35 Burst results for "Mckenzie"

Wildfires Jeopardize Access To Drinking Water

Environment: NPR

03:53 min | 2 d ago

Wildfires Jeopardize Access To Drinking Water

"In many Western states, drinking water supply start high up in the mountains as reverse. This summer's record-breaking wildfires have reduced some headwaters, forest burn trees and heaps of Ash as Luke Runyan from member. Station K. U.. NC reports that often creates expensive headaches for water treatment plants long after the smoke clears. Few places in the West know how wildfires affect water supplies like Fort Collins Colorado the state's largest wildfire ever recorded is burning just outside the city now but their problems really started eight years ago before then it's main water source the poodle river was nearly pristine. We had been privileged and in some ways probably took for granted that these watersheds were providing. A consistently clean clear water all the time. That's Fort Collins Water Quality Manager. Jill or pays we're along the river just outside the city downstream from where in twenty twelve, the high park fire burned more than eighty, seven, thousand acres for the first year after the fire every time it rained the river turned black from mudslides we ended up with a lot. Of Sediment in our pipelines that was difficult to remove to keep those muddy flows from causing problems, the city installed an early warning system, a series of monitoring stations along the river. If there's too much sediment or a pays says utility workers can turn off the treatment plants intake and switch to water from a large reservoir it became really important for us. To have a heads up for win those changes in water quality were occurring the effects of the burn scar on water quality only lasted a few years but this early warning system is far from obsolete because this year is cameron peak fire has burned another broad sweep of the river's watershed, which means for Collins, again joins the list of western cities learning. To live with wildfires that burn bigger and hotter than they've ever seen before this is a new reality and we're learning as we go. Joe. Harwood is with the water and electrical utility for two hundred, thousand people in and around Eugene Oregon this summer the holiday farm fire burned along the banks of their sole water source, the McKenzie River soon after their. Customers noticed the water coming out of their faucets had a smokey taste people quite frankly to use a scientific term freaked out because it's not something he'd dealt with me for Harwood's says, they eventually figured out the chemistry at their treatment plan to remove the taste and when this winter's rainstorms arrive, utility workers will be monitoring for other harmful things that can. Be transported in wildfire runoff like nitrates, heavy metals, and dissolved. Organic carbon were trying to learn the lessons of others, Colorado, and California to create our own best management practices. The utility is spending one million dollars this year on post fire erosion control with more spending plan. Next year hardwood says back on the banks of Colorado's Putina River the city of Fort. Collins. Jill. Or A peyser says the city had to raise water rates to deal with effects of the fire eight years ago that could happen again. But she says decisions the city made after that last big fire like building new infrastructure to remove sediment and beefing up policies around residential water restrictions will help them respond this time around we live in fire prone. watershed and. Are Part of our responsibility to adapt to those that reality a reality that because of climate change increasingly includes drier forests, hotter summers and extended fire seasons across the West for NPR news I'm Luke Runyan in Fort Collins Colorado.

Poodle River Fort Collins Colorado Luke Runyan Collins Fort Collins Colorado Jill West Mckenzie River Harwood JOE Putina River NC NPR Cameron Peak Eugene Oregon Fort California
"mckenzie" Discussed on Knowing Faith

Knowing Faith

08:19 min | 3 weeks ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Knowing Faith

"So great to be with you cal. Absolutely. So here's the question today. Is there anything interesting happening in the story of Babel Genesis eleven that maybe we might miss just reading it right in front of us just a simple reading may not show us this incredible or funny or interesting thing happening in the story of the Tower of Babel in genesis eleven. Well, that's a great question. Kyle and as a matter of fact, there is you know the inhabitants of Shenar, there in that valley there at where the story is told in genesis eleven want to make a great name for themselves and what is interesting here is what the biblical author's do with these words like this word name authors really in the author here in Genesis, one through eleven has used puns. Consistently I mean from Genesis one on he uses puns along with poetry to kind of put the spotlight on a particular aspect of his point. He really wants to hammer home and sure enough he does it here at the end of this genesis one or towards the end of this genesis one. Through eleven as well and it is so significant transition the story of Abraham Genesis twelve it just just very quickly. Here's what happens. So as we leave the story of the flood, we of course, see Noah's three children one of whom is named Sham, and at the end of genesis nine way see sheme being blessed while they wanna go sons is been cursed but shimmer has highlighted here in this poem at the end of. Genesis nine. So then we move into genesis ten, which begins with Sham. And it also ends with Sham. Now again, the pundits being this being played here by the author is him. which is spelled you know basically 'em and the word name, which is also in Hebrew spelled S. M. so to speak and then the word there is also spelled s. m.. So the is using a big time wordplay here which to anybody reading Hebrew is very noticeable. And so just very quickly, you might see here in chapter ten, right these are the generations of the sons of Noah Sham it also on so on. So forth, and then what happens is that engines ten you know that basically the world, the world. After the flood, which is basically made up of Noah and his three sons in their wives, all disperse and how did they disperse they dispersed in their tongues in their lands in their families and in their nations right. So again, no big deal. This is kind of stress throughout we then come to genesis eleven which interestingly enough although they just divided into their tongues. Genesis Eleven, one starts and they all had the same language right and so anyway as we see as we get into the these inhabitants, they're building this tower. That's so high reaches into the heavens they WANNA make a great name for themselves. They're the word there keeps coming up the word name keeps coming up but regardless of course. God. force their purposes here. He he I. Think in Verse Nine Year he says, therefore, it's name again remember sem is names called babble because they're sem the Lord confused their language or or all land from their Sim he dispersed i the more of the face of all the land and how does how does a chapter eleven percent start up? These are the generations of Shem. Was You. Know So. So we started up this toilet formula which I heard you guys speak about a couple of episodes ago. And we go right back to show. Yeah. Now. Again, the genealogy in the last part of Levin is its own deal. I'll save for another time but suffice it to say guess who is number in in the genealogy Is a sham. Now Abraham, Oh exactly Abraham is a huge deal There's a break in the normal pattern of the genealogy with Abraham with Abraham's father. Tara again, another another a little sermon for another day but of course. We. Know Tara we know. These. Things happen at the end of chapter eleven there's another they're there but we anyway, we come to genesis twelve three I just want to take you right to genesis twelve three. Of course, you know genesis twelve is huge because it opens up basically with Abraham and Abraham is going to be blast. He's told to go from his land and look at first to what God says to. Abraham, he says I will make you into a great. Nation. Right again don't forget injustices ten they all divided up into their own nation. So God is going to make Abraham into a great nation I'M GONNA. Bless you. Again I could preach a sermon over that I'm GonNa make your. Name Rate And it will be a blessing and then he says this I will bless the ones blessing you occur closing you cursing you and in you all of the families. Of the Earth. So again, just remember they they were just about in their nations they were divided up into their families. Right after the the You know the Babbel before babble. And so God is basically saying, look the the inhabitants of SHENAR WANNA. Make a name for themselves but I'm GonNa make a great nation and a great NAM name out of the Greg. Greg. Grandson of Sham who's named Abraham of course you know who? Someday? Give birth to the seat of woman. Yeah that's Gosh. That's fascinating. You know I think a lot of listeners are probably hearing you talk about the Bible, but they're hearing you talk about puns and the and that for them just to kind of land the plane here they may think like Whoa hold on. Are you telling me that the author of scripture could be intentionally writing this using puns or doing word play like when you think about God's inspired word you me think about it with reverence you don't necessarily I think about wordplay. So what would you tell the? Listener whose hearing you and they're going you're telling me that the Bible the authors of the Bible under divine inspiration might have been deploying puns and word play to kind of advance a message and they might feel a little startled by that. Would you just how would you encourage them with that? Well I think first of all, you know we we can again see this over and over again here just as one through eleven and it sets a literary masterpiece, it's a historical and yet literary masterpiece, which is trying to communicate truth in reality about this God that created everything. From nothing and from the very beginning, he actually knows the end part of that end is the seat of woman, the seed of Abraham. The seat of David who comes in the person of Jesus. Christ it's no it's no You know it's it's not lost on the author of the penalty gear on Moses. He has this in mind in a uses these fascinating little literary things, and unfortunately you know or sometimes lost in English translations I always encourage. Students my students to read in his many English translations as possible because sometimes they see these these rough patches. That really reveal the intention of the author. Yeah that's Dr. McKenzie thank you so much for joining us on after the fact. Thank you very much. After the fact is brought to you by southeastern. Baptist theological seminary. Studies incredible professors like Dr McKenzie head over to S. S Dot Edu slash knowing faith and discover just how accessible it is the study God's word so that you may go into the world with the Good News of the Gospel..

Abraham Sham Noah Tower of Babel Shenar Baptist theological seminary Kyle Tara Dr McKenzie Dr. McKenzie S. M. Levin David Greg
Trump administration to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Iraq

Fox News Rundown

00:56 sec | Last month

Trump administration to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Iraq

"Administration says it's reducing the number of U. S troops in Iraq less than two months away from the 2020 election. Fox's Jennifer Griffin with more It's the first time US forces have been withdrawn from Iraq since 2016 in Baghdad, the top U. S commander in the Middle East General Frank McKenzie, made it official quote. This reduced footprint allows us to continue advising and assisting our Iraqi partners in rooting out the final remnants of Isis in Iraq and ensuring its enduring defeat. In recent months, U. S forces have left a number of Iraqi bases where they have been increasingly under attack by Iranian backed proxy forces. The uptick comes in the wake of President Trump ordering the assassination of the powerful Iranian general Qassem Suleimani in Baghdad. Iran responded by launching ballistic missiles against U. S troops in Iraq days. Later. What else? Press Secretary Kaylie mechanisms says the number of troops is being cut from 5200 to 3000.

Iraq Baghdad Jennifer Griffin Frank Mckenzie Middle East Press Secretary Kaylie Qassem Suleimani United States Commander Iran FOX President Trump Official U. S
Trump administration to withdraw 2,200 U.S. troops from Iraq

America First

00:27 sec | Last month

Trump administration to withdraw 2,200 U.S. troops from Iraq

"Top U. S Envoy for the Middle East as the number of American troops in Iraq will drop this month for about 5200 to 3000 General Frank McKenzie says during a visit to Iraq that the reduction demonstrates America's confidence in the abilities of Iraq's own security forces against the Islamic state Group. The announcement comes as president Trump says he is fulfilling the promises of four years ago. To bring us combat troops back

Iraq Middle East Frank Mckenzie Islamic State Group Donald Trump President Trump America
U.S. Says It Will Cut Number Of Troops In Iraq By Nearly Half This Month

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 sec | Last month

U.S. Says It Will Cut Number Of Troops In Iraq By Nearly Half This Month

"The US is ready to reduce the number of troops in Iraq, the Pentagon's moving more than 2000 troops out of Iraq this month drawing down to around 3000, commander of U. S. Central Command, General Frank McKenzie announced a reduction in Baghdad, saying Iraqi security forces are better equipped to deal with the remnants of Isis. White House Press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany told Fox News. He's defeated Isis caliphate. Hey, met with the Iraqi prime minister and this was a deliverer able from that meeting. General Mackenzie says the remaining troops will continue to assist Iraqi partners in rooting out what's

Iraq Frank Mckenzie General Mackenzie Kayleigh Mcenany Prime Minister Baghdad Press Secretary U. S. Central Command Pentagon Fox News United States White House Commander
Trump to announce further reduction in US troops in Iraq

Mike Gallagher

00:32 sec | Last month

Trump to announce further reduction in US troops in Iraq

"Are coming home from Iraq. The top U. S general for the MIDI says the number of troops in Iraq will drop from roughly 5200 down to 3000 this month. General Frank McKenzie says during a visit to Iraq that the reduction demonstrates America's confidence in the abilities of Iraq's own security forces against the Islamic state Group. The announcement comes as president Trump says he is fulfilling the promises of four years ago to bring us combat troops back. Home Correspondent Can Norman Late

Iraq Frank Mckenzie Donald Trump Islamic State Group President Trump America
Trump planning to withdraw more US troops from Iraq

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Trump planning to withdraw more US troops from Iraq

"The U. S. is pulling more troops out of Iraq America's top Middle East commander says the U. S. will go from fifty two hundred troops in Iraq now to three thousand later this month general Frank McKenzie who heads U. S. Central Command said during a trip to a rock that the move shows confidence in the ability of Iraqi security forces to handle the Slavic state militants the announcement comes as president trump tries to make good on a campaign promise to get the US out of endless wars a senior administration official says another announcement on Afghanistan withdrawal may happen in coming days sabar mag ani Washington

America Commander Iraq Frank Mckenzie U. S. Central Command Donald Trump Official Middle East President Trump Afghanistan Ani Washington
Trump planning to withdraw more US troops from Iraq

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Trump planning to withdraw more US troops from Iraq

"The U. S. is pulling more troops out of Iraq America's top Middle East commander says the U. S. will go from fifty two hundred troops in Iraq now to three thousand later this month general Frank McKenzie who heads U. S. Central Command said during a trip to a rock that the move shows confidence in the ability of Iraqi security forces to handle the Slavic state militants the announcement comes as president trump tries to make good on a campaign promise to get the US out of endless wars a senior administration official says another announcement on Afghanistan withdrawal may happen in coming days sabar mag ani Washington

America Commander Iraq Frank Mckenzie U. S. Central Command Donald Trump Official Middle East President Trump Afghanistan Ani Washington
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

Daily Sales Tips

02:33 min | 2 months ago

Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

"Today's tip comes from Erin Bell. Aaron is the director of enterprise sales at degrade with ten years in both beat B. and B. Two C. sales she's lived all over the country and the world proving herself to be a go getter and a risk taker, a committed lifelong learner. She's always looking for ways to learn from others. But today we get to learn from her here. She is some of the best sales people. I. Now are the ones that are voracious in their everyday learning, foul thought leaders and organizations within the industries that you work with read listen and watch what they are. Talking. About daily for me, I go straight to the McKenzie's and Deloitte to the world. I'm constantly trolling through their websites searching not only for my prospects being mentioned but also what they are writing about in general about business, the markets what is going on in the world remember learning is not a journey with a start an end it is continuous. If you get your quote unquote reading at Baths in, you will actually train your brain to start to think in this way, you will also build up your confidence as well. You will begin to have conversations that matter and are informed. You will build up your authentic expertise and reputation as a thought leader with your prospects. Then start incorporating these nuggets of wisdom whether they be articles, blog posts, podcasts, whatever it may be into your outbound prospecting. Don't have an ask straightaway connected back to your research on the pain points at that prospect is experiencing start making some deposits. Especially if your ideal buyer is at the executive level, this will help to confirm with them that it is worth it to spend some time with you. An example of this might be I noticed in your company's ten report that you mentioned X. Y. Zad were strategic global business objectives into twenty twenty one as Mackenzie said in this Article Doing Avian. See are of the utmost importance in order to achieve x lines at or. Here's a staggering staff, Marie sent Deloitte Study Dot Dot dot but remember make sure their sources you're calling from are credible and carry a fair bit of weight in your industry or the industry of your buyer by elevating your own reading and worldview you level yourself up as a sales person. You do not need to know everything but being voracious in your own learning and awareness of the world will help you to level up as a salesperson exponentially

Erin Bell Deloitte X. Y. Zad Aaron Baths Director Mckenzie Marie Executive Mackenzie
"mckenzie" Discussed on All The Kings Men

All The Kings Men

07:49 min | 2 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on All The Kings Men

"Had I don't even think like the regular regular season was so long ago I mean. It. was almost really in in in a manner of. Another was another world. Yeah, and so now here we are you read anything and but this is true. Not just of the region. Carolina. It's true for everybody. We all go into the playoffs thinking okay. This is what I think of this team based on what they did in sixty nine or seventy or seventy, one game. That stuff that March march. I, mean I know from year to year how much things change and I know teams do change over the summer but some teams don't change that much over the summer and they come back and they're not even close to the same team. They were the season before why is that well archies a random game and the longer you put a a period of time off. the greater the randomness of where that team is that. So that's why I'm having a real tough time trying to sell these playoff matchups. The best matchup is islanders in the panthers. This the match up between two Stanley Cup winning coaches and trucks and Quenneville. Between the coaches who do you think has the advantage given their coaching style with their roster. Florida was starting to play some good hockey down the stretch from the is. Yeah, the islanders were kind of all over the place. Barry Trots exactly what he's got when think he is real comfortable with team, but it seems to be you would think a greater level of consistency or baby whenever you would expect from New York Islanders. They're more likely to hit Florida to me is the younger team and I've because they're younger team. There's more likely to be a big swing they could be like. They're good. They're really really good but they also have a tough time with consistency and and let's be honest if. They hadn't done this points percentage. There was by no means guaranteed the Florida paid. Yeah. We're GONNA. Make the playoffs. This is not a guaranteed playoff team. So I think they're more of a mature, you'll aspect to the way the panthers play. Then the islanders were what you see is what you get and you know and they've they're leading those looking. Somebody put her two numbers this morning on average age. The oldest stage average team out of the twenty four that are playing i. don't know what that means whether it's negative or positive. I. It just kind of reinforces to me that the islanders will surprise me in any way they'll. They'll play the way very hot spots to play the way Lulu guerrilla would want him to play whether either one of these teams is good enough. To, get I would think he's real traction in the eastern conference. A little skeptical or dope full of that. So fill in the blank here the islanders will win the series because and the panthers will win the series because. Well I think the panthers win the series because. You know Alexander Berkoff. If he's the dominant player. He has the ability to take games over offensively and defensively he can shut you down on a defensive side of things or he can make things happen in a big offense away, and there is some pretty exciting young offense of talent get uber, dot cooking, and some of these other guys in Florida. So I think that's what they would. They would rely on I would think. Thumb. Very far off is going to be the guy that That No. He he would need to be the best player in the series for for the islanders and if they win on the back. Kim. Got It. It's an interesting match because I think that you bring up. You Know Varlamov, and obviously you split the net, but you think he's the GO-TO. Guy. Well. Put it this way. Very. Confident in grace to come back with whoever's hot and Boy I think they'd like to think that. Would be the guy but I mean whether it was Robin Leonard and Rice, and always had a platoon system there where they've got a much confidence in the so called backup as the starter so wouldn't surprise me. Cross. Go to the bullpen on on either guy. The other guys not kidding? Yeah Last. Match up here in the East is Toronto and Columbus and obviously Toronto being the home team playing Scotiabank their own arena that brings an interesting facet to it on paper because of Toronto's Big Name Talent obviously, this match of doesn't seem to be as close in tight as we expect it to be. Why do you think that is so? Well I mean. Columbus obviously lost a lot of firepower in a lot of star power in the off season all the free agent class across in that an Errand Matthew. Shane and England basically everybody up front. But You can't sleep on the blue jackets and John Tortorella. It'd be little hourly this week it didn't the team was practicing We've been giving his guys and you have to think back to what they really the Tampa Bay lightning last year. And there are some similarities between the lightning and the leafs not so much in terms of age because waving was very much a veteran team led by Stamkos and Edmund and. Those guys that are being around for a while And the leafs are a younger team. White. Tampa you know the knock on the leaves of the that they You know they don't play playoff style hockey that they want it to be too easy. They want us to be fun and On for a relic all about taken the fun out of the game for teams liked to play a fun game. And that's GonNa be the mental challenge when you look at skill level of the Toronto Police First Columbus. Pretty big discrepancy. So unless you get corpuscle orders leak in one of the two euro goalies standing on his head and that's quite possible because both guys were very good. Elvis whereas weekends was fantastic in his rookie season this year I think he's GonNa be the goaltender on the rookie team although some people I know who voted Kennedy, Blackwood but You know that's GonNa be the challenge for the leafs is to get over the mental hurdle of you know can we play a gritty in your face? Type Checking playoff style hockey. Are we prepared to do that in the past for that? Isn't going to be that easy I? Don't imagine will be with John. Courts coach team or one that's got like David Savard or Seth Jones on the Blue Line. So It's GonNa be about the League psyche, and I, know that their general manager Kyle dubus. Kind of excited by the match up because he thinks is precisely the type of team physical in your face defense. I not a skill that they believe they need to overcome. If they're gonNA shed their stereotype as a soft team, literally planes when the gold is good. You set. Jones. What type of an impact in Columbus now that he's healthy. Huge Depending who you talk to top three, top four defenceman I I can't imagine wasn't on. The, top five ballots for the worse. On just per just what everybody in the NHL this year and I think you're probably wouldn't Carlson John Carlson's probably.

New York Islanders panthers Florida Columbus leafs John Tortorella Toronto Carlson John Carlson Carolina Tampa Bay Seth Jones Toronto Police Barry Trots NHL David Savard Alexander Berkoff League Tampa
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

03:52 min | 3 months ago

Pricing Our Climate

"So do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty fifty. All right. So it sounds like we still have a lot of work to do you know can't shouldn't. On a pandemic to get us to do the right thing for the environment definitely not. Even before we were grappling with a public health crisis, the United States was moving away from important climate initiatives at the end of twenty nineteen, the trump administration formally announced that it would withdraw the US from the Paris agreement abandoning nearly two hundred countries that have pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Many experts feel that this agreement is the world's last and best shot at keeping the globe from reaching the temperature of no return, a two degree Celsius increase from pre industrial levels. A big part of the administration's rationale for leaving the agreement was that it presented a threat to the US economy. This argument has struck many economists and climate scientists is misguided given the dire economic threats of climate change itself. So, there's two main ways to think about climate change in financial markets. If you think about things that you earn or things that can be bought and sold on financial markets, these can be affected in two main ways by climate change one is as the world moves away from what we call a carbon intensive economy companies and assets that have assumed that that warrant happen will value. The best example I suppose would be something like coal fired power

Paris Twenty Twenty United States Kate UN Mckenzie Bloomberg Todd
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

02:20 min | 3 months ago

Pricing Our Climate

"Do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty

Twenty Twenty Paris Kate UN Todd Bloomberg Mckenzie
"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"An stacey be carly. Ren- Jennifer. Ask Be Tab of the to seventy. Two Kimberley Melissa See, Mike e Jake, Marissa and Jude de- Remera Beth Be Chris F Sarah F Chad W Leeann p Jackie P led. The GO S Rachel reach him. Sean I always mess it up. I don't know what it is. Great it's ray and then chant Rachel. Love Rachel Ray my p Megan Deed Jennifer. See Mattie, S, tiffany l.. Or is it an eye? Straight Line is tiffany. I Kendrick Have Ashley Sigourney. P, Tom, p Matt, W, Belinda End Benjamin are Lisa, Jay and Kevin. The those are your top tier patrons. Who Thank you for all your love and support Another great episode next week. I hope you tune in key tune in man I i. You know as long as you're tuning in. We're doing this shit. Tournament out tune in turn out. TURN OUT, turn out! Did right what a treat it is to have you here. Though it's good man, it's weird. Seeing other faces I will tell you it is. You've been locked up. Bro, when good gonNA keep being good 'cause we kind of have to. That's for sure another shutout to my good buddy pressed and Christianson I love you buddy. You had a birthday and I had a birthday and hope you got all my my steph essential I love the gifts you and mom and Chris sent and I met him at. At, the Ronald McDonald House and and he's doing well right now. Things in remission and It's an awesome thing I. Hope it stays that way. It will and food on foot dot Org, my good Buddy Robert Great Organization for homeless and echoes a hope for Foster Youth and thank you to all the patrons who support the podcast join if you like either patient, all the good horror movies gone and inside you podcast patron, and that's a that's about it, so stay healthy, stay safe and Thank you for allowing me to be inside each and every one of you? You to Ryan..

Rachel Ray Chris F Sarah F Chad W Leeann Christianson Ren- Jennifer Melissa See Megan Deed Jennifer Ronald McDonald House Ashley Sigourney stacey Mattie Foster Youth carly Sean Jackie P Marissa Mike e Jake Belinda End Benjamin Tom Kevin Jay
"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

07:21 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"You know what I mean like. There's no yeah, I mean I feel the same way if I would have been like gene. Hackman I'm like Hey Clark. How's IT Goin'? And just you know, and by the way gene Hackman's my favorite, but honestly I said just play it real. Just be genuine. Be Real, have emotions and once I shaved my fucking head. Would you didn't have to do? It just that was like all right I'm here. I'm ready to put on a suit. I'll I'll look short. I'm wearing shorts, sandals and a t shirt. This is how I dress. You put on a suit and to three hundred dollars, shoes and a tie, and give me a mansion and shave my head. I am going to different. And I needed all that, so but for you. It was like hey I'm Ben McKenzie. They're going to do my hair a little bit. It's going to be in a different time, but did you. Did you feel like Day One? You felt like I. Feel like this guy I feel like it. I felt like they had all of those things that you talked about all is resources were so teed up. I mean I remember. We shot a pilot. We were not picked up to series. You know officially yet, but I walked into two story. GCP SAT that they built. That was gotta be. I. Forget Online at Somebody told me how much it cost, but it's definitely a million dollars, said if not more. And you know to build a million dollar to sue stories set. I never been on two stories set never been on a set, or you can have multiple open levels. and two hundred background inside of a set before. And I remember showing up, and thankfully they walked me through you know I got to see. See Before had film there and going? Okay all right got it I know. All the toys behind you like you're GonNa have all the settings going to be there? You'RE GONNA have the clothes you're GONNA. Have the the UH the manpower so to speak to like support the fact that you are supposed to be a leader of men are Jim Gordon's. Now now you need to be a leader. Ninety Ninety two, and the rest is up to you that see that's anxiety. That's like you're sitting there. Looking Yup I'm pretending I'm confident inside your about your pants and you're going. Yeah, yeah, I gotTa step it up man I got if I can step it up I remember it the first shot of the first day. We were in the sat there were. At least one hundred, probably two hundred background, who is a whole scene or some some guy, some Baghdad than than than pulled in and arrested, and he breaks free of of the officers that are trying to slam him in the in the. Jail, cell, set and I I appear magically on the this upper deck. Come down and disarmer save the day. That's my interaction, right? Super heroic introduction, so it's great, and we're doing rehearsals edited, and we finally start rolling, and and I'm literally I basically come down descend from the rafters you know. I wasn't on wires, but I might as well Obama. Juicy PD you know. On hand him or whatever and I literally remember going. See My voice cracks. I almost tripped on the stairs like I literally went. Because my nervous were I was. My Journal was out of Control and it was super embarrassing, and never pretended didn't happen and Danny Cannon pretended it didn't happen to Stews, endless credit, and and then the next day you know got better and better better but like. No. One's immune from that stuff, and it's okay, and you know. Get your head. That's the thing because I immediately would go to. If something happened like that, immediately, go to. I'm looking at video village in my head and I'm seeing the producer going to cast right guy. Fuck it just I don't know what the word is. It just grows that and you gotTa Stop It. You just got to stop it your fucking. You're good. You're remember Tim Roth and reservoir dogs when he looks in the goes. You're fucking so cool. You're so good. They had no fucking idea you're you're you're? Pumping himself up did believe in or not may it's cheesy at people. See it, but it doesn't mean we don't do it. Good I belong here. Get Your fucking shit together. beat the shit out of this other actor with words right now. It sounds stupid, but I fucking. Thank it I'm like I'm going to fucking destroy right now have to, or I could fall apart I'm not, and that's not possible. Absolutely right, absolutely right, and whatever that is whatever blender of drives. You go narcissism that gets you there like it's in that context. It's all all game. Yeah I mean at the end of the day like they're paying for that. They are paying to see you not. If you if you look afraid, onscreen talked done done over I, listen. This is rapid questions from my patrons. Talk me, it's called Shit talking. With my patrons here we go. She talked with Ben McKenzie Leeann. P. which is your favorite episode that you directed from Gotham? My my three soups, one of my three soups the. One with the. Chris asking, what other onscreen project would you like to do with Marina? You know what it's funny. We actually have been thinking about more stuff because we're in the pandemic, so we might we. You know we may do something we'll see. There's nothing like specially like yet, but we're. We're trying because it because it'd be fun to do something given so many people can't shoot right now. It'd be fun together, so we're gonNA idea then for this horror movie this and we take. It's seven actors. We all get tested and everybody's together for ten days, and then the crew minimal cruises eighteen people. Everybody's literally tested doesn't go out, and then we're there for ten days filming. And it's. It's awesome anyway I love this idea. It's great. It's it's got. I talk about all right Tabitha I'm a huge fan of Southland I've asked many other cast members as question. I always love hearing different responses I get. The show had more to tell, and should have been saved, or do you think it went out in a blaze of glory at the right time? I think it e. we always definitely could have told more that being said we were memory serves. We were told Vance that we were going to be ending, so we got to to wrap it up to some degree and I have a belief that show. Shows are not meant to ever die right like they're all their. Whatever S-. Small go could still be running, because it's built with an engine that that could, that's what makes it a TV show, TV show, but I proud of what we did, and and I'm grateful the TNT for saving us in that we went off the court decay. What was your last day on the set of the OC like you have any fond memories that day and had to compare with your last in Gotham you know. Know. My last days are hard. I remember my last day on the side of the OC. Remember talking to you know, give them just a few remarks is as I. Did my last shot which I think was the last shot of show. You not filming and just saying that the the truth. which was that when I got hired on the OC had been for a year and I didn't have any friends really. And now I feel like I. Have you know a few hundred and I hope there when I see you know you. Guys out on the street. When rancher child, we can grab a drink, a coffee ear, or just reminisce, because it's amazing time I remember that you know getting a little teary and. Still believing that true so. That was that was OC. Galkin was dot. com was different because it changed my life in different ways I met.

OC gene Hackman Gotham Ben McKenzie Jim Gordon Danny Cannon Obama Tim Roth Ben McKenzie Leeann Hey Clark TNT Baghdad producer Galkin Chris Vance
"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"You look in the mirror where you sort of like when you saw that where you like? Did you kind of embrace it like? Yeah, I'm fucking cool. Yeah. I thought it was hilarious and you know. I got a ton grief the. My family it, which is great like that's exactly what your family should is like. Make Fun of you. And but then yeah for sure I then also like a cute girl. Look at you, and you're like yes, sure I'm that's that's. That's me. I'm Ben. Facial hair. Well. It. was. It was funny time man I mean when we were in I. Mean I take your point about being in Vancouver. Really well because we were not, we were writing in La. We were right in the heart of La. Yeah and I think proudly so right. That was the whole gist of the show, and and and a marketing campaign behind it and I. think that you know definitely contributed to. Some, weird. Times man when you going out where you going out on the weekends or you'RE GONNA club. Were you like that giving you tables Mackenzie? We gotta a table for in the back. We've got some great news whatever you want to comment on. Yeah I definitely had that did do that sometimes, but I also hate spending money like that like I. Just can't a Mike, you want me to spend. How much money for a bottle of booze? That cost fifty dollars like you gotta be kidding. Give you free. Come on. No, that would, so. That's the thing is like you would always do that thing like well. What are we talking about? You know so I just remember being being the the midwesterner southern or whatever Texas boy. It was like I'm not gonNA. Pop Bottles like that's not. That's not a not a all all freeload a little bit, but I'm not gonNA. I do like free things. I'M NOT GONNA lie, but did you, did you? Did you ever have obviously married to one of the most beautiful women on the planet inside out by the way if you? Don't know or they look at it and like Oh. My God. He's saying when you meet her. She's unbelievable and you know that because you're married to her, but. Did you ever have fans that. You're like. I kinda. WanNa go out with this fan. Have you ever gone out with a fan? I don't know that. You know it's so interesting. It's such an interesting time in your twenties win. I think no one really knows who they are. We're all trying to like On't. E even outside of the the celebrity, dumb and She entertainment industry like your average twenty year olds. You're trying to figure out who they are. And so you combine. You're trying to figure yourself out. They are the other person is also trying to figure themselves out, so there's a lot of not talking about those things. Then get revealed. You know relatively quick, yeah? You're actually you're a fan. I didn't realize that was the way that okay all right. They're not like this. I think that that dynamic is not sustainable. Right because then it gets this in it's. You know it's not A. It's not a level playing field. You know there are all these assumptions that are being made on bath of of you know whoever you might be spending time with. That are not usually borne out by the truth. The main assumption being that you're cool, somehow some outlet. Let me think you're calling a not as cool and you're going to see that I'm never has any role I've played. I'm not as rich as they are. I'm not as smart as they are. I'm definitely not as cool as they are, but I will say Jason, Priestley. His wife, they've been married forever. They have kids water relationship. She was a fan. I believe. Avenue she was a fan and they. Fell in love, so it does happen. I'm not saying it couldn't work. I should I should have been that. I'm just saying it never. It never worked for me. It always felt like weird, but I think there's a thin line between like fandom and like Oh, I like. A dig what you're I like what you're Doin' I respect, and and you know I. Mean there's not it's not a a black and white thing. -sarily I mean obviously marina huge fan of my work. Obviously, that's why we're together chorus. By the way, Let. Let me! Jump into that real. Quick your onset. When was it was a day one where I'm just going to be the voice? Of Ben Mckenzie's mine like there was a show called inside Herman's head where you could hear all the voices love love that show now when you saw marina, the first time was the inside voice going only Shan't right. Or, did it takes time before you guys was at very professional? Was it very I'm sure it was professional. You're professional, but one was the moment where you're like. I can't get her out of my head or she can't get you. have to win that avenue. Exactly I do remember the first time I saw her. which was art she? She was cast very quickly in the middle of the first season. Because the construction of the show is that I was supposed to be with Barbara King James Rhubarb keen. On Fan boys out there like yeah, of course all his But it was weird. It just didn't quite. It didn't quite work because they'd set up Barbara to be. This rich girl who lived in out and house in Gotham City and but Gordon was supposed to be the every man. It just didn't quite the romantic. Yeah and through no fault of Richards find character, and they ultimately did what they should have done. which is turn are into a bill or an? And that's where she went and outs that. Tensions are under under way their relationship moving forward, but they needed a new a new object affection, and and then a real romance that could sort of like underpin the the show from A. From a near Romantic standpoint, so so she was cast I. Remember it was like Tober Yeah I. Remember what there was exactly it was October tweet seconds, and for reasons that will become clear soon, and any was raining miserable day shooting in some pretty rough area the bronx. Raining cats and dogs. We were inside thankfully, but. She showed up for a makeup in hair tests, and maybe some cameras because he was going to shoot. The next week for some reason, they needed her that day in order to get everything, right. And I was filming some other stopping the basically, the the executive producer inspired. She told me that she wanted to meet me and talk to me and he told her that I wanted to talk to her anyway. I was in my trailer and I got a knock on the door, and I opened it up, and she's standing there in the rain, and normally you would think like a romantic like, but instead it was just a trench drain. She looked like. Something was wrong. Something was clearly wrong. And I was like. I mean other than just singer being soaked and I was like coming. In Command Command and we had a small talk, but or something. You know you don't mind me asking. Are you okay and she was like yeah. I do that thing marina. You know tough marine like she's like she's talked to up. Fine fine fine fine fine finally. What happened like my mom died or something like oh? Okay? No, no, no, no, no! I know since mom is alive and live well. Your span in Brazil. She, she goes. Yeah, no, it's just. It's my son's birthday today. And I was like. Oh my God that you, you flirt on your son's birth. Oh my God. Yes, they're like they needed me today and that it was like Oh. Man I'm so sorry. How old is he and I'm thinking I'm? Assuming he's like a major, even though she's very young. I'm like. She's his.

La Barbara King James Rhubarb Facial hair Texas Mackenzie Vancouver Brazil Gotham City Mike Ben Mckenzie executive producer Richards Jason Herman Gordon Priestley
"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"Really Beverly Hills nine. Oh, two one. That's Kinda the way it is totally and I mean it. Does there some? I think it's worth noting you know because I think I. Remember having that expensive classic. This is pretty weird that we're making them. And it really was. The men are the boys whatever you WANNA call. The call us were were considerably older than the girls like Adam and Adam Brody, and I were in our early twenties or a year apart. And Mission Rachel were younger, and it was like this is a weird thing that we're. We're perpetuating some weird stereotype of like what masculinity slows to look like and what Supposed to look like it's very strange, I mean. How much younger were they then you? An atom I don't really remember I mean I remember me. She being very young like seventeen or eighteen years old Rachel. I don't remember I. WanNa say she's like maybe. Four years younger than me or something. Maybe she was twenty. I was the only I was the only cast member who had been to college I. Think out of had done a semester or something like ask you this. Do this. Move to to ally become an actor and he'd already done like a series and he he had the most. I think he well. He shot credits in. He had the second credits and. But I was the only one who actually like going to college gotten a degree. And not that that. Not That L. A. could've cared at all about that, you know no one cares about growth though for your growth, that was important perspective. Perspective of of you know. This is cool. This is weird. It's weird were on a television. Show that you know that you happen to get on salvage. Show that happened to take off and is. Pushing you out there the marketing campaign has taken over and his push up certain way. That's a weird experience. It was helpful for me. To have some perspective to say. This is strange. It's okay to feel strange is okay to like that. Because I think otherwise you can get caught up in it. It can be some weird. You know never ending quest for. Validation or something that like you know, you is inevitably however hot. You're burning at the moment. You're never gonNA stay hot right? Yeah, you know what I mean. The show lasts for I. Think last small to last forever. Or years you know like. It was hot. And you have to be able to ride that out. You know you have to be able to like. Make sense of your life when when the lights are not on. Or you're gonNA make yourself miserable. What was what was small? We've actually never talked about this. What was real like I'm sure, you've? Luckily, we were lucky with all this up because we were filming in Vancouver away from everything, social media hadn't hit yet, so we were like we didn't realize how big were and that was a good thing and you know I had done some things, but I wasn't really. I wasn't famous. Because, Oh, you're on that. Show Zoey Dick John Jay can George or something and I'm like l., yeah or they? Think. I was on another show and they sort of rationalized, but I wasn't. And then when that show hit. I mean stuck out like a sword. I'm playing lex Luther on bald, so yeah I mean it was, but we were away. We were in Vancouver constantly working and so when I came back, I would notice. I would notice some things like this. And I remember by the way I was I was the oldest one in the cast besides the parents so. Out of all the kids I was twenty, six, twenty, seven, I got smallville and. I. Mean Yeah. My life changed but thank God. I wasn't Tom's aged five years earlier or kristen, who is eighteen or because I'm gone off the rails I just like Holy Shit I'm. Famous I would've I mean there were times when I went off the rails, just in general I have a good head on my show even though I had. I never did anything really bad. I never gotten I always knew this isn't the right thing to do. I'm not doing that, but you know I still would get in trouble like in terms of like. You know. I, I did a little drugs probably probably like a like questioning what I just said. Trump's problem, yeah I do drugs. Ban Now drives urban legend. We did some drugs and I had never done ecstasy before doing. We didn't shoot for a week and. You know it's like Oh. My God I'm I've never felt this good before, and then I've never felt this worse in my life. So but I knew like hey, I don't have an addictive personality like some people, my family and my friends, and so I never had that problem. Thankfully, if I did I'd be dead, but did you. Do you think with Kazuko? See All of a sudden? You're like Mackenzie right right right? There was yeah there was a big marketing can. There's a big marketing campaign. Bind I, remember. Shooting it that summer. Or Shing the pilot in the Spring and the series as soon as they could possibly build a sense, right scripts. That summer in the marketing campaign came on like August and they were super smart they they marketed it through like malls and summer festivals. Stop and got the show on before school even started up so when kids were still wrapping up their summer. You know in not like nostalgic. A summer's ending. We're going to go back to school, but we're starting to hang out together. You know you've taken a family vacations and we're back like in towns we we're going to go to school. And it just took off like wildfire and it was. It was weird. It was weird it was a strange. Did you ever look in the mirror? Go ahead, go ahead. Well the the the the image at all remember I wish I had it up, but maybe he goes to find it. Put it up later as They. They took these like Pixellated headshot thing like they. They took images that were of us, and then they totally photoshop the living living. Shut out of them. And and mine was you know I was the bad boy? And so I had like a wife Beater, and the the Hoodie on, and I had a choker chain, which lasted like an episode or two Larry. It's but but the funniest part about it was like twenty three twenty four years old. and. They pixellated A. Facial hair that pixellated like it made me look like had a five o'clock shadow. They add even show hair to you. Yeah, pixellated like never. Look like George Mike. By George Michael, and it was the weirdest thing rows like. Oh. I see I. can make sense why you would do that. Not Me doesn't look like me at all as you can tell from me having shaved this morning like I still I can grow here and actually, but might when I shave my. Baby I wanted to toughen you up a little Ryan. Edgy but also Metro Sexually George Mike, Lee in a weird way. Sexy. Great. Let's honest handsome, but did.

Rachel Vancouver Adam Brody L. A. George Mike George Michael Facial hair lex Luther Pixellated Zoey Dick John Jay Kazuko Ryan Trump Shing Mackenzie Tom Beater kristen George
"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"You're listening to inside of you with Michael Rosenbaum. This is a very special episode. I don't say that often do I, but I've been alone for months now months on end. And He? They're lonely boy. It's been lonely time and I've been as you know. bitching sometimes Ballack Ryan got band stand. It's obviously social distancing. Make Fun, but kidding around because I. Know that Ryan can't be here but today. Ryan is back come back safely, and this isn't merch cheap promotion I brought him back in Saudi masks, still available on the inside of the online store along with. New mugs. These babies gotta just. I, don't I don't right on the awesome the new colors. And they're available autographed, too. Yeah I WANNA, thank everybody out there for all the the birthday wishes I've said this before. I posted on Instagram and Holy Shit. Man I. Guy for this guy felt loved. Honestly I started reading them, I took a couple of hours to read them, and I tear it up and I was like you know. Get in my head. I. Get in like you know really likes who really loves you. Always feel like you're alone. And these comments and people took the time and you're like. Come on man, you people some people I gear and it's it's I. Think it's important. To Take that in and just say hey. This is nice. This is good and feel it and be grateful. And that was nice. You brought over a gift brought. Some Rama got a kitty pool out back, and you got me so floaty for drinks and you got me so. I'm going to be I'm going to be naked in a kiddie pool. Former movie star TV star Michael Rosenbaum ends up in a kids. Many pull. Oh Jeez! Wouldn't that be just absolutely? Find I mean by the way that would be if I'm going to go that way. My friends who have a field day at the wake. They'd be like Fuck Rosenbaum and you know it sucks that he's gone fuck. To die in Kiddy, pool. I mean it doesn't get worse than they always say. We always said he was a kid at heart. That's right and his kid heart exploded in a pool. When you looking for my drink my water. Right here. yeah, this is one of these incited things, but that's just for just endless merch here and patrons than now, but we aggregate guest today. Great guests, lot of great guests coming up. Honestly, there's some some good stuff I got. A text from someone I've been trying to get on the show for a long time and He's a big comic guy by the biggest one of them again. Thank you for listening to all my patrons out there who support the PODCAST, endless love and That's the inside you. On patron and the new harp patron, thank you to all everybody on their. WHO's joining us? It's hard club we zoom. We do these things it's Where have all the good Harvey's Gone With John? Heater? Who's Napoleon and myself? So that's cool. nothing to really report other than you know got the online store and doing the podcast and you know writing a lot. That's what I'm doing. What are you doing out there? I? Hope you're. Living the best life you can right now and doing the best you can and kind of. I don't know FARC just brutal, but. Anyway thanks for supporting the PODCAST and make sure you follow us. Inside of you at inside podcast on instagram and facebook and that. Inside of you pod on twitter and at the Michael Rosenbaum on instagram and. You know subscribe. Tell your friends do all that stuff you know it is. It really helps the show and write a review. Do whatever you want, And thank you, so why don't we do it right now? Why don't we get get to our first guest I? You're I guess it should? Be The second-guessed your the. preamble. Prolonged, the prologue I think it'd be the prologue. Let's do this this is this was a great interview. I'm not saying. I was so great, but This was you know I had his wife on the show a couple months ago, marina background. And I'll tell you. I I read a lot about Mackenzie and it said he's he's GonNa. Private shy doesn't talk a lot. And I got some good stuff here. Man and I feel like I. was you know interrogating the Guy Ryan? But felt good. It felt like you know he text me up. and Said Hey man, said some nice things, and he called me a great host whatever man? That's cool, but it was fun. It was open and he got I. Think you know he talks about his anxiety and talks about having just it was cool. So why don't we just fucking do it? Let's get inside of Ben McKenzie. It's my. New..

Michael Rosenbaum Ballack Ryan Man I. Guy instagram Ben McKenzie FARC Mackenzie twitter Harvey facebook John
"mckenzie" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Jan Everybody to see you so many times and Oh my God thirty two years later. I still hear Laurie Say I. Don't think Sally. McKenzie would do that and I'm like well well Tutte. Tutte you, but so she is the president and CEO of Mckinsey Management Nationwide Dental practice management company with Sally founded in Columbus Ohio in Nineteen, seventy, nine, prior to Oh my God seventy nine, so you've done it. Forty Years Howard, please, you have to say. You don't have look like you're forty years old and doing this forty years. Six. You started when you're okay. Now perfectly makes sense. Prior to founding Mackenzie Management, she was an expanded duty, dental auxiliary and business manager and instructor of Dental exhilarate utilization with the Ohio State University College Dentistry, which when remind everyone is is not an credited dental school and Columbus. Oh. That was a joke, Sally. She's also the owner of the dentists network electronic publication founded in two thousand six power to founding mackenzie managers. He started one of the nation's first dental personnel placement business with four franchises in Ohio and started seventy five agencies throughout the US in two thousand, nine to two thousand eighteen. She was also the publisher and owner of the new Dennis magazine. She is a contributing consultant who dentistry today magazine since eighty-three, and it's hop, leader and consulting since ninety nine. She has a weekly email newsletter since two thousand two. That's eighteen years or over nine hundred published free article..

Mckinsey Management Nationwide Columbus Ohio publisher president and CEO Sally Ohio State University College Mackenzie Management Laurie Columbus McKenzie Howard consultant new Dennis magazine US business manager
Alabama officials warn of students holding coronavirus parties to intentionally get infected

The Daily Beans

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Alabama officials warn of students holding coronavirus parties to intentionally get infected

"And apparently Alabama students have organized covert nineteen parties is a contest to see who would get the virus first Tuscaloosa city councillor. Sonia McKenzie. Said students hosted the parties to intentionally infect each other with the new coronavirus party organizers purposefully invited guests who had tested positive for covid nineteen, and she said the students put money in a pool a pot and whoever got covert I. Would get the cash.

Sonia Mckenzie Tuscaloosa Alabama
Report: Edmonton, Toronto will be NHL hub cities when season resumes

WBBM Morning News

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Report: Edmonton, Toronto will be NHL hub cities when season resumes

"Is reportedly out of the running to be one of the hub cities to host the Stanley Cup playoffs. A popular report says Toronto and Edmonton will be the two hub cities. The host the expanded 24 team tournament. The Blackhawks are in it. They'll play the Edmonton Oilers, either in Edmonton or Toronto of the report from T S Ens. Bob McKenzie holds true.

Edmonton Edmonton Oilers Toronto Blackhawks Bob Mckenzie T S Ens
How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

CodeNewbie

05:59 min | 4 months ago

How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

"So you WanNa Post on Dev titled. Trained in your name is a hard unsolved problem and computer science. Can you tell us what this piece about? The thing is like the title of the Post is is very much like a play on a classic joke. Meam trope, which is kind of like. Is A hot until probe in computer science, which can go like either like the things that genuinely all that things that genuinely on and to me I think. It was a subject that became rapidly extremely important in my life as I went through recently I guess kind of still am in the process of changing my name to better reflect who I am and sort of just like all of the systems I bumped up against that were fighting me in any way to do that and really like being a accomplish sulphur engineer. Feeling like a lot of it should have been much easier than it was and really sort of coming to understand that a lot of it is less to do with software engineering writ lodge in multiple with sort of like how people think about information schemers. What was the impetus for writing this piece? Really? It was sort of my earn frustration more than anything else like sometimes. Sometimes when I'm writing will be a point. I'm trying to get across and it's like I have to really work at it to get the words onto paper. Like doesn't I dare I. Have It's? It's very big in Amorphous and it takes a lot of time, and this post was not like that. The text of this post fell out of me in the space of. Of about a day and a half, and it really was just like writing very quickly and fluently, and it's because I am transgender and I it because changing your name in the way, transgender people do is not such a common use case just like many computer systems I expected to be able to deal with it just one and it's like genuinely frustrating and disheartening to. To me to encounter that and I wanted to write about my experience and what I really saw after I published that really really resonated with a lot of people, and that was really nice to see. Yeah, I can't imagine how difficult that must be. Especially because you're in the position to fully understand what the flaws and decisions, people made to end up where we are. So, you read about your experience in particular restaurant when you made a reservation with your chosen name, and then the restaurant workers actually address you by your dead name shortly after you WanNa talk about that experience to me, this was like a really interesting example of like information systems, getting this wrong and not like the people involved so as best I can piece together from what happened. It's like one of those restaurants where you like a cell number, and then they like text you when your tables ready and then. Then you, come back, and they call out your name. And what had happened is like at left them my number and I'd said like my name is penelope. And then when they texted me, it was like Oh tables ready with no name in it whatsoever and then when I got there and told them I was there, they were like Oh. Do you mean and then they said my dead name to me and so like somewhere in that loop. My dead name had been associated with my phone number in. In such a way that even when I was giving my name to like the people in the place like they were being shown the old name in a few minutes later, right, what I sort of in fall off from that ineffectual is able to later determined to be true is that the system was cashing the name against the phone number and like either they didn't type in the name when I gave them my phone number, or it just overrated what they had said to it, and so like icon determine. Determine exactly what happened, but that is an actual site effective like these to identify as being linked in a way that is like actually like a really shop experience for me to have you know. How much do you think is inherently difficult or more sort of a blind spot with the way? Software is developed in terms of the demographics and what software developers are sort of carrying about most so the thing is we just bad this as an industry like Patrick. McKenzie wrote his fallacies computer program. Believe about. A blog posts several years ago and like most of the advice in it is still relevant today. Mike pursed is like a slightly different take on the same idea, which is the way that we build these information systems inherently make sumptious about ways that the world is that ton out not to be true, and so when I used, put my social engineering hat on, and really look at this icy like that most likely what's happening is people take a very simple view of the world about how people relate to names and include that into that systems, and then like that's just it right I mean for example like the assumption here that a person has a single name holds true for wide swathe. Swathe of the population, but is not true for me and is like for example, not true for lot of women who get married are impressive, changing the legal name or people who get divorced during process of changing legal name, right and other affected groups beyond and so like really to me, it's that we just haven't educated ourselves like as an industry on like many different kinds of human factors that actually we need to encode in our information scheme as even for the simplest of

Engineer Meam Mckenzie Mike Patrick
SpaceX makes history with successful rocket launch

KIRO Nights

07:24 min | 5 months ago

SpaceX makes history with successful rocket launch

"Let's talk about space we lost some will not I don't and and and a lot of firsts were involved in this first of all it it was a private space company SpaceX which started in I think two thousand two and Eli must company a private space rocket company they worked along side NASA they pick they basically SpaceX did the whole thing from start to finish they designed the rocket they designed the capsule and and these guys launch astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob bank in Bob and Doug they kept calling him on the launch I was watching the live feed and I could not not think about the SCTV scary for the movie strange brew with Bob and Doug McKenzie I can't want to calm hoser it it is I don't I I love this kind of stuff I think it's absolutely fascinating and if if you're like why are people making such a big deal about this because it was everywhere a bunch of people watched it everybody was talking about it I'm it it is it is really quite a remarkable thing and you've got these two seasoned astronauts right these guys are like that the commander dog is a marine pilot he's been to space a couple times this guy has flown he's docked with the international space station on his own he's manual controls that is a nearly impossible task it's not tried searching for I did I'll try searching for it on link then you will have a hard time finding this guy to hire they hired like one of the white people in the planet is the only got this particular job yeah in or off the planet he's the only guy but but this time they used computers they launching these if you saw any of the video it's this beautifully sleek cushioned capsule that they're in they have and I can explain why mom was a who owns SpaceX yon yep and if you look at the inside the capsule looks like it really does Tesla's known for having a steering wheel in a TV essential hand side and end up breaking out into the Aggie can't look out of gas pedal and accelerator pedal and that's what the inside of this without the accelerator pedal that's what the inside of this looked like it was all touch screen also not like what you the the the NASA space capsule that you have come to admire and from from movies it doesn't look like anything like that anymore it looks much much more modern it is what the future space flight in one of the significant things here is this is the the beginning of the privatization of space flight right the the way it used to work was was it's not like that there have been private contractors building the stuff if you work at Boeing you know Boeing's history of building major components of every space mission I'm going it was front center it doesn't really happen without bowing right and other American contractors who do who developed a high tech but it was all in the auspices in the funding of NASA this is different NASA was involved but essentially NASA was the contractor helping these guys get to outer space it becomes it's a very interesting reversal of roles and if you don't think that that Jeff Basil's and his blue origin was sitting out there both rooting for and against the wasn't reading I think Francis aster but he certainly wasn't rooting for massive success unless he feels like Hey there's it's a big universe there's room out there for all of us it was very very interesting to think about I mean for you one must love him or hate him in in you probably do both on the on any given month given the way the guy behaves getting a space program off the ground in from two thousand when it was it was too two thousand ten till now is a standing yeah without denial of land over rockets and you know it wise it really is kind of remarkable and this is if you or anything of a space junkie and I am this was a real historic day and worth seeing and on top of that like we talked about once before on the show there is a simulator where you can actually try to really high it's it's similar to what you can try and doc this thing on your own that is it marks up the similar it simulated that they used I don't know how many times I ended up into deep space on saleable or brand right into the space station because I couldn't get it done they used to have like a a simulator in Cape Canaveral in Florida and I went down there with my dad when I was a kid and he's a pilot he he's a commercial if he's one big jets and everything he gets in the similar I barely I mean he didn't he didn't do it he couldn't actually do but got really really close and he's like man that was like the hardest thing I've ever done right the space shuttle used to have I this is my favorite part of storage space shuttle used to have two thousand manual switches right and you're when you're an astronaut you flick and then you're doing all the stuff turn these this this has twenty from two thousand to twenty everything is touch screen and these guys Bob especially the commander he's an old school marine and at first he was like I don't know about all this because when you're wearing the big astronaut gloves and you're flipping switches and it's real important that those switches get flipped there's you know when you physically flipped it or toggled it or whatever it is that right with a touch screen he's he's like that took a lot of getting used to so the SpaceX people are like we got you Bob and they created like a like a little like bloom like when you touch the screen you see some sort of a visual indication well it is actually touched it's the whole thing in your phone we're so between the two at the haptic response to refer to it as when your phone buzzes or clicks right when you do that kind of stuff the reason that they keep the shutter noise in a camera what they don't need the center noise in the camera anyway all of these things are because we're so a **** waited to flicking that switch to feeling that resistance some sort of physical contact with it and so they just dumbing it up for our own company even though it's not necessary that's exactly what they did here everybody knows Houston as in Houston you have a problem mission control this is as Mike said not a NASA mission so mission control you with they heard they heard voices from Hawthorne California that's for SpaceX is based out of so this is just changing changing the whole game yeah I mean but you know Hawthorne has its own problems so I suppose in some point locally we never get to that point and it and I think that that's really what now so it was not built solely to make space a government enterprise but to alternately allow this sort of building to happen and I think NASA's done a really remarkable job of pivoting to what the future is in becoming sort of this agency to essentially becoming an incubator for private space right and that is actually not a dumb thing for for them to do and and now we have four companies and more in other countries that are actually buying for this for this sort of dominance it's a pretty interesting thing it really is it's one of those many things like we talk about in Seattle that underscores what it what it what a real setback it feels like for Paul Allen to have died because he was also involved in a project out of Syria and so a lot of a lot of effort now in the private sector of doing this thing but this thing being successful is good news for everybody including other companies that are competing with them because we needed to see it happen from a private company and I certainly hope that this is just the beginning of a really really interesting future

Nasa Spacex ELI
The Big Debate

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

05:59 min | 5 months ago

The Big Debate

"Hello Ladies and Gentlemen Welcome to the passing shot tennis caused by fans. My name's Joke Kelly. I'm Kim McKenzie and today on the big debate we're discussing the greatest players to never have won a singles Grand Slam title. Take your seats. Thank you everybody hype you while Hyppia Safe On. What would it be today? The very star of the French Open Garros Second Grand Slam off the season. Obviously we have no live at is to catch up on what main came have decided to do in. This episode is commemorated. The occasion by looking back at some of the best players to have never won a grand slam singles title. And it's nothing is fair to say it's quite Alexi List that we've we've captured and are few surprising. Names bad did about is the yeah. We've had a lot of suggestions for our listeners and followers say thank you very much for sharing your thoughts and we have had some niche suggestion straight in as well. I'm actually trying to think plays on these lists. Yeah A lot. More names came up that I was actually wanting to and I mean really one of the questions is where do you draw the line? How do you quantify like how many slam final how many titles players had to have one career ranking? They had to achieve to cut be considered good enough To have been capable of winning slam. Is it how close they came and in a final. Is it just what they did in terms of the rest of their career that you could kind of define it? Let's say we'll be looking into this more detail but yeah it's it's quite an impressive list of talent on this list and makes you realize actually how perhaps unjust sport can be when some of our favorite players never quite managed to go all the way exactly and as he said I could this list dominate at Alex. Verify think if that career they will at some point be able to kind of break that that grandson duck. We're going to start actually with a really popular answer. The calls one of one of the first thing that came into my head. It was one of the first that came into of our listeners. Had as well and that player is David Nalbandian. Who the me as one of those payers who do not doubt that he had the technical ability to win a Grand Slam. It was more. I think the injuries him. I think this is fiscal outlook or school. He was quite stocky and made. Now bandying was one of those players. Where yes he? He could be anyone on his day. He was let down by injuries. And the fact the his maneuverability around the court wasn't wasn't the greatest. Yeah I would agree. I think now found him probably gave into the list of being too injury. Prone to to capture title assertively. He was around before the dominance of of the big three m federal was kind of coming to the scene of course but Sam either he was before when the era of Jovic in middle kind of say dominating everything when you look back at what he actually achieved. It's very impressive. Though he was the the only Argentinian in history to reach semifinals Al Slams and even just reached semi-finals and more at all is is a feat in itself and oversee most famous he reached the Wimbledon final thousand. T- leasings Lleyton Hewitt which you okay. This was his best opportunity to witness lamb. However I think in this final you look at the score line and it was so comprehensive. He think if he wasn't capable of kind of doing more on the day at such a kind of big opportunity. I know this question marks around kind of whether he really sees the moment because slates near be like six one six three six two very straightforward line and this was the tournament. Schley going back to this two thousand Buddha. The top seventeen seeds were knocked out before the fourth round. It was only Asian. You and Tim Henman. It will get onto later. That actually came through so you think ooh found in. I don't know I guess maybe even getting to the final was a bit of a stroke of luck giving given that he was Didn't he wasn't having to play top top names to get that far. Sipa houses move reflection of that but yes that very consistent across the Sam's reaching the semi of old of them and the fact that he he was able to be the big three as well. I mean we talked about it in a in a recent Poe cost about the fact that he. He's the only player to beat in the Big Three in one tournament. In in Madrid. I think he'd be Federa Djokovic and the Dow so he was able to kind of know only just do it on one occasion. He was able to come string great consistency across. You know what you would need at a grand slam across. Two weeks is just yeah. You almost fell the loss hurdle as he said. He got to the semi finals of L. Better every Grand Slam and I think it's just a bit of a shame that he got so far but doesn't really have a lot to show for it in terms of in terms of actual titles and that two thousand eighteen. Would you look at the George? Dd that kind of that was potentially could have been his. May I know kind of you know? He's up against the world number one. The Best Player Lleyton Hewitt. But certainly you know how to kind of solve easiest drawer to get to the final to go out. So comprehensively was almost shabelle on his part.

Lleyton Hewitt Kim Mckenzie David Nalbandian Tim Henman T Al Slams Bandying Federa Djokovic Schley Jovic SAM Madrid DOW
Developing long duration energy storage

The Energy Gang

05:48 min | 5 months ago

Developing long duration energy storage

"What a year it's shaping up to be for. Storage manufacturing has taken a hit and some projects are getting delayed for obvious reasons Our analysts that would mackenzie say that. The coronavirus crisis will trim twenty twenty forecasts for Battery Installations. Globally by almost twenty percent. But they still expect it to be a record year and the projects that caught our eye are not going to get built this year but they do show the strength and resiliency of this market a few examples here. A coal plant in North Dakota is going to be replaced. In part with a one acre battery array that uses a new technology capable of discharging for a hundred and fifty hours. That's more than thirty times longer than a lithium ion batteries. The Electric Utility in Hawaii just awarded contracts for sixteen projects that add up to more than three gigawatt hours of storage and those will replace an oil fired. Coal-fired Power Plant in California Southern California Edison signed contracts for seven hundred seventy megawatts of batteries. Many of them paired with solar projects to replace aging gas plants plus in China more hybrid wind solar and battery plants are starting to emerge and wood. Mackenzie expects rapid growth in batteries within China in the coming years. It's the country will lead Asia. This lead Dan Foley who would McKenzie's head of energy storage to proclaim to our journalist at Green Tech Media The utility energy storage market is blowing through milestones faster than we can report them for example those Sei projects are together worth two hundred megawatts more than the entire twenty nineteen market says Fin Foley. So let's go through these. I think we should focus on the bright shiny objects I. What do we know about this form? Energy Project Catherine mentioned this at the end of a recent show so catherine what is Great River Energy who is form energy and what kind of battery could emerge from. This relationship is a great river. Energy is the largest generation and transmission co-op and what that means is it generates and provides power under long-term contracts to a bunch of member. Co Ops like twenty eight member Co ops and this is how a lot of the COP system is formed in the US where they're small co ops that are often serving rural communities. They are very much about keeping costs low for their customers and customers. Own the CO OPS. They are customer owners but then they sign up for long term agreements with these GMT providers. Because it does save the money in the long run and a lot of these. Gmt providers we've seen have these long term contracts For old coal plants and so great river energy is one of those GM GMT's and they made a decision a while back to shut down coal a coal plant call strip and they have been thinking about. How are we going to backfill it? And what are we going to use to do that? And so they've certainly been deploying a lot of renewables and they just recently entered into this agreement with Form Energy and forum is a start up Led by Matteo Harm. Yo who came out of TUSLA. He was the energy storage guru there yet mingchang. Who's an MIT professor? Who has been really another brains behind storage and Ted Wiley who co-founded Aquaman and energy storage company and there are a couple of other. Mit folks. Billy Woodford and Marco Ferrara and there. It's just a team of incredible minds. Who decided to try to calm at storage by thinking about it it as potentially being able to replace all of these Uncaught non cost effective coal plants and so their technology seeks to be super cheap long-duration Nontoxic something you would find everywhere to be able to you know. Put together a type of a flow battery that could just replace the footprint of any fossil fuel plant so that is their goal. And that's what a great river energy has decided to take a bet on. Let's talk about the tech first and then the rural cooperatives piece second jigger. This is a battery. We don't know much about but they call it an aqueous air battery. What does that mean well? Basically in it uses more abundant materials. Because what you find is as that the metals wondering yeah we'll water but also the metals they're using or quite Easy to find and so it's aluminum zinc magnesium etc right. And so so what you find is that they have this ability to use low-cost materials right and they're able to Store lots of energy so when you think about this ad. Matteo talks about this in his interview The way that Lithium. Ion Batteries work is that you can actually charged quickly and discharged quickly but at the same time basically to charge it as to discharge it. And so what you find. Is that these batteries It's around like sort of being able to constrict the nozzle and only making it one megawatt right because you can imagine that you could make a lithium ion battery that's a hundred megawatts incised but only dispatch one megawatt at a time and then make it last one hundred fifty hours now. The problem with that those. It's a super expensive way to get one hundred fifty hour battery whereas this is a much cheaper way. It's it's similar to sort of Etienne redux batteries and others were the basically have this. The fluid that that holds the charge can be expanded at a very low cost. The fuel cell that converts that fluid into energy that's utilized is the expensive

Great River Energy Form Energy Mackenzie Matteo Harm MIT China Dan Foley North Dakota Catherine Asia California Lithium United States Edison
NHLPA board voting on playoff format to return

Howard and Jeremy

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

NHLPA board voting on playoff format to return

"Last night multirole ports indicated that the NHLPA is executive board started the process of voting on the twenty twenty play out proposal that would see the top four seeds in each conference earning byes through the play in round will participate in a three game tournament to get some action and all the play in round would be bracketed and see a best of five series to determine who's going to play against the top four seeds TSN's Bob McKenzie reports that the NHLPA conference call was a quote spirited one and that while the voting won't be finalized until today some believe Donald fear maybe already have or will get the mandate to accept the return to play plan but not so overload but not overwhelmingly

Nhlpa TSN Bob Mckenzie Donald Trump
"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

Commons

05:15 min | 6 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

"For Shauna parks. Who heard from the top of this episode? The history of McKenzie. Towne deal much of a difference for whether or not her mother replaced there. She didn't really have much of a choice. It was either McKenzie town or risk. Being kicked off the provincial waitlisted entirely Shahnaz mother. Brenda was worried about the move right from the beginning. She definitely asked us like why. Why was I moved at such a bad time like what happened right away? It looked like staffing was an issue when she first moved in. They were clearly short staffed and that was evidence with our mom complaining. A number of times to us about not getting prescribed medication on time. She relies on a pain medication. That's administered at night to help her sleep and it's her only reprieve from her chronic pain and one night. She didn't get it until two thirty in the morning. And she's supposed to have it at nine o'clock at night and then they heard that someone had died of cove. Nineteen once the announced the first death at McKenzie town. That's when things started to get really out of control because there were there were staff that were roaming around coughing and working in the facility just bury little precautions that were being taken. If any at all Rivera didn't inform their residents families about the death. Right Away Shawna and her siblings heard about it from the press to find out that McKenzie town had its first deaths in the home sewer. The media was disturbing within a few days of arriving at McKenzie Towne Shawna's mother was exhibiting symptoms of Cova nineteen when we first heard about that first staff and McKenzie town. We were really clear that our mom needed to be tested because we were saying she has symptoms of it and they were saying she didn't eventually they were able to get a test done when my mom was tested. These still had nurses going into her room without protective gear on so while they knew she was being tested. There were still people still healthcare professionals putting themselves at risk and putting other residents at risk going in and out of her room. Shawna's mother Brenda tested positive. But even then adequate protections weren't put in place didn't have enough staff to monitor DEMENTIA PATIENTS. So my mom a number of times in her covert recovery in the midst of being contagious. Had A number of other residents walk into her room sinking. They were in the right room. They may be disoriented. And then we're exposed to the virus so it was very clear early on that. The resources were not in place at the staffing. Was Not in place to manage this outbreak. The staffing shortage meant Brenda. Couldn't get proper care even while she was infected. There were times when my mom when her recovery was trying to get her congestion cleared and she was in a laying position which is terrible for Kovac and couldn't get someone to to move her bed up or to get her into her wheelchair for hours so she struggled with reading for hours and then was placed on Oxygen. Because they couldn't get to her and that's not bad staff. It's we don't have enough staff but I wonder how many people died as a result of not having enough hands on deck to to take care of their their needs. Dr Dena Hinshaw. Alberta's chief medical officer acknowledges that protocols were followed at Mckenzie town there protocols with respect to testing and making sure that we quickly identify if that is the case. Kovic in the case of McKenzie Towne that outbreak protocol seems to not have been implemented immediately. So there does seem to have been a significant amount of exposure Rivera's response to the pandemic has enraged many of the residents families. Rivera sent out a letter to all of the families who had loved ones living there at the care center and included a hundred dollars. Save on Foods Gift Card. Isn't that ridiculous and family members? Other families are just disgusted by this. This step that Rivera had taken a really. Could those resources have been allocated differently? God for sure. We asked Rivera her comment about what happened to both brands clears grandmother and Shaun Parkes mother. But we didn't get a response a month and a half. After she came to McKenzie Towne Shawna's mother has recovered and is now covered free. Thankfully she's gone through those symptoms and she's at the other end of it. She's had better night's sleep she's not dealing with a cough or any of those symptoms but she's in isolation rate and and so she doesn't get out of for room and the only the only connection to the outside world is is through her cell phones. Facetime.

McKenzie Towne Shawna McKenzie town Brenda Rivera McKenzie Towne Towne Shauna parks Shaun Parkes DEMENTIA Facetime Dr Dena Hinshaw cough Kovac Cova Alberta medical officer
"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

Commons

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

"My mom found a nurse and US what the Fuck happened. And they told her that might. Nfl JUST JUST SIMPLY. She fell and my mom said. When did this happen? We didn't we didn't know anything about this fall. The nurse had said that they had called doctor and the doctor had determined over the phone without actually seeing my that it was nothing to worry about the took her to the hospital and there. They discovered that she had a concussion. I don't even think that the word stressful can In quite describe what what we were feeling. You know it's it it was. It was a law. A big reason why we have moved her to Mackenzie town was. They had had kind of been known for their team of wounds. Specialists and because of the diabetes that might not have had she did have some wounds kind of on her legs that that did require regular attention regular cleaning and dressing changes but the proper cleaning wasn't done and her wounds became infected soon. She was entirely unresponsive. She was taken to our South Calgary health campus. Which is I can't. I can't thank all of those doctors and nurses enough for the care that they provided her for those last two weeks of her life. They were amazing. I visited her every day. My mom was here staying with her somehow. Miraculously she did wake.

South Calgary health campus Mackenzie town Nfl
"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

Commons

06:10 min | 6 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

"Marshy man and from Canada. This is Commons. This episode of Commons is brought to you in part by fresh books to cloud accounting software. That's designed to save you time every time you use it. You're like a lot of people who are now working from home. The upside of that is that you're doing your part to save humanity but the downside of course is that it can sometimes feel like your work never ends includes taking care your finances and especially if you're a freelancer or small business owner. You might be worried about having enough money on hand to just take care of your needs. Fresh books is a great way to both. Save Time and make sure you're getting paid faster with fresh books. You can create customized and send brandon professional looking invoices in about thirty seconds and invoicing. Gets you paid about twice as fast you know? Running a business can be chaotic at the best of times so having access to the right information can help you navigate all the chaos just a little easier visit fresh books dot com slash. Cova Dash Resources for to date articles resources and information curated especially for small business owners and for a limited time. Fresh books is offering listeners. Fifty percent off their first three months. When you sign up for a paid plan good fresh books DOT COM SLASH COMMONS. Enter Commons. In the. How did you hear about a section? That's fresh books dot com slash commons for fifty percents off your first three months a somber Saturday afternoon at the McKenzie. Towne continuing Care Center. The death toll due to covert nineteen the facility rising to eighteen covered nineteen claims a third life. Mackenzie town long term care facility. In Southwest Calgary Alberta now has forty eight deaths related to Cova nineteen after two more deaths reported in the last twenty four hours one was in the Shepherd Care Kensington facility in Edmonton the other at McKenzie. Towne continuing CARE FACILITY IN CALGARY. That's twenty one death inside that facility alone. Twenty one people have now died from cove in nineteen at the McKenzie. Towne Care Center. That's over twenty percent of all the Albertans who've been killed by this virus just at this one facility but this isn't the first time the McKenzie town in its owners. Rivera have been in the news. I think that spend any amount of time there. I think that the holes Hannah quickly where they're lacking that's bringing sinclair her grandmother. Wound somers was a resident and Mackenzie town in twenty thirteen. She made an impact on everybody. That she she met she was just too is very caring very loving. She had a positive outlook on all things and she odd this really kind of goofy side to her really really silly side to her. She liked to have fun. She was a farm girl group playing baseball. And then you know. A lot of grandkids ended up playing baseball as well. And Mina My Papa. Were always there supporting us. They are our biggest fans so we have nothing but fond memories of Mine Anna. She was choosing angel. She really was as she got older. Lions started to exhibit signs of Early Dementia and by twenty thirteen. Her family needed to find a place that could care for her. She was put on a provincial waiting list for long term care and was taken to an interim facility in the meantime remember that day. Well I don't think I'll ever forget that day. Actually she was. She was terrified of that move. She didn't know where she was to her. We just dropped her off and left her there. She just didn't know what was going on. And there was no way of US explaining to her that made sense to her. What was happening. It's heartbreaking. I think every family could relate to the feeling of of guilt of not being able to bring them into our own homes and care for them. A permanent spot opened up in the Mckenzie Town Care Center in two thousand thirteen and why own moved in Bran remembers liking the look of the place. It's Nice I mean if you if you WANNA look at it. If you've to just have not know what has gone on behind the doors and look at it. It looks Nice but quite quickly. Brienne became concerned by what she was seeing. I remember visiting my Nana one time and being in kind of the main hall I guess they had a a medicine closet. Basically just kind of off that hall. The door was left open completely open. It wasn't even that the door was closed in locked. The door was left completely. Open with medications floored see laying on all the walls and this patient had just wandered in there. I didn't know what their state of mind was. I didn't want to startle them. So I did find a nurse or a worker there and told her you know she just she led the the person out obviously knowing their name and who they were and their temperament but I just remember that being kind of like a what the Fuck Kinda moment. Brian Remembers. They're just not being enough staff around the often times when I went to visit my Nana even to just find somebody at the front desk to give me the code to get into. The door was hard to do. There wasn't somebody I'd be wandering around on the main floor looking for anybody and I couldn't find somebody. Brian was getting married that summer and her mother came up from Washington state to help. It was around that time that things got much worse for her grandmother and Mackenzie Town. My mom had come to Calgary to kind of help with my wedding and to visit with her mom. During that time my mom had gone to see my Mina and walked into her room. She was sleeping. And my Nana's phase.

Commons Towne continuing Care Center CALGARY Mckenzie Town Care Center baseball Mackenzie Town Brian McKenzie business owner Canada Shepherd Care Kensington Southwest Calgary Alberta Mina US brandon Lions Cova Rivera somers
"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

Commons

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Commons

"Have to place a family member into long term care. It's going to be difficult and complicated for Shauna parks and her siblings. Taking care of their mother Brenda was especially so we have a complicated family history and stuff but being in the situation with my mom and communicating with her more than I have communicated with her mine entire adult life and really as a teenager as well as a child to. It's just been bizarre. Shawna grew up in foster care and her relationship with her mother's been fraught but as her mom got old and frail. She tried her best to be there for her. I'm thinking about how would I want to be treated? If I was in her shoes. I would want my kids to show even if I had no relationship with them. Even if I did terrible things I would still want here for my kids. It's really been a bit of a mind. Fuck for me to be honest earlier this year. Shawna's mothers condition worsened. She had declining health so she was in assisted living for a period of time. So number of difference concerns came up for her including diabetes Arthritis Home Inari hypertension and just made it so that she was becoming more and more immobile. Brenda had been in the hospital. And then as they sat on the provincial waiting lists for long term care to a temporary facility she was placed temporarily at a facility. Cupo view manner and shoes there for a short period of time before my brother received a phone call from Rivera saying that they had a bed available for her and because she was on the urgent move list that they needed to act fast. Rivera was the owner of the four Prophet Long Term Care Facility. That just opened up a spot by now. It's march of this year. The cove in nineteen pandemic was in full swing long term care facilities had been locked down in Alberta where they lived and that meant no visitors so Shawna and her siblings were worried but Rivera insisted that she be moved into this home because she would lose her place there. Would it be all these consequences? Really just put pressure on my brother to to make the move. Rivera insisted on moving her into McKenzie. Town right away which shauna parks her mother. Brenda the rest of their family. Didn't know was that the virus was already in the Mckenzie Town Care Center. In fact a staff member had started exhibiting symptoms days before Brenda moved into the facility on March Fifteenth. Shawna's mother was soon infected and the McKenzie towne outbreak would become the deadliest in all Alberta.

Shawna Brenda Rivera Mckenzie Town Care Center Shauna parks McKenzie towne Alberta McKenzie
"mckenzie" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Starting an internet business is harder than it should be you need to incorporate to create an operating agreement set up a system to accept payments and many other seemingly straightforward tasks in the nineteen nineties this was how it felt a setup anything on the internet you always had to stand up a web server on your own infrastructure before you could get to the interesting part which was building an actual product but the popularization of cloud computing made it easier to stand up a server because of that lower activation energy millions of applications and thousands of software businesses got started but the activation energy required to start the business remains higher than necessary it feels like standing up a web server in the nineties there's lots of tedium and reinventing the wheel that has been done by people before you this is the motivation behind stripe atlas which is a project to simplify the process of starting an internet business patrick mckenzie works on atlas at stripe he was previously on the show oh to discuss his experience building a small software company or a series of small software companies after leaving a large corporation and his name has become synonymous with the modern phenomenon of the small software entrepreneur he has been writing about this topic for over a decade at kells zuma's dot com it was great to talk to patrick once again about internet businesses and i'm excited to see stripe atlas become something huge we've done for other shows about stripe as well as other financial technology like blockchain's and automated trading.

patrick mckenzie blockchain kells zuma
"mckenzie" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Yes not be entirely so anyway performing yeah backstage i saw yes a lot they're of both you or in excellence the last week she in it or so so that hopefully seventy i've knuckle i powers think wanna andrew's betrayed going of to be india's on the in trust america and of it'd a friend to be great athlete to back act on as well plays so we'll see anyway and that's you keep theater confusing bull them let's talk a little tv of with okay a guy yup he that's benefit had esley not was one waiting pace for this does not happen clealy two to be guitar naked in three just this full special majors would've successor kill you the cool writer swayed review gers here if success it is was this in as conversation television real as with ben josh mckenzie thought it ben was and mckenzie remember so to right checkout gotham and of this course thursday one last evening reminder for ben's review looking plan second on this rate show ours to subscribe unna rectify kenzi infant assira police brother there's the good no official word of happy insurer sek duck shin confused man where's love it we're oh just going to chat palese to watt like to human cover don't beings make off congratulations those oh badly god what novel or an then order concept please at least gotham one obviously of us will pretend to be fourth season at right your or is job that what i don't know what i'm going to do.

india writer josh mckenzie gotham ben andrew america official
"mckenzie" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Today you on happy second fused ben mckenzie on gotham directing and the otc hey guys on josh horowitz welcomes through another dish in of happy sad ken fused on josh that sammy high you'll if you point they don't know that you're pointing to me that's the only way you'll notice speak got it it you is know making we watched to make he'll his career patta poltics for i it how this for to pull months ted bend mckenzie through to fame today's enfor ch in guest ryan atwood is ohs ben of of mckenzie courses character you know ben on mckenzie that show and of yes course we talk a from quite a bit three about very the notable oh see shows sammy i know southland but the people want they're going to freak people out whoa of the south wound he's a of i course really like gotham a noun talking at sports to ban i season haven't i don't think i've spoken to much to before if at all mike but sammy we i think we did i we connected got distracted in a by verb your profound there's a thank costume you as a probably here passage of other a levin in the holes from at kamikawa stranger things on it they so distract i think i've probably talked was to sent mike comecon it to me just if the clarify yes if i really and plumbed three the depths members i'll talking say three are hurric because i don't count com rely on you marina count backer on on earned his wife the o c which was morteau of course beloved the series it's that right they have a baby together now i think its who you're old actually atman.

ben mckenzie josh horowitz ryan atwood levin mike comecon gotham ken sammy
"mckenzie" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"This is an awful some moment filled out by mckenzie and she writes there was a guy who moved to my school nobody really knew where he came from but i found him extremely attractive we started talking casual flirting here and there then he asked me out we played on a blanket in the field under the stars but was straight out of a movie he kissed me it was the best kiss of my life we laid there for a while and then i told him about my adoption he said he had a sister who was taken away when he was six in the sister was four turns out he is my pie logical brother aw thank you for sharing that this is a shame in secret survey filled up by a woman who calls herself not poetic poet and shoot she is in her twenties identifies as bisexual was raised in a totally chaotic environment ever been the victim of sexual abuse some stuff happened but i don't know if accounts i vaguely remember something happening with the babysitter when i was around twelve she was older than me she would often kiss me and change in front of me purposefully i usually disassociate or dissociate when ever there is sexual contact with people and i don't know why i don't realize it's happening until the person i am with pauses and asks me if i am okay she's been physically abused and emotionally abused um she was beaten by her stepdad.

mckenzie
"mckenzie" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"mckenzie" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"How did that happen well let me quite because god forbid that steven as content gets lost in the shuffle because i'm a bit loud let me try this again how can reggie mckenzie not know that how could reggie mckenzie not know that that better oh so i guess what are in the middle of a stephen a swift show podcast let me tell you and i'll take phone calls on the rant on gruden on a few things but let me tell you what my biggest disappointment of the nba season has been i can get into a lot of things because the biggest surprise has been a boss it's of that expect at the miami heat will my sleep put in not disappointing me right now and then of course not only that the other thing to consider is my biggest disappointment ladies and gentlemen i spoke about that today on my television show first take on espn and there's every weekday from ten a m noon it's live it is not taped i got a few things on my mind about this team but before i tell you get into really really why i wanted you to hear what i said on national tv this morning cat take it away tekdal wafting chant went out calling you out i'm so sick to these people no the wanted for to john wall had 35 going to london last night you do will lose it to the utah jazz without rudy kobe.

steven stephen espn rudy kobe reggie mckenzie gruden nba miami john wall london utah