't even know what to think of that. I need. More context was her life just better back then and so he's connected to that even though he raped her but you know maybe he was part of like a better time in her mind. Yeah I read that in more than one place that she said that but I also there is almost no context. It was just like at the end of her life. She still said this so I don't know it. Sounds like some complicated feelings to be sure. Yeah the last thought I found from thaw in his life. Harry K thaw. It's this story may not be true but the story goes that years later. He was on a trip in Florida. And he really didn't like the Cookie Cutter Pink stucco Mediterranean Revival Mansions there. And he said I shot the wrong architect. Oh funny I don't know what to think about that. But apparently this is something that stayed with them the rest of their lives in one fashion or another. You know the one way that I can see these two stories fitting together. In the movie the trial of Harry Shah and over the murder Stanford White and Coal House Walker Jean Walker Junior. That nate calls Walker. Junior is the fact that Harry Shaw got a trial got to plead insanity. Even though he wasn't he knew what he was doing and got out of you see him. Leave the assailant asylum at the end of the movie whereas Cola House Walker. Junior was shot on site like leaving get a trial. I think that's a great connection to make. I wish that would have been clearer in the movie. But that's a great point. The only the one thing though that we're just really doesn't you're not comparing true like kind of equal crimes with different types of people socially back in that day is the fact that. Harry Shaw shot a rich White Man. So it's not like he got away with killing a black man so it's it seems like he shouldn't have gotten away with it but because he killed someone who that society deemed important. Yeah some I think is something I thought about to in researching this trial is apparently the public really sided with Evelyn. Nesbit in this So it seems like public opinion was really on her side in. I wonder because we live in an era of Harvey Weinstein's in Bill Cosby's and you know both of those men are still living and they are able to claim a defense and go on trial for their actions whereas Stanford White as soon as this came out. Obviously what he did was terrible to her. But there was no like he couldn't even rebut whereas Lena like Harvey Weinstein. His lawyers are coming up with these ridiculous things about how men in America under attack. And this has nothing to do with this. You did some really bad things and you are finally having to pay for this. This has nothing to do with men at large. This is as far as being under attack. This is about you doing bad things and you finally having to pay for them and I wonder if Stanford White had maybe survived. This incident may be trial would have come out differently. Maybe has resources would have comeback on. Harry K thought he would dragged Evelyn nesbit through the mud. Yeah Oh yeah for sure. Yeah Yeah Anyway. This is all conjecture but just something I was thinking about with how current events are playing out. In how sometime somehow Harvey Weinstein still thinks he can make. It seem like he didn't really do anything that wrong. Well it's like I I'm not even I'm not shocked by that because while there is so much more awareness for how women are mistreated and there is more justice for Women Still. Our society is ruled by men. And it's it's still a man's world in that when we walk through it. Were uncomfortable all the time with men. So it's like I'm not surprised that he's fighting it but you know just like we say even with the Coal Health Walker junior you know. Just being shot on site and That completely reminded me of what's happening today. And all the videos and images we see of black men being shot in America. Twenty twenty for no reason so it's like wall while things are better. They're also not. Yeah wow I didn't realize more we talk about this. Murray realize ragtime actually has some really relevant implications for today. I wish that we are because there's some really stuff leaked their stuff. You can dig into the movie but a lot of the conversation. We're having right now. Is I think US pulling the conversation out of it. Not The movie making the conversation and also of note the Kohlhaas Walker. Junior story is fictional. We should make that clear so yeah he did actually weird connection. The Morgan Library he holds hostage was designed by Stanford White in real life but that event never happens so to Washington common. Try to save the De. Yes in other instances. He did many great things. This is not a real instance of something that happened. Also weird to bring in a real character. A real person into a fictional story line like that because what would booker T. Washington have done in the situation in nineteen. Oh Eight. Whatever year that was we have no idea so all that to say movie had some relevant issues not a great movie. No crazy stuff. Yeah Yeah and just not that fun at like now that I need a movie to be fund but like it was not joy. Watch no no. So we do not recommend rag time from Stanford White Architecture cool. He was agreed for Ya. Not a great person by many accounts as we say. Don't meet your heroes now that he was my hero but if you will. I didn't even know about him until until we decided to do this. Podcast talk about how this fits into the world again girls. I think it's about Dang time I think we've kept these people long enough. So their house was we'll Richard was definitely hundred percent. Correct was not built by Stanford away if it was built in one thousand nine hundred seven like he says because Stanford White was dead yes and if the stork will society tour guide was correct that it was built by Stanford White in one thousand nine hundred six then he would have had to have designed it before June twenty fifth of that year when he died. So I don't know seems unlikely. Seems Unlikely. So Richard? I'm going to say he knows more about his house than this other person does and Stanford White. I I looked up stanford white protege students but they brought on a lot of different architects into their firms so it could have been any one them. I know I tried to do the same thing and try and see if there were any well known people who trained with him and could not find anything concrete. That was clear to me now looking at pictures if you just google seem for white mansion plus some of the other house listings that I saw on. We will share in our tumbler. I can understand how someone who studied under Sanford White. In this fictional television show of course could be inspired how the people designing the show Gilmore. Girls could be inspired by Stanford White in making certain pieces of Emily Richards House or different rooms of their house. I don't feel like it's a definite one for one comparison. I don't feel like their home. Is that like grand renaissance style. That I see in these other pictures but I definitely can see some influence in maybe how. The People Gilmore girls designed emily in Richardson. Right well and just the fact that Emily and Richard Gilmore live in. A house built by architects. Yes if it were famous architect adjacent and this is definitely relevant to the area of the country. They live in because his architecture firm did design houses in Connecticut. Yeah so it's not Malibu Lean. It's totally possible. So how much money do you think Emily and Richard? How much money do you think they're home would be worth today? This Well if that one house went for nine and a half million your although that was on that was the Central Park House. No that one went for forty two million. Okay so okay nine so it could go for that nine and a half I think that's probably the ballpark because everything's finished. It's not the one and a half million dollar fixer upper And there's a lot going on there now. I don't know if it had fourteen rooms and was I don't feel like the Emily and Richard House is eleven and a half thousand square feet. Don't think it's that big and it didn't look like they had many years. It seemed like our neighbors. Yeah closer probably not that much but probably still no them the one and a half million. I Dunno yeah. We'll say five. This is where the lines of fiction and reality get really blurry because obviously this is not a real Stanford White House Pregnant House. It was designed by set decorators. Yeah and we only see certain rooms of the house because obviously it's expensive to buy a new rumor that house any television set. Yeah I was reading a little bit about any Sherman Palladino on how you know when the season starts. They don't have much money they're using an actual house. It looks kind small. She said Richard looked like he was sitting in a dollhouse. Because he's so tall and that they were able to make the dining room a little bit bigger every season until they hit where they wanted to be. And it's true it starts out small and then it gets. That's honey. I've never noticed that I London. Yeah I'm in the first season now because I'm always watching yet. I'm noticing how much smaller the their home means. Yeah but I do think tells us something about Emily and Richard? I don't know when they got in the house how they came across it if they paid for it themselves or if it was a wedding gift much like emily when it to gift. Laura Lighthouse for her name but it is A. I do think emily and probably take pride. In the fact that their house was designed by the protege of a famous architect. Yes and I think. Definitely Emily able to afford her. Cape COD COTTAGE AND THE REVIVAL MONEY. She got from selling the mansion. Yes yes and I love that they actually know who designed the house. So Taylor soon. That's our show so it's an architect. Yes so it's an architect and one last throw thought for you. This is not intentional at all in this reference. Which is why. I'm throwing it away at the end here seems relevant that we have Paris getting to know Professor Asher Fleming yet at the same time in this episode. When we're talking about seeing white just saying oh. Yeah not an intentional connection. I don't think in any way but it is definitely a relevant comparison to make between age gap of Paris. Geller is definitely idolizing. Fortunately it is not quite tragic. Yeah he does die but not so if there's anything else though you're like hey usually this really important detail about Steve. He's let us now. Hopefully it's nothing gross Nikki but if it's something relevant to our conversation or maybe something about his architecture we would love to know you can email us at so to show a genius dot com. We did us so it's a show us. What was I going to say? I forgot also if you own a stanford white home. We'd love to see. He's he was a great architect. I'd love to see it. And if you have any ideas of what you think. The Gilmore Girls Characters doing in quarantine. You can shoot a some tweets are you can email us or you can find us on temblor. You won't be able to tell us there. But you can learn a lot more about Stanford White and see pictures of his homes and the home. Carla went to go see show podcast APP. Temblor DOT COM. Here's a teaser. For our next step they locked the door church a series. What if I need to do something only commit? She's here in the damn bells after breaking the law overseas watching her to harder about to pay off when you joined the gym after ahead to is the. Princi- did you go. God now is crazy to him and although the fears Frankencense and learn.

Stanford White Evelyn Nesbit Stanford Mandy Patinkin Madison Square Garden Gilmore New York Justin Rory Stanford East Coast Morgan Library partner Ann Taylor murder mckim mead Harry Harry Keisha Erique Shar Fran Drescher Cemil L. Jackson James Cagney Sarah
Storytelling: Test Track

Detour To Neverland

1:04:24 hr | 6 months ago

Storytelling: Test Track

"Welcome to detoured and land where you are the author of your own disney story. There's a lot of satisfaction in developing ideas into realities. And you can find magic in your everyday life. If you do what you really want to do you feel like you're playing. How can you write your first chapter. Today greens figure out where we wanna go. Why is how we get there. I met this way. Your hosts brendan welcome back to detour tonight or land. Today's episode number two hundred and seventy seven. We are continuing our attraction storytelling series today talking about test track. This is a story about government bailouts about obtaining ideas about trying to fit something into the theme of a park that has an identity crisis. We're going to jump into all of that. Of course our goal is always here to make sure that the next time that you ride test track you have a more enjoyable experience and understand more of the story. That's going on around you but before we jump into all of that excitement and do you want to mention our travel agent sponsor hannah little with creating magic vacations. If you are planning your next trip to disneyworld or really anywhere else you need to go to a little bit of disney dot com there. You can find a quick form that you can fill out if you know what you want to do in your dates go ahead and let her know if you don't that's okay too. Just give give her whatever you do. Know she monitors. All the latest discounts for disney shall make sure they get the best deal possible. She's easy to work with and she's going to help you plan a great trip and the best part of all this is that you don't have to pay for any of her services because disney actually pays for it so it's basically like having travel assistant for free which is ultimately going to make your life easier. She can help you grab those hard to get dining reservations opening cantina. And she's here to help you save you some time and make your life more stress free so again you can find her at little bit of disney dot com or click on the link in our show notes so test track. We need to get out of the way katherine loves this attraction. I'm a little more lukewarm on it. It's a good attraction. But i think for these and especially this one. That has such a complicated history anna complicated past and future. I think we need to get our buys. He's out of the way just a little bit. We're gonna try to be as objective as possible but you're probably going to put a more positive spin on some of these things will. I will take him more negative spin. And that's just how this conversation is probably gonna go. Do you think that's fair. I mean it's probably fair. It disappoints me every single time to know that you are a known hater of this attraction. This is the great divide in our household for epcot attractions. But it's something that we are constantly working through so we'll be okay. That's funny it's a. It's a work in progress for us. It is so let's get out some of the key facts for track before we get started opened in future world of epcot officially on march seventeenth nineteen ninety nine. They did it all the way back for a soft opening in december of nineteen ninety eight now. They had a lot of problems getting this open right. Yes we are going to talk about all those problems. But it's funny to think about the concept for test track And when they soft opened. You're literally being their test subject. They needed to run the ride and test it out because it had so many issues that they would only run it for a few hours a day at that time until it was ready to be opened completely in march though. I do find that amusing so it was delayed around. How many months almost two years almost two years. It was supposed to open in may of nineteen ninety. Seven is when they originally scheduled for this thing to open and again there are just so many technical issues that they could not see since this was i mean. This was an attraction unlike anything else that they had ever done. It was the fastest. It was the most technologically advanced and they ran into a lot of problems so they understand how got to where it is today. I do think we need to look at test. Track history and the history of this pavilion and to a certain extent the history of epcot itself. And so i wanna start a kind of a thousand foot view and understand. What is the story and the theme of epcot in future world. And how're they working together. So in our research. I found this quote from walt disney imagineering. I don't know who exactly was attributed to. But they said epcot is about discovery the ideas and technologies. That will take us into the future and the people who will make those things happen. Epcot convinces us in. The future will be a great place to be an encourage us to make the trip. They're together now. This is probably the best description i've ever heard of epcot. I do to our age. I did not experience epcot at all in the eighties and nineties. We weren't really at a cognizant age to really feel epcot in its heyday. So we've kind of picked up scraps along the way and we've heard from many of you. About how wonderful of a park. This was when it first opened and it's had an identity crisis for so long. But i do think this description does something. That is very important in. It blends world showcase in future world better together than any other description. I've ever heard there's a couple of key phrases in there. That mean a lot to me. I think discovery is a big part of it. I think discovery can be a blanket. All of walt disneyworld. Then if you go on people who will make those things happen. Those things being the changes for the future and then at the very end make the trip. They're together again. Referencing the future. So i don't know. Has this been something you've ever thought about about. How future world in world showcase how this common theme actually bring together is people more than anything. Yeah i've never thought about it that way until just now honestly in and hearing this quote i do think that. That's one of the biggest parts of world showcase is highlighting people and cultures and then tying that back into technology and how everyone is working together. I think that's a really fun. Notion that is easily missed because typically people break apart epcot into you know the front half in the back half and everyone has a favorite right now. The front half is not there. So i'd say we'll showcase is the favorite at the moment but it would be nice to be able to see that tie in more easily and they kind of makes sense if you look back in the history of that future world and world showcase both began as independent projects that walt disney imagineering working on they were never meant to really work hand in hand together but this idea of came up and they were going to put this entirely new theme park together. That was not based on intellectual property. Not based on the blueprint that they already had for magic kingdom disneyland. This was just a completely new concept and they had these two independent projects working and finally they saw connection and they said the key to the future is people working together and so when you experience different cultures and you get a better appreciation for other cultures and other places around the world. That is how we build a better future now. There's probably some ironing out that they can continue to do to make that a more fluid theme. But i bring this up just because this is a common discussion point around epcot of that. Have they abandoned the original idea. What are they doing. Where are they going with this and a lot of it ties back to waltz. Famous epcot film that was produced and and put out to the world of him. Pitching this idea of epcot. It was recorded in october of nineteen sixty six and it was just two months before his death so obviously for that reason. There is a lot of emotion tied to epcot. This was kind of waltz thing that he worked on his last grand big idea and what he pitched and what we got is obviously very two completely different things. If you're not familiar with that we're not going to dissect the entire epcot film that he worked on. But one of the biggest parts of this experimental prototype community of tomorrow was he did. I have commercial and residential in. They're one of the biggest. Talking points was transportation. And i think that is so key to not miss that that so much of what wall was about and what he loved his passion was revolved around transportation. You can see that in his affinity for the railroads you can see that as an affinity between him and bob gurr working on pushing the limits on ride vehicles for his attractions in the parks. And so i think that lays a really good foundation to understand that transportation is vital and has deep roots in epcot vision. I mean i completely agree. I think when we're talking about test track today. That's something that we're always going to come back to because not only does it fit with what wall loved and it was a big part of this original plan for epcot but it also kind of starts the history of the space where test track now sits. The test track replaced the original in this space which was called world of motion. And when i started my research for today's episode. I never planned on going down a rabbit hole for world of motion. That's kind of where it took me to. And i kind of loved it so we are going to talk a little bit about the history of the space before we talk about the actual test track. Because again i do think the history especially in this point and with what you just mentioned brendan i think it gives us a better appreciation for test track even for those of us in the room who are known haters haters harsh dislike. I just prefer soren and world of motion. We even though i never went on it well to kick things off. World of motion was the transportation themed pavilion. It was part of the opening day in nineteen eighty two and it was there until nineteen ninety six and basically. They always knew that they were going to have a transportation themed pavilion it featured an omni mover and it looked at the history of transportation and my first instinct was. What a snooze fest. I mean honestly. The history of transportation is sounded terrible. It actually was not is attraction was primarily designed by ward. Kimball in mark davis. Big mark davis fans here and it was actually known for being funny. It had a lot of humor. They're getting different gags throughout the attraction and it was meant to kind of offset the straightforward narration of how transportation had evolved. So it's kind of like a spoof. Which is interesting because you can kind of see how this goes hand in hand with spaceship earth. You know as you enter the park and you learn more about communication and how we've evolved as a human race. This is taking a deeper dive into a subsector of that special. Earth doesn't have much humor though. So i think it's interesting that this volved a lot of humor and if you go back and watch the ride through of world of motion. It wasn't even just the dialogue. That was humorous. The animatronic were funny with their expressions and they had a sea monster in there that. How would you fit that into a story of transportation but mark davis basically found a way to. We've all that in together so from what we are it. It's like mark davis was basically attributed with most of the humor and the scene setting and then ward kimball did a lot of the art and kind of filling in the gaps along the way. Yeah his background was that he was actually an animator and this was the first and only attraction that he ever helped with and he came out of retirement to do so so he must have had a very specific skill. Set that they were looking for and something also to mention because we are talking about mark davis. There are a lot of similarities between this particular attraction and some of his other more famous attractions. Things like haunted mansion in pirates of the caribbean. In the sense that you know haunted mansion was an omni mover. It had some little gags and some quirks to it which were also part of world of motion. They had the The pepper's ghost ghost part of world emotion motion which is super fun. And it's interesting to see just some of those similarities. You know that mark davis truly did have a style and he kind of had a blueprint that he went off of and favorite people to tap into bringing his ideas to life of those being ex attend. Ceo so exited co wrote the music for grim. Grinning ghosts yasser wrote yoho pirates. Life from me. He also wrote a lot of the music used in world of motion. Well the music world of motion so the world of motion theme song was called fun to be free. We're gonna to talk about it here in a minute. But it had the same idea of bo those other attractions pirates and haunted mansion where this song basically throughout the entire ride but it changed just ever so slightly to fit the room that you were in so depending on what timeframe or what type of transportation you learning about. The song changed just a little bit but it was constantly moving. Just like the omni mover and i mean that's so interesting again. It makes us wish that we could have voted ourselves so we mentioned kind of before in wall story in his vision for epcot about this deep tie in with transportation and just to further illustrate how world of motion came to light. It really date back to the nineteen sixty four new york world's fair so at this time disney partnered with ford to do the ford magic skyway interesting ride concept they had all of these ford convertibles that they took the engines out of put them on a track. I think they had fifty of them. Right had quite a few. And it was basically an omni mover of ford convertibles. They would take you in. They would show you. They had dinosaur scenes. They had all kinds of stuff. Well it makes me think of that scene. That is making fun of the other day on the railroad where you pass by all the dinosaurs and i was like how random but that's kind of what the ford magic skyway was. It just walked you through a bunch of animatronic in a ford car and people loved it. It was a hit and so at the same at new york. World's fair in nineteen sixty four general motors had their own pavilion. And obviously the ford. Magic skyway was a massive hit with general motors. Actually had a massive hit in their pavilion as well and so following up on that basically general motors knew that disney was continued to expand. They're going to add a new theme park to the walt disney world resort and so in the nineteen seventies. They basically tapped disney. I and said. Don't you dare go to ford. We have our hands on this. We want to be your partner for when you do some sort of transportation pavilion type thing. We want to be the sponsors and ward kimball. Right was who was attributed that he kind of made the first connection with the ceo or some executive in gm and that kind of got this ball rolling of how they were going to get this pavilion off the ground. Yeah and gm actually ended up being the first sponsorship for epcot so obviously epcot went on to get sponsors for all of their attractions but gm basically approached them from the very beginning to be part of it and they helped them create the idea for this world of motion as well as another idea. That will talk about in a hot minute. So basically gm had a first contract that lasted ten years from one thousand nine hundred eighty two when epcot opened to nineteen ninety. Two however in nineteen ninety. Two when their contract would have been renewed. Gm fell into some financial hardships in decided that they were just going to sign one year contracts for a period of time and it was around that same time around nineteen ninety-two where they started to have conversations with each other about world of motion meaning an update or needing a complete overhaul. So this is a really interesting time in a lot of different pieces at work here. Gm is running out of money. They're not doing well financially. They're putting up a lot of money to disney to sponsor this attraction and they basically say we're able to do one year deal. That's all we're able to do from disney standpoint. They don't wanna lose their sponsor based on other attractions that we've talked about in epcot. Losing a sponsor is the worst possible thing that can happen to them and for their attractions. Because at this point in the walt disney company's life they cannot fund these things themselves so they almost made a compromise and they both agreed that they would take it into a different direction under a common goal of trying to sell more cars for gm. They didn't think that world of motion was doing a well enough job of getting people into gm cars and so that's kind of the birth of where test track came to be but there's a very funny story at the final ride of world of motion will basically it was the last day they knew that this was the last run that world of motion. Whatever do so of course all these. Gm execs came out decided to ride the attraction one last time and on that last ride it actually broke down and the gm executives had to climb out of the vehicles and walk back out the exit. They lived dream of being evect off a rod they did and then it shutdown. Now's was the last time. And that was it. But i do think what's very interesting about world of motion we've talked about this for other rides and attractions to throughout disneyworld disney is. I don't even know what the word is masters of repurposing. that's it. They are masters at repurposing. And some of my favorite repurpose mints came from this ride. So first off. They sent some of their audio animatronic to disneyland to be. Parts of pirates of the caribbean would probably made mark davis. Happy since he probably worked on both of them. I'm sure and then some of the props in different pieces from the actual transportation parts where then putting hollywood studios in the back lot tour showroom space which that's funny you know when you first thing rising. Oh that's great that's just full of props but that's not even the purpose of back lot tour. We just learned about a couple of episodes ago back tours at the movie. So why did they have world of motion props. I guess just to take up space. Yeah i mean. I think most people probably had no clue so. It's just hey look at this cool thing. I wonder where it's from. You'll never know it just worked The other attributes to this attraction can also be found throughout other disney and these are probably the most interesting ones though the first tribute to world motion can actually be found test. Track in there. They have several the first one is a sign outside of test track that reads f n to be f. r. e. Which is the abbreviation of fun to be free. Which was the right original song which he should go listen to. It's pretty good and then by exit tennessee. Oh so yeah so. of course. it's good point taken. However this easter egg is by far the coolest. I think that we've ever found so. There is an easter egg and skipper canteen. Which is the new restaurant. That's seem to fit jungle cruise in magic kingdom. I still think it's pretty new. So i call it new and inside the map. That's on the wall. It's featuring the legendary beasts of the mediterranean in its detailed by c. Member captain mary osha. Near and one of the creatures is the sea serpent from world of motion that you mentioned brenton and his name is kimberly were bliss and that's a tribute to the imaginaire word kimball. So once we get into the restaurant storytelling of skipper canteen. I'm sure we'll back to this idea and again down the road we're going to have to do an entire series on the society of explorers and adventurers but it is pretty cool that there's that connection. Mary oh chenier. If you're not familiar. She has connections to wear now. I can't remember. She's not typhoon lagoon be. I don't know we need to study up on our see mary. Share is a confirmed member of see as well. So i don't know they're they're just so good at tying in those things kind of seamlessly that you never would have seen the connection between before now i and it's absolutely brilliant so those are the biggest easter eggs. I'm sure there are more out there so next time you ride test track. I definitely think you know. Typically you look for in mickey's that next time you might want to look for world of motion easter eggs so bringing it back to test track. Let's talk about the story of it. We're gonna talk about just some general things to keep in mind and we'll go through each version and then at the end will kind of have a. I don't know maybe a debate or a discussion. A friendly discussion of friendly discussion on the two different versions. That have been there but when it was decided that world of motion was ready to re- replaced a team of imagine nears circle back to an original concept for what they were going to do with the transportation pavilion way back when they were in early development of epcot and it was based on this idea of a testing site that general motors used called the proving ground. And they really liked this idea that all of these vehicles were on. The roads today had to go through these rigorous tests and You know practices to make sure that the vehicles were roadworthy and they particularly became fascinated with this sled. Thing called hiji is i guess. Hij- heidi it's hydraulically controlled gas energized sleds. That gm would use for the crash test. Basically it's what you see. All those videos were there smashing a car into a brick wall instead of pressing the actual gas accelerator. It's being pulled from underneath and accelerated towards the wall in that fashion to give it its crash test crazed rating and everything along that but that was scrapped back when they did world of motion and they had budgetary constraints and they couldn't do an entire transportation pavilion like they had originally plant so instead they went with the omni viva omni mover world of motion. And they left this behind. It's interesting that they were able to circle back to this idea. So it's not even a concept that was completely foreign to them. You know test track was something that had always been in the back of their mind. Since the beginning of epcot which i love i think that makes the story better. It does make it better. And so they brought this idea out from the archives and presented gm and gm loved it. They really fell in love with the idea of basically building a mini version of their proving. Ground here up caught. So thus begins the basically the re transformation of the space so they kept the circle structure the wheel structure that they had originally built for world of motion but basically everything else was completely scrapped. They emptied out the contents inside to start working on the new track and the cars in particular where something that gave the imagine ears a run for their money. They did not anticipate all the issues that they were going to run into. Basically they were highly sophisticated. Each individual car contains multiple computer systems and as they started testing the cars they realized that they couldn't withstand the high demand that they were going to be facing. They ran into things with the tires like the tires had to be replaced every week. We'll that's not going to work. Can you imagine how much time that would take and how expensive that would be. So they had to work through those issues. They had to work through the actual computer system issues because they needed twenty-something cars on the track to be able to twenty nine was the number that they decided on to be able to fit all the people and when they were first running their tests it would like kill over at six cars such a big difference so when we think about why they had that big two year delay. That was it. It wasn't the building where the steel or any of those other excuses that they could have given. It was truly that technology wise. That kind of bit off more than they could chew and they actually went about at a different way than you may be have imagined. They actually outsourced the computer and the software system to build this and when they got it back that's when they learned that it was capped at six. They decided that twenty nine was the optimal number of cars at needed to have running loading unloading on the track. Addessing time to meet the demand for the guests to make sure that Wait times we're still not crazy now. This ride still has crazy. Wait times because it has such a low ride capacity but twenty nine was the best that they could get it too and when they got this piece of software in this control system back from the outsource company they basically said it's trash we have to build this up from the ground up and they basically brute forced it along the way they built it up to six then they built it to seven then they built it to eight and they basically put on a new car each and every time that they wanted to add a new one on there and they finally got up to twenty nine which is really crazy. That's how they had to go about it. I mean it is quite incredible. And i guess you know it just kind of goes back to if you want something done right. I guess you have to do it yourself. Because it just did not work for them but they also talked about the actual design of the cars. And how like the mechanics of this operation works and it's a slot car design and i thought it was interesting and some of the closest relatives to these test drive cars. Do you wanna guess what some of them are. 'cause i never would have put it together. I mean your mind automatically goes to like tomorrowland speedway all topi. But i know that's probably not correct. That is not correct. It is actually the monorail for one of them so the way that it is basically pulled is similar to the workings of the monorail but then also the technical elements of it is related to the indiana jones. Cars out in disneyland. So if so facto dinosaurs. Well probably if you had to predict well and that goes back to the software as well in both of those attractions reagan. All three if you're going dinosaur. They have the starting stopping turning. You know a lot of decision making going into those ride vehicle systems along the way so that makes sense when you put it that way. What was it. There's something that they claimed like there was more computing power on these cars than a space shuttle is like the thing that i kept reading about. Yes i mean so this just goes to show. There were so many moving parts that i think. They expected the turnaround time to be super quick because they had the plans. They knew what they wanted to do. The only dave themselves like fourteen months. Initially it was supposed to be a quick turnaround. And i just don't think they ever anticipated some of these problems. And ultimately that leads us to some other really cool facts about this ride Basically this is still considered the fastest ride in walt disney world. It goes just under sixty five miles per hour and immediately. Start to think of other roller coasters and in particular rockin roller coaster but according to things that we were still reading online test track still beats it out which is pretty incredible and this is also believed to have the biggest price tag and i think that two year almost two year delay has a huge part in that. So it's rumored to be close to three hundred million dollars in cost. The of course disney never actually reveals how much it costs. You can probably gather more information from the gm documents that disney because they do such a good job of hiding it probably in their books but but even though it had a huge price tag and had a big delay it ended up being wildly successful because really this was the first thrill ride in epcot. This the door for all sorts of throw rights. Not just an cockpit in as a whole so what you're telling me is that it's test tracks fault that we got missions. Base test checks fault. Yeah no it is. I don't even. I don't know you could fault. Yeah i nobody wants mission space. But it's there because probably attracted so well at the beginning. Well i can't put anything track. I love test track all right. Let's talk about the first version. Then we'll focus more on the second version and the story that's being told you their first version of you never got to experience it. We are going to walk through it piece by piece just so you can kind of understand enhance to facilitate our discussion at the end here. So the first version of the attraction brought us into a working. gm production and test facility warehouse. The key was packed with basically two different areas that they had set up for you. They had quality tests. That's the things where you'd see how they install the cars and how they put airbags in place and do the suspension test. Then they had safety test based on crash ratings airbags and how they're deployed. They also had like a big mallet. That would smashed into a test. Dummy it was really strange was a cool. It was very cool but it was a sensory overload. I do remember being as a child and very loud. Lots of moving things in. I think it was just a little too much. They went a little overboard. However i'm sure a lot of people found it very cool and very immersive along the way so after you wind through the q. You were staged in what they called the briefing room. Where bill mckim and sherry. Unfortunately sherry doesn't have a last name on a first name basis with sherry would greet prompt you with what they needed you to do as your job today in replacement of the test dummies. So we're gonna play bill macadam and sheri's ride preview right now to the test. Track village the control center. Just a of minutes. You're going to be out there on that track. i just. These are the same kinds of tests. That are run at Gym tests disabilities the portal. The twenty six th grade suffering rally steep rate. Give us jews to evaluate stress in your engine transmission. Let's put it that blocks. Germany belgium overhead serves into the integrity of the jc. When you're more time this time with the environmental tests put a tube five seven seven. Take your vehicle to some extremes. Interior pointless corrosive to see how nature worst offers. Zanu buy your vehicle surprised as soon their tents routines of extreme. You're absolutely wasn't that awesome. I mean it was it still is and it gives me all the nostalgia and everything that you love about nineties early. Two thousands disney everything out a pre show. I mean anything about things. Like dinosaur tower of terror. I mean is like everything. Everything has a pre show. I think it's hilarious. How the horrible. Their audio mixing was now that was like someone recording the recording. But like why were the car so loud that you couldn't even hear mr mckim for a lot of the time because cars are allowed. Brendan well they still could have. Toned it down just a little bit. We could hear everything and he was saying. But i do wanna take a moment to talk about bill mckim because this will mean a lot to you. I think he's one of those actors that you've seen him in like a different things but you never put a name to face. He's played by a pretty young john. Michael higgins and he was impeached perfect. He was in yes man. he's done a lot of voice acting as well. But most importantly catherine he was mr tipton in the suite. life of zack. and cody. now. Mr tipton was not a regular character. If you remember the show it was basically. When things went horribly wrong he would come in to check in on mr moesby but that was played by the same guys bill mckim and for those of you who have no clue what we're talking about this as disney channel. Show that i mean we were probably both obsessed with who didn't love this. We live in cole. Sprouse ashley tisdale brenda song. Everyone that started cast exactly. It was a hit so after the pre show. You basically went through everything that mr mckenna said that you would. You went through an accelerated hill-climb suspension test over different types of road surfaces including bricks and rocks and dirt and all kinds of stuff. You did an antilock braking system test which you went through twice actually once you went through with the abs off and once you went with the abs on so if you remember this is your first has is when you hit the cones and the barriers along the way and they basically were demonstrating how important a bs was to handling. Do you remember. That aren't of course. I do next environmental tests with a heat chamber and a cold chamber and a corrosion chamber. The coal chamber was always my favorite. It's everyone's favorite and to be honest the other day we got on this ride and i was like. Oh they're going to have that room where it's cold like it'll be so nice like i still when i think about test track a big part of me still pictures this even though it's been gone since what she hasn't twelve. I still ride this ride. And i'm going to go through the courtroom next. Were handling test where you climbed a set of hills with blind turns and with each subsequent hill you would increase your speed by ten percent. Each time in the very last one was where the big mac truck almost hit you. The ultimate thrill. You'll never see it coming. You've never see how many times you ride it. Also now. That's why. I love that scene and Rotate radiator springs racers so much. 'cause it back is there. Yeah the nice nod. Next is the barrier test or the crash test and this is where you accelerate towards the concrete wall in seconds before you hit it shoots open with some blinding lights at the very last second opening up. Where they're taking you on the speed test. Where he go around the bank track before straightaway takes a max speed a sixty four point nine miles per hour. That's pretty much the end at the end. They had like some thermal imaging would show you in the car. And and then you would exit in the execute go to the assembly experience which was a simulated gm assembly plant. So this was pretty cool. They had like a stamper. They had doors and seats an engines on these chains that were gliding overhead. Above you. basically that you were in the other half of the warehouse. Now that the safety tests done this is where they can start putting the cards together and then of course they have some lovely. Gm vehicles there that you can view and learn more about. But i mean funny enough. This did really help them out now. We've often joked who the heck has ever bought a car. I mean i don't know if anyone actually buys a car there but maybe it peaks your interest it. Does i mean it's interesting you know. Is that check box on. How did you hear about us to buy cars test. Track in epcot. That would actually be amazing. So that was the first version in its demise is kind of eerily similar to the demise of world of motion when the two thousand eight financial crisis hit. Gm was able hang on for a little while but then by two thousand nine gm had filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy so at that time they were then bailed out by the us government and relief. Package jim got somewhat back on their feet as the economy started to recoup but were still really strapped for cash. And at this time they told disney again. We're only going to do one year contracts and we want another update to this right. This is where people get lost. This is where people get upset and ultimately you know. I'll just say from my point of view this decision to take away. This version track was made by someone in a suit living in detroit. And not by walt disney. Imagine here and so they made this second version. They took it down for refurbish. There's only an eight month turnover well because realistically we're gonna talk about the second version here in a second they didn't change much. They basically re skinned it. I think is the best way to say it. They changed enough to take away everything that we loved about the original but they didn't change it enough to wear like they're going to be crazy technological issues and things like they had the first time you know the cars are the same the track for the i mean the track has the same. They just took away all of the elements from a test center. Basically it's won't you walk us through the second version and then we'll discuss at the end so the second version again mirrors the original. It just has a few key changes and basically and test track two point zero. Which is what we're going to call it. Guests are immersed in really the design process. So it's more so about the creation of the car rather than the testing of the cars and well. I agree with you in saying that. This a lot of this change had to deal with gm and financial situation again. It can be argued. And i do agree that this has a more futuristic approach and it does kinda fit in better to future world because it is focused on the design and putting you in that position. And i don't know does that make sense. It does make sense. I mean it definitely has a more futuristic feel and for that point alone i think it does maybe fit in future world a little bit better however i do think that may be some changes that could have been made to version one that still connected it to the future so if you date all this back to world of motion. The last seen in world of motion was this future city and what they thought. That's when you're talking about the pepper's ghost they were taking a stab at what they thought. The future of transportation would look like i understand. They went the safety route with a test. Track version one. But i still think you could have done that. Look as cars. Get more safer what we might be able to do. We could make them fly. We could have autopilot. There's all these things that we can do. They're going to go hand in hand between safety and futuristic design. That's my argument. That's a fair argument. Ultimately the biggest change that i see between the two especially in the queue is that now guests get to go through the chevrolet design studio where you create your own prototype in. They call this prototype. Your sim car. And i guess it's important to note. Gm did decide to drop gm from the title sponsor. It is now one of their brands. Chevrolet point good point so then this test car. The sim car that each guest gets to designed is what is tested during the demonstration on the now sim- track and on the same track. You go through four tests and they test the different performance attributes of the car that you created so you have capability. Efficiency responsiveness in power. The one that i think needs the most help efficiency basically in the efficiency space. That's where the hot and the cold chambers were they basically it's just a bunch of mirrors and they have like a light that just goes over you and it's supposed to be like airflow. It's super lame. Bring back the coach chambers. That's what everybody needs. Give the people what they want. But again it's very similar to the original where you can tell it's the same track If you were to go back and watch like an old. Pov of one point zero and then go ride two point zero. You can see exactly where you went through those same tests. The truck is still there It's just not a realistic looking truck. It's a more futuristic looking truck. They even mentioned in some of the research that we did that. They kind of gave it tron vibes with like the colors and the way that they modeled it to make it look more futuristic and ultimately each car is tested in scored in real after you go through each of these tests and it gives them a score so there is an element of competition here which i know does play into the rewrite ability factor is each time you do ride you get to make your own car and then you scan it in using your magic ban little card that they give you in. That's how as you're writing. They know the you're writing basically. Here's my problem. there's no story version. One had a story in although it was silly and it was. You know you can use all kinds of different adjectives to label the first story we. I guess we didn't explicitly pointed out and we cut off the pre show before it explicitly said it. The story behind the first one is that the test dummies have went on strike. And so they need you to come in and perform the duties of a test dummy which is hilarious. This one the story is that you were designer and you were helping them. Push the limits as to what cars will be in the future. Is that how you would describe it. I mean that's the way to interpret. I mean that's a great interpretation. I honestly think that's probably even over thought from what it is. I mean i think it's just meant to be like an interactive experience where you are designing your car and your testing it on the same track and then you can continue to test it after you leave the track in the chevrolet showroom so i think when we look back we're gonna look at this era of disney parks in the two thousand two twenty twenty twenty thirty s. Maybe as well. We're this era could be called the immersion era but mixed in that immersion here so when i say immersion i'm talking galaxy's edge pandora toy story land you know you're completely immersed in the store that's being told to you. I think. The misstep here is that they miss interpreted interaction with immersion. Because they're not the same thing. This is very interactive ride. You're competing against other people that are with you. You can go in and you can build a different car every single time. But that's not immersive you leave and there's no lasting effects i don't think is kind of my my issue with them and i i can see that as well. I mean there's no story there's nothing free to really put yourself into. It's very straightforward now and all of the things that we were kind of drawn to in the original or even in world of motion we now has been completely stripped away with a bunch of neon lights. It's a advertisement version. One was an advertisement secondary. It was a story primary. I think here. They've made the advertisement primary and i think disney was willing to do that because they didn't want to lose their sponsor which is sad now again. This is where you can always go back to what you said about epcot and you know some of those original ideas for what epcot is an especially for future world and this is where the argument can be made that. This is more futuristic but again futuristic just because it has neon lights does that automatically make it more futuristic like does is. Do you have to sacrifice story. I guess is the biggest question. And i don't think you should have to. I think he can have the futuristic story about test track dummies going on strike. And i think you could have made it work. I think we would both agree. The the primary The best way they could have done. This was to keep road of motion and add track. Because then you're showing the history of transportation where it's going in the future and then also showing the safety aspect of it and how cars today in the future are going to be tested before they can hit the road and it's just a shame that they both couldn't coexist and we really couldn't get the quote unquote transportation pavilion which was originally intended for epcot. So sounds like we don't even really need to have any sort of discussion here. Yes so when you call me a test track heater. I think i need to be more specific on a test. Track two point. Oh hater i do think now. I know maybe people who went on world of motion would disagree. I don't i'm not. I'm not necessarily going to say it's an upgrade but introduction of a thrill ride that still demonstrated an important aspect of transportation like test track version. One point oh i think satisfied vision and the theme that they were going for and it truly did fill a gap. That epcot had you know. They needed something thrilling. If you look at all of these original pavilions no matter which one it is that you choose to look at. They were all very similar. Like you even pointed out the similarities between the world of motion and spaceship earth. It's an omni vor walking through history with animatronic and narrator ends with something that leaves you in the future. I mean how many of those attractions can someone sit through in one day. No matter how great and historical mark davis esq at horizon to that list. Two so same thing exactly. You can only do so much of that in one day. Which is why. Maybe if they had done the transportation pavilion like he said in the original manner with both parts both could have survived that they had to make that sacrifice early on and the rest is history. Well it's kind of funny to think of using about the early days of epcot as to and it wasn't even an opening day attraction but if you go later into eighty s into the ninety s the most thrilling ride in epcot would have been maelstrom. So obviously which was pretty thrilling as well thrilling in a different way but as theme park gassed continued to push the envelope. And you see you see you know universal heading that direction and then i by the late eighties. You see hollywood studios kind of heading that direction as well. I guess that would be the nineties. Syncing opened an eighty nine but the theme park industry was going that direction in epcot had to keep up in some way. So that's why. I think you know yes. Of course it would have been wonderful to keep horizons to keep world of motion to keep body wars to keep all of these classic epcot attractions. But they had to do something to keep up and to be matter of fact on it. They still have to do more to keep up. It's still behind based on what it's supposed to be satisfying now. We have grown to love. Epcot probably more from a food and beverage aspect. But you can't. Isn't that sad to love theme park for being able to go there and eat. There's more to it. I think maybe we can consciously say. I think we like the music. I think we like being in the different cultures now when they the lack this is a completely different topic. The lack of international college program cast members. I think really hurts world showcase at the moment but there is more to epcot but to the average theme park goer. Epcot doesn't cut it for a lot of people. When you have a sewer in when you have a test track i guess depending on what you like the have a space a it satisfies more people and what they're looking for. It kind of helps meet that expectation. It gives people through the gates and then hopefully once they get through the gates. Didn't they fall in love with the app that we know you know with the with the different cultures and the food and beverage options and then hopefully what future world slash innoventions such that entire area hopefully becomes in the future. They still are able to get into the door based on attractions. I think that's what sells tickets a mwana water. Experience doesn't sell tickets now. I think it's going to be amazing. i think. I think it will sell tickets. Well tell a little girl that moana end frozen are in epcot in that parent is automatically buying a ticket. So we're pretty far off track. We are we are. But i think we both agree. Version one point zero was just a better experience. Flat out capel's apples. It's a better experience. The story was better. There is a case to be made that version two point. Oh fits future world better. But i still don't think it's enough and i can agree with that so we are in agreeance here. So what if we look forward and we put on our thinking caps. What can be done. Is it tesla is that what is it. You're saying now what could be done for test. Track three point zero. I think to bono's not sustainable. Isn't it it's been open for. What eight years now. Somewhere around there. I honestly just have a hard time believing that they're going to put any more money into it right now. Just because i feel like they're satisfied with it. It's a thrill ride i. I don't know third so much concerned with the story. Like we are what will be interesting to see is when new future world is unveiled whenever that is does it still fit the theme in the narrative of it. And that's already be outdated whenever they open. And that's where i think that maybe they would change it. But i feel like because we don't know exactly what new future world will entail new feature was going to be like new fancy land an era. That's true it will be. It's going to be exciting. I am genuinely excited. We're all the new things coming up. Caught i just need a larger starbucks again not one. that's in a shipping container amen. To that it's hard. It's hard to say what test track three point. Oh could be because. I don't think they're going to take a step back. Which is what ultimately we would want. I just don't see them inserting a story. Because i i don't know if that's the direction that they would take it for future world mel. Let me be clear about one thing. Because i you know. This rumor has circulated for years since cars lane got added. You'll say well. Why can't they just put cars intellectual property in there. I i'll go on the record and say i support intellectual property and almost every scenario except for this one. I don't think it would work. I know i don't want cars. I don't want ka chow lightning mcqueen or anything like that. I just don't think it's possible. I think it would be such a watered down. Version of what disneyland has that it would be sad. Cause i don't think they have room to make them race Which is a huge part. I feel like you're not going to get the same experience of being in radiator springs. Maybe the only thing that i could see them potentially doing with cars is what is it in cars. Three where they have like the indoor test facility like where they're on car treadmills. I mean if they tried to spin that as like this is the future of car testing racing mcqueen racing academy like do that. I mean it does but are they going to keep that forever. So that's a pretty cool animatronic. It is neat. How scrapping purpose. That they would pick him up and carry him over. Oh the last thing that. I did want to mention though which we thought was super cool so this is completely off topic but in world of motion one of the coolest parts of world of motion. And maybe this could be included in like a three point o. Is like the three sixty tunnel of motion where they would make you feel like you were like bob sledding or going quickly and that same kind of technology now we see in universal so it was kind of ahead of its time and it is fairly futuristic to maybe when we would that be cool. He did talk about that last week in our rollercoaster episode. Did i mean. I think it's cool. If it's done correctly i think that now. We've never been on fast and furious supercharged. Which is one of those that uses it mainly because we've heard all the reviews of it being a global ride but we have been on Kong skull island and it's a pretty cool effects. You really do feel like you're moving based on what you're seeing on the screens. So i mean i could. I could be down for some tory like simulation like that. That would be okay even if they just took some sort of technology like that and replaced it with that terrible eco efficiency room. That would be better to me. Just pause in there for fifteen seconds and say like. Here's a road simulation test. I mean something. Give us something other than air passing over us I did want to mention one of the thing as well. Then i promise. We're wrapping this up radio hour a good It was a big talking point whenever test track whenever they switched over from world motion to test track and they extended the track out back behind there. Where you're doing the loop. Basically doing the bank turns to get ready to do straightaway coming back of that. This was one of the first and maybe one of the only times where they willingly are showing you a backstage area in the parks and there was a lot of discussion around this between the imaginary between disney management about the integrity of. Can we show this. This is a cast member parking lot. This is storage back here now. Now we do run disney races back there. So is there as much integrity. Who knows but that. That's an interesting talking point. I think of that they were really worried about taking you back there in in showing you this area i think ultimately they started most people are so focused on the track ahead of them that they're not going to notice the costuming building or the cast member parking. That's down below you. Yeah i would agree with that. I would say that that probably would have won out the argument that it is something interesting to think about. Since for so long disney was worried about you. Know sight lines and all those other of onstage versus backstage. Yes when that's another episode another episode for another day. So thank you guys so much for listening. We want to hear from you. Send us a message tags on your story. Whatever it might be let us know. Did you like world of motion. Track one test track to all of the above. None of the above would love to hear your thoughts on these. I'm excited to be back in the storytelling series. We took a few weeks off from it but excited to be back in here and we're going to restaurants storytelling on thursday. I'd say that's a fair a fair assumption. So hopefully you can join us for that episode. Hope you're off to a wonderful start terry week and we will talk to you real soon. Thank you for listening to detour. Neverland make sure you an. It enjoy the show between you can find us on instagram at detoured and every land or visit detoured and overland dot com. We appreciate you letting us be part of your day. So you real soon.

disney gm mark davis ford epcot ward kimball walt disney imagineering bill mckim Gm Brendan walt disney walt disneyworld bob gurr mary osha Mary oh chenier hiji Epcot sherry caribbean magic
Ep 442 - O doente, a canja, as torradas e o ch

Túnel de vento

15:12 min | 5 months ago

Ep 442 - O doente, a canja, as torradas e o ch

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Vitally kilter kuzak ulama affirmative famiglia essen conveyed akaka quiz excess sinica. This immediate bush a. m. s. dot com slash the former penn side commercialistic vehicle Milk few seniors. The mersch within a deal quizzes kill slash. Better stems atmospheres. Sometimes the new orleans area school when my zeal leverage assume is of an agent to leave to command improves dominant improve topic. Dials akin novus farmers deviated to me. Neither squeezes yellowish quiz. Song of songs. Alma quizzes Divy style komo mood and more villes. Jaffa reveres billions assets into diva zita. Sound of of former mcewen site minova via cuisine that your dash cazzola steamed and the drills concealed or spoil out louise. Smith's shoe defenseless. that she didn't assume. Superiors alma leah. So while man almond roca metric through possession ball the doley meet. Cosco us lapsed in the break. Lieber do you kooky at its steam. 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Ep 392 - O livro esgotado

Túnel de vento

09:28 min | 7 months ago

Ep 392 - O livro esgotado

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Ep 345 - Este  o melhor planeta para se fazer podcasts

Túnel de vento

13:31 min | 10 months ago

Ep 345 - Este o melhor planeta para se fazer podcasts

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Vainly that can be your by that. I could think of your worship theory gibson somewhere modality no matter coming and can say catholic failures i e mitch clem will not deal with the farish your brand new cbs new kobe gibbs senior sejour novem matt india so i've been caring i quiz react cash immunity the start the source merely the passing south. That's south good things but they will be the qassam zomig Reached a single discipline. Motor not a specialty. Still key might sleep you. The master chef ishmael seven island them should be fooled. Malcolm do skinned nausea stems of evil. Seattle did squat. Zuniga squat and we've Get gimmicky assi zone. As you say anthing you'll get on a whim. You canessa salted the main vast with these timber me on the perez lot. The members know for you. Now is the pursuit mishmash. He'll won't they three hours snacking. Members get a minute video wars bush to simmer abe gone sue era. Bob acquisition bazaar. Neither of the there for us. Get outta bishops. Lovely key monge move. Am fecamp contain apply. Get such good. We're in fact. Susan shivers sobbing on various guessing input asleep susan's nova jefferson channel casting who've man mississippi cheaper housing. Seth yeesh two times gog native muench say appel sandwich. Fluish gilmore's adam. Adamant faucet were still selling quizzes. Nitesh cuisine french faster absurd to Damascene tiger nor i knew feel of spreads the activist a pill style. You basically the more you to the response bills are snipers in soc abe tuna keb panova. That's the casinos another traits scrupulous wound vac mkaku era scare with thousand. I believe staticky of acquisition while biggest. Some stay finished but while bras wrote the bill might nauseous getting's incas sewage. After museum so still parish eivind out for dinner the main out. I'll sleep that malul into the ash house. The entire you lead averaged more important wisdom. fatah's my out still start getting rob. Humint cuisine bleak. Our michigan stems muneer. There's get abc's liquids oprah interstate movement loop serving general. Do frau scam weakness rituals. You buy most of us will give you square inch provision which quiz to shoot fact comic Cousteau parral in stem shaded by connect to shake zoe so assault gordon. You def- out black oil giants by mugabe's sinbad reviewed no some sheriff look as al-sadiq wilt my evaluate minch smash. Mike flew right. Did you compete under suk. Weinstein cows emphasis in. We'll bring gaza by tom. Luke got back in gaza. If he's game. Ian border thinking group can move to. Sean are so much sukhal raza. She would collaborate that every thing. Banish year percents. No but admit quarterback. Mitch mitch muc's massine sauce body listening to these super points. It can avail thing much free. You'll see interest mechanic and eventually mounted mentors thing. It could see it. Florida issue with me. Thou movement keypads inca cement combat apart goosey part of required steelers multi. He has sent. You got to your mallory alone. If he comes to an might absolve them veneers would be by the who that path streak local on bash them can feel shutt- mpm ruffles nominate. You'll normally no grand hct soothes. You warming fico getting up to get his magazine. Who saw brazil. Koska kentish squinting marciano seven. Macos bill say flashing teed. Fash you keep them. I do group source body. Namic exclusive to get fat. I squeeze you might. She might say they should so the namic fast mu disquisition and people to visit will not poured in a coffee shop around seamers files went viral. Op board say no vacillate and those skit at this that get getting now getting the boys. Nothing salahdin can permit the camera. Hope epa equal to remove empowering suicide patterson beach gripping tale launch and two women. Don't have kickoff paphos. It seems newer stupid on message to muslims. Lump caesar compare hoping or winter hooper. Alma for bella vita grandmothers for bella. Nope season study visa at the sewage. Mitsuko cimpian ship nauseam with the hooper who centauri to hope the same time season. Luther deer rosza so argue. Argue compare hopes the whole month is santa middle back. You can the symbol on board and the gaza city. Should you mess of this. i mess. Who culligan gonna this now. This is lewis. Kendall symbol aboard silvestre's love goop mexico. He built mira suits three thousand a built murph superbowl. Some foundry michaelis willing wound. It was enveloped week. Fill up damage. I followed maybe squares. Buffalo rhodesia follow the mundi. Were both our from your style from mish goupil many of these. Upc bush breezy and mort more to re on podcast travel. Israel's provided by values. He's actually wish michaels isn't gonna selfish. You ought to throw in his for all event the quiz would of mccoy's shattered those participating. Cpu ado in to present to buy those pass. Another new cash. Steve maza man amp made politic. Stobbe since nurse will remain militia. Now they just saw asked visine podcast weren new plane. Tickets was famous not now available woman. Foreign mob share walk through a geek story cease. Newer consider spouse muslims pasta. Quincy sharon planet advice. Normally z podcast shuji virus. But you need to november. Both gasoline macos sh- upper mart. Different jupiter plant zoos but in the pacific seems shampoo. Them stack movie cement reading spur mart sees new terms. Air by steadily while strut likud made have been in for to has come centers to share dish. Air patch. grimm's law seattle moderates a few. Been to lose two thousand different. The msci story easterners gavin for me. Either still still in our book and everything in the south. For starters i let the steam passenger exist percents brilliant wished stock ladders. Tinton brisebois understood you. The best team sees new sailed off your sale. Dumont topping sale. Your who's your movement. Crap each parabas the it to remain toddler zoo. Wash my mother. Continue over veg quoting away with wanting movie poverty ish. 'cause we need to sue baranov. Ish maters astroid groups valerie. Town wish throwing we need to see your mother yet cannot warm above the normal. Wear them so over. The main bus bear weakened. You'll be out the studes leo. Shouting talk acquis Thinks la for mohair. The affordable care conceal by the way the putting not meant a pavone at the berlin wall. E oculus th royd alley the baronet members we famish scherzinger. Ethnical saying you were stolen out. The control i sima. Every quarter of passage. Bluff emission cater epa tests using failures. Not here we'll see the keno vice novus moshe hip and square off. Calls me foolish. Mice will give you a semi she of quizzes measuring panetta. Who are visiting. You've ruined episodes through new meters thrillers. It available by the used. 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Erste Wahl: Gelb-Grn

Was jetzt?

11:58 min | Last month

Erste Wahl: Gelb-Grn

"So you're even taking yet. Podcast on stint stacked add-ons sisters september ish been. It is allergic on each pressure. Hotel but in astonishing via for their ftp by you mention on darlie about up there. Vulnerable concerned deutsch. Own in bellini's not in fox and tried tat safely and advert vanished. Wouldn't escaped floor. Couldn't afford 'em spun fence. It's come s. My tina matures. Peer couldn't more in that city. Who keep this not survive from sonntag esda pessimistic Benson yulia mcnabb busy as london's force. It's in the appetite in real fight. So cotin see sucked severe damage annoying on pattaya on stores. Mckim book for pearlman had stare dot to get under chef michaela suck signing inflicted a clear ati sexist city under scope impetus tack hat is quick tune after straight alleghenies in chef oscar touched on toy protests king. Rifle you're on an mtv renton pessina. Miniature on folks wagner the twitter. I would hire from braunschweig. Lanka averted the arkansas yuba. Huta gutman bit keeps etiquette side one-star trek and in from me as infamy yordan. Oil offer was tom. The starts shaft phototherapy beyong staff incisions sex. Moten want spy on. How's it so in. The minnesota starts invite shefket who engaged off uncommanded. Sa- give benetton susan thousand million oil hecatomb. Slow speed isn't podcast. Four podcast byzantine fund facebook beef and incline on demon decay angles as babba. Bg happen couldn't against copa. Some is the in a miserly candidate. An implant susan katz nashville at active puts. All patient couldn't uber facebook. Funded as act does pessimism that've apo of in facebook platform and dinner Michaela vancouver bonsai insight on dinah dagan sticks nuclei tightness Vin f- lubov anemia. Noble per uber facebook infant. An off about punked. Fbi point com slash the east less europe. That's just about punked. Fbi punked com slash. The east less europe. Can you make it as hofer. did you tell your own to. Perspective of abbots marked doesn't d. team defer. You mentioned so is on this. Fifty cent on kim viacom for funding in pattaya city won't espedido accomplish porn declared on a few yet in asheville in asheville and become stacks sakaf but in order to rice. The hearings and loud infratest-dimap dragoon onto ftp mitt. Diane sponsored potent off platt stride. Desk copa comte. Him nutty as pd mid no fincen in pawtucket on on your own leaked of platform. Few minutes input sent. Benjamin is taio to abide bedside online on espn and on espn but fast taliban hi mazafa finding arash baptism agape nece teddy furnish them for the ftp. Von victim dasent. It's fast and for the young lord. Liberal conservative anger state was at the ftp ridiculed against washington finished as his gun. Violence win the essence. Hoti after appears thima digital is yong johnny bob team on dodgson to set the time. Dhadly for hours. Discount these offer. It's so much pretty titty would our s. pd on done. This shaft closet enforced the entire day. United call up and the after geithner quasi in this forgiveness of unknown when does leaked. Diane does not after school and beyond that hundred meter seats. Houdini geoghan d.c. fuzzy guessing borden nobleness. Kyong on do your critique under qurna political your hattie ftp. gordon talk. Davis engelbert come from how many calls in pattaya young assist variety in fog lights in tyrod. Sharon editor mentioned. I i kind of also polish in jewish hours not established as potentially antipathetic. Modern on does as the city would dullish checkoff elder villa in sioux. Gin slipped above this montage religion politics dennis and that clinton against consultant victims spew. Ftp on english officer traditions. I in this religion spectrums gene by healthy lion team in is politic dentistry and industrial states. Davin does not even niche. Fuzzy has gotten fog in dotted conferences often so announcement. I can't have diamond yet. Him to confess left disgusted so conflicts columnist does have ftp in kunar in a hype him. She shoved an answer. Beaten inter levi for heighten as the union vian. After on korean position wants help slightly. Spd on cd is wifi. Can also all-stock suna rats cloth swindon etre nagazine. Shefty of 'invita zell's on union deflect signify combine definitive as god about in a violent shine team through the young lord is okay cut us toll for digital is natalie. Tired is on fused writing their corner and a few constants via turkey and despite numerous natalie. Valentine's day on the air and after it normally ted soaks in each benford nitrates of gannett. Show on still. It must sue give each ginza hot but his music won't naturally vice calmed each ultimate hits. I had james bond order. Few at steny craig fan on oakland and tim descibe geist on knysna for its in kinda hits. An unknown twenty four butch after midland as is survived. Now i swear paneth's Infant at to entity premier does in bond films. No time to die india london. Royal all but harstad on st burrito. Sean roy it's in kansas. Tim house on wetten infest completer for millions. Dacca of morton. Happy about it as kate. William childs coming out and visit l. Hasten s is lighter on target is a different. Let's admit any craik desert by ended up earlier biden train all behind that onto mind the haulers. It honestly dealin bellina. Forget on national. Annoys up gordon house gavir zone glide citation in folks and tried deutsche wounded and eigen up tim activists in hutton for her run at fifty thousand montage wafting immature and tried to help to to footwear and can see one does to name demeer at streit thousands wound and billion visits and gig shade and ignitions on on tutsis lissi hamster shaft want zach's unfancied potent hats zantac anime. I'd diffuse paul. Sorry esther ostovic connection frontside online. It's abayev scepter up. This is a guinness safely. Hits our influence of dobalina woundings patik ham counter hallowed hollow did need sativa dodge wound agnan. Heart attacks hits them. I had become had to us about it. He's been enough on oscar gung by forfeit. Who have does is the gift. Fewer does aikman would a few haggas h have two of their highest on the sun. Vaccine visit inbetween had a law in injured. Obama dossier on is fewer as remiss not to meet of one in goosen meets toys on some admitted a gaps and put into our off thailand. Fun diane's eighty percent fewer and placenta. Gidon win being done in dean ventilation took some bashful seeing off of conservative of state on dot of the median on wound. Dan duggan oscars porn fiene footage. Put sent to and from support. Sent as old as being done doc. Clara does enemy gop. it'd be getting nets. Might make sure it doesn't have any has not sell out takes off cafod. Almaz nam answer lightened few fun. Immobilien gemayel fallish zinn abba heist tat. Xactly dusty wasn one sedan asked my is these are folks and scheidt niche trash been feeding billionaires in berlin vora aggravate. Nines did not give them was in china's image season folks and shy county. It's anger that's done after. Playing the four hundred jewish feud about has come up the neue. Lena leguminous mandated sanctified opposite and politician of cocktail of as gate variegated would grin as lavar come on club. He isn't as you're listening to knock mega poofter. Another meeting decker kip vaudin from does rudy done s up from venice. Then taxation leash an angry feud would versus alice. No for come on as the art institute visa and after game had on dodd mukhlis cut to showers. Mcleish vera arba eastern leslie for him for some asking is focus of candidate effort spending and try to it's strike after endless needs at even under ditton matured mitten as some back pain mention as when focus on Task sheet versus teams inventiveness amnesties neiman and icon after toughness sicilian. Opinion abba sussman. Sean zahn canisters put it to shut talk instead as these. These voters site that has an enormous worcester is an entire show media. Boondocks politik in belene entire arch lands on the as bottom. This voice come com feel business and the best week is kind of protest. He candidates ain't gonna on valve us yet on the update keeps amounting on on globe critique on even deign versus not loose weight involvement on the mail orissa vast yet at site. Punti shouldn't technocrat in electric.

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BPR Full Show: Not a Wink of Sleep

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:42:06 hr | Last month

BPR Full Show: Not a Wink of Sleep

"Support for boston. Public radio comes from literally farms committed to transforming the way food is grown. In new england fresh lettuce harvested daily in massachusetts all year round. it's the local lettuce locals. Love learn more at little literally farms dot com head on boston public radio. Turn it on tuesday in boston. Stuck out fix it. We'll ask you and the two candidates for mayor couldn't be more different when it comes views on. Police reform nieces. Avi george says she won't take away for the police. Department factual add cops and show. Who is aiming for structural change and revolve join us for another installment of water. Talk through governor. Charlie baker will join us to discuss. Covert mask vaccine mandates money troubles the the status of federal relief might state and climate resilience and more all the heaven boston. Radio eighty nine seven. Gp h You're listening to boston. Public radio eighty nine seven. Gbh good morning. Tim hey maureen how are you. Thanks so the freedom to vote. Act on john lewis actor democrats final chance to save voting rights because republicans aren't about tobacco federal election law the blocks state level voter suppression and it appears senate. Democrats may be on the same page finally on voting rights. But it's only as good as the citizens who are willing to put their vote to us as we've discussed the turnout for the boston. Merrill preliminary is the latest example of low pathetic voter turnout with roughly twenty five percent registered. Voters showing up. And what's the excuse. There was early. Voting mellon ballots were permissible and with more people working from home. The seventy eight. Pm pulling our should have been manageable for most voters. So are we as a society one that has forgotten what it means to be civic-minded after all so many of us can't do the pandemic basics like masking up and vaccines up as low. Voter turnout about thinking. Your vote doesn't count or is voting still not easy enough with same day voter registration. For example. Increase voter turnout. Should businesses get involved in reward employees in an who vote essentially. We're asking what it going to take to get more people to turn out and show up eight seven seven. Three zero one eighty nine seventy. What do you think well it. It is interesting. We contrast with what happened in california. Where i think a lot of people. Were very afraid of governor. Larry elder the talk show host to elected might get rid of all the mass mandates. Get rid of all the vaccinations cove fears. And i wonder how much that turned to be in california but locally. I think i think i think a lot of people do not think it matters and jay touch on this and the globe. Say that that many people just don't think it matters and obviously they're really really wrong because it usually matters in boston who the is from everything as global twirl points out from getting your trash picked up to how the public schools feared before foldable housing. It usually manage when you think of mardi watch really think of in in in boston. You think a lot of talk about. He was really effective talking about addiction. Right he did a lot of Working addiction bringing kind of out of the closet but massive building massive building all of the city of boston. He was from the building trades union. So i guess that's no surprise. So i think what you need to. Do you know the mothers against drunk driving. I don't know what it was twenty years ago. Twenty five years ago thirty years ago changed the whole thought process about drinking drunk driving drunk. Know it used to be a joke when we were younger. I had i so many beers lost and i could barely see my ride home. That's not what you think about people who drive drunk anymore. You think it's a bad thing. I think we almost have to get to the point where you are as i said. I was at jury duty this week. And i used to cover a lot of trials to and i was a reporter always impressed me not that. The courts always worked. They don't always work. There are a lot of mistakes and stuff but it's pretty impressive to get in the court. Listen to a judge so you have to obligations united states. America you're asked to vote and you're asked to show up for jury duty up jury duty telling mandate could point but the thing is that this is how lazy can you be that you can't kid in the globular all well i. I don't wanna get up that early. Even though she said the polls open from seven to eight so that wasn't even an excuse. Either i think we have to change the the culture culture around voting numbers eight seven seven three zero one eighty nine seven. It's not about boston by the way. But turnout is pathetic. virtually everywhere. If you know a place where voter turn out as then call us and say what are they doing. They've better candidates. I don't think so. What did they do that gets people out by the way. There was a brilliant piece in the globe. A number of years ago the price was one say in government try voting and let me just list some of the things that incredibly astute analyst. Jim brown of course was a couple of things. I mentioned twenty copies for everybody today. The extreme obviously is mandatory voting. I'm not even gonna start with that because you're gonna start yelling. So let's move on same day voting. We don't have. We should ask the governor about at noon when he gets here where he is whereas he these days on. Same day. Registration for voting. I said yesterday. I think this option. Maybe not a huge thing in boston. People like most of the candidates this none of the above kind of thing that they've had for example in nevada forever. It doesn't disqualify the person who comes in second but you get to make a pretty powerful statement. I think that is a really good idea and probably the most important. I don't know what one of the most important ideas free. Appetizers let me tell you that there is virtually nothing that i wouldn't do or no place. I would not go. If i knew that at the of the line there is a free pig in a blanket by the way. I'm not kidding by the way. If they're not saying it should be state funded but having a little snack something to get. There may do the trick. Whatever it is dunkin station is broken yacht here. All these excuses we last night on television with a couple of former state senators. Well cove it. Well they thought all the candidates were good. What's this is total. B s twenty five percent of registered voters turning out Is just unacceptable. Both here and in surrounding communities were the numbers. Roll so pathetic again. So i don't wanna hear. We're not looking for your analysis of the boston problem unless you are boston voter. We're asking for your response to the problem overall. How do we increase turn out in a way. So that democracy also if there was going to say you can't complain if you don't vote don't say your trash wasn't picked up don't say the pothole was not filled. Don't say someone is corrupt. You should should lose your rights to speak. Can't if you don't even take the damn time. Does your rights to speak to vote in so much what that seems a little much not to me. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eight hundred nine hundred seventy to complain about government. Yeah i don't know how to pull that off. But i'll work on it and i'll get back to take some calls. Okay let's go to cambridge. Thank you for calling. What's up morning. It is rather pathetic. I was raised in a family. Where you voted just vote. That's what you do combat. Everybody else. I think at the time that we saturate our communication i news. We should saturated newspapers radio television online. The two of you start and end every segment with election day november second. Just keep she do a trumpet trumpet. Every single thing. Three times annoying then. But i could actually be a blessing because this would be true. Unlike those things would be a public service and so i think that there has to be a concerted effort by all media avenues. Who deliver news. Whatever you wanna call it including online to just have banners starting shop every program. Psa's radio you can't say unless you're living under a rock you didn't know it you. I don't know what i agree with that. I don't know the percentages of those who say they didn't know that there was about. I think the deeper problem is the one marjorie is addressing. Is this notion that it doesn't matter. Or i don't have a civic obligation. We do need some sort of cultural change though fear so that people think i really have an obligation. If i'm part of this democracy i have an obligation participated in nursing is easier terrible. We are lazy people. Well at least one of us is here so thank you very much for the call. Eight seven seven three zero one eighty nine seven. How many people do you think really didn't know whether four hundred thirty five thousand registered voters or something and boston. How many people there are in surrounding communities like somerville and all these other places that had preliminary election didn't know there was a lot of people who come here after college and i think a lot of them aren't paying attention to politics in boston or in somerville the surrounding towns. That's part of the problem in boston. But as you said the registered voters so they're already people have taken the time to to register so i always get blown out of the water on the argument. I don't know i just. I just think it's it's not something is the previous caller said. We tell our children all the time. You have an obligation to vote. You have an obligation to pay taxes. You're an obligation to do. It's it's not. it's it should be unpatriotic and un-american not to vote. You know the one of the things. I've mentioned same day voter registration which i know a lot of people pushing the state i think. Twenty states in dc roughly. Have it a lot of people i am a procrastinator. I take voting really seriously. I think i don't think i've missed one in decades. Maybe have missed one. But i don't think so even prelims but for those who were busy or forgetful or progress procrastinators. I know that there. I know a lot of people who say damned that. I missed the registration date. That i missed the whatever the ballot if he could do it on the same day. When everybody's doing it make it a hell of a lot easier. And i think the objections to it in the past. Don't really make sense anymore. Dorchester thanks for calling. Hello doug yeah. Hey guys big fan. I just wanted to share that. The reason that i didn't go. And i do normally vote every time logical isn't really yeah. Thanks i I really thought that all the kids the same except for george And george chance that corruption tainted just makes her unacceptable candidate And i would. Also i just year that the reason that i don't like all the other candidates and i think that's a talk of ground controllers really dangerous then new york city. I sound what rent control actually does And i think it's very problem attic. And i'd also like to share that even Even you share that you lived in. Ill legal rent rent-controlled subway right graceful and i i saw. I saw so much of that happening. And i really don't wanna see that. Coming off. Subdued the your. I really am glad you called nali because you were candidate enough to admit you didn't vote but i want to repeat back to you. What you said one rent control is a real problem and to you. Think saba georges corrupt. Obviously that's your right. Who are the two candidates. What happened to the two candidates whose positions you just criticized. time's up. They made it to the final. So the two people who you thought should be disqualified because one position on new to her personal behavior or are the two who made it and one might argue. If you and others like you had voted for one of the other three candidates then maybe you would have been happier with the outcome. No especially since it was so close between second third and fourth. Now all all. I all i had was bad choices because i could've voted for. George is an unacceptable candidate because of her history and corruption. Where i could have voted for candidate. That's the rent control among other problematic positions. That are not what i'm just saying. You confused because it's only one person that support rank until you know that right did at the end but andrea campbell corruption. Charges doesn't sport rent control and baracoa. You had three choices of people who were neither of those things. You know what i mean. That's that's a that's a fair point. i didn't. I didn't know that the other candidates were not Were whereas averse to crack control as has shared but powerful was wu and janey be open to second here. Because we're gonna talk because your your mother will be upset with your dog for nonvoting. That's number one and number two when you're in dorchester. In your city dweller. Don't you feel a little bit of an obligation when he comes in. Let me be your mother here for a second. Doug i think you should feel a certain obligation when you get close to the election to find out where people stand because it does matter in dorchester imaginable and to be fair. I think i think my my generalization is. i'm just pay progressive voter. I'm not gonna vote for progressive can't it's fine candidate and George was really the only the only option i just. I can't. I can't believe that people are supporting. Someone has the type of allegations that are. yeah doug Thanks for the call really show as we get closer to november second. It is interesting that That that there was that massive story about And i hope in the future debate. She's asked about that. She said her husband is not going to be involved in development bosnian. That was a big problematic story and it is odd that it was so little mentioned in the other two. I mean i said this before and the other two debates it was. It's a lot of people. Think rent controls a disaster too i. I'm not one of them. But a lot of zastava doesn't make you involved in corruption. I know but that's i understand. But they're issues. People decide to vote on different sets of issues the raised to them. They're eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy shannon. We don't know where you're calling from but we're glad you did. Hi hi. I'm calling from darkness. Welcome hello yeah so I i love you all the time. But i'm also political scientist. Oh great and you don't get me started on marguerite term limits. Because we'll be here all day. But what i wanted to say is that there's a whole field research on this right. This is what we political. Scientists study And some of the laws to your point. Turn out as both an individual decision. But it's supposed to collective vision There's a mobilization that happens. That is collective right. People get people to turn out to vote. We see people with their stickers. There are signs so some of the laws that we pass like early voting. Dilute the mobilization effect until they don't increase turnout. You end up having people who already would have turned out. Turn out other laws like same day registration. Doing fact increased turn out. Because they keep up mobilization effects there you can get people to the polls they can register and they can vote on the same day so the legal structures that we set up matter and I think it's really important for us to consider that sort of research when we think about the laws that we've since this is your area of expertise. What about the notion of pete that you see repeated so often that people don't get that it matters. I mean. I do think that's true. I think that's particularly true for young people right that they have to learn voting as a habit. I had a fabulous student working on this as a project to get young people to learn about that and to increase the stakes and see that habit Tends to we tend to get that habit as we age because we have more opportunities to do that. But i think you're right. People have to learn to know that it matters and they have to learn to build that habit showing root colson anytime about the person. That was a big liberal. You know they were in favor of rent control. They were in favor of rent subsidies in favour all this rent till they bought the first house and they got the tax bill and complete one eighty and decided screw the renters taxes. I we're talking about low. Verte turn voter turnout with twenty five percent of registered voters participating historic Race in boston. We're asking you to get more people to head to the polls accomplishes katina's in eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio. Welcome back to boston. Public radio modrica. And jim braddock again. We're talking about how low voter turnout asking what needs to be done to get more people to do what martin i consider to be a civic duty as a guilt trip. People to remind people that voted. There's people died to get them to vote. Would incentives be a better way to go. Should we take election day often. Employers reward workers who go to the polls more civics education. What do we need to do. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy two about this that we're in this whole background of talking about voter suppression the country point. The republicans intentional effort to make it harder for people of color to vote at war or democrats to vote because republicans generally on the wrong side of almost every issue in the united states america. And that's gonna probably make it very difficult for democrats get elected in two thousand twenty twenty two and twenty two thousand four. Who's the globe columnist. Who call it set. We did self suppression here in was comparing it to you know as you say suppression all these states. We complain about every day but we self suppressed the're when we didn't have it as easily easy to vote as we'd like it to be again for example same day voter registration but assures hell lot easier than in places. We're always complaining about tom. And beverly you're next on boston. Public radio thank for calling. Hi hi how are you guys doing. Excellent excellent Yeah i used to live in las vegas Many years ago. And i voted there a few times. I liked the fact that they have in none of none of these category on the ballot too. Because you could always at least express the fact that you don't like anybody else and i've often wondered why we don't do it other places. Well let me. I have an answer. Well sort of an answer. That my problem with the nevada thing which i love to tom is i would like it to be binding meeting if none of the above got a majority. I don't think anybody should get elected. The way nevada's law is is constructed. I'm sure you know is if even if none of the above prevails whoever whatever human being comes in second gets elected so that i would perfect it i mentioned on the show the other day there was a man on the cape whose name i forget who is about to put a question on the ballot. Massachusetts would've added none of the above to the ballot. He was sort of leader of the crusade. Unfortunately he died a right before he got the signatures. But that doesn't mean that people like you and those of us who believe in. This couldn't advocate for adding to the ballot. So i am with you. That's to tom and we can. Maybe totally agree that if anybody if that wins then their new election happens. I think so. I'm with you tom. Thanks for bringing it up. We appreciate it. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty no seventy. I'm sorry marjorie. What abraham by the way it was going about looking at boston lucchino other cities around here with city town elections where no one turned out self suppression really is i mean. It really really really is suicide from by the way. She said she thinks one of the things is that people are fed on politics. Yeah that was one of the things that she argues. That people are just exhausted by politics. I can't i'm not. I really don't buy that at all. What is that the notion. That trumpism is trickling down. We've set at five hundred times. I'll say it again. That was an incredible field of five candidates. There were sitting for everybody to like smart people. Talented people creative people. There's no excuse that you're sick. I mean in my opinion politics framingham. Thank you for calling. Hello says thank you. For taking my call coupon. I if we want to talk about voter suppression and destruction. Maybe we should talk about the fact. That massachusetts has a wall. That if you don't return your street sense of leaving split. It's called for two years leave. It is inactive voter list. And i have seen people. Walk away from voting. Because they don't want to trouble go in and getting. And i d you we complain about georgia and other places removing people place. If they don't vote have anything to do with building suicide law. You're fading in and out could just say your final thought there one more time we complain about people in georgia only removing people from the voting list for not voting. We've is from the voting list in the doesn't even have anything to do with. I didn't know that by the way that you were automatically removed. If you didn't fill out the i can send it to. You believe you. I believe we'll check it out to to confirm but that's how it is and you sound like you know what you're talking about. I'm with you. That's absurd by the way i believe. I hope i'm right about this. Please somebody in the control room. Correct me if i'm wrong. You can still always cast a provisional ballot. Which i know is harder so that people can check your real and you live there etc But but it's if you're right that's problem sues. Thank you for the call. I mean the goal is to make it. I think i su- most of us would agree unless you're governor the santa's the goal or governor abbot. The goal is to make voting as easy as is humanly possible. I mean isn't that the bottom line here as long as the ease of voting won't leave to corruption of the process. And some things i guess. Some reforms are problematic. I can't think of one of the moment. i'm sure they're bloody but for the most part the goal is to make it easier for the registered voter or the vote to get registered to vote. I'm just looking on. Bill galvin the secretary of state his list here and he says about an active election day some may find their names have been placed in the list of inactive. Voters are made up of rich voters. Who have not responded to the annual street list of subsequent confirmation but they will They can still vote the just be asked to show. Id and be required to fill out. Affirmation of current or continuous residence. What's a provisional ballot thing. And they counted later. I think if there's if those the number of provisional ballots. I don't know if they call him out here. Would would create a Might change the outcome of the election. Let's go to mansfield. Where terry is on boston public radio. Thanks for calling hi. Hi hello Thinking that back in the eighties seventies and eighties and ninety s. We used to read about all the candidates in the boston globe. Or whatever paper you know you subscribe to and so you get to know. We got to know the candidates that way and now everything is you know. Our lives so Complicated not everybody gets a chance to listen to the radio on. Everyone gets the chance to watch tv. And so we get bits and pieces of what the candidates are all about. who are they. What gentleman who talked about the rent control what we do all the candidates. Stand on this issue of different issues and if we had you know people like i don't really read the paper anymore and so if there was some type of voter guide because i'm a visual person so give me everything at once a week where the candidates at whatever they are proposing give me their background me all the information that i need to know so that i can look at it when i have a chance because they used to do. I actually did it for the last presidential election where for my local candidates. I was able to go on and see where they were. All will terry kind of tell you two things one. The secretary of states office does it on ballot questions for whatever not that. That's the red book that you get in the mail before an even year election when their ballot questions on the ballot here but there are tons of sources that are comprehensive the do do comparisons. You mentioned people and read the paper. You don't have to read the paper to click on the boston globe. And look at their comparison of issues virtually every interest group climate change groups Transportation groups Choice a abortion rights groups of rate candidates and give their answers to questions our colleagues here. Adam ryland serreyah. Winter smith did an analysis on a whole bunch of issues so people have to show a little more initiative. It's there we should make it as accessible as possible but a lot of reporters and advocates that really good work to get it out there. People just have to care enough to go find terry. Thank you for the call. We appreciate it. Okay let's go to john antioch it. Hi john hi. John i do you ever marjorie tell you much for taking my call. Thank you sure. I wanted to disagree with your basic promised though trip down. I don't think we need more. People voting twenty sixteen was a good example of that in the presidential level. I think we need people to be more educated and probably have a civics test. You gotta pass in order to get your right to vote and we might end up with a better government. Well you know john. There is a guy who sadly died about a year so go to margin. I used to be on the radio with regularly on our former station. Jay severin who Said very much like what you said. We don't need more voters we need. Fewer voters the basic notion. Being that if you don't care enough to vote you probably don't know enough about what's going on and probably were better off without you. I guess the twenty sixteen example you picked is probably a pretty good one of a lot of listeners here today. John thank you for your contribution. We we appreciate. You know we talk about one of the mantras that is so tiresome is we need more civics education but we do people have two kids have got to learn more about how government works of the power. You always a great campaign. I'll give you an example. This actually speaks to your change. The culture the aclu's what a difference the makes do you remember. What did that campaign that did polling. The number of people who didn't know the da's reading elected to begin with the number of people who didn't know da's made decisions about what someone is charged with if they're charged at all. I mean it just showed. People didn't know anything and they work to educate. I don't know what the actual turnout numbers were. But i mean you look in suffolk county. There was a reformer who was elected which i assume at least in part was a function of this education campaign. They did across the state. So there you go from worcester. Thank you for calling height so i think for a lot of people. There's a sense that it doesn't make any difference to their day to day life They go to work. The kids go to school. They get groceries. You know they pay their taxes and day to day in a lotta ways. Whoever's in office locally or nationally doesn't make a difference you know they still live their life. And i know that's not true. I know that it really does make a difference You know for a lot of issues. But i think in some ways i'm my wife and i are still living. We have our house. We go to work. We do our and yeah doesn't matter but dale let me let me tell you some. I would've agreed with you. Because i heard it. A thousand times doesn't make a difference the one contribution donald trump has made to american. Democracy is no one should ever be able to say it doesn't make a difference anymore whether you love trump with whether one loves trump or eight them. No one can argue. There's no difference between hillary clinton and her donald trump or donald trump and a joe biden. So i would hope all they have to do is look at the man who went to a boxing match on nine eleven. And you find out that it does dale. Thank you so much for. The call. By the way eric ludwig tweeted in that rank choice. Voting which was narrowly defeated by the voters. Last year would have been law in massachusetts would improve the situation to and just as was just done in new york city here. There was a story in the paper today about about Cops and this happens a lot cops do something bad and they lose these suits and they have to pay millions and millions of dollars. The city of the town brooklyn is gonna have to pay eleven million dollars now. Police officer that was that was discriminated against was wrongfully firefighters. Excuse me he was wrongfully fired. Eleven million dollars a lot of money. You know what that means. You're gonna get an increase in your taxes in some of these cases so that if you care about nothing more than having to pay taxes for the roof you should pay attention what your police department is doing. Because millions of dollars can be paid out whereas it boston. How many millions of dollars is boston paid out for police. Alma is huge and And it contributes to that and also just as basic getting the garbage picked up. That was kind of maintenance. Big thing wasn't bottles and garbage urban mechanic every mechanic anyway We are we are done at the moment. Yeah we're going. Oh indica abroad next. I was confused voluntarily. Sorry you're going to talk about the mayor's race a little bit more with andrew abroad coming up. How michelle ruin A necessity joy differ on police reform and public safety and a bunch of other law and order issues. Andrew cabrera's next one eighty nine seven. Gbh watson public radio. Welcome back to boston. Public radio merger egan and megyn brady join us. Aligned for this week's edition of law and order under cabral andrews the ceo of sand and former suffolk county. Sheriff former secretary of public safety for massachusetts heyndrickx overall. Hey jim brady. Hey mode regan engine. Greatest taught you so something. We just talked about with listeners. In a second question as well pretty dismal. Turn out in boston not just boston all around here. On preliminary election day you've been elected to office Why do you think so. Few people turned out and the other big issue. Coming out of this race is at boston. Had chance to elect a african american Or well a barrel cape verdean but a black person to the mayoralty and they didn't in what your take on that so. Nobody showed up to vote and boston missed. Its opportunity to elect a black mayor. Well usual usual response to that. Is that so many Successive elections That people are exhausted. But that's not you know that's not really an excuse. And you know i was listening to some of the discussion with your listeners. And jim's point about sort of this lack of civic engagement people feeling as though government is somehow disconnected from their everyday lives when it is in fact the driver. That propels them. It's just that they take for granted the impact of government because streets are paved and traffic lights work. And you know you know those are the those are the things that government does script. Schools are open If the tears is running that is what government So thinking that it doesn't impact your life or more importantly the people that you elect to make the policy around those things that impact. Your everyday life doesn't matter is a is Is wildly misplaced And there does need to be a much more focus and much more effort on making sure people understand this and feel engaged enough to vote because it is a disconnect a probably a more serious disconnect from people being part of a democracy than i've ever seen in my life so in the second issue the first of all is there a reform you make or implement a few were the czars arena elections a single reform. That you think would would change things or is it attitudinal cultural as margarita suggesting no. I don't think that there is a single reform. This is a this is a multi-layered problem with That requires any a comprehensive long-term sustainable solution. I mean we have you know if you start from having gotten away from civics education that has been decades in the making and Those chickens are clearly coming home to roost People not understanding not just which offices are elected. But you know what they do. Make a huge huge difference But it is also this sort of cultural continuing message that nothing you do matters that your vote doesn't matter because it can be diminished or decreased or ignored altogether. And so you know thing. That election was if the net from the national level down this building upon the big lie to decrease people's faiths verge government and the underlying tens of democracy telling them that the election was rigged when it wasn't but what you can see. Is that the people who are the proponents of those kinds of ideas who are doing it. Solely for The political agenda. Don't they know exactly the impact that this has and they are actually working against this country in doing and they are being allowed to continue to do it so you know that is. All part of the people are exhausted. Kind of part of this but if you want to maintain a democracy and we are literally breaths away from losing it you you have to. You have to push back on it and you have to keep fighting For it so. There's a piece stephanie. Ebbert wrote in the globe today. How did boston. Mrs moment to elect a black leader. You're quoted didn't let me read a paragraph or two yet prominent black women who supported campbell. There's a quote from joyce bowling saying there was a dividing conquer strategy yet. Prominent black women who supported campbell felt just the opposite deeming it. Racists suggest the presence to black women in the race hurt both and then you're quoted the idea that angers me deeply you said. I don't think you can deny a worthy candidate. The opportunity run that every white candidate has have you ever in your entire life for the arguments or too many white men in this in this race. Even if an angers the andrea cabral it seems to me that the the numbers that low forty percent that the three black candidates accrued between them barrows campbell and johnny suggests that a black candidate would have made the final. Had there been fewer. So even if you don't like the concept. Factually do agree that that would have been a likely outcome. Well a black candidate would have made the final. If it's a lot more people voted but on that specific question that You're raising. I push back on the notion that You know black voters have to unite behind a single candidate for two reasons one of which is general and the other which is a specific to this particular case. Generally i push back because black voters ought not be told to sacrifice or that they have to Make narrower choices political choices than any other group is similar to me. to This idea that the price of public safety in terms of the relationship with with with police is that you have to accept that you will be deemed an immediate threat or a risk and therefore in some cases deadly force is justified in being used against you. Because you're perceived as a greater threat. It is this constant throughout the history of this country that the that the whole The fulsomeness of the of the rights that inert of every other group i somehow diminished when they are applied to people of color. And that there's going to be a price to pay for you to exercise the same rights as others do and in politics. It's no different. So i don't like the idea that your order for one we lost. You don't like the idea for a second get a call. So can you say that when we're only one. Oh i'm sorry. I said i just don't like the idea that that black voters are told that the choices harrow or that they should choose to know their choices. In order for someone to be elected there were plenty. Plenty of votes out there. If people voted they would've everyone would have gotten a significant W votes and we and you would have a black person in the final so you can't on the one hand have a dismal turnout and further. Say to people we can't we have to accept a dismal turn out and because of that you have to unite against a single black handed but my more specific to this case objection to this is is that as if the logic of that argument holds true so put aside the my my initial objection and just say the logic of that. Look at that then. Wouldn't the candidate that everyone would unite behind the one. The jumped into the race last year when there was an incumbent mayor in the seats who immediately established herself as a front runner in fundraising and who immediately put her policy positions Drafted them created them. Put them up on her website immediately. Started working on. Mass cast continued to work on housing. She had been for the four years. You have a person in a position of strength already in the race. Why is it necessary. Five months later to start telling people to get behind a single black candidate so the logic of it. I have a problem with. Because i think that was less about uniting behind a single black candidate than it was about uniting behind the chosen black candidate and i think again you are narrowing the choices for black voters. Engineers couldn't say all of that stephanie. Ever but i. So i said it'd shorthand. Sandra ball former suffolk county. We know you were in your support of andrea campbell. Who to me was an extremely impressive candidate. So why do you think. And we had kim jan and she was appointed man kind of in the right place at the right time being presidency council but is it campaign wore on. I think you could see this. In the voters movement the movement was away. From johnny. And toward campbell and anissa soppy george. So why why do you think campbell did not do better. Because i thought she was a very impressive candidate to but i think i do think that a lot of it was the overall under voting. I mean i. I think that that was always the issue right people. I think expected that there was gonna be a consolidation of a certain faction of the vote around a niece ave george based on Her affiliations and the positions that she staked out in the campaign that that and so that was people sort of accepted. Almost immediately that there would be a group of votes that would be Inaccessible to the other candidates right. And i think the actual vote sort of prove that and but then it came down to who was actually going to turn out and that was always a question. People have been talking about it for months as to whether or not this was going to be a low turnout Election or high. Turn out and i think many people were hopeful that it would be high turnout because you had a uniqueness afield and and that there were choices for people and i think we'll be analyzing this for some time to come as to as to why in light of all of that People still did not turn out in anywhere near the numbers that they should have anywhere near the numbers. They have turned out in the past. It's not like there's no precedent for having a high turnout preliminary election when they're when there are things that people should be excited about and and You know Should want to vote on. So i think that's gonna be the topic of conscience probably the topic and a lot of conversations right now but i want to add one more thing to this and then we can move on and revisit as as we do learn more because we want to get your assessment of what the the race as it ended up being what it looks like. How how how should it be framed leading to november second between salvage george and and woo my initial position. When i saw the numbers on wednesday morning was exactly as i said to you The black vote was. I'm not disagreeing with your analysis of the problem. But the facts were that the that the three black candidates got a huge number of oats. And i think it's fair to say even you think it shouldn't have happened. If one of the major black candidates was not in the race then the remaining black woman probably would have been in the final. However what i read this morning is that there was a great reluctance on the part of white voters to vote for the black candidates which suggests to me the answer. The question about whether boston is ready for a black mayor which i was answering with a tentative yes yesterday is probably no and that's the other part of it and i think marie saint slur made this point beautifully. in the Stephanie everett Pieces that Where we constantly not not unjustifiably Because people have to be responsible for voting in the elected officials and showing up to vote to get what they want in their elected officials but it is it is a an absolute point that we very seldom focus on why there isn't movement. There's this intractable. percentage of votes where people just will not accept the notion of a black person in leadership. And and and i. I think i made this point earlier broadcast. We talk about whenever we say. Is the country ready for in your case. just now. is boston ready for. We're really talking about a percentage of boston right. Yeah what we're really saying. Is our white people ready to do something. And i have a and yes. I have a huge problem with even asking that question because it presumes and solidifies. This notion of You know Supremacy and that it should always only be the degree to which other people are allowed to enjoy the benefits of this. Democracy is limited by whether or not a percentage of this democracy feels. They're ready for it. That's just a that's a fundamental problem and it's been a problem in since the beginning of the country but that is your point is well taken. I mean there's certainly you know. I hope that there is analysis around that as to why That immovable block still exists in twenty twenty one. I'm sorry we're talking google. So andrew bra people never. The story was out in minneapolis. Before we do this i i. I wanted to hear her andrea frame. I mean there are two candidates left this thing really moving on what's play. What are people. What are voters in boston facing. Come november second. In your estimation well I think There clearly you know clear. Distinctions shop distinctions in some cases between the two candidates and i think You know unlike previous races. There is a much larger pool in the chasm between these two candidates And a much more diversified pool both Not just you know. Diverse traditionally But diverse in terms of of what they want and what they're looking for on a wide range of issues This is going to be a very very Matchup because the level of outreach by these candidates to those voters in how how if at all they're able to draw them to their base is probably going to be a greater challenge than in most prior races where you end up with two candidates who are fairly similar right. You often hear people going into the voting booth saying you know. I kinda like both of them. Maybe they're separated on one or two issues. I don't think that's the case here. We're talking to andrea cabral. Does okay pule may recall this case because it was so bizarre back in minneapolis about four years ago. This woman called the cops twice because she said she thought she heard someone screaming or being a woman screaming being sexually assaulted behind her house and she wanted the cops to come and apparently she went out when not apparently she did go out when the cops got there and this particular officer she was white woman. The cop was black. Shot her and he his. He was convicted of murder. The convictions being overturned. What do you make of this andrea. Yes this is mohammed new war. He was the first somali police officer. Minneapolis police force and he apparently She did come out into a darkened dolly and she was trying to sort of give police additional information. He appears to have shot her based on being startled. There it doesn't seem to be. She was in pajamas. She was unarmed. It doesn't seem like there was anything that would indicate that she was a threat But he was originally charged with third degree murder And that's where the mini minnesota supreme court throat on wednesday So he's he's going to not the conviction itself. I don't think he's being overturned. He's going to be resentenced on a the less severe count of second degree manslaughter. And it has much to do with the depraved mind. requirement in the second degree murder conviction and people may remember even from the derrick. Chauve in case there was a lot of talk about when when eiji ellison went in and decided to indict him on virtually every level of Murder first degree second degree third degree and so forth and we were at pains to try to make the distinctions between the two and figure out what types of sentences they carried this is. This is the same state. So you've got those same sort of distinctions And so he's going to be resentenced which he originally i think at twelve and a half years on the second degree murder conviction The less severe count. I think it's probably get less than ten years. He's probably gonna serve some time. So yeah but this was. You know there's a lot involved in this was about know holding police accountable for What would deem to be unjustified shootings but people also made the argument that you know they went full bore. This happened to be a police officer. Who was tamale descent. So it was more palatable to people to whole he's accountable when the office of the offending is black versus. You know lots of the cases where the offending officers white and no charges in so this was this was a very sort of controversial multi. Layered Case around the notion of Police shootings resulting the death of unarmed citizens than one would ordinarily fine but ultimately he will. He will be resentenced and he will end up doing less time. He shot her in the chest And and i think she died instantly And so it's a very serious case a very tragic one but you know as with everything else. There's always more to it andrew before you leave for thirty seconds. Just go back to them. Because i'm turn out obsessed today when you ran. I mean this was a really high profile race as urban races. meaning city races. Go when you ran for sheriff. What kind of turnout was there for an office. That obviously is not in the center of people's attention like a mayor you would think would be was it turned out decent reports. Well it's really interesting that you ask that. Because the year that i ran in two thousand and four there wasn't a single democratic incumbent legislative seat or any other seat who had an opponent you turned out to vote in that pre limits. Because you were a super voter while you were turning out specifically to vote in the sheriff's office. My memory is that it was something. Like thirty three thousand We did a lot of education around the sheriff's office before that happened. Andrew member year. Duval patrick ran. They had around balassa sections of the kanwar because there was a huge. I remember that in boston and used turn out for run out of ballots when i run for city council. You're wondering that didn't run out and give now. Actually andrew thank you so much. Energy cappella joins us every week for law and order she. Ceo of the former suffolk county. Sheriff secretary of public safety coming up governor. Charlie baker joins us to talk about how massachusetts responding to the covert surge. He's next eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio in minutes. Governor baker will join us some money troubles team covert mandates and the status of billions of dollars in federal relief. Then travel rick steves. He just returned from a ten day trip to france. Rick will join us to discuss. Tyrone clark is serving a life sentence for rape. He says never committed now the rape victim says she thinks she identified the wrong person. Suffocated should attorney. Rachel wrongs racist conviction and in asking for new trial. Gbh senior investigative reporter gentleman. Kim give us the details of this case. All that moorhead in boston for the radio eighty nine seven. Gp h crowd. I am major yagan. Welcome to our number two of boston. Public radio eighty nine seven. Gp h logan. Jim logger marjorie. In about a minute. The governor charlie baker going to join us for his monthly visit. Here it will be just. I believe a minute or so away. Last month you had problems with his headphones. Don't you consider him. Sort of a high tech kind of guy i mean. Isn't that how you see governor baker margaret. He's very smart. I don't know if he's high tech. You're not gonna get a chance to ask the former county prosecutor. Andrew ker brawl nope about outfits in the courtroom and suffolk county prosecutor. Cherif she was prosecuted there too. Oh a prosecutor so you know. I was enjoyed last week. And i thought jeans because jeans and court The the dress code is really deteriorating. The courthouses down. I everybody jeans ripped jeans shorts resorts. Somebody showed up this woman in a pair of spandex pants workout pads and what we used to call a nice. Where but he's gone wife-beater t shirts. I'm talking about Cut low. I don't believe we call them that anymore but Thank you very much. Well that's what we used to call them and cut low and ucla underwear. Hope i thought wow so. You drew this woman. You're going to sit next to someone you could see your underwear the whole time but that is an incredible thing and part of that conversation. But he's part of the rest of the conversation because join us now. Has he goes every single month. Is the governor. Charlie baker governor. Thanks so much for calling in. I think oops. I bet the governor would show up dressy dressed correctly at the courthouse. Would jerry try again in the second one can here but i was just. That was a dry run powered introducing the governor. I like the part where i said. Here he is the governor charlie baker. Because that's his name governor nice to have you and he didn't answer so i guess we don't quite yet wayne tour instruct. He can hear us jim but now we do. Let me try that one more time. Join us again or now or something is the governor of the conwell charlie baker. Welcome governor baker. i hope i got hi. How are you thank you for joining us. I don't know what happened. I got That's okay. I didn't even get a recording. I just got kinda that's okay. You missed arsenal statement governor outfits willing office and the courthouse. That was jimmy. we're not gonna. We're not going to bother asking about that because you are after all the governor baker. So let's talk about some some some really good news actually the vaccination situation massachusetts. Tell us how we're doing. I mean we're doing we're doing well. I mean it's all stuff stuff ends up being kind of relative but in massachusetts If you think about folks over the age of sixty five ninety nine percent of them without first dose and About ninety five percent of them are Are fully vaccinated We're in the nineties. For the over seventy five population. The high nineties The i mean even even the twelfth and nineteen year old in massachusetts about seventy one percent of those kids are fully vaccinated and the national numbers. They're fifty two percent and fifty percent for the twelve to fifteen sixteen to nineteen I mean generally speaking People have been really good about stepping up and getting vaccinated here in the commonwealth And i think the you know the big challenge for us as we get into some of the populations that were hesitant to begin with. We just have to sort of double down on our efforts to get them Over the goal and an and that's happening. I mean there have been weeks even though we have a high percentage of our population already vaccinated. We've had weeks over the course of the past couple of months where we've been the number one back to nader on a per capita basis in the country and And we're not in a ton of back to school vaccination clinics probably over a hundred at this point and I've said before people said to me. What's the number you want. And i might not number i want is more than i had yesterday me. We got five point. Two million residents who've gotten at least one dose and And we're somewhere in the vicinity of five million board currently vaccinated. So and that is i in the country Among states with more than five million people governor when you were with us last month There was not yet a mask mandate for kids in school. Shortly after you're here commissioner riley implemented it there was not a mandate for state employees. In fact we asked you about it or on prior month didn't support it you now have implemented it. You just mentioned back. Hey hey hey under consideration you did. That's a very good point. You'd at least not at this point. That is correct back to school. You talked about the vaccination issue as you know. I'm sure better than we places like. La or mandating. Vaccinations is that something. That may come out of us. Something you're considering. Well keep in mind that We don't have any Ability to vaccinate anybody Who's Under the age of twelve yet right And there's some discussion about when that might happen we also won't have For kids under the age of sixteen. I think a final approval. A vaccine at this point in time pfizer's approved for. I think for sixteen and up as a final approval but we're still working under emergency use authorizations below that emma during doesn't have an emergency or final approval at all. It's still an emergency use authorization. How about when they think it's important. I think i think it's important when you don't have Sort of a final so. I don't have the feds to be careful about how you think about this stuff. And and as i said with respect to kids generally were ten points and and twenty points above the national average in terms of where we are in vaccinating kids. And we're going to keep giving kids opportunities to get vaccinated and we put some pretty serious incentives in there for them to improve their vaccination rates. And i think that's the right way to go when you're dealing with a situation a circumstance where at this point in time you know only a very small piece of this is actually approved at the federal level For kids and a big piece of it's not approved for kids at all. but if there was final approval given for madonna for example. I mean you know these numbers better than i do. Only thirty eight percent at twelve to fifteen year olds. I think in new bedford in boston. It's under fifteen percent for sixteen and nine year old. Nineteen year olds once. Final approval is given across the board mandating vaccines for those for whom there was final approval. You know. i don't know when those things are gonna happen. Jim so in the meantime. I'd rather just focused on trying to get more kids vaccinated in those communities with the rules in the standards and the processes and procedures that we have in place currently then when you get into some of those communities. You're new you're into exactly the population where we've been modestly successful that significantly outperforming the country in getting folks and in communities of color vaccinated and in some of our communities. The numbers are actually higher than they are statewide. chelsea has done a spectacular job of getting their people vaccinated. But i. i really think you know. I don't end up in a situation where We put parents especially in some of these communities that have been hardest hit by covert in the first place and where kids really struggled last year in a position. Where you know the choices is between something that they are Very lows to do for whatever reason And having their kids in school. I just worry a lot about that especially in those communities. How do you feel about president. Biden's list of mandates including particularly private sector hundred plus employees. Well i'm I'm obviously big fan of people getting back and and i'm obviously comfortable with employers Creating programming for their own people to get back dated I think the the proposal defensive made at this point was You either get vaccinated. You get tested on a regular basis but we have not seen yet Any details on what this looks like and i hesitate to comment on it until we actually see something because at this point. It's it's an commenting a press release in a speech and something that is Significant widespread and as complicated. I would really like to see like how they think this would work. who qualifies. Who doesn't what the rules are and all the rest I will say this. you know. We're gonna continue to encourage people to get vaccinated and we're going to and and try to lead by example part of the reason for The decision we made with respect to them. requiring vaccinations for folks in the executive branch they deal with the public a lot Their health status is important to us and the health status of the people they deal with is important to us and also to send a message that we think this is appropriate policy for employers to consider doing with their homework forces. You don't make a one last quick thing on the vaccinations. We have a very pro vaccination audience here just last few minutes. I got tons of emails. People wondering why we don't have proof of vaccination card. That can't be messed up with like york state is done. why not in the schools you and just. Jim talked about that. Why in bars and restaurants the point being that is hurting the economy. Some argue because since most of us have been vaccinated and and a minority of have not. There's still a hesitancy to go if you if you couldn't come into say a bar in south boston unless you were vaccinated we would suddenly see a lot of twenty year old and south boston getting vaccinated or twentysomethings. That'd be twenty one to trank theoretically anyway or just or just drinking at home rigging drinking at home. That's right now we've been we've been talking to the states that have Have developed and it's certainly something that i mean. I just happen to think that getting to the point where there's a relatively simple process for people to um credential the fact that they've been vaccinated we'll be important for a whole bunch of reasons and You can look it up right now. you can You can for the most part you can access through the provider. You've got maximum Validation verification credential that you're vaccinated Currently but obviously There are states and municipalities. Have done something more universal than that. And we've been talking to those folks and And and working through how that would work here in the commonwealth so it was likely we're going to have such a thing at some point. I certainly think it's going to be an important thing for people to have But again you can. You can validate and verify that you've been vaccinated right. Now we're talking about governor truckmaker going to the top of the news we heard about you know this is going to be all these afghan refugees coming united states Tragedy over there in afghanistan. And they're coming to massachusetts. So what does welcoming me. What's going to happen with the refugees who arrive here in massachusetts. Well the first thing that just say. Because i think it's important for people to this in context. I mean there's a. There's a fairly significant refugee resettlement program that the federal government operates and works primarily with local organizations most of which are nonprofits and manages and it goes on all the time and so there are constantly people who are Who qualify who go through a process when they get to the us who get Among other things you know sort of determined that they are in fact who they say they are wide. They're here at this point in time the feds also require them to get vaccinated and And then eventually The nonprofit to typically work with a lot of these folks in the community based organizations Do the work associated with resettling and And there are folks who do that in massachusetts on a regular basis and there will be As part of the sheds process associated with refugee resettlement efforts for folks from afghanistan there will be people who resettling massachusetts and. That's something that as i said before we support and Want to participate in. But it's not like this isn't this isn't like do you remember the hurricanes. The tropical storms in puerto rico. Where literally in the space of a few days We set up Housing and and then resettlement options for Thousands of people who were Resettling from puerto rico. Because you know basically they had no they don't place live there no running water. The trinity and in the country was in terrible shape and so states including this one literally put up a ton of housing and support infrastructure for those folks To relocate here a lot of them most of them went back Eventually but a bunch of stayed. My point here is that the resettlement thing is much more of a going concern activity than something. Where all of a sudden there's gonna be this sudden arrival of a bunch of folks from afghanistan there there will be people coming in massachusetts and we suddenly hear through those Relationships at the feds have with those resettlement organizations. But it's going to happen over time. It's not going to happen. The way the resettlement work we did for the hurricanes in puerto rico happened for example charlie baker. Yes yes yes. Thank you and by the way i have to say. It's also helpful when governor and you have makes welcoming statements to people who are suffering unimaginable hand even begin to appreciate Difficult that must be for all of them so We're governor storing globe today about this mess taxpayers foundation report on the finances of tea. I'll read for people haven't seen it yet. The operator from the globe operate in capital shortfalls require one point two five billion new funding for the nba annually. They've found and that doesn't include funds for expansion projects like east west high speed rail south coast rail etc. How worried are you and what are you doing about it. Well first of all South coast was paper. Okay I don't know why that ended up in there okay I don't know if our folks talk to them or not. But we made a decision several years ago. do that project and that project finance and pay for On the other stuff. I just say the following Part of the reason for the problem in fact probably the biggest reason for the problem is ridership for The commuter rails running at about thirty to thirty five percent of what it was running out before the pandemic The rapid transit system. Is you know somewhere between thirty. And forty percent depending upon whether you talk and the red blinds the line or green line on a particular day of the week. I apologize the cyrus hearing the background and and the buses are actually the most popular and they're probably running in the forties of gay. So part of this and and there's so much debate about what's going to happen to ridership right I do think that the biggest question on ridership is ultimately going to be a question about Returned to work and published that Study on the future of work and basically said that we anticipated that there would be some permanent changes associated with where people worked in how they worked and the that would affect things like public transportation. A lot of other people said that we were wrong I don't think people know the answer to that question yet. And it's a big question mark when you think about the fact that basically half of the teeth operating budget and revenues also support capital projects. Come out of ridership providence. So ridership stays where it is. It doesn't change at all That's one scenario if writers do come back because people come back to their offices Or there will -cations where they work. That's a very different one. Over the course of the next couple years. I would argue. This is kind of a very This is a very pessimistic scenario about about what happens with the guy to ridership and there is a very significant amount of money that is almost by every calculation with respect to what the feds are talking about on infrastructure. It's going to be coming to the commonwealth to be used for transportation Very significant you know billions and billions of dollars Over time and the the final thing just have to point out is we still have five billion dollars in arp money that we haven't spent a billion dollar surplus from cal from fiscal year. Twenty twenty one which ended in june which we also have it spent. The state has a lot of resources here and And a big open question on how those resources could be and should be deployed. We'll be driven to some extent. What happens to ridership. and how We in the legislature and others decide to to spend the money that is available And the federal pieces. Big really big. Even even in the bipartisan bill. Which is the smallest of the trillion dollar bill. It's very significant resources to accounting and for transportation before we get to the. I think we should panic quite yet. Well before we get to the federal money. 'cause you at all assuming the worst case center or close to one prevails. I'm sure you've thought about the fact that a wonderful coincidences the amount of money that the fair share constitutional amendment the millionaire's tax would provide annually for transportation is almost exactly equal to the shortfall projected by the mass taxpayers foundation. Does that cause you to rethink your position or no. No because in many cases First of all people shouldn't be spending money they don't have right point number one point number. Two there isn't at this point in time A requirement that that money be spent if that thing were to pass Any particular part of the budget. It's just it's going to be general appropriation. Money that people can spend on whatever they want. and the and the third thing. I i just have to say is if we've learned anything over the course of the past eighteen months and it certainly shows up in our future work. Study people can work from anywhere. Companies can locate anywhere and many of them can be just as successful working that way as they were once upon a time when everybody went to the office and everybody lives in the same place and we should be very careful about that as we think about things like how much we think we might raise if something like The fair share tax and by the way is just so. It's clear your contending that they are not directing half the money to education half the transportation. Is that where you are. Yeah correct yeah. that was. That was the reason i mean. Okay i could be wrong about this. But my recollection is that was the main reason the s. Jaycee said that was unconstitutional. Because you can't write legislation into the constitution. You can't say that this tax should be raised to fund these programs that usurps the authority of the legislature. Which is the fundamental appropriating entity under our concert has got gotta say subject to appropriation through i if it does. We'll continue that part. Next month governor charlie baker. This capac to this this money. That The the money that massachusetts has it hasn't been spent yet. I know that it's been a dispute between you and the legislature about who should spend what when but but it does seem i mean how tall stakeholders wonder that. Become the big word stakeholders are. You can't make a move without the stakeholders lenny case. Santa present spilka says. I think that we're going to get moving on this after. They talked to this day callers. Mariana speaker of the house had says they're going to do something figure out how to be spent before thanksgiving but you kind of wonder. what are they doing. I mean this is an emergency and When are people going to see this money. Well i you know i was. I was pleased to hear the speaker. Say the other day and And i think the senate president said something similar that that they really wanted to put quote unquote calling the governor beers quote unquote something. We talking about that. A lot of the money that we've gotten for this emergency With a you're saying bill. Newfangled phones kidding gramps baker. go ahead and gone. There's no question that we have all kinds of things. We should be doing now at this. Just think about what. We've gone through with respect to weather and flooding and All the the resources that we wanted to put the work on On environmental infrastructure. Now i get the fact that that stuff will take a while but there's no time like the present to start I feel the same way about the workforce and the credentialing in the reskilling funding part of the reason we wanted that in may so we could start. Enrolling people in programming so in their unemployment benefits ran out They would either be underway or would have actually developed A credential that they could use to to get a good job and and you know my my colleagues in the legislature talked a lot about the explosion in and she's around mental health and addiction that have been triggered by the pandemic and we were looking for very significant resources. Put into those kinds of programs as well. We did turn around. Take a big piece of the funding that we did get from the legislature. The two hundred million that they appropriated for emergencies and and put it into a big part of it. We put into addiction and behavioral health services. And and there's also so much work that needs to be done especially in In our mid sized cities around sort of reconsidering and reimagining downtown house and and that is worth that should be going now and the final thing. I'll just say which you've heard me say before you know. We have a terrible housing problem in massachusetts. It falls disproportionately on working and lower income folks and It is in fact the big not that people have to pay every single month As as part of their cost of living here and it's probably the single biggest barrier many of them have to to saving money. And getting ahead. And you know we wanted to. We want to put a billion dollars of that work on on housing. And i again. There's no time like the present for a lot of this stuff. That'd be a priority for unit third term. Would it not all of that would be governor. We're talking to governor baker and it's flip phone on a really serious topic this horrible death of Professor david jones. I guess two questions. One we know the suffolk the as looking into this one. Are you a number to explain. Why there is a jurisdictional dispute that is holding up anything between two parts of government about who has responsibility for the the control and repair of this. This property. i. I don't think there's a quote unquote jurisdictional dispute. I think it's more that there are a number of points of Access to the to the to the trains at the station and this particular point of access was deemed unsafe. And you know. I think sometime around. Twenty months ago or so was barricaded on both ends and And our folks are obviously working with The da's office and others to investigate what happened here and why and And once that investigations completed. You know we'll make a decision about doing something about it But in for the time being you know it's it's basically you know it's part of the investigation and it just needs to sort of stay where it is as it is so governor. We had a primary in the merrill race yesterday in boston. We have a two women. Made final on this saba. George and janet wu first time ever is going to be a woman show. Michelle will janet will whoops. She's a news. Reporter really be did say janet she. She's great reporters to them both of them. That's right that's right either. Janet will in fact it's michelle. Woo so splendor. Very low voter turnout. So what's your reaction to who managed to the to finals and the low voter turnout. People may not remember this. But i told folks when i get asked about the election i said well i think the turnout's probably going to be pretty lone people like oh no it's gonna be really high. It's tremendous enthusiasm. And i said i think that's you know there was a lot of enthusiasm and a lot of candidates. Good candidates who random eight years ago and turn out in the primary Was almost exactly the same. I think it was twenty. Nine percent year In the primary and the general just you know. I think the general in eight years ago. He's around forty percent might have been forty one or something So i think the i mean my hope would be that. Obviously a lot more people would turn out. I think the city has worked hard to come up with different ways to make it easier for more people to vote It didn't translate into higher numbers on On tuesday maybe it will in november but I certainly expected anticipate the both Both city councillors will be hugely aggressive about campaigning and and knocking doors and and getting their vote To show up on election day. But i you know. I've always said to everybody. I've ever talked to about elections that you know they get one by people whose voters actually show up. And that's why turn out is such a big deal and and in this particular case More so than ever. And i really do hope. People take advantage of the opportunity to vote because Because these you know. I don't people in i. My recollection secretary walls won the race against john. Conley by an incredibly small number of. I think it was less. I think it was less than a thousand. Didn't win win. The primary nurse by washing my point is just that you know if there's not going to be huge turnout if it's gonna be a one hundred fifty thousand votes or something like that. And the and the general or one hundred twenty five thousand You know a few thousand votes really matters and the thing i would say to people is if you live in the city of boston and you vote in the city of boston. You know you're an election here. We're your vote is really going to matter with respect to the total. Tally and people should get out. Learn about candidates and get out and vote. Looks like walsh. Two thousand more from the very quickly does this. You're not a same day. Registration guy aria a because of the complexity associated with indeed. Because we have done a lot of things to make it a lot easier for people who registered to vote. And keep in mind at this point if you If you are involved at all with the registry of motor vehicles information's automatically going to wherever it is you live. And the city hall of the town hall is going to be incorporating you could check the determining factor you do there and your You're your citizen onto their voting rolls so And we have lots and lots of pretend needs for people who registered right up until election day a lot of processes that are pretty easy to use to get there But i i want municipalities and the commonwealth on election day to focus on one thing and one thing only which is counting the votes. We've done a lot of things to make it pretty easy for people to register and a lot of people will be automatically registered nearly because Done mass health or or they They registered car driver's license. What are they gonna state. Id so i sort of feel like we've done a lot to make this not only easy but in some cases automatic and An election day really ought to be about election day. So governor margaret star to go fund me for a new phone. send the check of swamps. Go and get it as soon as we raise the appropriate funds governor. And thank you i. I really do appreciate that but it would be really important after that if we can spend some time and you could explain to me. How the The push points on the glass. Actually work really complicated. Martin and expert has no happy governor talk. There's always okay. Thanks charlie baker. That was of course the governor. He joins us every month appreciate his time. I should correct myself Mighty wash get eighty percent of the vote in back in two thousand thirteen has seventeen percent was twelve way pulmonary to forgotten that big field with anyway coming up. It is time for some vicarious. Travel steve's has just returned from france. He joins us to talk about actually taking a european vacation. My best for him worked invitation anyway. Paper john in nine seven. Gbh boss radio looking back to boston. Public radio jim brady madrid. And it's time for another edition of day-tripping with rick. steve. Martin i both take deep breaths when that happens. Virtual travel through our corona virus world. Rick joins us every month. People our travel dreams alive this afternoon with an eye on european travel. Wilson domestic to as rick is just return. Ras margaret said from a ten day trip to france. Rick steves is author television radio host and the owner. Rick steves europe tour group. You can catch. Rick steves europe weeknights at seven. Thirty on gbh. Two and his radio show travel with. Rick saved sundays at four on. Gbh rick welcome home. Greg talked to the the jim and margery great to talk to you again. Rixon daiva know about your ten day trip to france. I realize it was hiking in. Most of us aren't able to hike one hundred miles and ten days. That's pretty impressive. So so you're in a hike. If you're you know you're not top of people. But i wonder how things were in the top of people portion of your trip getting in and out Hotel you know. I i wanted. I'm running a a tour company and we're basically doing nothing during cove. It and things are starting to break loose and i wanted to go to europe and just see what it was like. What's the experience like and right in so many cases when you read about it from a distance when you read about bad examples of things going wrong in the newspaper and so on you you have a bigger fear of what it's like then it really is and i'm not promoting travel now but i wanted to know what it's like because a lot of people are doing it so I went through all the hoops and the little bureaucratic headaches and so on went to france and It was Surprisingly relaxing i felt like europe was has a better handle on covert than we do and people were you know. They've got their anti vaxxers and so on but it's a smaller and smaller world for people that don't have their vaccination cart and in europe. They've got their qr codes and they're organizing these countrywide and even european union-wide ways to confirm that you've got your shots and for americans. We tried to get the qr code that the french shoes. But they're overwhelmed. And a lot of americans were anxious about what. What are we going to do without our french. Qr code for foreign visitors. And the answer. Is you just use your cdc card. So i had my cdc card. That showed that. I'm vaccinated in united states as part of my passport. And i couldn't get into hotels i couldn't get into restaurants. I couldn't even get into restaurant. Terraces outside without showing my cdc card. I could get into museums with it and You know there's nowhere near the amount of tourist crowds People were quite normal. The french love to live well and everybody was sipping their wine and surfing the rest escargot and enjoying their art. And you know talking about their next trip and it was. It was really an exciting trip. I i enjoyed it It was for me of actual vacation. Because i wasn't focused on working. I was just going over there. Because i needed to go somewhere and For six days. I was up in the alps and that was a total break from ovid. 'cause there's no cova cases really in the alps there's like one case in in chamonix and We were just taken from mountain to mountain hut. Can that was really good for my soul and my just needed to exercise my travel muscles and it was fun us the infrastructure and travel and get to paris. And i'm just so glad i went. You're anticipate you anticipate what my question was. How different is the experience. When the mindset is different is not. Rick steves head of rick steves europe. Rick steves the the traveller the kid. Well that's how i used to travel. I am fond memories of those days. When i just i just spent time enjoying things to do and new experiences in europe and now in my work. I've always got my notepad there. And i'm always making mistakes almost on person on purpose. What'll happen and i You know in the old days. I'd lose traveler's checks just to see what will happen you know and when i get ripped off by celebrate because they don't know who they ripped off i'm gonna learn that scam and bring it home but a on this trip. It was just pure vacation for me. Part of it was a concern in my staff because we want to be very conservative and responsible about americans traveling during kobe. And i'm not. I made it really clear. I'm not saying. Everybody should go there but i did want to test the waters and see what it was like and is as is the case in so many times when i'm about going somewhere to cuba or a egypt or to iran or to russia when i finally get there i'm so glad i went because the fears are i don't to minimize peers are belittle the fears but in so many cases when we get there. We almost feel smug that. We had the nerve to go there because it there. And you realize what was the big deal you know It's was a big question for all of us hiking around this mall blunk by the way. This is an amazing new way for me to. I just amazed that after forty years of one hundred days a year traveling greer. I'm still uncovering new dimensions of travel. And one of those are these classic long distance walks. And of course you can have your tent all your gear but also you can do the the clamping kind of the equivalent where you have a company set up your hotels and they arrange for what's called the sherpa service to shuttle your luggage from mountain lodged a mountain lodge and then each day. You've got your little bag. You hike for set. Well they say you're going to take for six hours at always took me eight humiliate. Who's clocking but i you know my friends and i we reminded ourselves. We're not taking this hike around. Mount belong to to be done with the day to get to the. We're taking it to be in the mountains so we really took our time and then You know we did. Mount blanc is a hundred mile. Ten day classic walk in a big circle around the mount blanc massif which is a clump of mountains around the tallest mountain in europe mumbling fifteen thousand feet about the height of mount ranier and we just cherry picked. We kind of cheated. We took the best sixty miles in six days and caught local buses through the boring parts. Everyday was a ten mile hike and we got Early start because we're always concerned whether will change in the afternoon but we had one hour of rain in sixty days thankfully and it was each day was i'm in. I'm probably in no better shape than you marjorie And i just did some hiking beforehand and got the good gear and it was my limit. Every every day we'd climb three thousand feet altitude gain and that's about a steep three hour hike and then you'd get to a mountain pass and you'd have your lunch and this would just be a ham sandwich and a carrot and half an apple some water but it was like a gourmet as when you liked and you sitting on top of a mountain surrounded by hackers from all sorts of different countries. You're just sort of euphoric. And then you spend the rest of the afternoon hiking downhill into the next valley where you've got your mountain lodge waiting for you and when you've been hiking all day and you're in the alps You know the hotels the largest. We're about five thousand feet up in the past where about eighty four hundred feet. Each and the food tastes so good. Your body feels so good. One thing i was really adamant about and i'm usually sloppy on this kind of stuff but was stretching. Because you know. I'm in my mid sixties and when you walk all day you're not you don't even know if you can do it i. When was the last time you walked six hours a day for six days in a row. You know and i started calling my body. What saint francis called his body brother brother brother brother mule was with me and brother mule did it for six days in a row and brother meals stretched and brother meal was careful not to fall and brother mulas real thankful. He had hiking poles. That's the big thing in europe. And i would not have done this without hiking poles but it was. I'm just. I'm i'm just majoring my enthusiasm just by talking about right now. Pretty clearly it was. It was a great experience and so thankful that we did it. Let the record reflect the rick. Steve said i'm in no better shape than you are marjorie. He did not say. I'm a nobody shape than you are appropriate emission. Rick we have monthly. Richard blanco in the show is a former presidential inaugural poet. He delivered the poem for barack obama. One of the palm that we cover palms with every month one palm that we have missed so far is one. That just came to my attention yesterday. The title of which is. Here's a love poem to rick. Thieves watching rick steves iran. Can you give us the back story on this fine piece of work. Oh you know this. I love to get random pieces of sort of inspired creativity by people who love to travel. And who i've helped you know nudge a little bit in this direction or that direction and a few years ago. We did a production. I was so proud of. We went to iran. And we just humanized seventy million iranian people. We didn't get caught up in all the political stuff you know. That's for frontline and we just wanted to go and see who the iranians we're who are these people that are voting for the ayatollah. I'm dinner shot. And all that kind of stuff and it was such a rich experience. And then when we finished it i remember screening it in seattle and i didn't realize how many persian americans are even in our community but of course it's a big part of our society iranian-americans and they were so thankful that somebody had gone to their country and looked at it not with an agenda. There's so much agenda journalism that they wanna show scary bed things they we just. I just went there to humanize it and share my experience and this young poet darius peckham. Who's an iranian american studying at harvard. he he wrote this poem. It was published in cincinnati review and he captured my perspective looking at myself as my perspective was broadened and was overcoming all the baggage that i had picked up from a lifetime of hearing about iran. From ted koppel and news. This kind of thing and it's more than hostage crisis you know and people people our age. That's how we learned about. Iran was the hostage crisis in. That was just a a media circus and so he caught me with these intimate moments Standing in a field with a farmer field with a lot of scarecrows trying to do their best to scare the birds way but not doing a very good job in the farmer with a slingshot. You know david and goliath slingshot throwing rocks at birds to keep them off of his field. So he have something to harvest and He cut the the the the since. I had of going to the mosque with the same worshipful approach. That i have when i go to church and how going to moscow on is a lot like going to church in america. It's just a different culture and a different world. He he went with me to a grave where these martyrs cemetery. They lost one hundred thousand people in the war with iraq in one thousand nine hundred eighty and so so tragic and we went to these. They're called martyred cemeteries you can imagine. Every towns got one and the grief at these martyrs cemeteries. even though it's twenty or thirty years ago was just is real like it happened last year you know and we met a family that was picnicking with another family on on top two graves side by side in both of their sons had died and their children who had survived married. Each other they met at. They were visiting the tombs of their dead brothers and they obsess every week had a picnic. with the two families together remembering their sons who they consider martyrs. This was just a powerful experience that humanized just the heartache of all of these you know and and then you know we we had. They've got a thing where they've motorcycle taxis in tehran crazy city when they crossed the street in theron. There's no there's no traffic lights or anything. There's no stop signs. Even big four lane highways come together at right angles in the cars. Just kinda shuffle and shift the mess and there's no way to stop and go. It's just you you work your way through in a works for them and when human being gets out there when human being asked across the street in tehran. The joke is are the term for it is. You're going to chechnya which is a very dangerous place but when they crossed the okay. I'm going to go to chechnya and If you wanna get anywhere you get on the back of a motorcycle. And i remember the motorcycle. Taxi cab driver offered me the helmet and you said you don't have to wear it. But then he pointed to a bus going by and there was a scuff of paint on the side of the bus and he said that's paint from a helmet. So i put the helmet on because i didn't want my scalp to be on the side of the bus there but Those little images doria caught in this poem and i just was so inspired by how he was thankful that an american had traveled all the way to his country to get through all the propaganda to get through all the the anger and the agenda journalism and just learn about the people of his country. On rick steves dot com. No the poem. Yeah you can find it on. Rick steves dot com we. We put it also. Rick steves facebook page. So people can their terrific you states. I want to ask you about the monday night. Travel show before i do i. I saw this interview that you're asking one tip for first time visitors to europe and you said pack light pack line pack right and i thought an all the times we've talked to you. We haven't talked about packing light. That's a real big deal. You know marjorie. I always say. There's there's two kinds of travelers in europe. Those who packed light in those who wish they packed light. And you'll think about it. You'll never meet any experienced traveler. Who after five trip sprague's every year. I pack heavier with experience. You get really fanatic and evangelical about packing light. So i'm a i just i. I always had a routine of of getting together with travel partner before a trip and picking a couple of days before the trip and just actually going through the luggage and picking up each item and just saying. Do you really need this snorkel thin. It'd be nice. It'd be nice in the greek islands. But is it worth carrying it through the alps. You know just so. You have in the greek isles and cheap is i may be. I'd go to great expense to enjoy the luxury of packing late. We have to remember. You don't want to pack for the the worst example of the experience you know. We're raised to be prepared and bring an extra just in case you need it. You know. europe has all this stuff so You know you take what you think you'll need and you can buy what you need when you're over there. If you needed more. But i have. I have a self imposed limit on our tours last Last season we were travelling. We took thirty thousand americans europe on our special tours and nobody was allowed to check anything to start the trip. You get a nine by twenty two by fourteen inch carry on airplanes sized suitcase. That's kind of tough love. But when i bully people into packing late and i've been doing it for decades Sometimes i think was a little heavy handed on this and they sit me down five or six days into the trip and they go. I'm so thankful we packed light. Nobody wished packed more when they go to europe. And what did they do did. They can wash their dress at night if they've only brought one dress and they spilled catch up on it or something that would they. You know. it's it's casual people aren't there's no. I mean you dress nice but you don't address formal and you've got a less wardrobe so yeah you don't wash more but you wash a little bit as you go. Yeah okay and you don't wash your sweater every time you use it. You're where things more than once. One thing i learned on our hike was Wohl really you can wear wolf for days before you need to wash it compared to cotton but no the main item of luggage bokan. Your luggage is clothing. So you get serious about that You don't bring extra a lot of extra shoes. A lot of people bring extra susan. That's huge baggage You get serious about your toiletries. And after that you're living off the land and It's just your big bag. And that's what you leave on the cruise ship or at the bottom of the bus or in your hotel and you got your day bag that you're out and about you. Don't wanna bring a fancy bag because that attracts thieves. You want just a humble like a book bag just a little bag and you got to realize that the most dangerous place for your valuables with you when you're out and about in the hotel i've got a one hour lecture about packing light the slide show and website dot com. I've got like thirty hours of different practical tips of a kind of practical skills. Lectures but this packing thing is so important. And i know i've got very little credibility among women when it comes to packing late so i get help from the women on my staff. I mean you know half of my team of one hundred people or women in their great travelers. And i just always committed to this notion that there's no excuse man woman rich-poor north-south winter summer two weeks to months. You need to give yourself the limit of nine by twenty to fourteen inches. That's a carry on the airplane sized suitcase. And you can do it and you'll be glad you did. Marie condo meet rick things exactly. We're talking to rigs zoos so tell us about monday. Night travel. Shell what is it. Oh well you know. i'm. I spent one hundred days in european normal times and then the rest of the time. I'm home but i'm on the road going all over the united states giving talks and i just this is what i do. I just love to enthuse about europe. And during the pandemic i have not been able or i haven't wanted to get out and about just because i wanted to stay home word safe and but i still wanna talk about travel so i thought i've got the technology and i've got a a webinar license that can accommodate five thousand visitors so every monday for forty forty mondays. Now we've been doing monday night travel. I do two shows one early in the evening and one later in the evening. I'm drinking the whole time. So people like if they wanna get me loose. They go to the second next Every monday we just get together. It's free you just go to rick. Steves dot com and right there. You'll see a a a tab where you just sign up and you get a link and it's absolutely free. it's just a party I never thought it involve a lot of food and drinks. But i have been featuring local restaurants and food from the cultures that were visiting end drinks. And i've been having fun cooking and then sharing my food each week last week it was. The best of spain. Had a guest live guest from madrid. Who woke up at three o'clock in the morning to be with us and we were spanish. Eat late but that was really ridiculous and we had all sorts of tapas. And we've talked about spain this coming monday. I'm doing the hippie trail. My trip of a lifetime might coming of age trip in nineteen seventy eight from istanbul to afghanistan Through afghanistan the katmandu and It's going to be kind of poignant. Because i've got beautiful memories of afghanistan from a generation ago and i just love to share that and I'm joined by my original travel partner. Jeanne openshaw and it's gonna be just for me a really nostalgic opportunity to share the the greatest trip anybody could have. This was the this was the hippie. Coming of age backpacker dream come true trip from istanbul. Right across south asia to katmandu But every monday we're doing something different after that we've got a show on little europe all the little tiny piece that you could put together and they'd fit into luxembourg with plenty of room to spare We're gonna do a show on turkey coming up. And i'm also going to share my mount blunt cake around hike around mount blanc Adventure but this is what we're doing for the rest of the pandemic. It's just fun to get together. We're celebrating travel and were letting people who love travel you know. Get together and just dream and share and It's a lot of fun and before you go rick. The last time we spoke you were talking about potentially spring. I know you're practically sold out already. Is that still the track. Your on this. Is you know it's just a matter of us getting vaccinated Europe is is way ahead of us now in my guide friends in europe or telling me they're eighty percent vaccinated in here in the united states. I don't know what the numbers are. But we we our own worst enemy when we wanna be out there exploring the world. But i think we're on a good track. As i said the world is going to get smaller and smaller for people who are not vaccinated. I'd like to require people to be donated. The take our tours. But i don't think we're going to need to do that. Because i don't think europe's gonna let us unless we vaccinated so europe's going to make that a decision for us but we've got probably i think we've got ninety five percent of our seats sold. I think we've got twenty eight thousand sold for twenty twenty two starting in april and i'm confident that we're going to be going especially considering the experience i just had last week in france. I'm going to italy in three weeks. And i'm going to have a mentoring tour with our newest guides where i'm going to Sort of guide with them and a few of our lead guides just to make sure we all have our our our style. Downright for rick steve style tour but We're feeling good about next spring But we we have a little work to do in our country to make sure that we are welcome in other countries. You know there's a lot of sort of disgruntlement by americans that why won't they let us in and it's there's something called risk of prosperity and other countries have a lot of pride and they don't have much power and money as we have but they've got pride and you know it's like it's like a yacht club you know. I remember when my dad was was running around puget sound in the boat if our yacht club in our town let the people from the other yacht club doc in our yacht cup we could dock in their yacht club. It was reciprocal. And it's the same way with travel. A lot of americans wonder. Why won't they give us a senior discount in norway. Well norwegians when they come to the united states don't get a senior discounts so they don't reciprocate when it comes to letting people in we've got to remember that we're not letting people in here without shots therefore they're not going to let people in there without shots. I actually think it's good to have a high bar because I wanna go someplace where i can relax. And when everybody is vaccinated. And i can go into the louvre like i did last week everybody in the move was vaccinated and i could enjoy the experience People wear masks when they're inside in europe for now When i flew home. I knew i had to get my negative test before i could fly home even if i was vaccinated. I took my home test kit with me. But i decided to just go professional in paris. I asked the hotel him. That's what i'll do next time. I go to europe to. I'll ask the hotel. What do i do when i go to the airport in that hotels town because they deal with travelers all the time and they'll tell me around the corner is it takes twenty minutes or half an hour go there. You give them a few dollars. They will do the test for you and assuming you're negative you will have the paper you need and you'll skate right through the airport. And that's what. I did in paris at charles de gaulle last week. And that's what. I think we'll be doing until we get through this pandemic. We'll be doing that so myself. Rick it's a pleasure as always. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks very much. Jim and margie. I look forward to our monthly discussion and of it Happy travels even. If we're we're not even staying home for a little while longer. We're we're starting to plan. Our trips in the world will start to open up so and i'm inspired by segment. I really am excited about packing. Might when i do go somewhere anyway. Rick steve thank you so much. Steve joins us every month. He's an author television radio host the owner of rick steves europe tour group. You can catch. Rick steves europe weeknights at seven thirty on gbh to and his radio show travel with. Rick steves sundays at four on gbh. Thanks again dirk. Steve's coming up for rape convict tyron. Clark has justice been delayed for nearly fifty years investigative reporter jennifer. Kim joins for that conversation. Next seven h. Boston public radio. I'm welcome back to boston. Public radio more dragon. Jim rowdy tyrone clark has spent most of his adult life behind bars and a nineteen seventy-three rape case. He always insisted he did not commit now. The victim of that rape says tyrone clark could be a victim to suffolk county. Da rachel rawlins's seeking to race tyron clark's rape conviction is asking for new trial because the survivor now doubts for identification of clark was actually correct and Rollins has said if a new trial is granted she will dismiss all the chart well all the charges relating to the rape gbh senior investigative reporter. Jen from kim has been covering the case. She had an exclusive interview with the victim earlier. This year jen. Great reporting a really good joined us. Thanks so much for having me or pleasure. Thank you so much for joining us. Jennifer so detail the story but before you do. I was stunned. That this is a black guy. A convicted by an all white jury and i was stunned by your interview with the victim. Who conceded that At the time she really didn't know any black people and she wasn't sure she could differentiate among black faces. So tell us what happened to tyron clark into and came. Yeah it's it's really a remarkable story and As as i've written several many stories on wrongful convictions. But this one really touched me because it's so unusual to have a victim comeback nearly fifty years later and say wait a minute. I think i might have made a mistake. It takes a lot of guts to be able to say that and basically tyrone clark was eighteen years old when he was arrested for the terrible brutal rape of this woman in boston. And you're right marjorie. He was convicted by an all. White jury Anne kane years later was re he and tyrone clarke has always said it wasn't him he's always said. Ever since the beginning he has he filed other motions to seeking a retrial. And it wasn't until a couple years ago that his new attorney tracks down the victim who said who was open to an inquirer because she had doubts of her own and the the attorney reached out to the survivor. here who by the way martyr username. Her go and we should say as you make the point two while we're not in the habit obviously disclose the names of survivors of These kinds of crimes in this case senate consented to it through you. What was it that convinced the lawyer in this case from the innocence project. i think. Correct me if i'm wrong. That an outreach. After decades and decades to the complaining witness to the victims of the survivor might be appropriate so jeff. Jeffrey harris works was hired by the innocence program. Out of the public defenders office to re take another. Look at tyrone clark's case. And i think just as part of his investigation. He reached out to the victim and was surprised that she was willing to talk to him and to reconsider everything. And basically so yeah. It is true that generally media does not identify victims of sexual assault. When jeffrey harris i reached out to me and said i have this really interesting case and the victim has spoken to the parole boards of into the judge. She's reaching out and she may be willing to talk to you. And so i met with her and she at that point wasn't sure whether she wanted to give her name to this story but then she felt like she really. She had deep concerns about whether the right person was in prison and she felt like she needed to put her name to the story to To give more prominence you know we should be clear here. What what. This is not a situation whereas you say decades. After the fact the survivor is saying i was wrong. Mr clark didn't do it. She saying she might have been wrong. Is that not correct. In addition to that she said she studied up on racial bias. Said she didn't know many black people when she was younger and she said i'm not putting words in her mouth but you'll correct me if i'm wrong that she of may have inadvertently been perpetuator of racial bias in her identification so she was twenty three years old when the assault happened she had grown up in a rural part of the country. She'd come here. Said she knew very few black people in her life and when this terrible awful assault happened she was raped and beaten choose dragged through the city by this perpetrator and then Afterwards she was brought in to look at photos and the second time long she went in. They showed him her eleven photos and she kind of assumed that the police had narrowed it down in that in that group. It was the perpetrator and so therefore she was at that point in her life in the nineteen seventies really believed and trusted in the criminal justice system to do a fair trial and over years of time learning. How the world how. We've learned that. There are many people who have been wrongfully convicted. In in america and dna has been one of the real reasons that we've realized that there are these problems can piece it apart and realize that witness identification has been a big problem with wrongful convictions and she started to realize especially with an african american that she might have gotten it wrong and she. She watched the movie. If beale street could talk she she. She listened to radio where she heard of other survivors talking about having gotten it wrong and she started to question at herself. We know what i wanted to. Jeff mckee mckim. This was unusually brutal. I mean rape is always brutal but this whole taking us through the city as you say on the six and a half hour saga was very unusual Black man raping white woman says was very very long even for rape case at that time but you also mentioned how they went to a restaurant ate a meal together and then spoke to his front so i wondered how effective his council was in the initial trial because if they spoke to some of his friends did they do we know. Do they bring in these friends. Actually she was. I mean so tyrone clark. She was not the only witness identification he. He was identified by four other people five other people including when she was yeah firefighters. She's through the city. And on their way back they were going by a roxbury firehouse and she ran in and grabbed onto the belt of one of the firemen and said save me and the perpetrator ran in after her and said this is my woman. I mean you magin the guts to do that. And then the firemen ended up saying we're going to bring in a police officer who's upstairs and then the guy ran out so they saw him for a couple minutes. Five to fifteen minutes they also. She also had a meal with him in some restaurant. And that was. I think something like fifteen minutes but but what about the friends. What about the friends that they supposedly spoke to that was part. That seemed unusual to me. I mean the police they did. They actually did a bring an kane all around town trying to find other witnesses and these were the ones that they were able to get that because no other victims and actually tom clarke had alibis that he was in a different place at the time but the but the jury did not believe in those allies in rollins is also said that part of our consideration here so neutrons granted is in addition to. I wouldn't say recantation but doubts being raised by the survivor. Self about our own. Identification of mr clark here. All of the other evidence has been lost. Some of which are at least. According i believe rollins saying could have been retested upon newer. Technology had not been lost so that is one of the things. I don't understand though. I know that he was released. I think in two thousand eight and did a small theft and sent back to jail. She has said. I don't think i asked her this. When she's with me last thursday but i know it was in the reporting either years or in the globes that while she would move to dismiss the rape conviction the other convictions would stand so two questions for one isn't a kidnapping what marjorie was describing six and a half hour thing and if he's not the rapist then he's not the kidnapper izzy. Well yes so. That is definitely been the question. I've heard from a lot of people and i actually went back to mean tyrone clark has steadfastly. Said he was not the man who did any miss. His attorney filed a motion to try to vacate all three convictions. And that was denied by the court and then he heard from the Da that they were willing to reconsider the the rape conviction. The other two convictions served out his time. So really it's the rape conviction which is with the possible life with the possibility of parole. That's kind of kept him in prison all this time. So tyrone clark maintains he's innocent of all of the convictions. But i think that this was way that that he has a possibility to get out and so he's hoping that the judge will agree with the victim and the da and the defense to support this new motion. You'll also like to get your thoughts on the question of racism. In this case is marjorie brought it up before all white jury. Obviously a black rapist and a white survivor. Is rachel rollins on greater boston last week about whether how whether she believes racism was part of what ended up causing taryn clark to spend essentially his whole life in jail. And here's part of what she had to say. I am never happy when i hear a jury of all one race and we both know it's only ever all white people if we all closed our eyes right now and i asked you to think of the last time away person was found guilty by an all black jury. You wouldn't even let the words finish. She'd be laughing because it would never happen. So there was fundamentally think unfairness in this trial. So what's what's your take away from having been really close to this case for a long time. Well we i mean we've we've met. Darryl jones was also who was exonerated in the last couple of years he also was convicted by an all white jury. These things happen. I think it's particularly interesting when you're talking about a black man convicted of raping a white woman. When you tie the registry of exonerations. They say that while they have discovered more wrongful convictions of black men raping white women. Actually that is not a racial construct that it's actually a minority of sexual assaults. Are that and yet. They found so many more of those cases having been wrongful convictions. Part of that they say is racism and the other part of it they say. Is this issue with Cross race identification and that white people have a very hard time identifying black people. And that's part of the problem too so it's both of those things so we're is mr clark. At this point. He is in state prison in concord. And i i met with him a week before the. Da filed her motion and he is He knew that it was possible that that was going to happen so he was very much appreciative. He also talked to me about how he felt only empathy toward the survivor and kane and was so appreciative of the fact that even all these years later that she's speaking out one of the things i found really interesting is that he has a very severe stutter and that was not something that the victim ever really talked about in her testimony when he can. He can barely get out a sentence without stuttering and so there are definitely questions. About what the first defense attorney did in terms of trying to defend him so different mckim. He was eighteen years old on when he was accused of this. He's now sixty six years old. Does he have any family. that's left. that's outside wh. What would he do if he. What are the prospects for him if he is released. Well i i think the They there are people in support of him who are looking to try to think of where he could live. He does have a brother who i spoke with And i know that he has very much hoping he told me that he does not want to die in prison that he's really looking forward to getting out. He feels very bad as you brought up when he was released on parole in two thousand five that he was Found shoplifting in a shoe store and he feels completely embarrassed that he did something so stupid. That was something like right. Fifty more than fifteen years ago in the parole board's never let him out again because of this rape conviction and they're arguing that because he kept going back to parole and saying i didn't do the rape i. Did you know steal some clothes that they haven't released them. So i think no i think at this point what he's really hoping for is to live the rest of his life outside the interest in meeting this woman. He wrote her a letter. So you know it's really interesting. You bring that up jim. Because there is a woman who has gotten sort of national prominence. Her name is jennifer thompson and she wrote a book called picking cotton and it was about how she picked ronald cotton. Who was the wrong man for her. Terrible nineteen hundred eighty rape and so there and she has started this whole movement of of of trying to get these stories out there. It was actually when i spoke to her years ago. I thought man. I'd like to write that story. And when i heard about an kane that was partly why. I wanted to tell the story because there is this whole Restorative justice issue bringing together people who have struggled particularly with wrongful convictions. Because not only do you have tyron clark but you have a woman who struggling through this all over again. Doesn't know if the real perpetrators still out there. Yeah jennifer kim. This is a great story. Thank you so much joining us today and the reporting is yeah the reporting his great. Thank you so much. Thanks very much love. Thanks so much for your interest. Absolutely jennifer be mckim is a senior investigative reporter at the h. newscenter investigative reporting. Thanks again to jennifer joining us coming up. Gbh executive are senator. Jared bowen is here for his latest arts and culture rundown. You're listening to eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio. Welcome back to boston public radio. Jim bobby modrica joining us from studio three for his latest. Rundown of arts and culture events around town is executive arts editor. John boehner spoken to him in years. He's also the host of the tv series opens thirty off which can catch right here on friday nights at eight thirty. He'll love their. Jared how are you. I know it has been a summer seem so long ago. Now i see your parking lot all the time that makes me feel good i guess. So so jared. Let's start with one. That's going to be very difficult to Explain our thing. I don't think so. Okay go get on your knees hoping you would give the synopsis go ahead. Tell us what's going on before. So this is a show at the emerson. Colonial theater clients presented by the emerson colonial theater. I should say it's up. Calderwood pavilion through september nineteenth. And it's called as you say get on your knees and it's a show by jacqueline novak. Who is doing a deep dive basically into a sex act between consenting adults on as she describes it as between a man and woman although it could be between two men. We'll just leave it there but This is a show. That i think is hilarious. She's a stand up. Comedian who Did this show in new york. It was extended a number of times. You gotta drop drama desk nomination for it. You've also probably seen her. Jimmy fallon and seth meyers. He's also had a Special on comedy central But here i think she fuses comedy with poetry with social criticism and cultural criticism. And you have this hybrid show where she really looks at this one particular act and the whole show. It's the whole show but it's because of the way. She approaches it and looking at human dynamics at looking at the aesthetics of the body in narrative around how couples come together how we view ourselves how how will we views sex and conversations around sex That's probably as many times. I need to say that word and this one conversation. But i just found this absolutely hilarious because of her. Very singular ability to Have thought and perception around this and turn it around for an audience To as the best art does to make us look at ourselves and society and what we do in a different light. You know what. I loved about this. She does a great interview with meredith goldstein. We've had around many times. Who the advice columns the boston globe and she talks about. How part of the background here is that. The act is kind of embarrassing. She said but temporarily the height of your being excellent cool and she said in her own life it was about wanting to do everything adolescent wanted to hit every mark wright wanted to be good at everything doing all the things all the activities all the extracurriculars so this is if she has a perfect this to get into harvard or something like that i also i hate doing things that can't practice privately. Which is so. It's really funny. We'd have a good time. It's extremely funny and it's a great time to return to the theater. I think and just really appreciate. I mean she's giving the show a lot of thought Especially having the downtime of the pandemic to really craft this as a theater piece because some people think. She's a comedian. So what does the suing in the theater. But no as they say it's got this whole arc to it. It's why she got the drama desk nomination. Why it was as one of the best pieces of theater in two thousand nineteen Because of because of her perception and commentary and skill anybody who can work references to the crucible and to this and other poetic references. I think is brilliant. So everything you're doing. That's an in person weren't asked you. What are the protocols Terms of public health that the colder protocols are very strict. And and this is why i have. I've never entered to indoor shows. We'll talk about another one of them. But i did my research. I reached out to figure out what exactly promos are and in both of these cases Especially since these are both shows that the calderwood pavilion in the south end You have to show your vaccination card. Or as i did. I have a photograph on my phone which you show you. Basically the first taker now and the second person. Actually scans your ticket You also have to wear a mask throughout the performance. I will say i went. Neither of these. I go to opening night. I went on other nights there. I think people are working the right back into theater so it wasn't a full house in either case so i felt personally more comfortable with a little space around me and actually in both cases and i know it wasn't just because of me and my job but they asked me What seating arrangements. They could make for me to be most comfortable. So i do. Your research certainly reach out and you can be best accommodated. I think and so. The second thing you did see was hurricane. Diane which was the first to open doors first. Theater production opened. Doors is not here in the boston area. And so this is at the huntington theatre companies again would face through september twenty. Sixth and this is a comedy as well. I think all of these theater companies have recognized that we all need a lot of laughs. Right now As we try to work our way through the rest of this cove pandemic so we find hurricane. Diane which diane here is. The god dyonisis who has come down after being cast aside for centuries and centuries and here she is described in the script as butch charm factory because she is a lesbian landscaper living her best degreen life and burlington vermont reveling in her curbside compost collection. But she's very disturbed with by what we the collective we have done to this planet and how we don't really seem to be understanding what we're doing to this planet. So where does she headbutt new jersey. So she can spend some of her time with some housewives in new jersey who are living very interior lives. Not very aware of what's happening to the planet and this coincides with a hurricane arriving but she just wants to to change their way of thinking in there well manicured lawns should be filled with palm trees and firmest permaculture and milk vetch So this is a comedy that really addresses climate change but this hilarious prison talking to journey bone. How does it feel to be back in the theater. Once you get over the anxiety. I i've obviously not yet is a great. It does feel great. And i'm glad you phrase the question that way. Because i did. I'll be very honest with you. I had a lot of anxiety going into the theater. It's the first time had been around so many people in an indoor setting but the moment the the lights went down. I got launched into the play. You just kind of forget about it. And you and i i will tell you. I did look around the audience several times during the performance and everybody was keeping their mask on and it just felt right for you sitting is close as you would in pre pandemic times as he said not well. Yeah what about that. No the same seats just in my case of theater wasn't full what i'm saying so it doesn't feel like you had as many people gathered all around you but it's the same seating. Set up everybody wearing masks except of course for the actors. But i i'm sorry to belabor this but is that intentional or is that because sold out i mean if it were sold out what you have everybody knew each other because i have all recognized that it you know with the right safety precautions and a lot of these theaters. I know you spoke to joe allen very recently as well a lot of the theaters of even reached out to him at the harvard school of public health to figure out how to outfit their theaters with proper ventilation uv lights etc. That's right. He was the gentleman that was in charge over there at the t h at chan school public health with interior buildings. And he said we do not need to keep wiping everything down jammed. No-one pace he told us yesterday of someone who got it from that. Kind of contact. Jarred bone cohen. Tell us about this The outdoor billboards that are going to be changing all the time in roxbury. I love this story. I can't even tell you how much i love this story. Because this is a story of one person making a huge difference and her name is dianne walters and she reached out to me about a month or two ago Because she just wanted to talk about what she was doing which is so singular so she lives in roxbury. During the pandemic there is a billboard in roxbury. Is john eliot square and we for whatever it was. Normally advertising people weren't leasing the billboard anymore so it's becoming a little bit tattered so she reached out to clear channel who operates it and asked because she is somebody who's long been steeped in the arts herself asked if she could curate the billboard so she reached into her own pockets thousands of dollars of her own money to lease this billboard then she reached out to a community of artists surrounding her longtime artists like equal homes. Chanel thermal right now. You'll see denise di marshall her piece on the the billboard and John eliot square and she turned it into what she calls billboard hope so she has rented it for an entire year and i think she's moving to be able to do beyond that at this point With artists who have created images all built around the notion of hope just something to uplift the community as she said to me at this point we need to really sold anything more. Do we need to look up and figure that we're going to be hooked into some consumer clutches. Why not just have art. Why not just have hope out there for all to see. I went down and met her at the billboard. One day everybody in the community knew her there was trouble. It was hard for me to talk to her because she kept getting interrupted because people were so appreciative And then. Since then. I think the city of boston has stepped up and i think other people are starting to step up to help her financially. Do this you know jar when you were sitting in from artery which was essentially all summer one of the two of us. But kind of do it we had was larry pearson paul good night in. Who who did this. Just incredible mural collaboratively the the fact that these these murals these these billboards popping up all over the place in the city adds a totally different. Feel when i drive by one you just you feel like enlivened or it's just great. It's it's one your hometown of philadelphia. Remember ten years ago going down to visit one of my kids. There are these billboards in philadelphia. And i thought gosh. I don't have those in boston. And now we're starting to get them and one of the things that i thought was so neat was that they had this beautiful image of the of the healing cranes that one was looks spectacular to me and i think interesting that you say that about just feeling different when you drive by them and i think it's because you know that there is an artist's hand there that there is a lot of thought a lot of planning a lot of money that has gone into this so there's great care that suddenly appears in your community. It's not just something being slapped up. It's it's an artist who who who's who's ingrained in the community so again. Let me just mention again. Her name is dianne. Walters just i think a true art a true hero gentleman and art hero for what she's done because she was so undaunted and thinking. There's no reason why i shouldn't be able to do this. So tell us about this. American waters up at jimmy's favorite museum. The peabody essex museum This looks really cool. it is cool it. It's great because it's so different as well so this is on view at the museum through october. Third as you say. It's called in american waters. And it's a longtime plan of the curator. Maritime art curator. Dan finnemore there to really take a look at the maritime painting. That doesn't typically work its way and we you know. We love to see our beautiful sunsets and roiling. Caesar placid sees. But what he's done here. Is something very different. So you see abstract artist. Abstracting the seat georgia o'keefe that denizen of the desert suddenly looking at the She didn't do very often. Having lived in the south west So through a different prism but even move beyond that in more substantial ways they have One of the few renderings of aslef ship that carried enslaved people that had a horrible ending in the ship. Owners being brought on trial In the i think it was the eighteen. Hundreds obviously not many depictions of slave ships because they weren't supposed to exist anyway so it takes a very different look at the c. but from all different standpoints including from some very new artists. You have k. Walking stick who takes a look at the new england coastline but overlays it with her basket motif from her native american heritage. And then amy sherwood. We've talked about her quite a bit. She did the official portrait of michelle obama. Yes towering portrait or painting. I should say here at the museum of four young black people i. It's tough to tell their ages but they're just young and they're just they're enjoying the everyday americanise of just being at a really sunny day at the beach with it just surrounded by color is. It's really quite beautiful. By the way. I it is what the is a great museum and i've seen some of the book. The came with the exhibit. That is just totally bureau. Like knock your socks off. Great and create. What are the rules. Peabody essex The rules they i. I can't quite recall. If i know that. All museums requiring masking. Now and i. I shouldn't say this with certainty. Maybe our team can check. But i think that they may have added a vaccination status But again precautions. You know they've done something else there to where they've actually replaced. All of the door handles with switches that you can just wave your hand over and see took took even though despite what you just said you still have to touch it. Don't have to worry about surfaces. There they went a step. Beyond what i've seen some others do well also creates a comfort zone for people i mean you know. Precautions are not one hundred percent about. I don't think about About all cautioned about psyche to caution theater theater grocery but okay so the loss leonardo. Yeah this is a documentary. That will as much as i love to talk about art in Support the arts and champion it. This will make you think a little bit differently about the arts. I think so. Do you remember a couple of years ago. There is the the the auction of the salvator mundi painting course which was considered to be by painted by leonardo da vinci sold at auction in new york for four hundred. Fifty million dollars just disappeared. So this documentary tells the entire story of the salvator mundi painting starting with how it was purchased for about twelve hundred dollars at a new orleans auction. How there came to be some thought that this was something different It could be very different that it could actually have the hand of leonardo in it. As as one expert says in the documentary there are a lot of people who wanted it to be a leonardo da vinci because that would be a major discovery sensor so few leonardo da vinci paintings in in the world. Only about fifteen known ones including of course. The mona lisa only shift. Yeah very few and so it takes you through. The discovery takes you through the conservators who base because it had so much damage. There was one conservative in particular who did a lot of `overpainting which is typically done in paintings to restore them to bring them back but she did a lot of work here to the extent that which another critic your suggests that it's more her work than it is leonardo's so then it starts to escalate You have people promoting it pushing it really hard so that it's suddenly escalates. And you have a russian oligarch billionaire who buys it. Then he kind of gets taken by another multimillionaire dealer he decides to sell it. That's when it goes up for auction. You have a lot of museums that are kind of tied into it including the museum of fine arts actually which looked at it at one point when it was offered to museums in this country and they decided not to make the purchase but they told me they routinely examined paintings so then it goes up for auction it sold and now we know it went to mohammed bin salma mohammed bin salman the crown prince of saudi arabia. And then just disappeared. Nobody has really seen it. Since there was a big exhibition for the anniversary of leonardo a couple of years ago. Four hundred anniversary. I think it was and they expected it to turn up there. Even president mccrone apparently got involved because suddenly this moved into the realm of global and diplomatic relations But basically this film documentary about this one painting takes us into the art world. The financial world and geopolitical world. And how they're all intertwined. How the market when you get to that level is unregulated becomes maybe even a money laundering scheme. It's fascinating so is it where this thing locally. It's playing at the kendall theater but it's not streaming. It's just that the kendall last check not. It's still just in theaters at the moment before you leave. Marjorie is asserted for the years. That the kendal has been there. That if you're a man and you go to the kendal you must wear a beret is. That is that still true. They're not absolutely true. That's right you can't have popcorn and you can only have. I don't know if you have you been to the movie theaters. I have not. I'm wondering what that's like. I've never been to a movie is particularly crowded at me and has been exception rather than the rule so i think it gets spread out in movie theaters but i don't know firsthand i mean you. Have you have a lot of things that before you go to movies there. You gotta vote for janet wu and the election in boston. He told governor baker before so. We'll they both great reporters on the gentler with the first for many many years. You know which one you're going to be voting for platforms. Of course jim before as we know on your show their bones by the way i have an update. I'm not sure. The pediatrics requires Vaccination this point but definitely masks this week. We will take you to the titian show at the isabella. Stewart gardner him. The reunion of these massive monumental six titian paintings an exhibition years in the making this final stop on an international tour and we will speak with jacqueline novak about show. Get on your knees. And she'll talk to us better process and she's just so funny marginal trying to think if she can come up with a clever line. I'm gonna. I'm gonna leave that one alone but i'm glad you know that she's she's export every extracurricular activity. And why not why not. We all want to be our best. Thank you so much. By jared Executive are senator. He's also the host of the tv series open studio which you can catch right here on. Gbh to friday nights at eight thirty. Let's get the judge on for joining us. Coming up sleep deprivation nation the pandemic has turned pandemic rather has turned us into a bunch of insomniacs. And we're is asking is being done. It kept you up at night is not what else is keeping you up at night. Keep your done. Eighty nine seven gmbh. Boston public radio austin public radio. She's margarita. I'm jim brought in other consequences. Pandemic obviously for a lot of people has been sleeplessness. Deranged working schedules the collapse of boundaries. Were bedrooms also become the classroom and the office is the storting our relationship asleep and the sliding work hours are making things worse if you don't need to be at the office at six. Am why not stay up until the wee hours to get your work on so on top of the pandemic anxieties uncertainties or financial stressors. And if that's not keeping up at night what about. The headline climate change could have sugar and coffee output by twenty nine on top of everything else after about a future without coffee and sugar. But luckily i will not be here for that in any case we wanna talk to you about your sleep. Patterns during the pandemic if you've been caused a new level of sleeplessness. And if you have what you're doing about it and if you haven't kept your sleep patterns intact or you're getting those seven plus hours year supposed to despite all your pandemic woes. What's your deal by the way marjorie. I don't even know what. You're i'm a big sleeper jim. It doesn't it hasn't impacted me. I'm i say nor me by i nor has examples to talk about it actually. Eight seven seven three eight nine seven actually huge numbers of say their sleep patterns have been disrupted by one of the various factors. That was mentioned a minute ago. And if you're one of those people would love to talk to you. Eight seven seven three zero one eight nine seventy and even more. We'd like to talk to you if you've had a disruption but figured out a way with keeping rituals during the day going to bed at a certain time you can't fall asleep right away what you've done to try to address this sleeplessness. Whoa you know what is apparent in this in the story we have on. This is that part of the reason for this problem. Is people getting up really early. Like several hours or at least a couple of hours before their kids. Get some work done before interruptions throughout the interruption. That's right or saying okay. I'll get that information to after ten after the kids go to bed so i think there's a lot of people staying up very very late at night or getting up very early in the morning to try to get work done around the kids because it's very difficult to work. You get a bunch of screaming. Kids running around. The house is clearly a huge part of this thing. I mean you know living even though it hasn't affected apparently either you or me. I'm surprised him. 'cause you're you're you're you're anxious bit aren't you. I'm anxious by day. I am dead asleep at night. i. I assume it's it's good if you're the person doing it but I sleep through a tornado in my bedroom. I mean i. I am really a sound and quick sleeper. But i have remarkable empathy. Because they don't own all things. I've remarkable empathy for those who don't because like on the rare occasion when i can't sleep and to say i've had while still rare for more of those rare occasions during the pandemic i hadn't even thought about just just a second than i did before it's torture and i can't imagine people who have to deal with insomnia issues throughout their life but people who didn't have those issues and all of a sudden having come pandemic time eight seven seven three zero one. Eight hundred nine seventy if you're amongst those that group or if you're in the margin jim category and you never been able to sleep through this whole mess. How do you think you've been able to pull it off well. This story talks about how this is something. That's going on around the world. This is not something at all. Unique to america's of forty nine countries forty percent of the people's that their sleep was worse now than before the pandemic people sleeping pills has gone up by twenty percent. Google searches for insomnia also spiked in the united states. In april or may in many parts of the country. Were under stay at home Orders that's back in Last april and may but the problem is not baited. Americans are spending a lot of money over the counter. Sleep supplement melatonin. That's increased by forty two percent in twenty twenty. Wow you submit. Your saying is a town. Yeah melatonin is supposed to be. I think natural kind of sleep. Thing which is supposedly not supposed to be as baffles taking. It's taking sleeping pills so eight. Eight seven seven three zero one eight nine seven. Oh is the number eight seven seven three zero one eight nine seven. Oh people are apparently having difficulty sleeping either getting up earlier in the morning. They're really staying up late at night or they tossing and turning on night because they are anxious be email from saying being gnostic dyslexic end. Insomniac i stay up all night long wondering if there's a dog she's i think she's making a joke about god but she's an old dyslexic. That's like that's like a joke from the catskills classic of this like six. Is there a dog. it's an old joke but it's still at the works. Eight seven well. It doesn't work actually but eight seven seven three zero one. Eight hundred nine Seventy i just got a text from a friend for people back in brighton saying they just called and they can't get through so we may be having some technical problems. Gentlemen ladies back there if you wanna take a check. Check it or boot. I'm getting some emails from emily. Who says my daughter started kindergarten last week. I haven't slept since school started her. Jonah was the first day because she had congested from allergies and they thought she had covert. We're gonna doctor's note back on friday. Then she was home on tuesday the quarantine because they classmate had cove it. She's out of school for the entire tire week. Emily says she didn't sleep because her daughter hated school. Now she can't because she worried about her having covert not reschedule about her being quarantined instead going to school. So there you go. I know you've said this queue magin living through that kind of circumstance eighteen months or whatever it is into this nightmare yeah well this. This is again. We talked about this before. Where if you have little kids you're up really on the morning and you're staying up late at night. This is alison dorchester. She's getting about five hours of sleep a night for the past eighteen months. She's kept graphic design job through pandemic. but she's a five year old and a two year old. She usually stays up until eleven to or one in the morning and then her youngest wakes up at six o'clock in the morning it's been brutal and she says when the nights when she doesn't know these projects to do she find soups patterns. Have been all Goofed up so she uses melatonin too. You know what. I use espresso right before i go to sleep now for those who are angry. Not angry by the way our phones are screwed up. They're working on them right now. In the interim if you tweeted us at public radio or email is some of your doing marjorie. It'd be pr wgn dot. Org will be happy to read those things. This is not directly related to this but to make people who are having sleep problems feel worse. You always say well. I'm not a scientist. i'm not a lawyer. I'm not a nuclear physicist. Whatever it is how is it that one person may can drink. I literally could drink on fresh espresso of midnight. Nba asleep at twelve one and others. A sip of a diet coke. At six o'clock at night would keep them up all night. What's what's the physiological difference. I don't know if. I know that my own family some of us are really affected by caffeine and some of us are not really affected by going. Get to the jim. But i do know some people actually even start to to shake which no something one of the reasons before we legalize marijuana. In in massachusetts there was a lot of writing about how women over forty or post. Menopause have a lot of trouble sleeping some something like forty percent of the united states and one of the things that people were using edible marijuana. Yla the indika as opposed. That's the down whereas the up marijuana die hard on this is that they would make themselves a little a little cookie Of the of the down marijuana couple of hours before they went to sleep supposedly marijuana at the right kind relaxed marijuana. As opposed to the hype. Yep marijuana is really good for sleeping and doesn't have a lot of side effects this one of these things like when the guys from this house are on you. Say your cousin as a question and it's you. Is this like one of the songs have i said. Well i don't have trouble sleeping. You're going to bed much later than i go to bed. And you don't get up some this firmness. This maosen allowed to say this on the radio but one hit of a joint right before bed. Works wonders for me during the lockdown. So they go. I was talking about the edibles but she was talking about actually smoking well. That's one answer to our pro. I mean for for some people. Obviously that is a You know some pe-. I can't stand milk because you know accepting coffee. It warm milk is that have you heard that as a fix for people who were having insomnia. Yes what does that to you. Don't know that either. Lots of people say that warm milk isn't worth. Maybe it reminds you of your mother or something. I i have no idea stuck with me. We remind you of your mother because she served you milk when you're young when you're breastfeeding is that's not. I'm i'm not joking. More milk and cookies we were. Yes yeah bet. You have those when you're could you from cookies. I had them all. We're waiting for them to fix the phone. I there's a much more important thing if i may just for second. I think 'cause the be instructive to people since we were talking at the beginning of the show and with andrew cabal and with the governor baker about low turnout in boston and other areas. Have you decide. How will you decide between the two. Janet wounds for your vote in analysis through research. Or what are you gonna do. We haven't talked about. There was a line in the paper today that for the first time in decades we didn't have a white man who was irish or italian and i was thinking. Okay i know the italian menino. But they're all irish were. They didn't was ever to giant mayor before need somebody they can let me know. Basically we've had white irish guys forever as mayors of boston and was maybe even before. James michael curley the most famous white irish guy who had a little travails. What was beloved by people as major american city. That will i mean this sincerely. And i'm embarrassed that i don't know i know we're in the at least late in the game. Are we the latest in the game of major american cities to have anyone other than a white man being being mayor of our major states. Major city. I can't think i don't know but we talked about this yesterday. And people were concerned that when we get tagged as one of the most racist cities in america if not the most racist this is going to play into that narrative right that we had an acting mayor who is african american and she got a lot of great press when she started out. I think in fairness she. She did struggle as the acting mayor but a lot of press and no. We couldn't have liked her. Couldn't elect our another year or another african american woman who did really well the campaign andrea campbell and the black guy john barrows who is very impressive guy. He got nowhere. I don't know what that was all about. But well except for the fact that i as i've said when we were discussing to andrew cobra schools of thought and it's interesting to schools of thought representative between andrew korol in the woman. She sported ondre campbell. Andrea campbell's quote on election night was was great night in many ways. If you total up is the point. I was trying to make to enter. Cabral the vote for black candidates which was somewhere in the low forty percents percent and i think michelle woo if i remember correctly got thirty three percent. That's one thing but the flipside is what we discussed. I guess read this morning. Discuss within your cabrera. A little bit White voters in this town. And i think this is the troubling takeaway a much more troubling takeaway. White voters were very hesitant. And that's being kind to vote for a black candidate now. You might say that. They thought that wou and asaba. George were better candidates but the numbers are so lopsided that i think until this further analysis i unfortunately left with the feeling the white people in this city or not crazy about voting for black candidates. Wildly cal qualified. I don't think we know yet where the voice came from. I know that people talked yesterday. About how the voting was very heavy in west roxbury parts of dorchester in south boston. Which vote prenup heavily and May may have voted for a asaba is a lot of public workers that worked there and she was probably the least threatening to public workers. But i don't think we know where we do know that in predominantly white districts the vote totals for black candidates was extremely low that we do know battle. Ready discussion of not being able to sleep went very well jim. Even though we couldn't get phone calls on you'd brilliantly with email is he always really thank god for email. We're gonna for the email okay and thank god for you guys listening to another addition to boston celtics beaming travel without you. No question about that tomorrow. It'll be joined by china's kazaric. Our sports wiz tech writer and not go go business com. Surely the young would a great piece globes. They would talk about tomorrow about where the money came from in this race regarding the business community. Run thank our crew chelsea murs knowing matthews in commie kency farkas and rebecca tauber. Our engineer is john. The club parker off site engineer is dave. Goldstein was on tv jam. Roll a couple of things one more hill. He's going to join me. We're gonna talk almost exclusively in fact exclusively about all the issues that flow from the texas abortion antiabortion law I think you know there's litigation department of justice more healy as co chair of the national attorney general association. They're involved a lot of things. Plug lead spring court to with her. And secondly we're gonna talk about the incredible hearing in front of congress where these courageous women who were abused molested assaulted by larry nassar and completely abused in other ways by the fbi and the olympic committee gave their testimony. I'm gonna be joined by a former olympian olympic rower. And a woman who used to work for the fbi. She's a lot of investigations but again a former prosecutor former fbi person who we'll talk about whether there are other people should be indicted or at least investigates that's all time credible senate seven o'clock. I'm jim geraghty. Thanks again for tuning in today. Hope how can tune in tomorrow afternoon.

boston boston globe andrea campbell marjorie Avi george massachusetts dunkin station somerville nevada tom saba georges dorchester doug Thanks Charlie baker donald trump katina jim braddock united states america suffolk county
BPR Full Show: The Dog Days of Summer

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:41:54 hr | 3 months ago

BPR Full Show: The Dog Days of Summer

"Support for boston. Public radio comes from sun. Bugs solar offering remote or in-person solar system consultation for your home or business to learn how you can build a more resilient future you can visit some bug. Solar dot com had them. Boston public radio. Happy hour has been outlawed massachusetts for roughly four decades. Is it about the comeback. And it will ask us. Then we think about human trafficking ordinarily. Think about girls but some of the victims. Actually you're young boys often connected to their abusers through an app like grinder. Gbh news investigative. Reporter jennifer kimball join us to discuss the latest installment of gbh news investigation into the unseen victims of the sex trade commission tasked with examining structural racism and master. Parole system has a lot of questions in these answered up. Black people represent thirty percent in massachusetts state prisons. They make up just eighteen percent of parole releases andrew control with us to discuss the commission's work what she thinks it will take to dismantle the structures historically placed outside harm on people of color in the penal system. All that more ahead on boston. Radio eighty nine seven. Gp h off. I and you're listening to boss. Radio eighty nine seven. Gp h good morning. Jeff marjorie see person last night. Oh and cnn. I watched the whole eighty minutes. Beat me what did you think. I thought well one thing that troubled me was this Continued reluctance to deal with the filibuster. Bring chaos voting rights reforms. Going to happen without it having said that while he's not gonna win any contests for articulation. Of course neither would his predecessor on me for the the thing that comes across. I hope people don't like him. Who voted for trump or listening. This is a guy who won so clearly cares about real people again you can hate all his policies. That's fine so poorly cares about real people and to when he was answering questions last night almost all of which didn't come from don lemon the moderator but rather real people. It's so clear that he considers himself one of them. And it's not phony. At least in my estimation and i find that so incredibly appealing and And i hope you know people. Even those who didn't vote for him do so unbalance i. That's what that was my primary takeaway. Filibuster thing bothers me. how about you. i think you hit it. He's he's a good man with remarkably low ego knees which is so unusual. I mean kept. Saying i'm right or wrong on almost everything. Trump was is bad man. I don't there's much question about that. Barack obama good ma'am had a pretty big ego. so i s presidents unusual. Can you think of president really. That's i dunno. Maybe h w bush. I i don't know but but certainly he's unusual but these forms are great by the way real people an hour plus watch your president again even if you vote for him. I think there's a lot of positive. Takeaways case on another note illinois has just repealed its ban on happy hour could massachusetts be next the state band. Happy hour in nineteen eighty-four after the drunk driving deaths of twenty year old kathleen barry and before the fatal car accident berry mid friends for happy hour at the ground round in braintree. Actually the state at the time also raised the drinking age to twenty one nearly forty years. Later there's a push on beacon hill to bring happy hour back or at least put some vehicle in place to get their thanks. This state rep mike connolly. He's filed a legislation. That would revisit the state's ban according to paul from massinc seventy percent of base. Sater's want happy hour break broken down. Further thirty eight percent of the people served are strongly in favor of bringing it back thirty two percent somewhat in favorite twenty percent oppose wouldn't just incentivize people to leave work at a reasonable hour. Get remote workers out of the house it would and this is why right. Now i think connolly's doing it would help restaurants and bars that are still recovering and will be for a long time from the pandemics. So we're taking your calls asking you. Are you among the seventy percent who want happy hour back. Are you among the twenty percent who don't and by the way if you work or own a bar restaurant we would love to hear what happy hour would do for you. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eight hundred nine seventy so well. The most important thing about this to me. Is that mothers against drunk driving which has been so effective and changing rules about drunk driving all around. The country is not against thund. Well they make a great point about how things change The senator statement that said mad is not against the consumption of alcohol by those twenty one and over is simply if you drink. Don't drive it's about making the right choice planning ahead if you're planning alcohol and having a rideshare designated driver uber and lift i think has changed things dramatically for especially kids that are out drinking. That are twenty one or twenty two and stuff like that is not a big deal to allow them to say okay. We're going out drinking. Let's let's get new burlesque at eleven and makes a huge difference by the way there are about twelve states colleagues told us this morning among the states is still the bandit still banner remain rhode island and vermont so it was a lot of it in In new england i. It's i think it's time i mean it's just. It's really time to do the same thing that makes me sad. Is that really. You know how. I feel about governor dukakis covering the caucuses one implemented this thirty plus years ago whenever was but with the limit. I mean part of the problem i think. In the case of this Young woman this barry woman who died. I think the person who's driving six or seven be a limit during happy can be limiting happy. And that's one of the things. I think it's important to remember that when they banned Happy hour is back in the eighties. They said you can't buy more than two drinks at a time during happy hour. That's perfectly reasonable to you. Need to buy five drinks at a time during a happy i. I don't think so and they talked about. They've got these free pitchers of beer at this ground round. They were at And they they. I don't pitchers here. Yeah they were drinking game tune game and the the prize winners got got three pitchers of beer as a prize. So this kid supposedly that was drove. This car with this woman fell out of as she died. It was awful in the parking lot. hit a estimate. He drank at least seven beers in a very short hour of time. At least seven nine mugs of beer. Two point five are period. So they don't think that's a great idea. I think that's fine. You don't have to be giving people seventeen drinks. You know half price of happy hour. You can limit and that. And that's fine too. But i think having two drinks at times is probably sufficient for most people seven seven three zero one eight hundred nine seventy the bring happy hour back to a masters in rhode island by the way i don't know if there's a bill pending charlie baker is also not quoted but mentioned in this piece in Channel five which mentions mothers against drunk driving to. They said he would like the band. Stay in place. But what are they note in there. what are they note then. He was drinking a harpoon at the time he was a political happy hour. I mean which is a different kind of apples. You gotta give credit to amass mothers against done so much. Because years ago at the time this is happening in the eighties. It was a big joke. Oh man tie on. I could barely see driving home if you kill someone. Drunk driving accident you. We're not usually going to jail. They deserve praise kneeling for the power. And and how. They've used it through the years the fact that they're not rigid. I was stunned when i read this channel. Tharp thing that they were open to it because ride shares there even those a lot of search rising. I have to say my attitude about. This is the only thing that makes me happier than food. At happy hour is vaccine. Mandates vaccine mandates are number one on my list of most favored status things. But i'll tell you when you can get like an oyster for fifty cents pig a blanket for seventy five cents which has not been outlawed by the way we probably should consider obesity crisis in this country that he could have happy hours. When i was a kid the park plaza park square. They used to have some really great Happy park plaza park growers. Get them mixed up. i think. So anyway Parker houses downtown hiker house by statehouse park closets. Down is in the other place near the legal seafood. In any case these free are herbs. That was the beauty evan. If you were like twenty one you had no money you go in there by two drinks for the price of one or for like two hours might god. They had the big stuff potatoes with all. The bacon on top was absolutely great deals. And if you believe in god when you have those free apps you say lord you can take me now. I mean is that not the attitude. Eight seven seven three zero one eighty nine seventy but this is not about food. Of course everything is about food. It's not about food. This is about drinking whether or not we should bring happy are back. Thirty eight states. Have a lot of people. Are you one of the reasons that drunk driving deaths are down dramatically. I don't know if there's a causal connection is because these happy hour bands are in place and a bunch of states. I'm not. I'm not convinced. I think that people is marjorie. Said take drunk driving much more seriously in twenty twenty one didn't nineteen eighty-four and it's time for a little more freedom in a little more fun rick in cambridge. You'd be first on boston. Public radio welcome to the show. Hi hi thanks so I'm a health education Teacher and i think one of the problems is is that within schools and also within in the home people are not taught the factors that affect The degree to which they will either stay sober or become impaired like how much they they drink the alcohol content of their Of the drinks. How fast they drink Their their weight and our people like understood that on they would be able. I think to drink at a pace that would prevent them from from getting impaired. You teach it rick. I assume you do. If you're criticizing others well i I'm actually retired from public school teaching I did teach it Kids take it seriously. Or they they sort of smirked their way through it no I think they they took it serious. Great i'm with you. Educate them on a whole variety of alcohol is become like the worst sin of of commendable practically in high schools. These days. you know you can be at a party where you're not even drinking but you're at a party where somebody's serving alcohol and you get your off the team for two weeks or suspended for the colors. Brookline high school game right. Yeah yeah and and the kids who came forward who were not suspended. Admitted that they were at the party. They suspended them too. So it's become such total taboo. That what you have now is kids drinking in the closet before they go to the party doing jello shaath vodka or whatever i mean it's like drinking has gone underground because we have this all or nothing kind of attitude toward it which i don't think is healthy for anybody it yes it it's totally unhealthy and i actually was a trade that you know my supervisor would actually walk into the classroom because what was actually doing with teaching research principles a responsible people say well. You shouldn't be teaching that because they're not supposed to be at all that sort of like safe sex versus The denial that there will be rick. Thank you for the call now. I can't get my mind off the apps. that's the problem. That's the kind of only after matters to me. Yeah what was your favorite jim. I have to say. I've thought a lot about sexually. I'm really glad you bring it up if i had to pick one appetizer. You will you know what it is. No little cheese blanket a blanket back with the impostor dip it in even all good ole yellow mustard could be five but by the way now. He's a pink blanket about the best thing that ever happened. When is free or seventy five cents. I mean it's just. It's unbelievable. But i've seen quite a few stockyard across the street. Those little sliders cheeseburgers didn't say didn't love him. I guess who my favorite is in love and didn't say would need them but any case andrew from marblehead. Thank you for carly what's up. Hey are you guys today. Great i so. I wanted to bring up another sound. Big fan of happy hour actually used to new york going back this weekend. I'll probably hit up a happy hour tomorrow. Because i can I also i worked for a brewery tour company so we bring in the house. So i worked for a blue to our company and actually teach people all about beer We take him around a place like airing on night. Shift places that people come on your show. All these great breweries can't actually work with them very well. Because the way that happy hour law's written is that the price of of of any beverage cannot change the course of a week and so you know we usually get a pro rated rate and other states and things like that and you know doing a lot of business and we we have trouble here in massachusetts we all probably this is the hardest or because of the happy hour love laws. We have broader implications lamey on. Yes happy inge's like if you wanted to charge Less on tuesday night to get people in charge a a saturday night. Is that what you're talking about. You can't do that. Wow so even an owner. If an owner wants to have a beer in their own restaurant they actually purchase it from themselves at cost at full price. Excuse me Obviously would be a cost that they'd be taking the profits but they have to actually ring it in and purchase it from their own establishment in some way It's really tricky. You can't change the price for anybody at any time. That's actually how that laws win and so it's complicated for a A lot you know beyond just drink a lot and it's good point afternoon andrew before you go away since you sound like you have some expertise in this area if you had a choice. General slider and a free pigging blanket. Which would you choose in this the type of sophie choice i gotta i bet you know picking a blanket your i kinda guy i love you. Thank you so much for. It is like a sophie's choice kind of thing and it's a tough one said it. Well it's really. It is a tough choice. The beauty is when you don't have to choose when you have a whole panoply of possible appetizers that go with your happy hour. Extravaganza eight seven seven. Three zero one. Eight hundred nine seventy. I wonder it a- did you say off the air. I think he did that. That the mad. I don't know if it's endorsement but failure to stand in the way of this thing probably particularly in this time when restaurants revenue real hard time. Recovery makes this very likely to happen. Would you think they've got great credibility done great work. They've made sure that people that have you can have a dui another dui another dui dui and then you kill somebody and and you slap and the rest is to renew years ago. They're the people that are responsible for for doing all. This great work largely not not totally but largely for doing all this great work and talking about how you can take these things seriously. You gotta get people serious penalties and if you kill somebody vehicular homicide you gotta pay some somebody else. We have to mention. what's the name of. I'm embarrassed that that will. We'll think of it in a second. We met a guy. Granddaughter grandson was melanie powell. Remember like it was yesterday who is a citizen activists. If form you guys controlling could look it up It was a grandfather. Melanie pollen and he became a citizen activists remember. He showed us the binder that he put together that he went to every legislator on and for years and and made dramatic changes. The loss of while med deserves a lot of credit. He was an incredible human being great guy. Oh yes he was gone. We'll find anything. We're both embarrassed by. The way was killed during the day by a woman who had a history of donnie. Thank you just a wonderful wonderful. So we haven't seen him in years. I hope he's well and he did. Great work. I wonder what he thinks about this Good point abby from newton. Thank you for calling the abbey. Hi guys i called you to terrible massachusetts weather and now walkie woman. What's up I was calling. I works in restaurants for many years and including in boston. And i found not being able to do happier. Actually a real detriment We were always trying to kind of like kill that middle late afternoon as we're having people third for dinner and we try you know we did the like lower priced. Appetizers people love free stuff. But they really. It still didn't work you know. And how many of these great ideas about we wanted to do like wine flights and everything and reasonable proportions. It wasn't like you know penny pitchers of beer or anything like that. Just kind of puts some education into it and i i feel like it was a real missed opportunity to just not be able to do that i. I don't think that people were gonna take it to extremes. I mean. I saw well obviously some. We'll take everything new extremes. I mean that that's the you. But i'll be the point you. You were talking about struggling in late afternoon in normal times if there was ever a time when governments state local federal should do everything that makes sense to help industries like the restaurant industry. That are struggling survive still. It's now and so unless there's a really strong argument against that and you make a good argument for it particularly in these times dancers. It's gotta happen right right. yeah. I mean you're building community. That's how i look at it. It's kind of like you. You have like a really nice fuzzy feeling in the restaurant. Not buzzy alcohol. I mean people people want to be there. Maybe buzzy alcohol. I don't know. But i just i don't know i kind of just felt like the the puritanical part of massachusetts was really kinda shooting themselves in this. Let there be good call. Make another one in two more weeks. Abby thank you so much for the call. You a caller. I guess who didn't want to go on the air. Well this is not directly relevant. Something margin. I've talked about only about ten thousand times through. The years is caller wanted to highlight that europe has the lower drinking age and it helps people learn when they're young. What their limits are. Well i get israel. It gets back to that health. Ed teacher and brother. We've talked a lot. I don't even know if it exists anymore. Something called the amethyst initiative started by the president of. What's the bill. Gibbons in middle breakout middlebury in in vermont amherst no amherst was signed on. I think are. i'm not sure voice. Any case it's a group of college presidents and college presidents provos leaders of colleges that signed onto an initiative. Believe it or not to lower the drinking age because it was sort of analogous to what the caller is raising because they believed by having the drinking age for was was the point. You're making before about you know in the closet drinking binge drinking doing all this kind of irresponsible stuff. Let it be out in the open. Educate them etcetera. Why couldn't they not move forward that because they were threatened by the federal government with highway fund. Exactly right well this. The highway fund money to states tied to having the drinking age is a bad idea. The jim from yorktown cambridge. He he says he's a longtime restaurant. Worker thinks this is a bad idea. Because people can't manage their behavior regular drinks. Never mind with happy hour chelsea lou. Burn your next on boston. Public radio thanks so much for calling. Hi chelsea hi I'm a bartender. Then for years and i'm adamantly against doing a happy hour for a couple different reasons So obviously we know that restaurant margins are pretty low as it is And so by cutting the price of those you're obviously cutting the profit that comes from that so i think that's kind of something to think about. And then as someone who works off of tips and works off of a percentage of the bill wells. You know. I think a good amount of people think about. Oh i tip on what the full amount would be. I don't know that that's across the board people do that. Then you have people who are there for two hours drinking a ton there. Tab is thirty dollars by the end of it and you make six bucks and it ends up being a little bit difficult from a bartender perspective. And then the other piece of as jim Mentioned over the the emails personnel. You melt and But people already have a hard time controlling themselves. So i'd be worried about that to your chelsea. i don't have the stats on this. But you probably know better as a bartender. Don't you think that there are people. Though i forget the people you mentioned who would be there anyway who are paying less than tipping less. That's obviously a problem that i'm frankly hadn't thought about but don't you think happy hour draws people in who wouldn't otherwise be going to your place in a fairly slow time from let's say four to six or something in the afternoon so it's almost found money kind of thing So personally i've always worked in the city And we generally been pretty busy during that time anyways because you get the after work crowd. Okay i know that that would be a huge impact. Really glitch gold. It's good point. I hadn't thought of it and we really appreciate your adnan. Thanks chelsea my email at the park plaza. Happy hour she. She said it's a stained her and her husband for years the dark smoke-filled bar with a cigarette machine outside the restroom and unending supply appetizers between the smoke. The cheap drinks and the pigs in blankets. We probably took two years off our lives. Cigarette machine nineteen forty two. When was there a cigarette machine cigarette machines through the eighties release. I used to smoke a cigarette machines. I think so. I think so if not if not If not letting that paul things what we should do is keep allowing takeout alcoholic beverages during happy hour made them two for one. Then you can enjoy the food you want with. The extra drinks safely at home wasn't actually an interesting Thought we're talking about bringing back happy hours. Are you for or again it. Would you raise a glass to its return. We're taking your calls. Eight seven seven three eight nine seven now. You can email us. Apr and w gpa. John take to boston public radio. More dragan jim brown and we're talking about the return of happy are possible. Return news a bill pending on beacon. Hill ask you if it's time for massachusetts lift. The ban is the world rethinks. Its work life balance. it's time and also rethinks some long gone after work. Trae the traditions sis what society needs after year remote working and isolation could restaurants and bars benefit from a happy. Are boosters chelsea just said is gonna mean that the bartenders and other servers and making less money. I really thought about it. Eight seven seven three zero one eight nine seven. I think it was abby that mentioned puritanical massachusetts. Yeah the whole country you think of what. Our war on drugs has caused us. And i wore an alcohol is cost us. It's just it's just crazy. I don't know if i quite through them because i'm not sure drugs. Whereas out of control is the quote war murdered. Alcohol was out of control and drunk. Driving was drunk drivers with was out of control. Right demonized alcohol and the thing with the colleges and providence college did a really great great thing I took one of my kids. Sara to look out a few years ago. They had this bar that you could go to at the school. Where if you were underage. Wear some respond or something like that. But you still to the bar and socialize. If you're nineteen with a twenty one year olds. I mean probably what was happening. Y'all are slipping beer to the younger kids but the point was you didn't have to hide in the closet. You didn't have to Do what what schools make you do. Now there's like no drinking any of these functions at the school which as law and but everybody hides it and everybody gets the road. I'm going down. The end of the year wants to clean out one of my kids rooms and i. It looked like a brewery. There are so many empty bottles of vodka in the hallway that the kids have been stashing their rooms. Can we return to a corollary topic. Which is one of the most important we've discussed in ages. The appetizer issue and as as as it was free and there were. I talked reduced price. Appetizers still wonderful but free is even better. i think most especially when it's a buffet. Did you prefer. Did you prefer during the free appetizers. Do you prefer the aluminum foil in the pocket or the bagging. I'm serious. You never did by the way. I told him some. Raise my right hand that baby you can walk out with a few and by the way i'm gonna be clear. I'm not just lowering myself. Pigs in blankets. Your question was. What's your favorite. I'm not saying it's my only. I love per shudo wrapped around mellon to. I mean who doesn't little. What's that called cute cute. Not actually acute could be better about two for eat the shootout and then right there at the table steve. Waylon thank you for calling steve. Welcome thanks for taking my call. Sure i had talked to jim about five years ago I think the email. And i had this idea called probationary consumption license and This this All happened before somebody came in stole all the air out of the room for five years. But what it What was the idea is to provide high school graduates at the age of eighteen and up a licensed to consume in a bar socially and Learn how to socially drink and they would only lapeer lab a certain amount of alcohol. They could not purchase it in a liquor store. They could only go to To bars that that would agree to serve them with this license and Everybody i've talked to thinks it's a great idea. Why did it. i don't understand. Why did it end having a five year. Hiatus what happened that trump's stall news. I'm sorry okay yeah basically. It's impossible to get any any anything anywhere But you and i talked about a little bit. Jim and i did talk to people at the project. I've talked to other yeah other What did the am this initiative people say to you. You know honestly. I don't recall recall one college professor. Who tried to get this going. And he was he said it. It was just got so heated and so ugly. He just dropped the whole idea. Well steve thanks for a raisin again and good to hear from you and i will add that to the mix. Thanks so much. Eight seven seven three zero one eighty nine. I mean the band is ridiculous. I know that what the name of the guy who keeps a list of all my bands that i wanted to ask jack jack. Okay now i know it want to ban a lot of things. This is banning. Happy hour's time has gone past. I mean it just doesn't i. i really don't think it makes sense anymore. Even though i have to say the chelsea argument a couple of minutes ago was compelling one but hopefully people sensitivity to tips the disconnection of tip from the price of the product particularly. If it's on discount is people have to grow up about maria from west virginia. Thanks for calling high First time long. I wanted to share with you that A few years ago. I went to san diego and the a lot of happy hour and jim. The apps were amazing. Like what steve. And i wasn't really fan of new england oysters but they were amazing but maria go ahead It allowed us to go to restaurants. Were really pricey and obviously you've got a reduced amount of food for richest on cost but the upshot of the thing is that on the street police headlined up tables and so they were encouraging you to come forward and take lots and that way. They wanted to teach you where you stood so they would say. Do you think you've had a lot to drink. And then we try. I said yes. I got i had and the did the blow test and sure enough. I wasn't at the legal limit. But for myself i was done like i had a couple of them. All i could take from but it was fascinating and then obviously weren't gonna kick your name. Then you take them pilot thing or was this something they did. I love that idea. I mean talk gets back to the first caller the health ed teacher who talked about. We don't know enough. We don't know what our limits are. Obviously i'm fairly big person. I'm six five and i cannot. I was gonna say. I can obviously tolerate a lot more than a small person but as marjorie knows it's not true at all. I can't tolerate liquor at all. So did people resist doing this or they were into doing the testing with the cops. I think i you know people like hell no But we were intrigued so we walked up and they said this is just informational. We just want you to get a sense and everybody. Had you know. Feel little blow a straw and it was really fascinating. I think if we tried something like that. I think that could really educate people great. I as you're drinking. Thank you know what they can do when they closed down. Newbury street closed down the street the other day. So it's in one location. You know what a great place for the boston cops to be doing an experiment like the sandiego deal very one of the things. That ramazani said Mrs awhile ago when we last talked talked about the fact that you've probably driving drunk about one hundred times before you get arrested. The first exactly that was like chilling and area. But it doesn't make sense you notice sometimes driving driving. You see someone who seems to be swaying driving course wardiman. Won't i always wondered. Should i be calling nine one one at what should i do. I don't know well. I do actually from tom. I mean every couple of years i encounter or something like that but think about uh oh by the way i think we. We weren't candidate. I mean when i was young i. I don't think i ever drove drunk but surely drove. When i shouldn't have probably never ever ever do now. Do you drive after. I've been drinking if i last wine mean but if i've been drinking like full about the planners punches right no i do not much at all. That's that's right. stay permanently at home. I call uber jim. That's what i do. I forgot about that. You make that planners punch don't you. Yeah i think everybody is afraid now. Rightfully show of of getting pulled over. But i think also unless you've got a drinking problem you know when you've had too much drunk and by the way somebody said about pot-smoking me talk about that with rick. Rick steves the fears of people. Driving under marijuana are not nearly as bad as driving drunk. you make a commitment to ourselves before. Summer's over we do lease the segment or to exclusively focused her chance taking so long. I mean really. Let's do that. We promise you so. Stick around okay. The dating app grinder is a popular way for l. g. q. Daas to connect but what happens when teenager sneak into the adults only mobile app talk about that tough conversation next on eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio. Welcome back to boston public radio. Jim brady and margery eagan. General a journalist. Jennifer mcken philip martin and working on a multi part investigative series cold unseen which looks at the sex trafficking of boys in massachusetts and their latest installment. They've been looking the role that adult dating apps like. Grinder play to perpetuate exploitation and abuse jennifer. Kim joins us to talk about a cheese. An investigator reporter with news center for investigative reporting jen mckim. It's good to see you. And congratulations on a really powerful series. So far thanks so much. Good morning great to be here with you. Yeah congratulations as well jennifer Obviously what we hear most about is sex trafficking of of teenage girls This is jim just said. Focus on boy so give people a sense of the overview w- how many boys what are the percentage. What's going on here with these young men. Yes he's decided phil martyn. I decided to do this story because both of us have written about sex trafficking for for years. And we've always heard about the problem of women and girls and how it's a largely you know unseen problem but the thing is with boys it's even worse because there's more stigma and shame and facts that we don't even see boys at all as victims and so the idea is vastly underreported. But there's some new studies out that show or some studies over the last couple of years showing that boys might be as much as thirty to forty percent of youth who are trafficked. And because it's been more under the radar not only are the numbers of reported numbers of victims survivors. Obviously not what. The reality is I've learned from urine. Philip reporting services available for young boys are nowhere near the service level for a girls. that's right. there's just very little out there to help them. If they come to be found at all. I mean it massachusetts. There's one small organization with very little money. That helps a sexually exploited boys and young men. Well how did they wind up in this situation. These young boys. So when you think about commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking it's a lot about vulnerability so it's a lot about poverty. There's a lot of young people who are. Lgbtq and kicked out of their homes there are studies that show that a third of both boys and girls who ended up homeless end up. Doing what you call survival sex which is exchanging sex for something of value which is often shelter or food and Yeah so that's one of the biggest problems and and you focused in on the app grinder so for people that don't know tell us what grinder is so right so as part of this project. We started looking at how. The internet is such a big problem with sex trafficking altogether. Both for boys and girls. And i was looking at that as a big thing. But it's part of it. We started talking to Some young people who told us really that there. There's a lot of sex being sold by minors on grindr and one of my sources. Chris bates talked about how he now is an advocate and the survivor and he'll go under this dating app and seek people out and try to tell them. Listen you don't have to sell yourself for money. You can find other ways. It's a dating app like tinder Basically it's a location based app where people can put in their name and put in the picture and find people near them advertises itself as the world's largest social networking app for gay bi trans and queer people. You'll one of the things that didn't surprise me at all when you first read the story and you say we'll why these young people able to get on the app at all and then you sort of say to yourself. Well why can young people or anybody go. Look at porn or anything else the answer. Is you check the box saying you're not a minor in your set. Is there any any verification threshold other than self verfification which obviously is meaningless for kid. No there's none absolutely it's just a young person can lie and say they're over eighteen and they can get on the app. Can we talk one of the things by the way. We're gonna play a little sound. A few minutes from chris bates and german chavez who are to your sources who are too widely impressive courageous people who lived through this nightmare all hearing them in just a second or two. Can we talk about who some of the perpetrators are here you talk about. Let's stay in massachusetts for minutes. People don't think this is some faraway problem in california colorado star lawrence cop a newbery. President of former president of the city council felt a little bit about them. Yes so there are. We found over one hundred cases across the country including in massachusetts of people who have of adult men who've been caught seeking sex with minors in massachusetts including a lawrence cop who is now facing charges for actually meeting a thirteen year old several times a couple of years ago. He's facing charges As you said another newbury port councilman who is serving time for meeting a fifteen year old on the app. You know there was also not just meeting. I think having sex with rape raping a slate is just reported to on this. A catholic priest wasn't just nice on believe catholic priest but was the general secretary of the us bishop's conference and as you may know the us bishops conferences after president biden. Criticizing him for going to communion much more important issue for them to pursue than there. I just want to point out that according to the this new catholic news site called pillar this this particular priests that was a big deal in the bishop's conference which sets policy on things like lbj t q acceptance in the church which the church does not. They don't accept lgbtq people. He was visiting grinder in your daily basis. It's to see that story. Come out after our story came out was really surprising. I mean say. Nobody's accusing him of meeting minors. But definitely he resigned. After after this information came out that he was using grinder to meet people so yep we poetry some criticism because people are saying well. We're now we're going to mix up like we did during the catholic sex abuse thing. A gay man and and pedophilia are going after teenagers. Which are two different things totally. And that's why. When i wrote the story i mean i spoke to a lot of people. I was very careful about this like i. Don't you know there are some people who push back. Why are you focusing on grindr. When there's so many apps out there there's hundreds of places that are predators are seeking children of all kinds. But i spoke to several people. Who said listen. This is a. This is a problem because of homophobia. And we shouldn't make homophobia make it worse by not saying that. Yes gay teens are on this app. And they're at risk because there are people who are You know posing dangers to them. One of the things from your reporting not just this first. Install a third insult but throughout the whole thing is. It's so clear to me is a consumer of your stuff that that there's a common thread through this and when you and german chavez and chris bates draw me the other night in greater boston things i asked him about. Was this thing where they at. Least i see themselves as victims which i think is not that unusual sadly in terms of sexual assault. And that sort of thing. Here's what they both had to say. In response to that question i german chavez and then chris bates. What was like y'all trip for me. It was more that. I was one the downloaded the i was one that the profile as i got older i felt like because i the initial arts as a minor. I felt like it was always my fault. I kind of feel the same way. I didn't really know. I'm kind of anything about disposable income. I grow in a single family home where my mom struggled and so really. I really thought that. I was taking advantage of these guys. They were purchasing access to my body. And it's not just chris and german. This is the common thread through a lot of these young people. Right exactly chairman. Chavez was thirteen years old when he. I downloaded the app grinder. And he says the first man he met was sixty years old and sexually assaulted him well at also. I wanna bring up that point that a lot of this is just not sex. It's as you report. Assault locking people in closets keeping them there for sexual servitude. I mean it's rape it's really by definition. It's all assault because there. I know what your point is. their kids. august can't consent exactly but violence. There's a lot of violence going on. Maybe is where. I should have put it actually websites dedicated to bad stuff. That's happened with grinder hookups. You you mentioned about signing up and saying that you're of age you know. I think that's true of of almost every side of on the marijuana sites the if twenty one everybody says yes whether twenty one or eighteen. They're saying twenty one so this is all kind of a joke. This saying i'm twenty one. Isn't it right so there is a lot of reasons. Why tech companies are protected under law for because of what the communications decency act section. Two thirty there's a lot of discussion right now. Been pushed back about. Should we be doing more and there are especially sex trafficking anti sex trafficking groups who are starting to file laws filed legislation. I'm sorry lawsuits and trying to change things. But bitcoin martin and i were talking about this section thirty before and this is the thing we hear a lot about strange bedfellows and a lot of these issues by the way because a lot of people who obviously would find what happens on grindr that you've reported on disgusting in criminal and prosecutable also free speech advocates. And they don't want the platform to be held liable because essentially the facebooks of the world. And the grinders. Were couldn't do anything if they had a essentially that every single entry however and i know i'm a lawyer in the room so theoretically stands no but i don't understand it better as the thing. I was trying to say when i was talking to marjorie about this anticipation you come in general kim earlier this morning is i. Don't think section two thirty in verification have anything to do with each other even if section two thirty unless it's amended by congress And i think this is the texas spring court case to which you reported on which may open this up to but even if even if section two thirty is is allowed to last as it is that's separate from the notion about whether a site has a requirement to make at least a good faith attempt to find out if the verification is. We have andy anoc tech guy later. But we'll ask him about this but it seems to me and i may be incredibly naive if you if there's a verification obviously this will diminish their business because it's an extra hurdle but congress could require this. I think you have typing your license number if you ever license number or some identifier and the technology exists to confirm whether that's true or not. I mean let's underage and you don't have a driver's license. Well then you put in your birth date and your name and if it turns out they then check those and that thing is legit. It seems to me. There's something to do to without violating your privacy and protecting underage people that could do. Is that naive new. I mean that's what a lot of people are arguing especially in the anti-trump traffic and community that there's a lot that tech companies could do right now without changing laws to protect children which is age verification very much one thing another thing with artificial intelligence being able to actually look at faces if they're looking like they're lying or language that there's ways to to find to keep Young people off these apps. We're talking to jennifer mckim. She and philip martin here at gbh of working on a multi part investigative series looking at sex trafficking and boys in massachusetts. We just heard from from Two young men who were sex trafficked and is jim said very courageously survived all this but tell some other stories about people that you talked to how they get into this. what happened. how if they survived. They didn't survive. What happened to them. Well it's hard to find voices of people. Who will tell you these stories so chris bates german chavis. Jose al who's another source of ours. Were really our most detailed sources of people who talked about these cases and all of them Actually most of the people. I've talked to people who find themselves out on the streets and unable to take care of themselves without trying to sell themselves. I've talked to law enforcement. People who say kids don't have any thing else to exchange besides their bodies. Yeah so that's where you get in these terrible situation so far the one by the way when you mentioned in one of your earlier installments. He had somebody. And i don't mean this a pejorative way. Who became essentially of vigilante on. This kind of thing is he. Oh no actually no. That's so that is jay velazquez scoreboard. Velasco's is doing yet. And i wanna tell you. That is another large reason. I decided to focus on grindr because jay bilas gez is massachusetts guy. He was a victim of sexual assault as a young man as a young child and he got involved in this sort of to catch a predator type organization which are now around the country recalled predators poachers massachusetts and basically he goes on pretends. He's a fourteen year old on grindr and and people just start to talk to him and then he sets up meet ups and then he live streams in handed it over to the police and he's had several arrests in cases related. What he's done some prominent people absolutely. Yeah former police chief from stowe is one of the first people who he caught and so for me when i was talking to him i kept saying but we are the really fourteen year old guys on kids on grindr meeting adult because it was so confusing for me to understand and then i found this study that said yes in fact more than half of Sexually active gay and bisexual boys are on grindr other apps like it. We're talking to jen mccann by the way i think. I accused the while. The priest is clearly guilty of horrible hypocrisy. I think i may have accused him of a sex crime. A little bit A few minutes ago. So i think that I apologize for that. The guy from this This national leader in the catholic church. Have you found an part in response to your reporting in part in response. The people like a german and chris Going public that resources are taking up meaning more. I mean one of the horrible things you say to yourself when young boy figures out. What's going on. I'm not the problem. The problem is those guys. And i really need help. Because i don't have support from my family. I don't or maybe worse the only thing i can imagine it's worse. Is you finally say. I do need help. And you can't find a place that can provide for those resources. Being muscle up enhanced their one of the things a lot of confusion about the whole language of sex trafficking in america is that federal law says again that you are considered a sex trafficking victim if you exchange sex as a minor for something of value and basically. That's so much about poverty and racism and homophobia so in a lot of ways like those. Those are sort of the central problems of so many of the issues in our community. The most of these kids of color. Yes so that was our part to series is that the black and brown boys are more likely to be trafficked becau- than others largely because they're more likely to be homeless etc so it it is a very much a concerning issue of powdery poverty and resources with total but more about the about the two young men you did it extensively or jose if you want how how how they got through this so i think what was really amazing with all of them is just realizing you know they were children they were trying to survive and they were selling their bodies and then found ways to to to be able to support themselves in different ways so chris bates he's in his twenties when he finally i mean he started selling sex as a teen and then actively at eighteen and it wasn't until he was in his twenties that he was got some financial assistance from the government was able to live in a safe place and became involved realized that he'd been a victim and then became an advocate and the survivor so it's been really sort of amazing hearing the process of these people and so i think that's why it's really hard to talk to the younger kids because a lot of them might not even know that they are victims as everyone saying over here from people who've lived i mean the value of you reporting on these people in them again having the courage to be reported upon is seems to me to be so huge for that other fourteen year old person who feels that he is alone whose end obviously i just loved it when you have them on greater boston and i was seeing their you know their lives faces talking and i was thinking our story was unseen the boy victims of the second fading in here they are being seen and telling their stories for that's really great genuine philip done great work and if people wanna see this entire series unseen they go to our website. Wbz news dot org and they look for unseen. Yes that's exactly okay. All right jennifer. Thank you very much. Jeff from kim is an investigative reporter with news center for investigative reporting along with philip. Martin martinus jim. Just such has been working on this multi part series called unseen which is looking at sex trafficking invoice in massachusetts one. More time if you wanna learn more about this. The entire series is available on the wgn news dot org website. You look for unseen. Thanks again for coming up. is president. Find making good on his pledge to reduce incarceration rates. Andrew abroad joins us for that conversation and more on this week's edition of law and order and two guerrillas next one eighty nine seven. Gbh possible the radio. Boston public hendrick rawls joins us to discuss a small but growing the escalation police departments across america including boston when dealing with mental health crisis then a federal ban. Fictions vice in crowbars pandemic is about the end next saturday. Landlords can begin addiction policy. Incense who haven't been rent bruce mark. Ceo and founder of the nation's largest nonprofit housing counseling organization will join us to discuss what renters and mortgage holders can do if they find themselves in trouble new documentary about the loved food writer and adventurer. Anthony bourdain aims to breathe life into his story but has gone too far. Some of the footage uses a deep fake of his voice to narrate. Something never said himself tech writer. Andy nocco join us to discuss the artificial intelligence technology that into creating more. Jane's voice and the behind using it on a subject who's no longer around to give consent all that moorhead. Most public radio eighty nine seven. Gp h can. You're listening to our number two of boston. Public radio eighty nine seven. Gp h logan. During the break. I was watching john. King talked to the head of the national anthem health. This whole mass thing is going to be a political nightmare in this country. Because it's coming back or at least it appears is in any case. Join us online. For this week's edition of law and order. Andrew cabral is the former suffolk county sheriff former massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is now the ceo of essential other andrew corral. Hello there jim. Hello there marjorie injury. Great taught you. let's tell it was something which i think is good news. We've talked a lot about police in nine. One one call police when people are having mental health crises and how they can be done better lee. The i graph of the story by tanya allen and the globe about what the boston police are doing if denied entry. Disengage if a person facing involuntary hospitalization becomes combative refuses services. Disengage no more restraints. No more forced entry leave and try again later and this is not in the first paragraph but also trying to bring somebody with you who knows about mental health to answer this call so this does seem like a big move in the right direction to me wrong. No i think it's a great move in the right direction. I think it primarily focuses on the pro when when a person is facing the prospect of involuntary hospitalization so the police get a call And there's an issue of whether or not either they or the family i think is gonna is desiring to commit someone under section twelve with it. They need evaluation for such a commitment But i think it's an excellent step in the right direction. And i think it's a great acknowledgement by the boston. Police that you know you you know you kinda can't have it both ways. You can't respond to situations that turn In ultimately into deadly situations where the person who is really the person in need of help winds up dead or seriously injured and and say well. We're not really equipped to do this kind of work and at the same time be the ones that are always showing up to do this kind of work without any tools on how to deal with it so i think that this is a way both The the group i think Or not the organization. The mental health professionals that they work with they caught. The group is called beth. Yeah working with any outside group. Any group of mental health professionals. Any group of social workers. that either work with the police or partnership with the police to respond to these situations. That is always going to help. But it's also really important. That police have de-escalation tools and alternatives to direct confrontation that is likely to escalate into a deadly force. Situation handrail. i. I'm hoping that there's a movement in this direction. And you know all i know is we. I think we talked to you last week. About lynn appropriating was at five hundred grand or something for similar sort of diversion cambridge city. Councils voting on something like this and boston are these aberration or is there finally some recognition in police departments across the country. That a that. This is the safer and by way. Cheaper according to most experts way to proceed with these these special kinds of situations. I think this could actually be a trend. I think things have reached a critical mass. Where the number of he's where Police are shooting and killing People who are in the throes of a mental health crisis when they respond to that situation. It's not to say that you know. In in some of the situations they respond to the person clearly can be armed can present danger to themself or themselves or others but the problem is that it ends up with that person dead and so there have been such a such an explosion of those reports recently and as i always say i think and i think maybe this is starting to happen when you look at what it costs to put. This kind of preventative stuff in place and you say well. That's really costly. If you're not considering settlements and judgments against police departments municipalities as a result of those deaths in those injuries when they are responding to these calls. You're not really calculating. The true cost so no matter how expensive it is. It's not really that expensive upfront. It is always going to cost you less than having the municipality or the department individual officers be sued And it costs you less in grief and sorrow and pain for the survivors of Of people who were killed. So i think i think it actually is a trend. I'm very hopeful that it's a trend and it's just smart. It's smart policing and it's good public safety. Let me just say one thing. You know a name that almost nobody knows greg long. Who's the acting head of. The boston polices happening on his watch. And he sort of under the radar after this dennis white fiasco of a month or so ago so good for him. Even an interim position implementing something that is so wise and so good. I we all think for the public. So little shoutout to a guy who's most people don't even know the name of so agree. I see holding things together. I think providing some good leadership. Maybe i shouldn't use a such a cavalier phrase but i think he's providing good leadership For the bp so this is not a very sad story. And i'm wondering what you think the lesson or takeaway of this whole thing this story about the retired state trooper and his wife who hosted graduation party in dedham Were young men drowned june six. They've been charged with providing alcohol. Deminers endangering a child's life. The as i just said the young man drowned some question whether he was drinking wasn't drinking but apparently he couldn't swim and he was found to oppose pushed into a pool in the backyard. What's the takeaway here. Just another warning about parents. Should the ideas of the parents knew that kids were drinking in the backyard. Ends of bud light. Leftover the adults were apparently in the house when this was drowning occurred. But what's the lesson here. This story surprised me in the sense that it was. It's a retired state police. Detective captain you know hell the and his wife and it just surprised me that that that they would be the one sort of doing this and essentially As a result of the death but really as a result of the party itself The death having been the thing that brought the party to the attention of authorities He and his wife have been charged with providing alcohol to minors and endangering a child And so apparently as you said there was this graduation party that was apparently clearly alcohol At this party there is a question as to whether or not alonzo poke. Who is the a young men who unfortunately drowned was drunk himself but they but as the story explains they have a backyard pool which has a deep end and there was Inadequate lighting on the deep end of the pool. You couldn't really tell how deep the pool was at that end. The light itself apparently was sitting on the side of the pool. connected to the pool but not let not inside the pool and somehow despite the fact that there were apparently teenagers and adults. They're more adults than just this particular couple from the way the story reads. No one seemed to notice that this young man Who apparently got pushed into the pool was still. There never came up and was drowned. I mean the entire thing is is is unfortunate. I mean the story. You know and so preventable. The story actually also says that. I guess the adults had had gone back into the house at some point. Leaving the teenagers there So at least some of whom were intoxicated they would not chaperoned poolside. And this pool wasn't properly lit And there was no you know ascertainment of who could swim and who couldn't swim keeping people out of the pool or whatever it was so it's sort of they're not charged with Anything directly in connection to the death Of poke and i think you know that's the possibility depending on what evidence Gets developed with further evidence gets developed. They're charged with providing alcohol to minors endangering. The child and i think the lesson is don't do this. I don't i don't care how care if you've got some of your kids friends are are are. Are you know age and others may not be. Don't do this in your home. I mean something terrible like this stance to happen or even a child leaves you leave the party and drive home and gets into an act exactly someone or is killed. You're going to be responsible for that. Yeah that's what surprised me a state trooper you know he. He knows a lot about people having having too much to drink and misbehave but it's surprising but you know we used to hear these stories when we talk about this and some people would call and say well you know my dad's keep the kids in the house and let them drink drink anywhere. I'm going to supervise them. And i always thought you're on your mind to do that but when you used to hear. I told you the story about a friend of mine who used to be an assistant. Da very well known guy in town talking about how he and his wife would be up up in their in their in their bedroom watching a movie and the kids would be down in the finish basement and here. they thought that they were just. You know watching a movie themselves and then come to find out that they're twenty five kids in the finish basement breeze drinking up a storm and they learned that they had to be kind of constant hawks. And what was going on down there. That's what i've heard about people not knowing that the kids were doing this but you think in twenty twenty one. I don't know if i'm buying that. I know it's about as i have to say i find that if you have a you have a big enough house and you know you're on that your three floors above. I could see if they weren't screaming. Yelling you might. You might fall for it you know. I missed a lot in my days. A mother you have a and so we all you know entered before he leaves. Say a minute ago. i'm sorry. i think you did that. Brian kelly who pretty well known former. Us journeys office lawyer. Who's representing the trooper. Wife says that the young man they alleged wasn't drinking at all it was just drinking water. Did you say that. I just gotta get drink. That polk was well known for not drinking. That doesn't necessarily mean that graduation. He wasn't drinking but it's irrelevant. Whether or not polk was Was intoxicated and that may have contributed to. His drowning is completely irrelevant. Yeah he's charges. These charges providing alcohol to people other than poked children other than both and endangering a child by virtue of that and recoup. I'm sorry say this is particularly tragic tale. The kids seventeen years old varsity athlete. Multiple sports had a scholarship to college. I mean it's just a tragedy notice it surely is a andrew several. There's a story in mother. Jones taking joe biden task for committing to cut incarceration obviously in prisons that he can meaning federal ones By half during his term and they say that the fact that the prison population is up a few thousand whatever it is x. number of months in proves that he's not taking it seriously. I think the charges unfair so early. I don't know if you do. We'll find out minute. Thing i do think is unfair which i guess i'd forgotten about. Even i heard the other day is the administration wants. The emergency is over which apparently will not happen until the next year. The intention is to return to prison. The four thousand plus inmates who are low enough risk that they were released because a covert. And when i'm reading the story i'm saying to myself if there were low enough for us to be released because the cobra to begin with number one two. They're out what a year and a half for those of that. Four thousand who did not get in any trouble during that period. Why does the president united states. This not just not grant clemency for. Let's say i'm making up a number. The thirty five hundred of the four thousand and stay out of trouble and let them continue their lives as they apparently have done fairly well. during the pandemic is that not the same solution here. It's a perfectly reasonable question to ask. And for starters The mention that there's been an increase in the federal prison population does not appear to be attributable to anything In the biden administration. But to your point there are a couple of things at play here. You know when you're sentenced and if you are released conditionally and in this case the release pursuant to kovic it was a conditional release it is the judicial branch that sentenced you not the executive branch so you know anything that that commutes that sentence or changes that sentence. Would you point out. Have to come through executive clemency. You can't simply say we're not bringing anybody's back absent in order from the executive branch now we're talking about thousands and thousands of people so in order to do it right versus the way that donald trump used to do it. You have to go through all of those everybody they'd have to petition. This is not you know. I mean you are arguably you could say. I've give blanket clemency to everyone. But i suspect that the biden administration would want people to actually petition. Make their case for clemency and they would decide each one individually. They certainly could do that. I'm always struck by is at the time that people were released because of covet. Everybody was on noticed that there was a possibility that they would have to go back because the sentence itself has not changed. So why not at the time. You're doing it. Put things in place that are sort of conditions that will help grant clemency right so if people released you to cove it. You're you should have stuff in place where people are encouraged to get jobs. Find sustainable Long term housing do other things with their lives while they are out and it is in the context of a pandemic and everybody needs to be careful that would show that as a convicted nonviolent offender that the sentence they originally received was far too excessive to meet the needs of safety in the community in other words. I got a sentence of fifteen years for a relatively small amount of cocaine. I not only can make the argument that that is an excessive sentence in and of itself. But i can show you that. It was an excessive sentence for me. Because this is what. I've been able to do since i've gotten out you've gotta you've gotta create Pathways that make it easier for someone in the executive branch like the president to give a blanket. clemency. It is really politically perilous to just sort of say without really knowing anything about all of these people. I'm just going to say that everybody who's been out in. Who hasn't had a problem. Sense can stay up willie. They're all worried that they're all worried about a willie. Horton moment is that that's true. Yeah that's absolutely true. And so i think if you think about it critically at the time that people are being released and you put some things in place that helps support them that refer them to programs and services where they can come and say it'll sense what i'd done. Yeah it makes it easier and the and that is data. That's good data for future studies. I just don't think they did it in this case and now they're faced with what appear to be on all in in what appears to be all nothing situation a blanket clemency or or sending everybody back you intricate. All the gop in the united states american twenty twenty one as we know is clamping down the pot. Their policies are unpopular. And so they're making it harder for people to vote as we know in states all across the country now apparently at least in the story out of. I hope they're making it harder for people to get ballots. Referendums on the ballot. Dozens of states are filing measures to do the same thing to make it very difficult for citizen activists to get the bell. I mean this is really a little much it seems to me. It's a little much literally. I don't know why people ought grasping this like in a big way in a big picture way. The gop single driver is to eliminate the democratic process as it relates to voting. Because they can't win unless they destroy it. It's really really simple. They don't have the numbers. They cannot win in the marketplace of ideas. The only way to hold onto power is to prevent other people from attaining it. And the only way to do that in a democracy is to make sure that people's ideas don't make it to the ballot box where they don't have the power and the volume of people pushing those ideas and the voting power to make those things happen to keep people from voting all together to make it difficult for them to vote to intimidate them when they're at the at the voting booth to make lies about Voter fraud the basis for making people present identification and do a whole host of things in order to show that they are that they somehow deserve the right to vote which is fundamental intrinsic to everyone's constitutional rights. This is what they're doing and the reason that we keep having these conversations where where we're saying. Oh you know what they're doing now and look at what they're doing now because it is a strategy there just exit executing strategy. It's been in place for a long time and doing every step just the way they plan to do it. And the fact that we have yet to come up with a way to beat this back even though we outnumber them is astonishing to me. Let me say two things. I on the on the ballot question thing. We should consult a ballot expert to explain about extra. That's right. I am the reason this matters for those who don't get it out. There is when you raise the thresholds of the number of signatures or whatever to get a question on the ballot. It is not made more difficult for a business for example a corporate campaign on the ballot. 'cause they can hire people to do whatever meet the threshold citizen activists. Though who don't have those resources just have a good or a bad. I have an idea they want in front of. The ballot are essentially precluded from using the ballot. If these thresholds are inordinately. High having said that before you go here. I want to quote you andrea cabral. They do not grasp it in a big picture way. I would argue. And i mean this respectfully. The joe biden doesn't grasp it in a big picture way his line last night. And the cnn townhall with With don lemon was when he was asked about. The filibuster is getting rid of the filibuster would throw congress into chaos. It is in chaos already. Does it get any more naive. I think the question. And i'm paraphrasing the dom lemon asked. I don't know if he asks that this in your face but it was pretty close. You're either for the filibuster or your for voter voters rights. There's not right now. There's no third option. There's no middle ground and by resisting. The the effort by most democrats in the senate to get rid of the filibuster at least for the the to voting rights the for the people act in the john lewis sack you're essentially saying the states the republicans and all these states can do whatever the hell they want correct. I absolutely agree when i say they. I am talking about biden. Schumer pelosi steny hoyer the leadership in congress and at the executive branch level that this is. This is not rocket science. This is not complicated. It is a genuinely binary. Choice and the wrong is is essentially the end of democracy. I don't even know why this conversation. It's like trying to say there are two sides to apartheid. There are two sides to this. If you're a but the other thing that to your point about the ballot question stuff and trying to eliminate the right of citizen activists versus corporate interest from getting things on the ballot. What that also does particularly in republican. Gop led legislatures in certain states. Is it ensures that the only laws that ever have a have a chance of passing are those that come out of the gop legislature. 'cause they will be no citizen activism to get anything on the ballot. So that's the other way that you hold onto power. You make sure that you there is no other avenue for people's voices to be heard. Well live by the grace of the slaughter in an in a red state by the gop led legislature. Aren't just send us an email saying well they should just do with the massachusetts legislature does about ballot questions. Ignore the results if they don't like the at least one that's pretty good line art but on the other hand a lot of credit me. Mr ballot questioned but a loss of about marijuana was all on on ballots. Three three in massachusetts three were made all acting as if everybody was going to turn into a to. You know a dysfunctional pothead. And we're all going to be stoned on the street corners if we passed any of these laws including okaying medical marijuana so the voters of massachusetts put the put this legislation into law. Somebody who's i dunno in the marijuana business if she agrees with oh you happen to have someone. I wasn't even thinking things because they didn't want also the hollowness of all of that. You know the sky will fall kind of stuff. All of that stuff rings hollow when You know the hand immediately comes out to talk about tax revenue exactly the tax revenues. Not a problem even if you believe that this is this is what's going to happen then you're in the state apparently seeks to gain from that. So it's you know it just it just lays bare the silliness of all of that you know the sky will fall and and it you know captain dogs living together and all that other stuff you know half the house. Gop members in the house don't won't reveal where the accident or not. Nor will ron johnson in the senate or rand paul and the senate of course is tucker carlson. Kabbah andrew talk next week. Okay well thank you very much. Intricate kabbalah joins us every week. For law and order. She's the former suffolk county sheriff and secretary public safety. She's now ceo of a sandwich courses. Marijuana store jim in the store doing other stuff to marijuana business it's amount of business. Thank you very much. Welcome okay coming up with addiction with whoops addiction loops. The eviction moratorium set to expire at the end of the month. We look at the state of affordable housing here across the country that conversations next eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio back to boston. Public radio jim brady and modrica last year. The cdc imposed nationwide fiction. Moratorium barring some last minute change. Because of the recent uptick in the crow virus cases. The moratorium is set to expire next saturday july thirty first. The pandemic is underscored. How susceptible the housing market is too abrupt economic downturns and how easy it is to lose. One's home bruce. Marks pays close attention. All this is the ceo and founder of the neighborhood assistance corporation of america. It's the largest housing and urban development certified nonprofit there is help renner's and mortgage-holders and would be homebuyers alike bruce great to see a human marjorie. It's great to be here great to see you. Every time bruce here to do the same thing. Bruce one shirt i mean we should say he's doing fine in the world but he essentially owns one sure and he's wearing it on the right breast. That says naqa. Obviously that's the acronym and it says financial predators. Beware need means it on the left. It says america's best mortgage and aca dot com. Yeah how many of those have by the way. I have about a dozen of them and jim. I see you only have one because same shirt. You were wearing blue point at some point. I've seen that navy blue shirt black. Whatever as polish your twenty seven thousand so so before we get to some of the amazing stuff that you do to help people get houses. Your perspective please. On what is going to mean if this eviction moratorium does expire on the thirty. and there's no intervention. What's going to happen so so it's very interesting when you look back. We're in a unique time. Be this is the first time since one thousand nine hundred sixties where we don't have a fight to get the government resources and we don't have a fight to get the government to do the right thing so the money is out there first time so issue is really implementation billions and billions and of federal rental assistance. Dollars off thirty. Five billion of the rental systems is tens of billions of the mortgage assistance. So it's really the issue of implementation so if you were to separate the two so let's look at the mortgage i on on that so if you look at the mortgage it's very different now than it was in two thousand eight. 'cause now with the lenders are doing on the mortgage side. Is they're doing for balances. So if you're late on your mortgage payment and you can be up to eighteen months late on your mortgage payment not paying for eighteen months. They'll put on the back end so they'll make a you know three three hundred sixty month mortgage into adding eighteen months on there which is great and if they did that. During the mortgage crisis three million homeowners who lost their homes would not have lost their homes. So it's really positive on that side so even when that period is over i think on the mortgage side where we're really in solid shape. It won't be perfect. 'cause people are gonna have to start paying but they won't have to pay more than what they're paying for. The mortgage is now on the rental side. That's the nami that's where we're really in a lot of trouble because the people not only are gonna have to start paying their rents on the diction but they owe tens of thousands of dollars in back rents and there's one thing you can say who are the most evil people in the world who it is the non occupants landlords. All they wanna do. Is they want to maximize their money and live in their lifestyle that they've been come accustomed to so they. Don't generalize chickpeas a truism right. All they want is their money. Now if you're an owner occupant landlord you have to live with the tennis. That's a different story. But these are all they want to do. So that's where the the soon nami is coming. But you've got to forty five billion dollars but they're so evil in there so greedy they don't really want to take the money a lot of them. They just want to addict people you know. The tenant many who've been there for a long time and then they can get someone compared to pay higher. Maybe you can explain it by the way i'm sure right. In some cases were landlords. Don't want the money to do wanna affect because it's in their economic self interest but in many situations there isn't that problem. The problem is the money is not flowing from the source to the renter and landlord. Who's more benign. Let's say this case who just can't where is it. Where's the disconnect. Why is what's the breakdown in getting the money from the feds two local authorities to the individual renter or right so we have gone to washington. We met with the head of the. Occ the office of the com- control of the currency mike sue and went with cfp the consumer finance protection bureau so we went with them and said you got a problem out here because the implementation is not there and we said you gotta get on this instead. Used a model of what biden did for the pandemic. So you know he came in. You know it was a mess. Two states weren't doing it and then they had czar and they said we're gonna make sure that the assistance you know the vaccinations get the people that need it and they did it but they don't have it now jim. They don't have a czar on implementation so they're setting themselves up for failure. Because the money's there as we talked about the implementation is not there into government impetus to make it get it. Done is just not happy unless we're only what twenty seconds twenty. Whatever we're nine away from the end of the month. The reality is problems not going to be fixed in the intervening nine days. Since we have people listening to us in a number of states it is totally a function of what state legislatures and executive action has been taken about whether or not people are screwed. Come july thirty. i haven't been able to pay the rent. Is that no no. I want to do. Yeah i mean they get screwed but you know but the problem when you when you hear when you talk to the government officials in washington. They'll say it's a state thing and they say you know it's up to the stage. It's really knock true yes. There is the question that they have but the department treasury is not taking the lead but they use that same argument during you know. The lack of the vaccinations and the federal government took the initiative to stay to the states. This is what we're gonna do and where you're gonna have mobile units out. They're going to do all these things. They're not doing that. So they're they're using the excuse of the states the states implemented but i would say to anybody out there in the rental assistance. Yes you need to get to you. Know to look at your with the state's doing or frankly to call knack because we're doing the outreach on death so have three. Million members of which ninety percent are are minority members. We're reaching out to them saying we're going to work with you to get the rental systems not just a mortgage assistance and the utility assistance. And make sure that you get you know the child tax credit all those get through this transitional period once tr- alive thirty first comes until you're able to help them obtain the assistance that that you're talking. Oh absolutely should call you going on. And they see a dot com or call us at four to five six zero two six two two to say that one more time slowly please. Four to five six. Oh two six two two two good because the vast majority of our members while we're homeownership organization are renters and the are envy communities. But the other thing that we're doing jim and marjorie is that we do the recording the knack expos. So you know that we've done these huge advance for homeowners to save the dream to their homes where we helped over two hundred and fifty thousand homeowners. Save their home going to different cities you have like a weekend event and thousands of people we do for four or five days we have twenty thirty forty thousand people come dow in now before depend democ. We're doing achieved that dream of events for people wanting to be home. Now we're we're doing is enacted. Expos were booked helping homeowners renters and other in other services to other organizations can come in to help people with legal services all these things as a one stop shop for people to get it all done. So how are we doing in massachusetts. not very. Well we're not doing good. I mean we're not doing very well on the home-buying buying side on the purchase side. Because just look at it marjorie. The median house price in boston is seven hundred fifty thousand dollars that means condos not much lower by the way it's like a hundred grand lower much and that means that you have to make to get that even at three percent interest rate you have to make over one hundred fifty thousand dollars so we're not doing that and you know the rental systems they're not regret on that they have not Extended the moratorium. So you know we got problems here in massachusetts as well as throughout the. Let's be clear. Because i don't know you're providing assistance if you're saying well wait and expo is not happening in my community in timely fashion. Well then call that phone number. We'll give it again in a minute or go to neka dot com. Bruce you know for those who are unfamiliar with the work you've done. Can you describe the core mortgage program that defies belief in the minds of men. Before you do that before you do that. I just want to. We just got an email from pam. Give you her last name later. Who says not literally saved my life through a series of unfortunate events. I found myself nearly homeless. It was great determination. Help from naga. I was able to buy a beautiful house in rhode island. I am so grateful to for them to help me. Make this dream a reality. Please tell ruth thank you for me. That's great thank you. Marjorie is the best job in this country. You know i mean we we make you know magical. Things happen every day because because think of it. What are the major obstacles for someone to be a homeowner. If you're monitoring come one is tough to save the money. So what is what is the solution. No down payment and no closing costs. Second thing restrictive underwriting based on credit score knacker solution look at people's individual circumstances not based on their credit score. Explain what that hits with. That means. somebody applies. I to repeat what you said because you glossed over the no closing right thousands. No no down payment. No they're so talk about when you sess when you vet someone to see if they qualify for a loan. Explain how you vet them differently. That gets them from here or there. So it's character base lending and it's called and compensating factor lending so someone has low credit score which we don't consider because we don't think it's relevant because they can't make their medical bills that's not a reflection where they're ready for. Homeownership means that we have a dysfunctional unaffordable healthcare system. So you look at the overall circumstances and then you get full documentation verified it so you verify the income you verify the payment history and you say we'll we're going to get you through so you're ready for homeownership and then you determine what they can afford. What's the best way to do that. What are you paying now in rent. And what are you save every month and then you say okay now the terms what is the interest rate so someone comes through neck. Get this for thirty year mortgage. The current rate is one point. Eight seven five one eight seven five thirty year mortgage and for a fifteen year mortgage which is also mortgage is one point two five. And then you say. How do you deal with the racism and biases that are you know endemic in our system. Will you pre-approved people so that they know that this that the sellers the lenders in the real estate agents know that if they have a knack a mortgage they're going to get through the process. What's your default zero point. Zero zero one to one hundred a one percent. Didn't i read where you look at the character and now you get people to talk about the character of the was i mean so that means that you know. Get letters from their schoolteachers. Got delayed because a lot of people the way that you'll get a mortgage and we third grade teacher. But but i have to tell you story on that. I got a call from. I got a call from jeff. Riley traced right now. He's not he's the education commission on them and says you know what i've done but knack so he said in lawrence. He was a superintendent of schools in lawrence. And he said. I need if they were in receivership by the so he said i needed to make sure that my teachers reflect the students so the way that he was able to diversify to teach your core was that he said you can get a knack of mortgage so for years. He was giving people getting people. Didn't aca mortgage so now what he wants to. I wanna make this the standard because the test scores and lawrence have gone up by far more than any other area used to actually diversify the teacher corps. End results speak for themselves. You know bruce. We never rarely say good things about banks here and we should say one of the last times your most recent times. Your loan program was in the news. Was i think it was in. May when you got a mayday struck a deal yet again. With bank of america for an additional how much money five billion and how much money overall has bank of america have you. Collaboratively been lending out so we have. We have a total of twenty billion dollars. We fifteen billion with bank of america and that started with sr with humor call in a meeting in nineteen ninety five. You threaten them to near no yet. No we had a meeting. You're in various ways but but so we had a meeting. We were doing campaign against first union and so he asked to meet and you know the top four north carolina in charlotte in his executive office room and he said and i said all banks are evil and all you want do is maximize your profits. That's a great opening law only charming. Why one at work into it a little bit. And he says that all nonprofits one is a handout. And you don't want to be held accountable. That was beginning of the conversation. The for two minutes of that bruce. I met a vote for those. That don't know many many years ago when we were both working for the hotel workers and our first joint experience was a variation on a theme. Getting proxies going to shareholder meetings. What company do we shut down. The shareholder meeting of was handcuffed and ran the boston. Marathon young irresponsible but not anymore. We're talking any response from you. Know bruce tell something and again. We're going to give you the phone number two minute if you're at risk of addiction and if you're interested in these loan programs you can go to. Ac dot com or call the phone number. You mentioned minute. You also have another program that i hadn't heard about until we knew you're coming in today. Rich could you just i. C h what is the acronym main and described the program to us please so so the focus has to be on revitalizing neighborhoods. So it's the revitalization initiatives for four communities through homeownership revitalization initiative for communities through homeownership rich. What does that mean. That means that we're going into various cities and we're saying to cities you own all these properties either vacant or they're abandoned properties. We want you to sell those properties to homeowners for a dollar and then through the napa program which is not which is wonderful family unit and you can purchase and you can rehab it so you can get like for example in baltimore's or saint louis early places around the country you can get these properties and then you can get one hundred thousand four hundred fifty thousand dollars to renovate those property from the city or from you from all we need is so we've got all the pieces we've got the mortgages. We have the homebuyers. What don't we have. We don't have the properties that need to be renovated or new construction. And so we get those for a dollar go straight to the homebuyers they own it and we provide the money and what that is is that you're really taking a critical mass fifty hundred or two hundred units making them into homeownership in an area that needs to be revitalised. And that's how you do which instead of making homeownership as an individual listrik thing. I'm gonna buy a property here or there. You have a concentration through the rich program that makes it work. The other thing that we're doing record sitting gets the tax revenue. The city gets added the name for win win. But the problem is i mean you can look at. What's going on in boston in your. Who's running for mayor. Well they have all the right rhetoric you know you know. We wanna to do development. We wanna help low and moderate income people but they're still being a lot of women but still being bought and paid for by by the developers so our question to people not just the candidates running for mayor in boston but around the country saying wendy's wendy's developers come in and they say we want an exception to the rules. Bright they you know they go in front of the zoning board of appeals and all that saying to them put make sure that thirty to fifty percent of the units that they develop are made affordable to people making eighty percent of the or less than medium or fifty percent less of the media and then the and then. Would you hear from the developers. They're always crying well. We can't make it affordable okay. We can't make it work. We'll show us your financials and when you show and you look at their financial saying oh. I didn't realize that we're paying for your mercedes. I didn't realize that we're paying for your kid's education or for your mistress out there. We didn't realize that we're paying for all those things. So you know the point. Is you know. Hold them accountable. And we have unaffordable housing here. Because the prices so high forced developers who are making money hand over fist to thirty to fifty percent of the units as affordable units without. They always planned. The building costs here as much to building trades. 'cause marty walsh is such a big good job when he was running. The building trades union. They're so expensive to hire that. That's why they can't make The key they can't make housing affordable. Yo say they said well okay. Well i'm sorry but we gotta verify what you're saying because you as a developer have a pretty good track record of lying so let's see your financials and prove it to us. And if that's the case then we can make exceptions. But let's have a high standard. And then you can. You can build in the exceptions. You know just a quick side in the last few years this neighborhood of brighton which used to be much love students working class. I mean it was not a high end Boss necessarily using this place booming cranes everywhere street alone at work but a lot of the friends of mine have looked at places around here. The rents are absolutely astronomical. Somebody's base like three grand for a one bedroom and stuff like that. So what does he gestion about that. All the expertise that bruce does but if any of your friends are interested in a property and serious. They're having problem. Bruce can just go on threaten the owner. Is that not something you can do and work out no no. It's more than threatening the owner. It's just going to where they live and a few times we did that. We actually did very well as far very high profile executive. I'm still not forgiven. Us easter sunday right the go easter basket hold on but the point. I was trying to make in the same time we've heard about is. The is the desperate need for foldable housing in boston and there has been some some as mayor. But it's mostly been these really high end things absolutely and they're making so much money marjorie on those deals. And so i was on the i was on the neighborhood committee jamaica plain and there's no push to make these developers do affordable units but if we require them to make i would say fifty percent of the unions that they develop affordable but thirty to fifty percent. Then we would be able to deal with that. But plus we're saying yes we we're now getting the data on these evil landlords landlords so emailing protesting that there are people. I their information. Glad to meet the maker home owners to go before. Only a minute left by the way. When bruce says j. p. while neko's headquarters here obviously our national organization but originally started here and you have you has your organisation for example reached out to the five major candidates remaining and ask them if they embrace for example. This rich program. If you haven't are you planning on doing what are you doing. Absolutely we have over twenty six thousand members that live in boston. So we're going to be you know and because now we have pack and we can endorse candidates and as you know we did a lot in georgia where we you know. We have over three hundred thousand members in georgia so we mobilized the pack and we endorse warnock and also goss off and we were instrumental in doing that. So yes we're going to be very much Going to the candidates we gave them the opportunity. Because we have these workshops right so we get an opportunity to speak to a thousand people at one time. Our zoom call just for people that live in in this area. They didn't show so you know so we're going to be you know reaching out to them but the test will be. What are you going to represent renters in this city argument. Are you going to represent homebuyers or you're going to represent the developers who are lining your pockets. Report to us attorney. Just you know if you need any volunteers like attorneys to help you with paperwork. Assume you're accepting absolutely because you're all cents and you know and we need the legal services lawyers 'cause we're going after these landlords you know and we're going to go after these predators out there. So that's what we do. We haven't stopped. We've been doing it for thirty five years. Jim and you know when when you and i started the big issue back then in delayed in the mid one thousand nine hundred eighty s was workers had a hard time how they couldn't live close to where they worked. Will now you just fast forward to now. It's the same mission mission workers. Now you know they can to where they were. I remember doing stories million years ago. Then the yankees about little old ladies have lived in the same apartment in the south end. Boston for fifty years getting dumped out for condo conversion. It happened over and over and over again. Bruce was good to see you as always. Thanks so much for tom. We appreciate the lawyers. Wanna reach you. Anybody else wants to take a great job. You're doing they're gonna knock that or that's an ach dot org does correct. Yes okay actually. Call me again. So so the they go to knack dot com dot com dot com dot com so nace dot com dot com. Call four to five six. Oh two six two two two and if you wanna volunteer. Here's my cell phone number now. You're kidding no. I'm serious all right because what is it. Six one seven eight three five four four seven seven and by the way. Bruce told me before it went on the air since the twenty fifth anniversary. That meeting with banker. He's going to let him out of the closet. Probably sometime which i think is very generous on your part of the nice thing all these years smart. We've been feeding congratulations for all. You've done sir rancher. Smart scraping is the ceo and founder of knock knock dot com not oregon. The nation's largest housing urban certified nonprofit. Thank you so much for being here. Bruce appreciate it. It's marjorie jimmu to see you coming up. Is it time to add mass to your back to school shopping. List paul revelers here for that another education headlines. Keep your don ignited seven. Gbh boston public radio back to boston. Public radio jim brady and marge regan. Journalists salon latest education headlines. His poll revel pulse professor at harvard. University's graduate school of education. Real runs the education redesign led his latest book and its author. Lynne sachs is collaborative action for equity and opportunity of practical guide for school and community leaders. Paul revel good talk. Jeff hello jim and marjorie From sunny province down pr problem. Oh my goodness how us. What's what's going on down there. Visa mass in god we we seem to be the leading edge of the you know the latest development. Here where you know. There's been a significant number of breakthrough cases where people have had. You know been double vaccinated in yet nonetheless. They've tested positive for cova And they you know they have some you know. The good news is for the most part. The symptoms are relatively mild. That people have. But you know it's concerning boston. Health commission is putting regulations about people returning from A province town now and having to quarantine for five days get tested and things of this nature. So it's really you know in. The city is issued a An advisory for everybody to start wearing masks again. You know province sound like most other places within the sort of state of exuberance and people emerging in the summer from the goon you know getting rid of the mass and just going completely to normal and i think it's You know it's kind of an early warning system that we're not really ready to go back to the way things were they're still hazards out. There wonder when let's thing about the province on parkas direction and talk to you about mass for the schools in the second. We were talking about this the other day poll. I think it was two days ago. We had a province town resident. I think she was called. We got a couple of people who were visiting but call and say that the the the mask urging is being ignored for the most part. Is that your observation or no. Well it's hard to know i mean. I think that a few days ago before this. Become a salient as it has in the past several days. You weren't seeing many maths here. You don't see masks. In general on the street in buildings most of the staff or wearing my and A number of the buildings have requirements. I mean galleries and and You know coffeeshops chapter where your mask coming in. But if it's restaurants you know. People are eating indoors and outdoors without masks and You know i. I noticed yesterday on the street. I didn't see any mess. I'm not going anyplace now because we're just trying to avoid it so i don't know what people are doing indoors but you don't see it outdoor so i mean i think people are you know. The momentum is so much in the direction of demasked And then led back to normal. I think part of what happened was on july fourth. A lot of people came down. Here they had record crowds and rained and everybody was indoors and then You know a couple of weeks later and people have gone home and suddenly they've got symptoms. And so i you know i think the biggest message from on the education side is this. This may well be a harbinger of things to come in other words when we come back to fall It may not be smooth sailing and just a steady march back to normalcy There may be some fits and starts here and some situations that are going to require us to take a step backward having taken two steps forward. Well as you know paul the cdc. This is a few days back. Said that When the schools reopened the unvaccinated students only need to wear masks. Now you've got a group of pediatricians Just a couple of days ago. Saying that every kid Should wearing masks in school. And you got the head of the american federation of teachers in massachusetts saying everybody should be wearing masks if she were in charge of everybody. Teachers kids custodians everybody in the schools wearing masks. So what do you think is the right route for the reopening in the fall. We just wait till we get there. Do we start playing now. Or what i think we i mean i think for for the present time. Gotta earn the direction of caution. I mean so i. I'd say for the recommendations made by the the union leaders in the in the physician's groups who were saying you know when in doubt everybody mask up because the thing is You know you can carry it home even if you've been vaccinated and don't get symptoms. You can either be a symptomatic or be you can be carrying You know because you've gotten it from somebody who's unvaccinated and you bring it home to people who are at home when maybe unvaccinated or be vulnerable so i think right now And as we move to the fall when the transmission rates seem to have been higher in the past anyway That we should for awhile in the direction of caution and then watch the numbers and see what's happening and if the numbers merit You know we can begin to relax but right. Now i think with incidents like what's happened in providence that and some other places around the country but notably here. It's going to push people to the direction of masking up not be clarified. I don't want to confuse people. Is beth konta. she's the has the american federation teaches massachusetts. She's the one that thinks everybody should be wearing a mask. The woman that's the head of the massachusetts teachers association It should be a local decision. So they're not at the same the same place. I remember talking to the head of the american federation teachers. Nationally are early this spring. But that's not going to mention that because that was a long ago it doesn't even matter coming back after that confidence and trust me. So paul coming stay on the fourth not from me believe me stay on the on conscious denigrate thing. I think she does no one. I know but the one that said locally. I mean i criticize teachers unions a lot. This is a great thing. I think she's absolutely right. Anyone gardeners iraqi wind like crap and then a case Paul locked in your basement margaret. Could she would trust me. Hey having a feisty discussion all beyond the mass are all the plans. I mean it seems to me. It's a whole new universe. Come to fall within our kids under twelve being vaccinated at least for the foreseeable future. I mean what's the fall. Gonna look like in your estimation across not here only. I'm talking about across the board. But again i think it depends on how numbers run but something else that was in that recommendation that has Less common it on but they equally important in terms of the practical ramifications of mass. Is they three-foot. Distancing require a good point and and you know those requirements will push many schools beyond the capacity of a classroom others twenty five or thirty kids in a classroom and you have to do them at three feet. they're not all going to fit and And that's when you've got some real practical problems that push many school systems You know last semester to have some of their students online and some person and these hybrid models. So i think that's something to watch closely. The degree to which school systems or states are going to require that three-foot distancing because everybody can do the math and you can still all being placed and have the same ratios and things of that nature the three-foot distancing and let alone what might apply in transit. You know in in buses and things of that nature. one one. Last question could be problematic. Because i know you know school leaders from around the country and then we'll move on from this is you keep saying it depends on the circumstances. Well the circumstances. We know in some of the southern states for example Alabama arkansas mississippi vaccination rates in the thirty percents. Some of the governor republican governors. Arkansas have been very responsible others not our school leaders in general. Maybe this is unfair question. More science focused and science following in those mostly republican led low vaccination states then a elected political leaders are. That's definitely my impression. I mean people closer to the families closer to the children You know and and they're connected with educational institutions tend to be science friendly people If we have to distinguish people by those terms which is bizarre no took in in any in any event The the answer. Your question is yes. I think i think they're striving as best. They can to persuade a families and kids to do the necessary precautions to get back. Sonate it you know. of course. it's not universally true. But i think for us aboard generally speaking. That's the case. We're talking to paul rival former secretary of education out harmonies in brooklyn sound. So there's been a lot of Upset about something called critical race. Theory across the country will now. It's happened here to a group of boston based group parents united whose kids are mostly. I guess it to private schools. But they're upset about critical race theory too. So what's going on well. This is a strategy by the republican party and really initiated by donald trump originally to sort of whip people into a frenzy of fear that Schools are both about to be taken over by a racial minority who is going to oppress the white people and It's just really unfortunate. It's it's catering to Catering a whole bunch of kind of elemental fears With no basis evidence or factor the critical race theories at general Analytical proposition that emerged from academia that says you can see traces and elements of racism in the way systems like housing and and And policing and even education have been set up in the country and we should be mindful of those things. well that's turned into a You know a battle cry from fox news and others on the The right wing extreme to think that somehow White people are being oppressed in society. White people are the victims of racism and it's expressing itself in the curriculum through critical race. Theory so yes. There is a group of massachusetts. It's a small group. It's emerged from private schools. Now i have to say on the other side of the equation. We have seen a lot of the most exclusive private schools. I think it's partially a function of white guilt. Isn't there's increasing recognition problems associated with implicit bias and and You know in in systems of oppression and things of this nature that that some of the private schools have bent over backwards And some parents are reacting to to practices and policies that sometimes even in my view border on the extreme and some of the private schools so we have a group of largely private school. Parents it's a small group but it gets a lot of publicity because this issue is so heated up who are coming forward and what they're saying and the rhetoric is not offensive. I mean they're saying they wanna make sure that kids get a balanced Curriculum that there are two sides every story. No child has the feel ashamed of expressing a different viewpoint and so on and so forth so it's hard to argue with that but their origins are in this anti critical race theory environment and and seem to contribute to that. But i i don't look for it to have much of an impact. Your mass one less thing senate race theory. Isn't that much taught. I mean it just It isn't really part of the curriculum now. To begin with so this is this is safe. False fight. That's been set up. And i think a full sir fight if i may create a word that doesn't exist because the globe story on this when the woman who runs the organization was asked to name a school where the offending things were happening. No surprise she couldn't identify chose not to identify. Either in. my sense is sort of election fraud if you can identify. Then in all likelihood it doesn't exist. We're talking to paul revel so let's talk about boston. Latin they had changed the way they accept students. Now at the idea behind it was to let families of kids in a more diverse neighborhoods. Get into boston latin. I'm wondering what you think about this and is this. Does this have any kind of ramifications across the country across the state and other kind of schools like this. Well i noticed it reported on the front page of the new york. Times webpage at one people around the country are are paying attention to it. I i applaud the superintendent and the school committee for taking leadership to address. Tough sorta no-win issue. 'cause no matter where you come down on this issue as with so. Many education in society generally There are people who are sharply critical of what you've done. I i think this represents a significant step in the direction of opening up access to the exam schools There was a lot of flap when the commission that was charged with making a recommendation on this brought in a recommendation at the last minute that was different than the consensus of the group and eventually a superintendent came back with the original recommendation. Commission had mind and they're going to be noth. I'll explain this better than i did. what what what. What are they decide to do at boston. Latin well it's now but you know it's the three schools it's possible at boston. Latin academy And the The third the message or they ryan and so this applies to all of them but basically You know seventy percent of what's going to be considered for admission. We'll be grades. Thirty percent will be a test scores Then the city is going to be divided into sort of eight geographic quadrants. That are Similar in terms of socioeconomic status and They're going to be Some set aside for people who are come from low income backgrounds. Some pointed bandages there and so and they will go. They will fill seats A little bit at a time from going to each of those groups and gradually fill up the seats in boston. Latin and the latin academy. And then the o'brien by the way it's a car. It's a more complicated system than we had before But it's Unquestionably we'll open up access. There's still a court case by the way In the background on this but the judge originally ruled that a system like this would be okay and He let it go. he's now Indicated he might have another opinion based on those texts from that Controversial meeting having some of the texts were withheld from the court. And so that's another matter on the said that fraud may have been perpetrated on the court by the city's council by not releasing those texts. I just want to say one last thing for those. Who are not familiar with this issue. Which i think is playing out in a number of cities around the country. Maybe why pay of the new york times website This is a solution search of really serious problem which had found. The racial imbalance is intense particularly at boston. Latin we just took this from the state's website. The percentage of african americans in the school district roughly thirty percent. The percentage in boston latin of african americans is eight percent hispanics as they call it. Forty two percent in the district only thirteen percent at boston. Latin on the flip side white people make up only fifteen percent of the district but forty five percent of the student body in the final thing. I'll say about this. Because i've read a lot about it even though i don't understand at one tenth as well as you do obviously ball. This is not about letting kids who are not qualified in which is what a lot of criticism is. it's just a different more equitable way to determine who the qualified kids are. Who will get to go to. These exempts school. So this notion that it's letting you know creating an inferior student body. I think is belied by the research that went into into This proposal is that a fair. no i think. That's a fair statement. And i would i would. I would say about this thing. Overall is i think it's It's a big step forward. It's not perfect it will. It could never be under these circumstances but it's a step forward in the name of equity and at the same time i'm relieved that to some degree. We have this behind us because the equity work in terms of making Equal opportunity available to all students when boston schools extends far beyond these three schools. I mean there's a great deal of work that needs to be done for example at our schools the other high schools in the city Which don't pass in many instances the tests that quality that we apply to To places like these three school so we got a lot of work to do in terms of improving quality overall boston public schools and increasing equity in the boston public schools. And so this is sucked up all the oxygen for many many months. Now i hope we can move forward on the other agenda Going forward here. Well we'll talk to you about that other agenda pau coming up. I hope. I hope you have a nice vacation and promised not to nerve wracked narendra. Stay like on your on your front desk for the entire time. My wife out getting a chest now so she is over because because of being in contact with people that you fear are are they saying you're supposed to her anyway or why we're gonna have to. We're going to have to anyway. But she's just doing one in the interim and so we're it's yeah it's let's hope This is not a harbinger of things to come. But i think we all need the education sector to have interesting plants going forward to speak to you. Personally you could talk. Thanks a lot pub. Rebel joins us regularly. He's the former state secretary of education professor at harvard. University's graduate school of education where he also runs the education redesign laugh. This latest book author. Linda sachs is collaborative action for equity and opportunity practical guide for school and communicators. Coming up a new documentary deep fakes. The voice of the late anthony dane is a creative or unethical use of artificial intelligence or is it. Okay check writer andy. Nocco join for that more than eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio back to boston. Public radio jim. Audi and martin regan join us the latest headlines at the intersection of tech policy and commerce zandi nocco and he's a tech writer and blogger. You can find his work at a not go. Dot com and you can follow him at h. Nato low end do nocco. Hey folks before we to your top say we were talking earlier today. whichever mckim. She's one of the reporters here at. Gpa sh she and our colleague. Philip martin today series called unseen about grinder the app and they were focusing in on teenage boys being exploited On grindr. And the reason i'm asking you about this because this applic- alava upset you're gonna to be twenty one to go onto it but of course they just say you twenty one you say yes and then you can onto it. Is there any verification of this or any other apps orders people. Just go down there. Who are seventeen lying. Get away with it. I mean what is the deal about verification. Most dating apps just don't Japan for instance has an actual law in place. And that's the place. Where if you're for instance trying to create a tinder account it will ask you to. Please take a picture of a photo. Id and kind of photo id. But in the united states you all it needs is is really a phone number How he can also sign up with With google counter or facebook account. And one would think that it because those two accounts no your age would verify that way but you can also just a phone number and those are easy as pie to to get a hold of so. Yeah there's really no verification whatsoever all the systems that i know of on tinder and bumble and And then the rest. They're all voluntary. You can you can get like they like twitter blue checkmark if you go through the process of providing them with your photo id. Their tender has has an interesting other angle to it but these are all voluntary options this. There's no verification that i know of so i assume the sites that have this non verve occasion verification argue against requiring something like what japan does they would argue that it's too burdensome would and that translates in english many won't make as much money because we won't have as many people using the app but e- eat would be moving up to the japan standard. Be a done some burdensome to me at all but totally doable is it as nobles that sounds yeah absolutely you think when you get down to it. All internet businesses that are required to verify. Age have found a way to do that. If you want to buy alcohol you wanna buy tobacco pointing products online. They will figure out a way to get your id to comply with that law And it's they don't even necessarily need to get a photo. Id in order to make that happen. There are outside services that can get that have access to databases that can simply take a phone number and a name and connected to state databases public databases all kinds of stuff and do a very good job of verification. What are these services Costs like two cents for verification Now and that might. That might be a problem when it comes to free accounts but for paid accounts. There's no reason why any of these services should not be verifying every every age of every user tries to sign in very helpful information. Thank you india. Nocco so tell us what the ftc is done about. The executive order from president biden. Coming down the side biden on the right repair stuff with worship. they got right on it. just a week after the july ninth executive order. That did a lot had a lot of content about promoting right to repair The ftc commissioners voted five zero. That's two republicans. Three democrats all voted five to nothing on a policy statement that they released on wednesday And so essentially they they're Underscoring something that they said sort of casually a few months ago saying that they already have the authority to investigate Right to repair re- restrictions on existing laws That they don't necessarily need the help of congress That this policy safe has five points to it among them. They're saying that well. Now we're going to start to look at right to repair as a possible. Violations of the sherman antitrust act. So that if you're if apple or may factor. John deere car company is Preparing a preventing user repairs third party repairs to make sure that they make more money on their own repair services. For instance. that's violation. There also have the umbrella. mandate to Protect consumers against a quote unfair acts or practices or deceptive acts and practices and that's a violation of section five of the trade commissioner act which they have the authority to prosecute for They're also going to be monitoring right to repair consumer complaints That if you have a if if consumers have a problem with writer right to repair stop like you're trying to get something fixed but you couldn't Or your company decided to like not. Support a certain Harder you had because you had it fixed by an outside party. They're hoping they're they're asking these people to have had these problems to please. Make your complaints to the ftc. Because they're going to start to use that data to see if they can File suits against companies based on the nineteen seventy five magnuson moss warranty act which can cover this. And they're also saying they're going to be taking a more interdisciplinary approach to this problem so instead of trying to do all within the umbrella the ftc. They're gonna be working with state and other local Local officials also working with other departments to be more comprehensive in these sort of data. They're getting in and the actions they can get out. This is a very very emphatic statement that this is not something that companies are going to be weasling out of and if a couple if companies are fighting this this out in congress they might win. They might win concessions from congress from state legislators. But they're not gonna. They're still going to have to fight the ftc on all of these points so definitely a win for consumers and for the right to repair so the controversy about the late anthony boarding where the great show and seeing them on. Jim's favorite not everybody's favorite a new documentary about his life faked his voice using artificial intelligence. what's your take on this boy. It really depends i is. It's a sort of topic that you can spend an hour or two or three on a friday night. Get with three or four people. You respect getting into every detail of this. The basic idea is that The the director of roadrunner that he had an emailed that dane had sent to a friend and rather than having the friend like read it aloud. Dramatically he wanted it to be read in danes. Own voice so he hired a company. That is an expert in. Ai voice provided them with ten hours of audio of anthony bourdain speaking and they created a synthetic voice. That could speak those three lines that dialogue. And so this didn't come out until not just in an interview with the director. But i follow up question when the interviewer later on realize. Hey how did they get a. I find it very weird. Anthony bourdain read an email to a friend and they got a recording of that. And the record. Oh yeah well we did this. And that's the way we're not going to think about the of until maybe later on. We got what we needed to get. And so it's it seems like a really bad mistake on the part of documentarian because if the if they've if you know that even just a simple three lines of dialogue in his voice were fake. It starts to get you thinking about. Well gee what else about this. It's something with the documentary. That's very very fragile. Thing and there are so many other ways to do this famously roger ebert and Val kilmer were both same situation. Where bio-pics biography documentaries are made about them while they were alive and after they had had surgeries that left him unable to speak but of course they were alive to choose a voice actor who could read a text for them that the that they had presented It gets more difficult. We get to people who have already passed on And so this is where the really interesting questions kind of kind of go on. Like for instance We might think that this is creepy for ordain. But what if the given the software is out there and it's very very easy to use I for instance you. You're not gonna believe this. But i have a a an editor a a Audio editor that. I sometimes use for podcasts. it's called descript. And all you feed the recording of the audio of what. I recorded for an hour. Or so. It gives me like tech all of this text. And so for short passages after i've after i've trained the the i if i simply select a half a sentence that says oh i'm an idiot. Don't listen to me. And i just type in. I'm an expert. Trust what i say. That's such a short thing that can actually synthesize my voice and recreate that audio. So i don't even have to record it myself. That's how that's how good and available. The software is so but imagine that how this would affect like the example. I was come up with a the bereavement process that Let's say that again. You lost a spouse. You lost a parent a friend unexpectedly and you decide the gee. I have all these personal emails from them. I'd love to hear those e mails read to me in this. My loved ones voice and software could help you to do that. Kills software could even This this is a big leap but imagine having your smart assistant voice being something that's similar to a loved one that you've lost. Yes that's is very very creepy. But i also ask you and everybody thinking the abstract about our tradition of our loved one has died. We're going to have the corpse on display for two days. That's creepy too but it's accepted because it has become part of our tradition and part of how grieve so these are questions that we're going to have to ask ourselves that what happens to our being after we die and will future technologies be allowed to recreate something of that essence and its synthetic way for unknown purposes. I want to stay on this just for a second. We have some sound from the film This is just five seconds of ai. Produced sound of the fake anthony. Bourdain again he wrote the email he didn't voice the email this from road runner. And the that here it is you were successful and i'm successful and i'm wondering are you happy and by the way it sounds exactly like those who were a couple of things just in the facts of this then i want to step back like you did andy by the way this is not some schlock documentarian the guy who made this nevermore morgan nipple. I think may twenty feet from stardom. Which i would argue is one of the greatest in the history about backup singers. And it's just brilliant. A should say the problem here which is not a technical issue but an ethical issue is he didn't disclose it. I mean you can have a debate on that friday night like you describe. I couldn't be part of it. Because i go to bed early on friday night but regardless you can have that debate about whether or not you should ever do it anyway. And there's a discussion about whether the state approved it or not. You can't have a debate about in my opinion about whether or not you have an obligation to be transparent documentary and say at the bottom of the screen or later on that. Those three portions were produced rather than the actual voice of anthony bourdain but stepping. I don't think that's even debatable. But stepping back for a second. I was totally convinced that i was wrong. But i don't know if i'm going to be wrong in the future when i first saw i think the first deep fake video ever saw was the one of nancy pelosi. Were they looking like she was drunk when she was speaking when she was actually speaking slowly etc i convinced myself that a deep fake release right. Before the i think it was november third. Whenever the election was was gonna decide to close election it turns out what almost the side of the election was other fraud. Not just this. Luckily it didn't putting aside the issue that you raised. Which i think is a good one andy about loved ones that die and want. Keep as much of them with you as you possibly can. What protections are there that exists are being contemplated to ensure that the day before the midterms for example in twenty twenty two that there's not a deep fake of one of the two candidates that's released with not enough time to respond to it That is is nali deep fake but totally fake. There's no protection is their wealth. The good news is the technology is definitely there to detect the that something has been depict. There are there are clues. Get leave behind left behind. An even the most most most convincing deep fake how and and most of the video sites have some sort of that technology in place there certainly investing more strongly and that kind of scanning however the bad news is that it doesn't matter because the people that you're trying to reach that kind of propaganda all they want to see is verification that that Pelosi is drunk. I mean they don't they will never hear the follow up ten seconds later that oh actually that was absolutely deep fake it was proven even if they hear it was a deep fake. They will say. Oh yes well you know. She's powerful enough to get that press. Release if i may interrupt. That's a different issue. That's the issue of somebody who is so deep into a big lie that as we discussed yesterday with juliette they don't wanna hear the truth and if you give them the truth then uric conspirator to. I'm talking about the situation with his no opportunity even for that ten second rebuttal saying it isn't the fake but it's just out there it's it's email to ten thousand voters you know. Twelve hours before the the experts the macos the world will know in a second. It's deep fake. The voter has no vehicle to do that right. I agree with that assessment. I would also agree with the assessment that any lie in any form. Even if it's just simply tax can be distributed that way the the nice thing the good thing about video is a no one's going to have enough money to host the video themselves they're gonna have to put it on youtube or facebook and as soon as facebook realizes either directly through growing technology or through outside party reporting this They're gonna pull that video down not only in the original form but whatever other form that so if that helps. That helps outs drop. We're talking to india. Nocco andy before you go. I was talking to a friend a couple of weeks ago. I didn't realize how autonomous a tesla already was. And then i read from you that. There's this new beta of a quote fully autonomous driving. Sulfur could you say what how autonomous at tesla currently is and how this software will change it and thirdly while every time. There's an accident with an autonomous vehicle. Everything is shut down. Almost everything i read suggests that autonomous vehicles are safer than human driven vehicles. If you could quickly speak dole three okay last one. I guess of autonomous vehicles are are safer and traffic than than human driver's chiefly because most them when the breen driven on real streets they're being driven very controlled conditions. So that would be. That would be true on that. One secondly The problem with what tesla has done is they've just their latest beta of their full. Self-driving package Is is the first one to add. I think but. I think what they're calling A street level ones. I'm sorry. I'll i don't have on my tongue but i'm sorry the city streets feature so then right now. If you buy tesla you can only use it on how you can only use this autopilot type of feature meeting you know. Keep keep your hands on the wheel but it will automatically change lanes for you and take the right exit that only works on highways. It does not work on city streets of the city streets feature which is in beta right now does work in for local traffic. Stop lights stop signs traffic all that kind of stuff. And it's being tested by a few people on public streets without the permission of individual municipalities And because and that's because tesla they re especially elon. Musk he's taking a real cowboy. Approach the cavalier approach to this where The society of automatic automotive engineers has created a five step left str- survival table for defining house. How self driving car is number five. Means that this car can drive anywhere on any streets. Under any circumstances any road condition anywhere that conditions without any interference or maybe relation or oversight from human being Number three were the good start. Has good stuff happens where it's actually making decisions on its own. But there's there's a lot of steps between three four and five officially tesla's features are level two meaning they're right up there with like maintaining maintaining your lane Maintain a like an extended cruise control That sort of thing and so so when when eland must talk to the public and talk to people that trying to sell tesla's to they say oh well we call it autopilot. We call it full self driving and oh we think that by the end of the year. We'll have all this working. But when they talk to regulators and this is a proven thing you demonstrated by freedom information ask requests but they're talking to regulators like the california dmv. They stress that no. This is the level to this is absolutely level too. We will not be higher than level to by the end of this year and again that's actual statements made a made by tesla to these regulators in california they would not be legal for them to operate a three four five car without the permission palley. That's in there. It's what's that again no. No i'm just saying. I didn't get into a lot of details but you always have to be a little bit. Have a little bit of a cynical. I when you talk when you think about what elon. Musk is saying about tesla. Self driving cars and it's something that Tests will have to communicate really really clearly to everyone who buys one of these. That's why most of the deaths they weren't really the they weren't so much mistakes. The tesla's software made their mistakes. The driver made by saying. Hey i'm gonna play video game on my phone instead of keeping my you're supposed to keep your hands on the wheel and full attention level to hands on the wheel full attention to the road even when you're on the highway like that and the debt fatalities kind happen when people ignore that great explanation is always ending. Thanks so much your time andy. Thank you very weekend and did not go joins us regularly. He's a tech writer and blogger. You can find his work at not. Go dot com and follow him out nocco. That's i h a tko. Coming up the bummer. Summer meeting your calls asking. Are you giving in accepting the fact that this is distort pick summer. Keep your dial eighty nine seven. Gbh boston public radio. Welcome back to boston. Public radio jim brady and if you were anticipating a summer of fun are you finally conceding. This is a summer of discontent. We just talked. Paul rebel from province. Down i guess. He's making the best of it. But any case it started with weather extremes of alternating heatwaves and unrelenting rain then came the covert outbreaks hitting summer vacation destinations like province sound mask mandates in some settings returning parents already having to think about the return to school. And what. The resurgence of cova cases could bring to the classroom and a good chunk of the workforce is wrestling with what to do next. Go back to work. Stay remote or become part of the great resignation. Are we living in climate. Essentially that is making the notion of a carefree summer. We are so negative. You and i something that is impossible to conceive can had one thing to this list by the way the numbers eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy while you're dialing in. There is one hell of a story in the boston globe by zoe. Greenberg the fry fest of overnight camps closed after six days this is on top of all the the travails that i mentioned a minute ago. The campus saying they had closed for six days. You gotta come get your kid. I know you spent thirty four hundred dollars for two weeks but you have to come. Because we're the food supplier broke down. Well here let me read you from zo. Greenberg's piece the decision to close the eighty-five year old hampshire camp in the middle of the summer. Left campers bereft counselors and. Some parents furious soon. Stories began to circulate a problems. That went much deeper than late. Deliveries marjorie counselors hired just days before camp lacking basic training a counselor punched in the face by a child and a camper later hit in the head by the same child. Dirty dishes. so-and-so campers vomiting getting quarantine etc and then it's followed with a letter from a camper to her parents in the first week saying we have been in tears board and devastated the whole day. The camp director is lying to us. All you have to trust this. So all the dreams of this breakout summer were easing our way. Out of the pandemic. They are serious when rebel called a little while ago. And he's in providence on. I mean i'm going to the cape later this summer. I you know. I used to live in province and i love. I don't know if i'd go to quarantine self quarantine for five days when you leave town. I mean this is. The whole thing is a nightmare but you like to think that one of the problems in in promised how is kind of this attitude that party hardy people stuffed into overcrowded club. Dancing and drinks angeles has los angeles to. I like to think that that was part of the problem in promise town summers here. Let's go crazy but you know what you're talking about token summer. I mean you opened up the paper and you hear about the wildfire out in oregon. That's raging across the country. Seattle with their with their horrible temperatures. They can't get things about are there now but you can't get wineries can't get insurance out in california because the drought is so bad that the little all the grapes are drying up in the vine story of the day about the guy running around trying to find water. Some special machine in the winery. And then you know the the the red tide thing. The gulf coast and florida were just all this dead fish because they're not doing anything about fertilizer pouring into too much kind. Break it up okay. There's something about just hope. There's a good news after the customers at a place like apt cape cod scream at the young employees. They closed down for dave kindness. So there is a silver. I mean this is like everywhere you turn. There is like a pain and the question is are you the kind of person obviously margin. I appear not to be the kind of person to carve your way through this and find the best you know when we were having a negative convert a dystopia and kind of conversation. Jared nine when you were off a couple of weeks ago. I told you this lee pelton. The new head of the boston foundation called in and politely trashed us for our negatively. So if there are others out he did it in a very lovely way. I should say he was probably right. If people think that marjorie in particular is being far too negative eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy th. We could list for the whole remaining fifteen minutes of the show nightmares in every damn direction. You turn and it's it's makes it hard eight seven seven. Three zero one eighty nine seventy. Let's start with seth in salem. You're in boston public radio. How you doing seth. I'm doing very well. Jim marjorie want to say that that that that letter from the a little girl at camp. I'm surprised i'm surprised. Did not begin by saying hello. Hello here and it's an old one for People listening out there. Google figure out so what's upset way. Wait i wanna say is is that for me. The summer has been really good because the Community band that i play in here in salem. We're having our concert in august and able to do rehearsals and person without masks and i Weeks ago they visit my ninety three year old grandmother in new jersey. So for me. It's been going well. I i'd love that and i'm glad to carve through marge negativities seth thank you much for the Call you make the best of what. Which i'm gonna to try to do by the way despite all this negative stuff i'm gonna. John mean we've waited a long time for a little bit of freedom and even if it's inhibited in some fashion you try to find the best. You can what we're talking about. This is often said summer's over after fourth of july. That was two weeks ago. Time to get in line with the al being order your close but some great discounts on summer stuff. You're into discount. That's i lead. You're in july. If you wanna buy summer stuff you are really doing it sarafanov. Thank you for calling sarah. Hi how are you guys are great So i work over at hundred farms which is in norwalk. Dairy is a dairy farm there but we also have a garden that i started there this year. And actually all. The rain has been super helpful and we have so many fresh veggies Kini and summer squash and everything and the ice cream is fantastic so anyone is looking to be an farm. There's so much to do there. Since you're such a positive force. Tell us the name of the farm one. More time so h. r. n. s. kiara fabulous did job white in the mood to thanks call. You make a great point. I was on vacation effort two weeks for week. Get where wherever. It was very worried but the plants plants. And i'm gone about. Were gonna the plastic enough to worry about this vacation because came over there was so much rain. It's like a jungle out there with everything. Overflowing from although the gala droopy because there wasn't much sun but except for that you know how would you feel if you're spending thirty four hundred dollars which is serious money to send your kids away for two weeks. It's not just the money. Let's face it marty's let one of the few parents that admits freedom is like an attractive thing. You love your kids around when they leave. There's a little bit of joy a little bit of like a little in your step kind of thing you finally say. I'm about to have two weeks of freedom from these damn own up from these children. That i love you. Pay thirty four hundred dollars and six days in they say back. Come get your little monster in the car. Thanks for calling. Thanks gone l. family. I think i'm so sorry. Hi no worries whatsoever. The glass is way more than half full guys. Okay brumfield happened but to go broomfield really thrilled about that. Speech sun is shining. And it's not snowing. I was super thrilled about that. First time calling you guys because you can actually be a little happy. Emily does see. The broomfield is the is the antique show. That's what that is. Yeah three times. A year may wasn't so great July was hopping a ton of people out. There fatty donuts wasn't there which was a bummer. But there was still francesco. Was awesome the restaurants. The all the stuff that was there was amazing. Came away with a lotta dutta marble rolling pin which was fantastic. Very nice but emily. Ignoring i read in the paper. Is that unfortunately. Most of the antiques were washed until hieaux is that not true kind of insanity salary three thirty. We did get okay. We had it express show walking back to our car but it was still fabulous woman. Emily thank you. i'm emily thank you for the call. I'm totally serious. Why she's chosen as the prior caller to pick the best things in focus on that right rather than the worst thing right and incessantly focus on them like you. And i think we need to choose happiness. Jin choose looking on the bright side. Choose glass half full not glass. There is one of those things where you're supposed to choose something we've an excuse. What is if you had to read as much news as we do every day fair for the radio you might get depressed too. Well the thing that of all the things depressing from the days when you were reading from cnn chart about fifty percent of the republicans in the house won't say whether they're vaccinated four very high profile senators really really leaf and marblehead high. How are you. We're well Better than mardi but neither of us. Great so gladly. Welcome i mean honestly you guys need to put a smile on your face okay. Pitiful day today like beautiful. It is gorgeous. That's a. it's a gorgeous day. That's a very good point godly. It really is i. I hate three four thousand foot mountains of new hampshire in the pouring rain last weekend but it was so great to see so many people on the trail like young all then. You know suited up smiles on their faces. People are just like so over this pandemic and just want to get back to living. Well another very healthy attitude leave. Thank you you express that beautifully and thank you so much for sharing that perspective we are clearly. The outliers appears here. Margaret beautiful day is beautiful deck. Say could be nice tomorrow. I think it'd be nice size. Get three nice days in a row. That's really. I guess it's not gonna be so great on sunday. British three days neurotic which is really kind of it doesn't make you appreciate the sun. You know what i mean. We weren't you're on your vacation. It's been pouring rain for three days. So as the orange thing i was traumatized orange traumatize going out for lunch. It was cloudy when i left him. I got there. It was like massive thunderstorms sitting under one of those. Like canvas type bruce. You don't love that one's pouring rain not when you think that the water is so heavy on the roof collapsed on top of you. And you're trying to eat your dinner. You're of you're soaking wet. That's a that's an inhibiting thing that's true but it just make you appreciate this like i said marina from ashland. Thank you for calling marina. Hi hi. I totally understand where you guys are coming from. You know needing to focus on the things that need to be better. But i just want to throw out there. I'm on faculty at the dow shore conservatory summer music festival and we are finally able to have our first in person music making all the doors and safely distance rate It is incredible. These young people found amazing You know from all over greater boston and it is just a privilege and an honor to be with them. You know he'd come out in. The contracts are again outdoors and open to the public. We would love to win win. are they. tell us a little bit more. Give us a website or the first date or tell us something marina sure so there is a concert this evening chamber music and the jazz festival and then At one o'clock tomorrow there's a middle school ensemble and the upper level of the high school ensemble is at seven o'clock tomorrow night called. He needs to get that. This is the south shore conservatory. Summer music thank you. Where where marina where it's the episode chore conservatory which is the hang on campus. Like one conservatory drive. I believe rhea thank you. Don't call tomorrow gonna be. Nelson is gonna join us director of the boston back in tanglewood. That's absolutely wonderful. Tell us all about it. I mean if you've never been adjoining wins is gonna be on the stage with him. And then i think keith lockhart. I think i don't know what the days are. We'll find out tomorrow morning and you know how exciting if it's if it's not raining you can sit out there on the long with your blanket. Your shed nick. If you're if it's raining your shed that's right where we i think i know is there wasn't with you a year ago raining and the sound of rain on the roof of the shed with the phnom serious with with. Yeah but. I don't think they're playing that is with with. What do you call it with live. Music is just so incredible. So that's really upbeat. Music number. One time walking around jamaica upon this winter with this spring and you know how everybody had to be segregated separated rather by six feet. There was this band playing up on the side of the jamaica pond. They were all rehearsing and they were all standing far apart. It was one of the neatest things i've seen. It was kind of a magical moment. We have time for one more quick one colleagues from problems sound. So what's the deal. Frank minute take it away. Hey quickly first time. Caller longtime listener. I love you guys. Thanks I just wanna know jamie. Why are you trying to ruin my vacation now. Having a great time but all this negative negatively about kobe. Just putting a damper on things frank. I'm going to be in progress out on a few weeks. Tell me i should feel positive and good about it. Take it away. You should definitely feel positive and good about it. Everybody here is having a great time Nobody's wearing masks by the way. But you know Just be careful. I guess that's actually be careful. I guess and and and it's not inhibiting at least the fun for you. Is that correct. True right okay. Fair enough Frank thank you sound very we just got ted from marshall said unlv marjorie. Cheer up is whether good yes. Are you feeling well. Yes is trump president. Gee how do you have your cue tips if we do. I haven't in the car by the way. I don't use them in car because i watch that seinfield seinfeld episode about another thing. Someone did in the car. O you remember that great episode and he looks over. And i think it's a woman who's gonna date or something. He's doing something with his nose. I hit the russian. Some say yes. I've never done that powered by us. Acute much listening to another addition of boston public radio trying to be more cheerful tomorrow Jeff mortgage negative. So the only reason. I grieve good rains going with us tomorrow as i said before. Bso's under nelson and our friday all-star sue o'connell and show the young want to thank our crew chelsea murray soy matthews in cali farkas engineer. John claw parker. Ma smith and dave goldstein. Run a remote studios. i know you're not unto god. Remember most weeks. Forget the check in this. I just checked in with adams doing tonight. And it's great. David cashman's susan joy hassle. Going to talk about the fires in the floods that were obsessed with remember jonathan martinez from yesterday who was spectacular on conservative ship. In general martone is a friend of ours also going to join him on. What the spears battles britney spears battles mean concerning conservative ship mental health women's agency all sorts of sounds like adams got a fabulous show. That is tonight at seven o'clock. Yeah at seven o'clock on greater boston. Even though i'm not by the way a moment seriousness. I actually feel better now than i did. When we started this discussion. Because of how. Good the callers were so we have to cheer a love. That expression doesn't that say doesn't have perfectly capture. What the person is exactly is so good. So i'm jim brady great night. I made sure he can. Thanks again for tuning in. I hope you can tune in tomorrow. Have a great day because it is a beautiful day and we should be grateful. Five part

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What Every Global Professional Needs to Know to Succeed in the Zoom Era with Paula Caligiuri

The Dave Pamah Show

36:36 min | 6 months ago

What Every Global Professional Needs to Know to Succeed in the Zoom Era with Paula Caligiuri

"Welcome to the dave thomas. Show the podcast. Fives restores and awakens. Your innermost capability. You have the training and the talent to succeed but do you have the guts to fail. I love what i do. We love what you do. You want to be the best at it today about the power you you will change to find your path to success the journey of those who have succeeded. And now your host. Dave pomme welcome. Welcome back to show and in this episode. I have with me. I distinguished professor at northeastern university founder. And ceo of skillfully is that right singular as president of ta sea global and. Her new book is build. Your cultural agility. The nine competences competences of successful global professionals paula. Kelly jury welcome to the show and it'd be nice to be with you as well. I our struggling there. So i was hoping that maybe your professor bray might help me. Draw my tongue twisting. There sometimes get get it anyway. Never mind go the name. anyway calgary. Excellent well yeah. What is really glad to have been a show and obviously certainly been global issue of the over the past year with pandemic in every we're not gonna talk about you know the doom and gloom on the pandemic offer the show but certainly one of the things we're using right now is zoom and that certainly Been a plus sign. Isn't it really fair for kinda to a few people using this and other kind of meetings windows teams and other means but obviously zooms big name. That's been but the question i ask. You is in terms of the work. You do with global professionals cultural kind of getting grayer culture. What does every glow of professional needs. An what does every clo- profession needs to know to succeed in zoom zoom. We are yes so it's interesting. I think what i'm seeing is that you know for any global professional who's still working abroad. Even during the pandemic they're using the the collaborative tools like like names zoom or skype. Or whatever and there's this assumption that because you're on skype or hunter zoo or because you're on google or whatever that cultural differences go wet and indra they they become exacerbated. It's wrong because you have snow. Few cues to signal that you're in the middle of a cultural difference of broad given great great example. I was gonna. I'm gonna american and are known for being very informal. What ends up happening within. Formality is when you essentially you can become more relaxed. You become even more informal. The zoo context has made a lot of americans even more informal. So you don't wanna call the other day and it was a. It was a global collar. Their number people from different cultures and one of my american colleagues is a tee shirt eating his breakfast cereal. You know something that that just was was Visually jarring for in more formal culture. So there's there's only subtle things. I contacted that. We don't account for the but they're still cultural differences. Yeah wow wow. Wow i mean you've suddenly you're going to was writing a book about this and you have a new book out as of mentioned Coda filial cultural agility the nine competencies of successful club with professional. Well what good is right is booking in the first place anyway david. It's interesting story when they think about cultural differences and you wanted to get the most macro level that idea of you know. I have a meeting in another country rambling work in another country colleagues from another country that idea of national cultural differences. Everybody you know especially in this whole diversity and inclusion one. We're all thinking about you. Know sincerely picky about different. Says like okay. What do i need to know about the other person from hazard lens which is which is important. But that's like one half of the equation your for the equation as the competencies. You ring to that new situation to that situation of being a multicultural environment in the book was about. So there's lots of books out there about you know if you're germany dennis if you're mexico doodad if you're an american serial for allen so so the way this this book unfolded was to say. Look yes that's important for chapter when we talk about those cultural differences with the rest of the chapters are it's not enough just to know how countries and cultures differ really need to know how to manage yourself in a multicultural. International multi cross cultural environment via book is much more about you. Know these these competences that you can build while roy say why. Why is that important. And i mean i'm actually in the philippines but i. I'm doing work for an australian company as a separate thing is kind of entrepreneurs going through it but anyway the thing is i'm from the uk. Kind of british people are mercury pre-poll australian people. of course it's using online because of the pandemic so it's working from hong kong of what we're doing. She's talking to the camera. Say so that that's interesting. You bring it up there. Really ecause speaking money to australia and business people And business owners. And i don t much about string coach because i've mostly grown up in the uk so that's the other side of the world from more closer to america which is why you would say on the other side of the pond rather underneath know lot of coming when he called it now upside down or can we wanted cut it with australia conflict. Assad well anyway we've only sidetracking. Yeah i mean. Why is that something portland i mean. I'm just saying because. I'm actually in the situation where it's very cost cultural. I'm doing and in the zoom era. If you like right right. I think i mean why is it important is important because you know the more cosmopolitan we become. We did the kind of career you just described your in the phillips working as britain working with buster aliens during without leaving your home the more cosmopolitan we become the more cultural differences. Started dr jekyll. The perception of cultural differences drive down. But the reality is that we're all socialized whether socialized by from our families from our religion from our on professional professional endeavors. We have from the communities. We live in from our educational systems. You know keep going easing the these socializing. I think just layers on and it becomes the way we interpret the world so unless we have this healthy respect for the idea that it everybody's interpreting the same thing through different you know through a different rain through different limbic system We tend to get at ron. Why is it so important. It's so important because whenever you know whenever our brains hit a situation of novelty are grants are essentially. We're really our brains are lazy. They're calling me lazy you out every going functioning brain so we basically we try to conserve our brains energy and we do it. I use the emmy. This is the most natural thing in the world. We do it in a few ways. We do apply looking around and and using what we understand the world to be an understand what to be true and you interpreted as such so unless she can kind of say. Look at i can take the competencies i have to realize that. Yuck i hear it i see it. This is what my brain. My brain is interpreting. Which no there's these different ways of seeing it. That's perspective taking or i need to ask more questions that humility or i need more time to linger in this ambiguity. That's tolerance for ambiguity or. I'm gonna get right at to get better at it. That's resilience i mean. These are so critical to be effective in a multi-culture environment because we are fundamental human. Well yeah that's quite well. It does make sense. Actually traveled cartwheel. Trevor person so i i also like to get ingrained with his culture on the cultural filled with the to speak to the locals in the is a can is easy in a western world. Light for example. You're not going to the states or or even australia or somewhere where it's because it's an even europe. Although they have their culture i dunno. It's kind of well. I suppose western living well. Maybe you're at different actually the the actual you may nine europe but you study. This was ages ago but looking at angle is going to angle cultures and angles looking to going living going to live and work in donegal cultures. Actually angle's going to anglo cultures that had a greater adjustment challenge already know knocker. Explanation was ms early evening. It what we found was that it was a couple of things going on in your company sending you out in international assignment. It was pretty natural. Say hey i'm australian go the family of the and it's going to be easier students you begin to say. Hey it's all the same it's easier you expect everything to be the same. So then your brain wants to be even lazier. The little subtle differences. See come on this jari culture. That's very different. It is overtly buried different Brain down and use yo mr forest to be present and mindful and interpret the world s. What questions this is can interesting. Yeah yeah. I mean saying Up in between london and asia in the last recent years before the pandemic asia know work. And you know the position you have to be wild. We're not the the culture is more westernized. I mean you you quick anglo. I don't know if that's the right word but people tend to say western culture. Don't read that tends to the weather us but that tends to be more adapted in less in less western countries. Now we are seeing it here. You know certainly the philippines. They've adopted it anyway. Long time ago but up into various parts of asia and it's the keeping their culture lock in india. But of course you go to delhi the capital in the business. I'm a probably took more the business areas but they you know the younger cultural more you know. The the music is more likely western music that they don't wanna do rap music and things like that not not typically the eastern oldest and stuff and saying that the western world of adopted things like mindfulness and yoga and and actually made it more mainstream if you like and extracted connor the religious solder in a horrible way. But you know to make it. This is good medicine. Kind of thing so really. It's isn't it. i think that just as much as We talk about national cultures. We need to talk about generational cultures. For exactly the reason you describe planet sort of you know news in these rhythms and generations. Do they have some. You know some shared experiences. Yes and it's one that has been sunday. We we talk about the yeah the internet. I mean things obviously with younger generation. It's tiktok things going viral and you see happening. The same in different countries and i think administering called the ice fishing challenger wherever and every country in the same thing fair enough. They've got their own religion. It got the round kind of way of doing things but there is this kind of now kind of. Do you think the incidents doing that. Whereas is kind of like especially with the younger generation but making the kind of like almost equal coaches shared culture now for the world we need to think about alternate in a slightly different way. Think about culture. You know as an iceberg or an onion or anything that that there's something visible we see on the outside right and then the further and deeper down you go the more powerful and strong. It is on the surface. You're absolutely right. You're looking and sounding and responding so much more smoothly around the world especially in the city's cosmopolitan the well educated it. There's there's there's not as much variance unwelcome. We see so that the iceberg or the skin of the union. What happens though is an in some of the behaviors of the things. We're seeing the actions of the music. We're listening to the closer wearing whatever. The debt nets becoming quite quite modernized. But the way were socialize to interpret. Subjective things like what's right and wrong. What's fair and unfair. What's acceptable and unacceptable. Were that's happening in. That's far deeper. Under the reason part you danced at the onset of your podcast. Wyatt wrote the book. One of the reasons i wrote. The book was because we are becoming so similar on the surface that that we were sort of let allowing brains to getting lazier in believing that we all must see the world in the same way. So there's no cultural differences new. There is yet australia. Yeah so yeah. There's a place for it. And i think the internet has his set up the made of the end of the ice burger. This getting more visible still things that are happening. The note below the surface that acceptable at the phrase elvis to use with my my students is Because i'm in the united states alone the if you mentioned like grandparents great great great grandparents in the united states heritage comes from all over world. I said imagine that are great. Great great great grandparents were all sitting together in this room would different languages. Aiming wearing different clothes they would be so visible we are present similarly as i never. Yeah yeah that's quite interesting. Actually i'm gonna actually. It's quite funny. I went to new zealand with my. What was his fight. When i was five hundred sixty five game anyway The australians came this different teams from wells and then they came and then there were a bit more rowdy than to the new zealand is m a bit more of if you know. They're kind of neighbors really quite far away from each other. The neighbors And then they they hotel a manager was he said he's australians came here and the jarecki's because About two hundred years ago. When britain great britain discovered australia the island they sent ex convicts there. That was the i mean. That's the reason why they did. It say said now under the behavior that is a registered from there ex convict background. But we even know. That's kind of like an anglo to anglo. They was even difference in interns. It's the same as what you saying about your very informal compared to maybe britches. Not kind of not from a caribbean in that which is kind of very mixed. The aspiration light but only in britain and raising britain so. I know that there is a stiff. Upper lip. Formal more kind of thing value so in a workplace. You kind of adhere to that. Don't really in terms of the business etiquette type things for knock you say if you eat and serious. That shouldn't be allowed kind of that kind of thing that i would actually do that. And then they'll complain about thank them again you know he's like oh yeah. Sorry i'm very former here. You know so. Yeah but there is even lucky. Say that different. In the anglo kind've anglo if you like countries so Of silence i think is fascinating Also something that happens on zoom calls. That's massive cultural difference in some cultures. Silence indicates being thoughtful being pensive being engaged in other cultures silence means being disinterested tuning out cultures interrupting. Like i'm doing right now. We're having a conversation conversation. Say it's not me. I was doing this to someone who is from law. A culture that was considered yet in its reflexive with unintentionally trying to be rude. But so i keep going back to joss because we're using technology doesn't mean cultures banishing on saucy. Exactly now a conversation. We just had just now really Really doesn't it really says you know someone from the news in australia. In america and britain will have that different kind of Way of Asoka if you like so. I started on camera. Lucky say one person will find it unacceptable if were interrupted all if a at breakfast actually ex-convicts jerky what made any way but not. I have anything against that confidence. Just say it was funny when it came just fine when i came up there so but yeah there i'm trying to say so in zoom me in you might see those different subtleties of cross cultural kind of ways of behaving and it's not that kind of well. I'm guessing what you're trying to say zoom meetings. It's face to face meetings every that we anytime you're with someone who's Who's been socialized through a different lens. I mean the bet the best example. It you don't even have to leave your home. Country generally bureau town just watch. Two generations knits in. Watch how they because they've been socialized even if they've been socialized in the same from a national perspective of cultural perspective in in terms of geography. They've been they've headed different set of socializing film on life stage and watching the mixed. It's just the perceptions of right wrong good bad fair unfair appropriate inappropriate you. You can't turn it all we you're right. It's building your couch with jealousy. What would that actually. Now we've kind of a long discussion of our own interpretation of various cultures and way means but to what what is building your culture jalousie so the idea behind the book is to say look at there are are nine competencies that my research has uncovered are in people who are because he great in this and some of them are are these their self management competencies is. How do you handle yourself within a in a novel and a new environment in an environment whether it's generational or you're a new company or you're with people who are from a different country you know whatever how do you. How do you manage yourself in that environment. And then the second bucket of three competencies. How'd you manage your relationships engage and then the third is. How do you manage the work. You're being asked in each those. The three three and three to those competencies are critical for for success. And usually what happens. Is everyone kind of leads with one or the other But everyone could use some help building out those They're a little bit weaker into the idea of the book was to say you know. Here's an opportunity to build out these competencies. It's funny how we have an online assessment tool. She can go on. Assess your own cross cultural competencies. It's free book to go onto it. Yeah it's called. Www m. y. g. I d. e. a. my guide with two ice. Yeah you can go on check it out like look at your cultural competencies pretty cool. Yeah well well in a nutshell. All the non of successful global professionals not only to myself cat you know. Companies he's management competencies like tolerance ambiguity. What we were describing resilience curiosity soon as really natural competencies that enable you basically it enables you to handle the novelty of the ambiguity or the complexity a little bit longer without having either you don't mean spike or your your need for cognitive closure you need to like figure it out quickly marriage yourself in that new environmental longer. Since the self management relationship management is things like humility and perspective. Taking those ideas that you know your ability to build relationships the idea next only can really learn in the novel environment is to be socialized into it and the only way to do that is to connect with people who wonder standards. That's the second son. Third says a little different that saying look at it. How you manage the task their situations. Where in this is where you know. It's not a more is better. It's just trying to figure out when the time is uc to these three competencies. There's situations where you need to adapt to the situation. You're in cultural dictation. There's other situations where it might be. Safety might be a fix. It might mean production schedules something but there are times when you need to hold a standard and you need persuasion motivation to something. That's out or call all and then there's a third one and that integration and by way your way we're just gonna come up with a new way of working together wrong. Are we working together. Isn't gonna look like team next to us. We're going to do it even though so those are sorry. It was kind long answer. Those self management relationship management task management is great. It was great. Well i don much questions about yourself about your background. The professor so i felt very challenged already intellectually. But but yeah what. What's your background your professional the international business school but You live in boston. Which isn't far from where. I used to go to new york quiet. Which isn't far from boston is. It's free four hours drive isn't it. We Had had to do what join the into. This is not very elegant at all in nineteen eighty seven. I was studying abroad with and invite. I'm back then in the eighties. The only kids that really went abroad. The only american abroad were wealthy. Children you know. And and i was not one of them off with my mom was a homemaker. I with your saving money. But in the fall of nineteen eighty-seven the market crash. All the crash. My wedding was worth nothing that i already money parents. Sweetheart get a job so while the other kids were you know. Jetting off to greece and switzerland to go the rich kids. Rich kids right everyone. I myself but i had a different experience like my family. My heritage is southern italian family. Join italy them. Time alien friends growing of initially up into southern indiana. I went to calabria where my family is. Oh that's say spent a weekend. I mean i'm stopped very rome or florence. Or i'm gonna start over in roman midnight mellon but yeah i like to actually. It wasn't bad. You can see sicily can just run side anyway. Let's not bore the What i'm sure they find it interesting that travels but i think they listening more about the interest of your background. So so yes so you spent time in. It's something easily ernie. The journey was actually once when i ended up returning to finish out my college degree. Some psychology professor. Paul was drunk. You sit down depress nice. I don't know. I feel like i'm a different person from that experience that if it was so fascinating for you why don't you study it. You know my mind graduate applications. That i wanted to study. What made me wait. What makes people effective living and working internationally and they wanna know how they change from developmental cross cultural experiences so my joke is that you know thirty. Something years later i am still studying. What makes people affected living in working internationally and how they changed from depress cultural experience right. Okay i'm so proud of that right now. I could do that much for succession of its. Yeah yeah as a well. Traveled man has really been to maine. Africa offering a supplies needs cases of wants to go to mainland india indian africa to just say always a kind of culture that people wanna solve explorer as well. Yeah definitely the whole planet. Yes but anyway i am. Yeah well it's really great pleasure having you here Polar and can you explain or tell my listeners wherever they can find your book and also more about the work. You do yourself sir. So my i understand of the book is available pretty much wherever finds herself banging on amazon. But certainly I'm consoled bilger cultural. Jill dougherty is is really on a compilation. It's supposed to be accessible it is. It's it's to help. People become really effective in a multicultural environment. It represents about thirty years of research doesn't sound. I'm trying to think well so So it's meant it's meant to be useful and helpful on as i mentioned earlier. There's a three web apps that people can go. And do some self assessment true. I'm i Affirm leaguer that the best thing we can hope for in on her on her. Inner world is for people to start getting more comfortable skiing. The similarities with having each other means competencies. That will build that in. I'm a. I don't want to sound naive but i really do believe that. If we can start moving the needle on some of these cross which will competencies moving the needle on being your equity and racism and xenophobia. Or i am going to trying well. Yeah i mean we could move on to. A different topic obviously has been hot topic in especially in the states. That certainly one issue that was going on and that's not even krakow because it's happening in the us and this difference differences going on this. There wasn't really but but it's still perception of people other and you know one of the people always ask. I'm getting incident wannabes because of the book. And because when they come on the. Us a senator topic and say melissa one skill everyone needs and i think it's best thing we can do is to learn how similarity is soon the moment you find similarity in another person saves for instance if you both have teenage children or elderly parents or you both have the same dog taper saint type of dog or something in common anything in common find a similar. All the sudden difference melts away with both went to calabria what we've been to collaborate pizza america but not boston so it's not the same place. No no just kidding. it's sad it's some it's the perception of similarity that enables people to start forming. Anything that gives you a told begin. The conversation that enables superbowls people and fifty builds the greater the similarity of the heat builds on so unfortunately know even it. When are when are is a natural tendency when our brains are under stress reclaimed. a familiar. It's the reason why there's comfort shooting. Every single cultural surround. The old went were under stress. We see comfort when distress missy comfort. That also means friends family so me condemning did we cling to old friends family. You know we just meal must be combined center and danger risk but being radisson coming up really neat people It's natural ever go into like a orientation of brand new college students. Kids who are who are out of their element for the time. They're in pockets of demography. Like there there you know there's always groups that are so similar and you can look at that as just an observer and say well we could all this racism or you can saying or what and people are under stress thing cling to familiar the second. You break them. Because we've done research on this great in how people see them larry. They cling to a different group of people and whoever scattered out racist brazil phobia. It's just naturally redundancy for student. Life does as well we especially. If you need national student conduct environment. I think during the pandemic some students do to stay amongst. Oh is that what you mean in terms of clinker amongst surround people rely knocks gets just. It's just what we have to recognize is It's a natural human tendency in went when you when you having dieting your life or stress in your life clinton the things that are familiar. If you're walking into a situation a networking event don't only one Demographically like you know the acts that person as your says the democrat demographic a different from you might have something in common the second you learn that the nep this is kind of black in kind of black acknowledgement or see so you come here in the philippines nasi africa because there's a lot of african students as thing is is not black guy. Obviously americans expert says so. It's kind of. You'll see an expert in his lawyer you know see. I don't know about editor what they do where you are but i noticed some with some people who drive certain cars they wave at each other when you see someone who say yeah that happens as well yeah With the basal was always this kind of cultural because it was still is a collective i but there was this kind of beatles club so when you saw them when side in the seventies or eighties. There's always this way can. Yeah because it's been aiming at the club you know stuff that probably online master but yeah yeah yes exactly what you're talking about now in terms of that you've done even deeper study. The may china get this half an hour or i four minutes of talking review but certainly everybody wants listening at checkout polo's book build your culture agility the nine compasses of successful global professionals. I suppose not only professionals anyone in kind of career satan wherever convenient it from company really with this discussion we had is very kind of not inform. I don't use that word again. It's kinda very generic. Wasn't it really that the way it's come station today wasn't really pointing particularly it professionals. Was it really sunny. And it doesn't have to be business so we we've worked with people marin The military yours will end religious groups who were multiculturally adams to students. Who are in all multicultural university. Really ins anyone who is working out novelty multi-culture environment. Yeah they can find it on amazon and whereas can they've learned more about yourself which can go to sir so you can go onto worse. You mentioned still fight the beginning a l i y so skilled by dot com on their again also to go to mike guy dot com. The wanted to the reassess excellent excellent. i've got my dot com on the show notes. Anyone listening they can certainly click on there. I think i've got another. Ta sca global dot com. Yes i remember these websites junket but yeah but pula is dr paula kelly jury. It's been a pleasure talking with you for a friend in in a biology seven. A good chance. Yeah have an intellectual you not to my professor. When i'm in the middle of my politics examiner. Saying what do i do until you. It's a bit like that in a student bar though anyway polar. sorry. I'm just a great pleasure. Having you on the show and sherman is great knowledge that culture and see the done there be a pleasure to have you back as well on similar. Topic topics relate to that. So so did come back. You became can be wonderful. Thank you so much. You're welcome vessel for this episode. Thanks for listening and remember if you want to support what we do then. She subscribed eib over on apple. Podcasts all head over to my website faith. Palm dot com and click rate show but also for now the. I'll see you in the next episode all day palmer show follow us on facebook twitter and instagram's.

britain australia Dave pomme dr jekyll skype asia Us philippines dave thomas northeastern university jarecki uk europe Assad paula lazier calgary new zealand donegal emmy
News Roundup - Assassin's Creed Valhalla, Xbox Series X Games coming next week, GDC Summer digital-only

This Week In Video Games

06:26 min | 1 year ago

News Roundup - Assassin's Creed Valhalla, Xbox Series X Games coming next week, GDC Summer digital-only

"Welcome back to this week video games and this is the news roundup giving you is fear. Game News. You need to know in just minutes to find this useful than light can share and subscribe on Youtube and your favorite podcast APP links down below in the description or the show notes says Friday is the first of May twenty twenty selects into the news. I up marks of the show experts series X. Games for livestream next week. This one comes from Europe. Gema by Tom Phillips. Mark Software show of the first experts series X. Games in inside Xbox livestream next Thursday seventh of my four PM in the UK. There's no official word on what exactly we're GONNA be seeing. The uric understands that a number of third party games will be showcased. Obviously fans are also looking forward to seeing more of the flagship title Halo Influence. I only used until now. But also some of the many products of monks up to ray of game studios have been quietly building and keeping under wraps. We'll trying to stand at the first couple of experts series broadcast classmate monks off laying out more information and footage next. Gen Console Ju to launch in holiday. Twenty twenty so there is an update this article where experts exact. Aaron Greenberg has confirmed that next week. Xbox partners show next games during the broadcast and the internals do have big summer plans reinforced fact marks off. There's plenty of first pie. Predicts the reps and it's going to require an additional broadcast to showcase and that's really really exciting stuff to the hype for next Gen Consoles. Does here going to be really exciting. Day Thursday. Seventh of my four PM next in the news. Assassin's creed Valhalla. Has Been announced and this one comes from game informer by Matt Miller so throughout the day. Ubisoft been exhibiting a livestream with artists. Boss logic created digital patient showing up from Nick set in recesses Craig game so we. This piece is now complete. It's clear that the next installment of the long running series would transport players track some variation of the Viking world. That's a stream came to an end. We also got an official name is assassin's creed Valhalla. Details remain scarce about the new game. But the first piece of Kiara Office include suggestions of what we can expect including the Viking. Long Boats Medieval forts and of course. Fis- mealy combat. So we're going to be following the game closely over coming days a month and how actually had a trailer on April the thirtieth that was a cinematic trailer? And it was really really interesting as we got some xbox Game Studios Logos at the end. So hopefully we're going to get more leads from xbox next Thursday next up in the news doted twos. The international has been delayed. This one comes from Kentucky by Alyssa. Jones Daughter Two's most important competition. The International Been Delayed Digital Covert Nineteen Pandemic Valve announced his decision in a blog. Post last night stating that. The event is likely to take place in two thousand twenty one savannah said we've been exploring various possibilities but it's like the event will need to happen in two thousand twenty one. Given the highly volatile landscape for local gathering restrictions virus trajectory and global travel pulses. We don't expect to have enough confidence to communicate firm dates in the near future. Several years foul was helped fund the competition record-breaking prize poll by sales any bow. Pass twenty five percent of the money earned eventually finds. Its Way to pros. But last is outing netted valve around eighty million pounds or one hundred million dollars in bonus revenue as such a little surprised that the system will be returning soon instead of closer to the event itself to the international twenty. Nine team took place in August while. That's still several months away as likely pre difficult to arrange travel and event logistics right now. It's not fortunate way to ring in the twenties tenth anniversary. There's one of the world's biggest e sports tournament. I imagine. The national isn't going anywhere anytime soon. Next UP IN THE NEWS CO OF DUTY Mon- More to remastered is now available on. Pc this one comes from PC. Game or SEAN FRESCO. So after a short period of playstation four exclusivity call of Duty Mon- Morph into remastered now available on pc only available on bound on that. And it's only the campaigns that don't expect gentleman's the multiply or SPEC missions while the original modern warfare two is still available on steam. Its new version. Sports Four K. Has Improved textures and as well as remastered audio also has out too wide. Marta support and it may even be more gritty though. That's not listed amongst facial features. If you play was on last year's modern warfare review you also get the orderly titled Underwater Demo Team Classic Bundle Whereas Nets. Your ubt go skin based on the one seen only easy day was yesterday mission from warfare to finally in the news summit. Gtc Now fully digital as corona virus pandemic continues. This one comes out of our Gen by mckim so game. Developers conference organizers have announced the plan. Gdp summer event in August. Who was meant to replace? The original March conference will now be all digital as the public continues to grapple the Corona Virus. Sure blog update. Gtc organizers announced that there will be moving forward with GDP summer event as a digital only affair GTC traditionally runs a live event in San Francisco during March but the plans were halted after the Cova. Nineteen outbreak in. The United States organizers later announced a shorter replacement event that was to run from August the fourth until the six traditional site the Moscone Center in San Francisco. However those plans have now changed again. Why would you? Dc is primarily event game developers is usually talks hosted by industry leaders that give great insight into some of the biggest games developers hideous. Kajima slated to give a keynote talk this DC before shows postponed. Cdc host annual game developers choice awards which honor some elite biggest and critically acclaimed games. Other game shows have been impacted this year due to the pandemic three well. That's it for today's news. I hope you find useful. And don't forget to subscribe on Youtube and dams and if you like it then share with a friend this week in video games as a patron put constant issue general. And if you're interested in joining head on over to Patriot dot com slash this week and video games and sign up for benefits. Include exclusive audio dischord rose community events and more. Well thanks again. I'll see you soon.

Gtc official San Francisco Twenty twenty Europe Gen Consoles Tom Phillips Ubisoft UK Youtube Mark Software Aaron Greenberg Long Boats Medieval Kiara Office Matt Miller Kajima Kentucky Dc
Ep 258 - Carripana avariada na rotunda, simpatia sem guio, o problema dos culos novos

Túnel de vento

15:35 min | 1 year ago

Ep 258 - Carripana avariada na rotunda, simpatia sem guio, o problema dos culos novos

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