18 Burst results for "Mcgovern Medical School"

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on Houston Matters

"To get vaccinated do news outlets in your view have a moral responsibility and how they report such stories I think that you know in thinking about the way report. These things in and wanting to help to support people in being saved being able to relate to stories is a really important piece of change and so when we think about other situations where people have experienced a lot of change in their opinions in their beliefs about things. Oftentimes it is through close personal experiences with other individuals I'm thinking about for example the lgbtq movement and the way that our culture has changed to be so much more accepting of people across the different spectrums And i think that when it comes to things like hoven in vaccination while know sharing stories about you healthy people dying from it. I think that that is important. So people understand the risks It might be that people are able to relate more to stories where they haven't shared experience whether it is someone that reminds them of someone that they love Or is is consistent with the way that they view the world. So it's hard to say whether it is a moral imperative. But i think that we want to continue to support people in in knowing that we are all in this together. We're sharing this in a lot of different ways and and giving a variety of stories that people can connect with. This is houston matters. I'm craig co and we're talking about. How media talks about the pandemic now a year and a half into it with dr linda semi associate professor and director of graduate studies at the university of houston's jack jack valenti school of communications and the voice. You just heard dr jennifer hughes a psychologist with ut physicians and assistant professor with mcgovern medical school at ut health. We welcome your questions and comments at talk at houston matters dot org or seven one three four four zero eight seventy dr semi. There's been a lot of debate in recent years in journalism circles over the long standing notion of pursuing objectivity versus what's Known i in some spaces as advocacy journalism reporting. Typically with a social or political agenda behind it to some media that encouraged. Vaccinations are taking that social or political. Stand to others. They're.

hoven craig co dr linda semi jack jack valenti school of co dr jennifer hughes mcgovern medical school ut health houston university of houston dr semi ut
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on TSC Now

TSC Now

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on TSC Now

"Dr scene is one of the principal. Investigators of the tse autism center of excellence research network otherwise known as taciturn. Tassone is a coalition of five research hospitals boston children's hospital cincinnati children's hospital medical center university of alabama at birmingham university of california at los angeles and university of texas at houston. The group was formed in two thousand and twelve and received a grant from the nih in part to better understand autism and tse and begin to identify potential biomarkers. That could predict what children were at higher. Risk of cognitive manifestations from that initial grant eighty papers have been published on a wide range of discoveries in dc. Tell us more about the research that has been done to date. And what's ongoing. Here's dr sahin now. Joined by dr mustafa one of the primary investigators of the tse autism center of excellence research network. Also known as tass earned. Dr seen. Thank you so much for talking to me today player. So what is tasked certain. What are the goals of that network. Pattern is a clinical trial network for two risk and prior to two thousand and twelve. Most of the research onto risk sources was done at individuals centers that each center would have played thirty forty fifty patients that david studied and for the most part to studies will be underpowered to show effective of potential treatments or ability. You have a particular finding so what we wanted to do was to collect a large number of patients throughout the united states and that was the main goal of tests. Aren't we combine. The efforts of five large geographically distributed throughout the united states. These were university of california in los angeles mcgovern medical school in houston texas Alabama in birmingham cincinnati. Children's hospital in boston children's hospital so these five geographically distributed connects decide to work together and identify patients with diverse stars as close to birth as possible. Nice now we could collect the cohort of patients between zero and three years of age and investigate them. Deeply for any of the red flags of autism says this is a grant that was provided by the nih to study autism. Refocused ended early. They will win the autism entity essy population as you know as approximately fifty percent chance of developing autism. You're born with the resources so Identify why and how that fifty percent of the children went onto autism so what we did was to identify patients early in life usually due to the presence of the rumors and then to prospectively identical imaging studies identical. Mri studies eeg acquisition as well as neuropsychological s Sequentially until the children were three years of age and our goal was to see if we could identify biomarkers or red flags of autism. Early in life. So you mentioned that term papers generally speaking what is a biomarker then within autism. What are some of the potential biomarkers in. Tse specifically biomarkers actually short for biological marker. It's something that can be measured. And it's a sign of either a normal or abnormal process. It can be a condition or a disease in this case into discusses. You're looking for biomarkers autism anything. We can objectively major now biomarkers in different forms. You can have biomarkers in blood bodily fluids. Things like cholesterol has been used for instance the studying cardiovascular health for autism. We are not aware of any bio markers that we can measure in. A patient's blood is no gene test. Blood tests done to diagnose the condition of autism itself or the severity of autism. So most people have tried to abuse tests that are closer to the brain function it is structure or the function of the brain so the two areas of biomarkers that we have studied in this clinical trial network is mri especially connectability of the brain cells. That you can measure on mri old diffusion mri scans the second one is the eeg does is looking for function of the different train regions. And how they're connected to other. So we've tried to correlate both the imaging and the g findings with the presence or absence of autism symptoms. Children since this consortium came together almost a decade ago. What progress has been made in. Can you tell me a little bit about some of the studies. The group has conducted. It's really remarkable. That we as i said we got this grant from dan. I h into dozen twelve and we started to work in around two dozen thirteen and that particular grant has expired but it has led to eighty papers eight scientific obligations either directly or indirectly and it has also led to other funding opportunities. That were charlie actively working on. I won't mention all eighty of publications. But i'll focus on a couple of publications that had been thinking my mind influential so one of the observations that we previously had before we started a grant that was done just at our center in boston. Children's was that children with autism and to resources seem to have less organization of a particular brain tracks A major bank track between the right and left hemisphere. If you do a diffusion right you can look at the structure of the corporate schools. Quite specifically what we had found in our population of patients. Here in boston was that rain track was not well. Formed in children at symptoms of autism Persons does that did not have but this obviously at small study relatively small study forty patients and we wanted to look at a much bigger population. So as i mentioned in passer we collected the much larger group of patients. Actually hundred sixty five imprints Run the country and we had three hundred. Seventy eight is from these hundred and sixty patients so we really had a very rich data set to ask the same question. Does the corpus callosum look different in children that will go onto the autism versus those that will not and answer seems to be so we were able to build a previous finding in this much bigger population. So in that sense having this reached Has been incredibly helpful. Cronies under sixty five. Infants be also did eeg physician. We have four nine hundred gs again and very rich data set in the same patients over time as they are growing so there have been a number of the aga studies at came out. One of the most influential was led by marketing devon and joyce wu and what they showed was that if for the clinical cj start. The easy becomes abnormal. And you can see these interactive discharges on the precursor of clinical seizures and on the hall the becomes out of nowhere around four months of age and clinical cj starts roughly between six and seven months as a group. So there's a.

fifty percent forty patients thirty forty fifty patients los angeles charlie eighty papers three hundred today Alabama david three years university of texas seven months two thousand each center united states Seventy eight zero mcgovern medical school eight scientific obligations
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Get old if you want to avoid sleeping on the couch. Okay, well, I think that sounds like a good plan. 50 Plus continues. Here's more with Doug. All right, Welcome back to 50. Plus, thank you all for listening. I certainly do appreciate it. Did you know by the way that the number one thing that moms want this Valentine's Day? Is to be left alone Seems maybe we've reached the end of the quality time together thing built up by covert and all our time at home. I actually asked a woman in our office if she could guess. What moms wanted overall across the country for Valentine's Day, she said, the same thing. Right off the top. She nailed it moving forward. We will talk in this segment about something far more serious than that. Which is a condition called a R. D. S, which stands for acute respiratory distress syndrome. We'll talk a rds and its ties to cope. But actually with Doctor hold your Elsie, chair of the department of anesthesiology at McGovern Medical School and UT health and with that push of a button, and as I put my headphones back on because almost knocked him off my head. Will welcome you aboard. Good doctor. How are you, sir? Thank you Duck for for having me. I'm excited to talk with you about a radius and covert. And, um what is our perspective off? How we can help patients were suffering with that wonderful surfers that let's start with the definition of a rds that most of us can understand. So Air DS is sort of a kind of lung inflammation. You know, it's like having a very severe inflammatory disease of your lungs that suddenly offsets the function off the lung, so people with their ideas Will develop water. It's called pulmonary demon, both sides of the chest. They will have trouble breathing and in severe cases they are going to require mechanical intubate. Mechanical ventilation, So they're going to get intubated and they're going to be put on a ventilator until the lung can recover. Hopefully, hopefully, huh? Is this something that patients who wind up hospitalized with covert bring into the hospital with them, or is it something that develops while they're hospitalized? Well, Typically, patients come in to the hospital at earlier stages off from Cupid. 19 s O. Somebody comes in, says Ah, You know, I've got the symptoms, you know. I'm coughing, wheezing. I have, you know, sore throat. That's too a covert test. And then somebody made that measures the oxygen concentration and sees all while the oxygen concentration is not a size, it should be in there being put on supplemental oxygen on then, while they're in the hospital in about 20% of these cases It gets a lot more severe, You know that The covert 19 Wire is the source of two bars targets Al Villa. If you feel yourselves these cells represented in the lining of the lungs. Many of these are Villa If you feel yourself get extremely inflamed when they are, in fact it with The source code to virus and we're calling this L villa inflammation. When this gets more and more patients will progress towards more severe forms of air. The S will require mechanical ventilation, and some of them will even You know, requires sort of a lung replacement therapy. It's called examples where we put them on, sort of like a heart and lung machine where we're kind of taking out over the function of those lungs. Some of these patients or do recover, But it Zahhar journey and some of those patients we know do not recover the you know the the type of lung disease areas. Is the predominant form that kills patients who have covert 19. So it's the biggest threat to the space population. Good heavens, you mentioned the more drastic measures. Is there anything? Can you catch this early and say, Okay, we'll just we'll treat it with this real quickly to see if that stops it, or is it just Something that by the time it gets to that, and you can acknowledge it, it's already pretty far gone. So that's a very good question on guy think, you know. One of the things that everybody's talking about nowadays is vaccine. So if we're vaccinating patients, and they're not really getting the sauce cooked to infection, they're not going to go on to have aired. Yes, so there's a lot of effort. I put on to, you know, preventing task of to infections with vaccinations. Also, there's this monoclonal antibody therapy that Even if you have covert who can help clear the virus, particularly if it give it very early on. But right now our hands are still somewhat tied. And we don't have a lot of options when patients come in with source called called too early on, and they're progressing towards air DS, and that's a very important area of research. And a need for a patient's. We believe to find novel approaches that can help prevent this form of al Villa information that can turn the source code to infection in tow deadly areas. My goodness. So back to it seems to be more common than say, Rds seems to be more common in military veterans and other groups. Is there any idea why yet? Yeah, well, I think the lessons we've learned over the over the Last 12 months of the ongoing pandemic is kind of the older you you are in the more comb abilities. You have. The higher your risk is that you're going to end up with these kind of complications so particularly elderly patients with a lot of additional diseases. Are more prone to developing areas and having a better outcome, and unfortunately, many off all veterans are older patients..

Rds al Villa Al Villa respiratory distress inflammatory disease Doug Valentine Duck Elsie UT McGovern Medical School
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Through more than 20% of American history. And I guess most of us keep right on doing that. Generally speaking And especially during these past three months or five months, six months, however long it's been two years. I can't recall now. Seniors tend to have a little higher incidence of depression. Probably even than younger folks. We're losing our friends. Family members may be moved away, or even worse. Still live, Chloe even worse than that. Would How about people who still live close to you? But don't stay in touch. They've gone on. For some reason they moved on. They just don't have time. It's hard stuff that's tough on people. And hopefully There are Not. There are not too many of you who are dealing with that, But it's It's the real deal and to help me to help me with that to shed some encouraging light, too, and help identify the signs of senior depression. I'll bring on Gyre Suarez. Let me push that button. There we go, Professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at McGovern Medical School and a member of Beauty Hell's consortium on aging Welcome gyre. Oh, hi, dog. How are you? I'm very well, Thank you so much. Nearly six million older adults dealing with clinical depression. That's what I read correctly, only 10% of them. Getting the help and care they need. Is that right? Yes, Those are staggering numbers. So there really are remarkable that the size the scope of the problem really? It truly is. Well, Do you think that Six million is accurate. Hasn't maybe gone up a notch or two in the past six months? Yeah, probably. Because depression has a lot to do with stressors. You know, it tends to Happen more frequently in some people who may have a biological predisposition in times when you know life is just offer, and things are kind of chaotic. I mean, like they've bean the past. Few months, So both the pressure on Israel was anxiety are definitely on the rise in alongside often comes alcoholism, substance abuse, Because people obviously you know, they try to self medicate. And may end up making the problem. Worse is pandemics been just especially hard on seniors and depth. Doubly folk tough on folks I would think in assisted living or nursing homes where they had to go without being able to even sit in the same room with family members and people who really care about him. I just can't imagine being At that stage of life and being thrown in voluntarily into such isolation. It's got to be taken a toll. Yeah, talk about big stressor right there. No questions. So are the people who work in those places required to report signs of depression among their residents. Well, often not, And that's a part of the problem, and it's beginning to change. But it hasn't you know changes in off. It's not only for ah, like nursing home settings, but also even in General medical settings and the like When you go see your general practitioner, uh, to you recently. Yeah, You know, people may not be asked about their moved and energy level how they're feeling anxiety because you know those could be symptoms of depression. It has started to change very recently. The past, maybe 23 years. We see that being beamed them or in a more widespread fashion. You know where it's kind of like A nor divide all signed the same way that us you know, you take people's Post hoc grade and Ah ah, that one should ask a screening a question or two about depression just to catch that early. It's very prevalent, like you said. It's also very formally co occurring with other medical problems. Physical problems. Let's say, you know somebody who was going through like a It's like a cancer, for sure. But even things like you know, just a diabetes, diabetes that hasn't been well controlled. That has taken a toll on that person's, You know, physical health. Sometimes, like heart issues. Ah, certainly. After stroke, many medical illnesses oil increase the the the odds off someone becoming depressed by several fold. And by doing that, they actually the outcome off those physical illnesses becomes wars. And it's said that in many instances that may not be diagnosed. It's beginning to change since you're doing more widespread screening, but in the nursing home saddens definitely not done enough. I mean, you know that more effort Mohr awareness Ah needs to take place where It's really you know, being done very systematically, for you know, for everybody in that setting or any type of general Medical said. You know, for that reason. I think it's incumbent upon doctors everywhere to just start asking That question is part of a routine physical exam, even for family members who are Who are able to see and talkto older parents. What are some of the more common signs of depression that we just as regular folks can look for? Great question? Well, so you don't life throws as level lemons and you know we're going to be said for a few days, but that sadness Goes on and on, you know, let's say two weeks in a role, and you're still sad sadness that it's impairing your sleep takes away your appetite, you know, and you're not interested in doing any of the things that you normally would want to do. Sometimes people will tow the extreme off that, you know, people don't want to leave any more. And they may think about suicide. But most most commonly, so you have, like, let's say elderly parents or friends or anybody that happens in young people show. So they're just more reclusive and ah, you know, you try to engage them. They're not interested in and sometimes they look said they're crying more often or are often it could be also lots of anxiety. You know that sometimes depression disguises as as lots. Lots of anxiety is physical complains is another. So someone was generally healthy. And now you know, they're having all sorts of like sword here and there, and they seemed less interested in things that that could be another sign that depression is actually the culprit. You know, that was really happening there that needs to be Diagnosed because there is treatment treatment have come a long way. We can help.

depression Professor and chair Gyre Suarez Chloe McGovern Medical School Israel Beauty Hell general Medical Mohr
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Back 50. Plus, thanks for listening. Starting to appreciate it. We're talking this segment about something that's defined in a $10 word. Immuno sin essence, I'll admit that I've already cheated looked it up, but I'll also stop short of trying to define it myself. Instead, I will hand that ball with this push of a button to Dr Jessica Lee, associate professor, assistant professor. Excuse me of geriatric and palliative medicine at McGovern Medical School in UT Health and, of course, a member of UT Health Consortium own aging. Welcome aboard, Doc. Hi. How are you been? I've been pretty good at what you do know I'm hanging in there for an old dude. I really am. I'm keeping myself I'm chock full of vitamins. I am exercising regularly and doing all that I can see in a language We can all understand what on earth is Immuno Sin essence. Sure enough, in essence is a decreased and ah I guess the effectiveness of your immune system as you get older. So that's just gonna happen. Is that what you're telling us? Like over the front of my belt. Get it all right now, So there are some things that occur with aging that are a natural part of aging. One of them is, unfortunately that you're immune cells that help you fight off. Infections tend to get a little bit weaker, maybe not quite as good quality and also less quantity. Then when you're a younger adults, um, this is it sounds very depressing. But there are things that you could do to help with that if you understand that this is something that can occur. Okay, so so we know it's coming. There's nothing we can do about it. The lug nuts are going to loosen up. But we're going to be ableto work within that system, and it does that kind of go parallel with say, if we break an arm or a leg or something like that, it just takes long or even cut ourselves it takes longer to heal is that part of All of this immune oats in essence. Yes, That's right. There are some things Yeah, that just take a little bit longer. You know, older people take a little bit longer to bounce back. And so this is definitely a part of that. You're just full of cheerful news. Are you Okay. So exactly well, not exactly. But around. What point? Is there a typical age when we when the immune system road passes over the top and starts going downhill? Well, I don't think that there is a specific age in terms of chronology. A lot of times in geriatrics. We talk about your chronological age being very different from what your physical or your physiological age. And your physical age is something that can be changed by things like exercise eating right? And so you can be younger than your chronological age. And so I don't like to put a number on when that can happen on when the immune system can go down a little bit, But if you're a person who has lots of chronic diseases, that's certainly going to make your numbers. Uh, go down earlier than somebody who lets say doesn't have a lot of medical problems. Let's look Att. 100 people who are all basically of the same general health. Are there any groups of people men, women? Race, whatever anything that comes into mind that affects them more than others. Right, so not in particular. If everyone is sort of the same general health, there really is no disparity, necessarily between different ethnicity, their races. There's really no not differences that has been seen in like first men versus women. Yeah, so if you're just a general healthy population than your immune system, you know, will will decline sort of at the same rate, but not something that's very advanced are very quickly. We'll call it an equal opportunity. Nitti offender just about the best we can do on this. So let's go. Hope is going to be the good news and talk about some of the things we can and should do to keep this devil away from the door. How about to start with just vitamins and immune system boosters? Do they really work? So it's actually been shown that if you eat a fairly ah varied diet that you don't need to take extra vitamins or minerals, because sometimes actually, that can cause you to have too much. And too much is not necessarily a good thing, either. So I think that if you're have eating ah, appropriate diet that has a good mix vegetable that good mix of fruit you know, and good mix of lean proteins. Then you really don't need to take extra vitamins but about a good died of sweets and fast food. And none of that is the system booster in the vitamin, then a good idea at least once a day. Ah, yeah. So I think if you want, Teo, you know, get it. Get your vitamins in. If you know that you maybe have not eaten well for a few days or something like that. It might be good idea to pop a vitamin A multi vitamins really? Yeah, Yeah, really. It's it's not something that unless you also sometimes the doctors have shown that you have something that your specifically missing like. If you're specifically low on vitamin D, or if you're specifically low on vitamin B 12 though, there's some common ones, then you should definitely take a vitamin to replace those enough. Dr Jessica Lee with us here If someone asked what the two or three best foods are for our immune system, which ones would you recommend? I would definitely recommend fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidants. Most of the times that means colorful. So colorful fruits, colorful vegetables if you change them up. Ah, you'll get definitely the amount of vitamins and minerals that you need..

Dr Jessica Lee UT Health Consortium McGovern Medical School associate professor assistant professor Teo
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KCRW

"And we have more from NPR's John Hamilton. The first study came from a team at the University of Texas that come through millions of medical records in the national database. Albert Omron of the McGovern Medical School in Houston, says the goal was to see which factors affected a person's risk of getting certain diseases including Alzheimer's. And one of the things that came back was flu shots. That seemed odd, so I'm running a medical student led a team that took a closer look at the medical records of about 9000 people who are at least 60 years old. Some had received a seasonal flu shot. Some hadn't we would try to make sure that both groups had an equal amount of, say, smoking status. Obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, known risk factors for Alzheimer's. Then the team look to see who was most likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Homerun says People who got at least one flu shot seemed to have a lower risk. We found a 17% risk reduction in our population. Also, he says, more regular vaccination. So people who got the flu shot once a year was also related to a lower incidence of Alzheimer's. Those people drop their risk an extra 13%. Doctor, Paul Schultz directs the Neurocognitive disorder center at the medical school and oversaw the study. He says the results surprised him to have these guys. Come out and say, Well, it looks like you know, Getting the vaccine associated with less was totally the opposite of what any of us thought, Schultz says. Vaccines tend to cause inflammation when they rev up the immune system and in Alzheimer's disease, he says inflammation is part of the problem here. We've got a situation where we're giving them information on purpose. And we're hoping it prevents the flu without causing their Alzheimer's to get worse, and we get the opposite of what we thought was gonna happen. We get people who are actually doing better. A second study it. The meeting didn't find as much protection from a flu shot, but it did find a benefit from another vaccine. Maria Cario is Thie, chief science officer of the Alzheimer's Association. It looked at both pneumonia and flew but found more of an effect with antimony a vaccine. This study by a team at Duke University analyzed medical records on more than 5000 people who are at least 65 years old. Flu shots didn't help much, but Correo says shots aimed at Numa cockle bacteria made a big difference. The pneumonia vaccine in people 65 to 75 actually reduce the risk of Alzheimer's by such as 30%. Correo says Vaccines for the flu and pneumonia may protect people by preventing diseases known to affect the brain. Every time you have one of these infections now you may actually experienced a challenge to your memory and thinking another infection that can have a big impact on memory and thinking is Covina. 19. So, Correo says Brain health may be one more reason to get a Corona. Virus VACCINE When one arrives. John Hamilton NPR news Millions of women can be forgiven if they feel like they've been made unwilling participants in an experiment an experiment to find out what happens when you are pregnant in a pandemic. There's still a lot we don't know about pregnancy in the Corona virus. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports on what is known. Carisa Helmer and her husband, Timothy had been trying for a few months to get pregnant. When the Corona virus came along, They thought maybe they'd put their plan to start a family on hold. There's a quarantine going on. We don't want to be Putting the baby at risk. Also, our jobs. They're uncertain right now. So we thought, Oh, maybe we won't try for a few months. But then her pregnancy test came back positive. We're like, Oh, I can't be late for that for homer. There have been some conveniences to being pregnant during quarantine. She's been able to work from home so she gets more sleep. And she was able to manage her morning sickness by having crackers and ginger ale, something she can't do on her 90 minute metro commute from the suburbs of DC into the city. But other aspects of the pregnancy have been tougher because of the virus. For one thing, she's had to go to all of her doctor's appointments by herself, and she's had to tell relatives to quarantine for 14 days before they visit. Homer says she's very worried about getting the Corona virus. Yeah, very terrified. I mean, my husband stalls going to the grocery store, and that's pretty much the only place that he was being more in place that I go with doctors. Often, doctors say an abundance of caution is the right approach. Last month, the CDC published a study that suggested pregnant women are more likely to get a severe case of covert 19 compared to other women with the disease. Laura Riley is an O B g Y n who's on the Koven 19 task force at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All along. We've been saying you need to take every precaution that you possibly can to protect yourself and your family from contracting covert. 19 pregnant women with covert 19 appear to be more likely to go into. I see youse around ventilators, according to the CDC. Their data had a lot of gaps and the number of pregnant women in the study who needed a ventilator was quite small, just half of 1%. The data reinforces the need for pregnant women to do all the things that we know work, social distancing, wearing facial coverings and washing hands frequently and it's critical that others in their households do the same, Riley says. Then the other thing is, is that if they have symptoms, or if you're if you think you've been exposed, it's important to let us knows that so that we can do the test figure out whether or not you've had it or have it or whatever the case may be. One big question is whether the virus can be transmitted in utero. Doctors in France reported that a newborn caught the Corona virus before birth via the placenta, but that appears to be extremely rare. CDC also found that black and Hispanic pregnant women appear to be disproportionately affected by the virus. Carol Medeiros is an O. B g Y N and Providence, Rhode Island who treats many black and Hispanic patients. She says that while some pregnant women can work from home right now, that's simply not an option for many of her patients who work in health care factories or retail For them. The pandemic makes everything harder, in part because their job might expose them to the virus. It's hard for them to take off time when they feel like they are most at risk. You takeoff time you might lose your job. But she says she hasn't seen many indications that people who want to get pregnant are avoiding it. People have come to have their intra uterine device is removed and start trying. I don't think it deterred anybody. Maybe Madero says it's that people have a certain kind of hope for the future. Laurel Wamsley NPR news Support for NPR health coverage comes from MD. Anderson Cancer Center offering lymphoma treatments, including car and K therapy more at M d. Anderson lymphoma dot com. This is NPR news..

Alzheimer flu CDC pneumonia NPR Correo Laurel Wamsley John Hamilton Homer Laura Riley Alzheimer's disease Paul Schultz Obesity McGovern Medical School University of Texas VACCINE Albert Omron
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"The show Dr men J. Kwak assistant professor of geriatric and palliative medicine at McGovern medical school at do you do and at UT health Science Center thanks for another check your time there doc thank you for having me here my pleasure so when I was putting my questions together for you I thought back to this this past week's discussion of prostate cancer and how we learned that a man live long enough you'll probably get that as senior men go is his heart disease like that is it inevitable or is that something most of us can probably keep away if we just make some good choices right I wish I can have the magic to make them get away from it but unfortunately heart disease has been the leading cause of death for men in the United States so it's been a big problem and then after trying to find out why it's happening but we are not able to find out why men are more likely to have her give if they're women so I unfortunately have to say that parties there there's something that's been going on for a while and it's going to be with them for awhile yell why they're alive we're not gonna have a vaccine for that or we while we do have the means to reduce the rate yeah let's talk about what what I'd be doing as let's call it just men over fifty that changes what we can eat what we do how often we do it so where do we start Dr.

assistant professor McGovern medical school United States J. Kwak UT health Science Center
Coronavirus can live in air for 3 hours, study finds

Sean Hannity

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus can live in air for 3 hours, study finds

"About the latest information that's out there about how long the corona virus stays alive and I quoted that number of three hours airboard and I want to supplement that comment that was the result of the study that was done by Princeton University and UCLA and posted by the national institutes for health not everyone believes that that is correct and that is not a peer reviewed study I have right now on the side of marketwatch dot com is the coronavirus airborne like measles the answer now that they're getting is the jury is out as of Thursday today it did not appear to be an airborne virus like say measles or chickenpox and according here Luiz S. drops the professor and vice chairman of internal medicine at McGovern medical school in Houston Texas it's a virus that travels in droplets this is very good news with an airborne virus one person can infect the whole room now for the bad news airborne transmission is plausible according to a study and that's the one that's been out there for several days posted that this week from scientists at Princeton University the university of California Los Angeles the LA and the national institutes of health and with the idea to put this on its website this is what led people to believe that it is their board that research concluded the virus could remain airborne for up to three hours post Ariel as they should so in other words I don't think we know for certain although many people believe that it's droplets only meeting that there has to be an actual physical form of the virus out there dropping in landing on something others are saying that it is plausible that it could be airport in terms of the high rate of infection it clearly is one that is rather easily

Princeton University Ucla Luiz S. Professor Vice Chairman Mcgovern Medical School Texas Ariel Houston University Of California Los A LA
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"To address the topic now that probably needs more coverage and I'm glad to do it delivery home and how it impacts the seniors lives to help me I will bring in doctor men G. Quoc assistant professor of geriatric and palliative medicine at McGovern medical school welcome to fifty plus stock if you're talking about nice to meet you wonderful yes thank you very much so before we get farther into the discussion let's let's give me about giving me a textbook definition of delirium sure William is that cute and clock trading changing mental status then it happened very commonly among older adults active path the definition of the Liam and it actually tells a lot about young itself it actually happens a lot in hospitals to if I read correctly right correct it happened one third of the older adults who are admitted to the hospital and then when we come back well it's kinda scary realist talk about some of the symptoms these people experience so that may be a a loved one or care giver would would recognize that it's just kind of a general confusion really is that right yeah absolutely so like I said the billionaire is a key change in mental status it's kind of no moment that that at the location for example a night for them to come very agitated aggressive or paranoid or very active person becomes truly fun they were very sleepy and that all changes from the baseline and bass exactly that happened is that a billion in debt the family member would notice that they are different and that the comment and I think the report number nine the older adults I get really sleepy if I eat a big meal doc sorry that doesn't count though does it but I noticed here well it's okay I noticed also here that says that you of someone who is experiencing delirium might have very vivid dreams it continue even when they wake up is that right they they they have delusions or illusions which means that changes up their protection for example think about yourself you know tell me why you're having a fifth street in New York up in the middle of the night and they wonder where you are and then doesn't remember what you have done and why you're there do you think that something else is coming and if you get there have you lived in a village and you get scared and that's exactly what older adults usually have field in the hospital you'll be looking at the symptoms it's easy to see how one could compound another and it just just big cycle of things that are going on and then you add in the the confusion of already opening your eyes in a place that's very unfamiliar to you and it would be H. it would just be scary it can be for for that senior oh gosh yeah you got it the date in the beginning they give really scared and if you're talking about older adults who do not have good memory and perception for example in older adults with kind of memory problem does not have their glasses on and walked the night in the hospital including there being that strange people with needles and she's been wiped down then it's very scary and that's that's the picture that you have to have in your mind when you have a feeling you get older at the office it up very scary yeah and and on top of that you mentioned earlier that twenty thirty percent of seniors who are hospitalized you're gonna experience just half up to half of patients who already are dealing with some sort of dementia are gonna have delirium while they're in that setting as well that's correct it's very common and then the most scary part is that not a lot of people recognize fifty fifty Liam and then it is preventable by re direction so for example if you have older adults having studio and you have to approach like taking care of a toddler looking for a mom in the hospital and get scared did you read that I read them comfort them giving their glass they've been here that night their perception about the surrounding to restore their memory and then we directed or reassuring that we are not there to hide cause any harm you're there to help them they are not in train your dangerous environment that the staff strategy and back to back the **** you went great taking care of older adults or your thoughts the ones that do you mean hospital mercy document you clock on fifty plus since it's it it's clearly not a hundred percent of us to experience a lame so let's talk about who's more or most at risk I see for example that even something is is simply cured as dehydration can be a factor why would that be sure you hydrate and thirsty your brain does not have enough circulation option and then your mind get cloudy and if you're talking about older adults who do not have very good regardless even though only a mentally ill the hydration can cause it's cloudy mind and your profession about the surroundings and minimize their understanding so that causes that may cause delirium of course I would imagine as an as a side note that lots of a higher percentage of seniors tend to be dehydrated than younger people is that a fair statement yes that is that the correct that the correct the state yet so they don't have a good physical reserve they don't have a good heart function M. A. R. K. not to drink a lot of water so they're very susceptible to dehydration why do you think would be people who have had hip surgery beyond the risk list what's that about what is the after hip surgery they might have a lot of pain because if the big surgery April right and they are the ones who may not know how to communicate very well they are deeply areas there are you man and also they cannot move a lot because of the surgery and then once you cannot move a lot your body thirty four and then they can have tended to be older adults who have faced when you're at the right a lot of factors like pain undiagnosed pain or discomfort in the mobility can cut and after surgery they tend to have constipation or urinary problems they may not be able to go to the bathroom the old computer at eight point eight billion yen you you bring up the the pain issue which brings up medications and those medications also can maybe be a little too strong or too you have a reaction between two drugs and that just poured more fuel on the fire doesn't I don't return to prescribe pain medication but older adults like I said had lower fecal recharge to medical liability medication they've had to have side effects buildup of the bad credit is to find the perfect balance but for a Wilder adult everybody's not the same and then there are bits of it are very different so it could be a little bit hard to find the perfect balance we may have to go back and forth between the pain and believe you're more side effects does delirium just kind of come on suddenly or is it something that family members or caregivers might notice little signs up as it leads up to a full blown up so and I know that this delay in the in the upside to this is that it's almost always temporary too right M. like a definition of Gilliam is fairly acute so I would say it happened right away and that can only define unfortunately we thought that the only of the three first of all in the past but new studies have shown that one third of the patients who did develop into you in the hospital they have permanent didn't come on time of charge for up to three months all goodness yeah that's that's a hard hard thing it's so sad to hear that does it well yeah for up to three months so that means long after people are home is there any medication that can be used to managers or how do I guess you just have to let it go away for three months right that's very good question there it's unfortunate there is no match the union may be caused by a lot of factors what we used to but we have to do it how much the possible coded the V. Leo and tried to report it but if the patient becomes very agitated aggressive to the point that they can be harmful for themselves or others then we may have to prescribe the medication to calm them down which you usually we use for the fact product problem goodness medication they'll put a lot of side effects so a lot of geriatricians are very helpful when I'll be prescribed medication for three years of course yeah you would have to be because it is a good chance that seniors already on three or four different medications while the man that has been a really good discussion Dr Minjee Quoc on fifty plus thank you so much I want to hang on to this one it'll it'll be in my best of envelope thank you so much doctor thank you bye all.

assistant professor G. Quoc McGovern medical school
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"And supplements and occasional over the counter man check with your pharmacist or doctor to see if all those chemicals get along with each other the right combination of man's will keep us healthy the wrong combination can make us seriously ill or even kill us chew on that while I bring up doctor rex Paulino he see assistant professor geriatric comparative medicine at McGovern medical school and a member thank you for doing that doc of UT health consortium on aging welcome aboard hi good morning great I the seniors taking more medications these days and they were twenty thirty forty years ago yeah yeah a lot of the older adults have been that have been doing a whole lot of that yeah well I guess one of the reasons because there are just more things that we can cure with medications now than there were thirty forty years ago right right I mean the the advances of science has really grown exponentially so that's why you see it like everywhere just like a lot there's a new medicine that comes out almost on a daily or like weekly basis and then you can just see it with the media and everything so it's it's natural that you know that physicians may want to explore trying to use all these medicines especially if their patients if if the patient ask for them I think a big part of that actually comes from the just preponderance of medication commercials on television now you can't pull rock without hidden some drug commercial telling you that if you have this you better tell your doctor about that is if your doctor wouldn't already know about it that is so true I mean knowledge is power and obviously with with everything that is being being shown in the media that you know it's there all these companies are encouraging patients to ask about all these medicines from their physicians if it actually makes sense yeah I was going to ask you how many times do you think or or has it ever happened where a patient went and said you know I saw an advertisement on television for this medication is supposed to help my whatever I don't suppose you've ever heard of that heavy in the dot com no no never heard of that David possible our is it really I had a and and and sometimes even for for the the relatively on your medications you know it's not uncommon that patients ask you about all these things and then you're forced into a corner and say well look we do some more research about I'm not sure that's right for you but all research it let you now I got you so in a lot of times what a knob experiences my wife had to take a lot of medication not a lot but several at one point for some headache issues and and stuff and we became very friendly with the pharmacist because the pharmacist in the doctor sometimes it would be like if say patients got two or three doctors you're dealing with they may prescribe stuff that unbeknownst to each other won't get along with another man and unless you really ask you you're not gonna know or you and that's a very important point of your brain Doug you know and with with all the advanced history coming out right now obviously you know patients also quite often seek medical attention from from different providers now it'll be in a in a in a perfect scenario especially now with at the electronic medical record system ideally everyone is talking to one a one another so you know exactly which medicines your patients are on and you know for for that specific time frame however it's not uncommon that you know patients would want to see a different doctor in a different institution and if they are not closely communicating they and their medicines could just easily pile up yeah that's why I think that's where the pharmacist can come in very handy and every time we've had to deal with something like that they've all been very patient and very thorough in their investigation of a does this get along with that and sometimes it may be just it might not be a serious side effect is not going to kill you but it might just be something where one medication reduces the efficacy of another medication and that's got to be taken into account doesn't yes definitely and I actually give a lot of importance to you is that the job that the role that a farmer pharmacists are doing even if it's a small interaction these things easily pile up and next thing you know it's going to snowball and all of a sudden you're in the hospital for multiple things yeah let's talk about some of those possible interaction situations it it might be some just as much it just makes you kind of feel clammy and sweat a little bit but it can potentially if you take the wrong two or three medications together we could take it out permalink couldn't right right and depending on the medicine that you're taking depending on how many you're actually taking and how many potential interactions which really can be a lot side effects can be anywhere you know anything from simple you know I feel dizzy it'll be unsteady on my feet to you actually falling and breaking a bone or you know hitting your head and all the settings during the emergency room requiring a lot of attention that's what I'm thinking about it let's throw alcohol into that mix too because a lot of people very casually take all the medications are doctors say to take and then we'll have a couple of cocktails in the evening and that could be a big one can't yeah definitely alcohol plays a huge part and yeah in in this **** and medical compliance and really how the medicines interact with one another so so it is a tremendous responsibility to physicians should do pretty comprehensive assessment on what medicine said the patients actually taking not only prescription medicines but also over the counter medicines because all of these things they just add on and it's very easy to to not be able to ask all these questions because you're here running a very busy practice yes yeah and I'm not I'm not gonna leave all the responsibility on the doctor it's also incumbent upon the patient to just say look here's what I'm taken in that ought I my wife and I've gotten into into a custom now every time we go to a doctor which bring a list of everything we're taking that that address perfect and what is what I would actually recommend is that every time you go to see your physician make sure you bring your updated soul it like your medicine list and do not leave character you know the practice the clinic until you get a new list of medicines because if they plan to change one or two medicines whenever you see like a practitioner right it has to reflect in that paper so that when every you go to a different practice at different in a different physician or practitioner CC at least you have the most updated instead of medicine yeah that it's got to be updated with not only just the name of the mad your own but the dose in the frequency everything about that and that that same list to half it's got to include supplements it's got to include vitamins all kinds of things they can interact it's got include everything because they even over the counter medicines are essential when it comes to reviewing someone's medication list is there any medication that's ever been thoroughly tested by the FDA and come back with the absolute zero score on headaches I think that seems to be common with everything it's a and you know side effects and that's that's where the challenge lights really is because you know yes that being able to sit down and taking the time to review someone's medicines can take you know quite a bit of time and attention it certainly can especially if you don't have that listed the list is there a doctor I it's been my experience pretty good about just taking that listen there for a minute in reading everything on it and then coming back to the conversations okay here's what here's our plan of attack for whatever we're dealing with right now right now and and ideal were I I wish all of my patients for you know we're like you guys take all of your medicine let's with yeah it's not uncommon that we see patients who you know they they come alone and they don't it in on the you know completely recall all the minister taking they don't know the name of the medicine that does all you know it's not uncommon that we see patients whose a felon well I I just take the bottle is that I take the medicine yeah take a blood pressure pill and something for my upset stomach and that's all they know the race got to frustrate you guys is certainly must Dr rex Pauline on fifty plus let's go back to that list I would imagine it's probably a good idea also if you have allergic reactions to medications that you know about that goes on that list to done it yes definitely and and I would highly encourage you know do everyone is listening that if you feel like you have you if you've had an allergic reaction to a medicine please let your provider now some of these reactions may be true allergic reactions but some are just you know they're not specifically allergic rash button they might just be your typical you know side effects from these medicines button you know it's very it's very important that you let someone know about them honestly I think doctor the whole headache thing I think there's some coincidence there amongst the the people who are taking the you know taking the part part the trial city view if you put a hundred people in a room what I'm at least going to have a headache in order to conform to doctor rex Paulino thank you so very much for your time I this is one that I know a lot about and I'm glad you you hit you nailed everything I needed to talk about with.

assistant professor McGovern medical school rex Paulino UT
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"That same basic area is going to remain open K. T. R. H. news time it's two oh three house speaker Nancy Pelosi won't be sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate until some time next week announcing today the house will vote on floor managers after Monday Marianne Williamson the space cadet of the democratic presidential wannabes the author and spiritual leader announcing today that she is dropping out of the race which reminded several people that she had still been in at the economy added one hundred and forty five thousand jobs last month fifteen thousand short of expectation but the unemployment rate remains as three point five percent and generate who was hosts money matters Saturdays at four and Sundays at one on Katie our age told Houston's morning news there's something else that got his attention wages are rising more people are kind of you come into the labor force and I think we're going to see job numbers pick up here in the near future moreso is hosting a free retirement town hall coming up on Tuesday January twenty first five thirty to seven go to Katie are H. dot com and register online if you would like to reserve your spot we're in the midst of a fake meat frenzy with makers of the stuff claiming they're saving the planet from the horrors of raising cattle and consumers think they're losing weight by eating in plant based burgers probably both wrong doctor John Higgins is a professor of cardiology with McGovern medical school at UT health you are looking for you know a burqa and you won the healthiest Berga then these do not actually appear to be back answer doctor he considers the main problem is too much sodium but the meal is workers also have too much fat and just as many calories he recommends a different kind of meat you are actually much better off going for H. at lean chicken burger or a Turkey burger some of the sink meat producers of said it's not about health it's about impacting climate change scar Crowder news for your son forty KTRE news on demand dad Katie our age dot com gonna have another update at two thirty breaking news as it happens.

Nancy Pelosi Senate Marianne Williamson Katie Houston John Higgins professor McGovern medical school Berga K. T. R. H. Crowder
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"On the issue and here's fox's Kristen Fisher. as Congress debates what to do some businesses are already taking action the world's largest retailer Walmart announced it would stop selling ammunition for handguns and assault style weapons the company CEO explained it to employees like this quote in a complex situation lacking a simple solution we're trying to take constructive steps to reduce the risk that events like these will happen again the status quo is unacceptable. question is Kroger also announcing is gonna join requesting its customers not to openly carry any guns in their stores and this is the difference is a concealed Kerry are open Kerry open Kerry the difference is going to be posted whether it's a thirty ought six or thirty at seventy nine apparently okay NRA denounce Walmart is giving in to pressure of the anti gun elites are news time now is five thirty four mainstream media has been able to defeat president trump with anything that they've thrown at him thus far and they throw in a lot. so now they're trying something new and here's Katie are just close Saunders live with that yeah a claim that your is tired of him as they are saying the president trump altering complete dominance of the media of every news cycle all the controversies that he generates may be is causing a what they call trump fatigue and sponsors Howard Kurtz robin I'm sure with the RNC says the exact opposite is what's really happening here is that people are excited about the fact that he's going to defending our valley. defending what we think that the media should be asking a different question but we are of someone who's standing out for America first foreign policy so we have to ask that question is whether or not he would be asked that question they're going to make the decision that they're happy with the direction we're going in other words only the mainstream media and Democrats have quote trump fatigue. his news media fifteen. the old board that anything sick and tired of the media here is kind of a surprising thing voters on both sides of the aisle agree that means Republicans to that the Russians planned to metal in the twenty twenty election lab at the Chinese and the Iranians and everybody else. they also a plurality both sides believes that it would benefit president trump interesting I don't understand how that works now national security expert at returns Askey says that doesn't make sense given trumps foreign policy he says Russia China and others don't care who wins the White House just as long as they can weaken the US from within. because all this chaos right. to change your vote because they don't have that capacity it's what they can do to destabilize our politics to get us to go after one o'clock. yeah Russia tears as he says been meddling with U. S. elections since the nineteen thirties so expect more fake names misinformation to be spread through social media next year don't forget about all the box they can come from anywhere our news time five thirty six there is a staggering thirty million Americans who claim to have on diagnose diseases there is even a TV show about a call chasing the cure have you seen that the good news though a lot of these diseases themselves over time. doctor Jennifer soils is an assistant professor of internal medicine with the McGovern medical school at UT health in patients who have different sort of neurologic symptoms patients have headache double vision you know tingling sensations a lot of patients actually come in with the key as their primary symptom doctors will sells them not to give up hope because they don't have a diagnosis doesn't mean that they'll be sex forever you know about half to two thirds of people with undiagnosed illnesses actually slowly recover on their own with time doctors will says some of this may be psychosomatic but a lot of it will just take more research scar Crowder newsradio seven forty Katie are rich. sleep here is a lot. water we should try it sometime good nutrition fitness tracker craze causing some concern among health professionals to doctor Elizabeth Thomas with diamond physicians has too many people are becoming obsessed with tracking their numbers instead of their overall health because what happens is sometimes people get their number so much that they lose track of what they're actually going for it to be healthy or is to get to a certain appearance is to make that thing stop beeping at me she says you should listen to your body instead of your fighting fatigue to exercise more or you're skipping meals when you're hungry maybe you should re evaluate your goals re calibrate that thing on your arm I think that's the thing to do is now five thirty eight Houston Astros Los to the brewers for to putting the them a game behind the Yankees now and a half game behind the Dodgers for the best record in baseball George Springer though now listed as day to day after being carted off the field he suffered a head injury when he hit the wall in the fifth inning the team has the day.

fox Kristen Fisher. Congress Walmart
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

10:12 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Welcome back fifty. Plus, thanks for listening. What is screaming me sometime? In this next segment. We'll talk about the aging process, and had to take your foot off the gas, so that you can kind of pace yourself into a longer better life to help sort that out. I will welcome to the show. Gabriel freeze a PHD and instructor in these sokaiya tree, and behavioral sciences department for McGovern, medical school at UT health and thank goodness, a member of UT hills consortium on as you'd think for taking care of us singer. Doc, thank you. Thank you for having me year, pure a term, that's kind of being tossed around in your world. These days is exceleron aging Helen's been around. Yes, it's been around for quite some time. So it actually started back when researchers in the laboratory, we're trying to investigate markers of aging based on on lab exams. Let's say and we realize that sometimes those markers, do not really match with our criminological age. And so we started realizing that there are basically two different. Types of aging. Right. So you have your chronological age and your biological age. Let's say so your chronological age measures that time lapse since birth rights, so to people that are born on the same day will have the same chronological age throughout their lives. Regardless of their lifestyle year. Diseases he's tree into your house, and as opposed to dad biological age measures, the declining the function of our tisches in our organisms might so depending on what we go through in our lives does chew ages. Don't really match. Let's say they're not really in sync. In the problem is not really. When they don't think it's really win our biological ages, actually older than our chronological age. Right in, in, in desiccation. We say that we have a premature aging mechanism or situation. So you guys have figured out a way to actually physically not physically, but actually measure the thing. So you can say, okay, this guy's biologically. He is seventy years old and chronologically. He's only sixty that makes sense you have you have a measurement system in place. Now yet. Yeah. Okay. And actually, there are several different types of measurements. Okay. That's what I it's part of our research to try to find the most reliable and accurate measures of biological aging. Yeah. Very interesting stuff here. So I'm figuring that you and your scientists. Friends have these ways to measure against specific criterion, benchmarks say, okay, this just like you know, this person's older in the calendar. Calendar says, so what are some of those some of those markers you're looking at? Yes. So there are different types of I said, so one very traditionalist called t Lemaire link. So it's a part of our chromosomes that tends to shorten as we age. Let's say and, and when we're exposed to unhealthy lifestyles and exposure to chronic lifestyle lifetime, stress, for instance, we tend to shorter to shorten does still species of the chromosome, we have a very recent measure, that we called. Epigenetics AG. Which basically measures some variations in our DNA that also go together with the aging process. And so based on our DNA's we can pretty much determine how old we are and have an idea of, of whether we have premature aging mechanism going on, or if we might even be biologically younger and really is determined by our life as a whole that unhealthy lifestyle thing. I think when I was growing up, we just call that somebody who looked rode hard and put up wet. Yeah. Yeah. Let let's talk about that. So if somebody if somebody you sit down with a patient, and you're going to measure their biological age or you asking more questions or doing more poking and prodding. What's the process? Yes. So one thing that it's important to, to clarify is that this is not really the type of exaMthat's s from patients nowadays. So I it's more from a research perspective than we expected. Choo, Choo contribute to ways that we can make the lives of patients bat, right. But he's not part of the cleaning routine and me personally, I'm not a clinician. So I'm really focused on these the basic science part of it. Who would ask the question. Probably doesn't want to know the answer. I know right? We're all curious you know what our biological age. Yeah, but then the, the, the overall idea, here's really choose tablet, what mechanisms lead to the premature aging and are, there is different evidence, suggesting what those might be as we just discussed and then depending on the population that we're studying once those targets are actually identified we might be able to, to work around them. Right. So we really identify those specific Guinea alterations are leading to premature aging mechanism by knowing that we can target, those, those still sequences of DNA for instance, and we can prevent premature aging mechanism. Right. So the idea is not to prevent aging overall. That's not at all. But it's to prevent premature aging specifically right there is that there's evidence or. There are Satistics that say that, for example by twenty fifty the American eighty five years old and overpopulation will triple, and so we can imagine the burden on the public health that this does increase, we'll eat you. And then if we just estimate that maybe even younger folks will they might have biological age stead are eighty five or older as well. That goes to show that we might be underestimating these statistics rights, so did the, the system will be even more complicated. If we take those extra folks into account point because you've got your chronologically eighty eighty-five and then you have to stack on the biologically eighty who actually maybe seventy seventy five eighty years old. Exactly. Yeah. And the, the older that we are the more likely to develop age related diseases cardiovascular disease, hypertension cancer into one and so forth. So it's really something that we need to be aware, off, right, both in terms of lifestyle and going to the doctor and things like that. But also from our point of view, from the research point of view to try to prevent that on the long term. Those talk about ways to do that. The Gabriel freeze on fifty plus a good diet. It's gotta help right? Yes. Absolutely. So one of the. The strongest evidence from the scientific community of waste shoot to reduce aging or to prevent from aging has to do with diet, and with caloric intake and caloric restriction more precisely the last, we eat overall, the, the, the, the more Bill longer we can live, that's basically it, and then in terms of our eating habits trying to focus on more intoxicated, rich food, anti-inflammatory food kind of thing. So more, a Greenlee she vegetables nuts, fruits, fish, less of the fast food kind of routine that we take our lives. Now. Knocking all phone out a living. Exactly. Right. I mean it is we are all trying to do that. It's not easy. But the point is that we need to be mindful of those things, especially if you already have a pre existing condition then make you more vulnerable to that. And that's part of our work here. So we see that some, some folks with that have a diagnosis, for example of other diseases, let's say, in our case, I can't diseases. They might be more vulnerable to premature aging mechanisms as is. Right. And so it's, it's especially important in these populations. She should you be mindful of these lifestyle. Yeah. Guidelines. What do you consider more important? Eating less or eating better quality. I think a combination of both I think that the, the, the, the science behind, it is not really that stab list June. How one from the other. So whatever we can do those in on that sense. Like just eating a little bit less and eating healthier when you do, that's for sure. We'll help. I don't think that'll hurt any of us and that, that brings exercise into the question. Let me jump over that because I know that's important every, every doc, I've ever had on here said use it or lose it, and that means get outside and move around. What about sleep? What's the importance of sleep to the aging process is just as important as exercising, and as a healthy diet? So we normally have like a small list of things that we used to, to, to say okay, so these are two main things they need to focus both healthy eating exercising having a good night's sleep. Avoiding drugs tobacco. Oh, this things like that we just in your exposure to you realize which is the son, you know, to protect your skin, this kind of things like they are all seemingly important in this attempt in this process to reduce premature aging. We're, we're down to just a minute. I want to ask. About the emotional state to what, what is the psychological wellness of a person have to do with this? Right. So this is something really interesting. So what researchers are finding is that are chronic lifetime stress exposure can really have or play a major role in the premature aging mechanism. So trauma.

premature aging Gabriel Helen UT Diseases instructor McGovern t Lemaire Choo Guinea Satistics Bill seventy seventy five eighty ye eighty five years seventy years
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

10:22 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Comes should talk over letting go. Now, we got stuff to talk about welcome back to fifty plus the gift that keeps on giving. So here's a pop culture pop quiz. What a Mariah Carey. And Mel Gibson have in common. Gibson can't sing we know that probably doubt that carries. She acts, but I don't think she's she's not in the big leagues of acting. But what they do have in common. Is that they both have bipolar disorder. Which as I've read of facts about five point seven million adults in this country and worth noting for this audience, a low bipolar disorder typically starts when someone's in their twenties, or so there are cases in which this disorder manifest itself. In patients, one of their forties, and even into their fifties to shed some light on this is Dr yaldo Vado, professor hold on push the button, and then say at all, thank you. There. We go professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the treatment resistant mood disorders program at McGovern medical school at UT health. Thank you for your time today. Doc, hello. Here. Great as is becoming custom here. I'm going to start with a clinical definition, what is bipolar disorder by definition? So by ardor psychiatric disorder where the patient experience, a different states across life has spirits off depression that west watches the most common, however, also has spirits off. What we call mania mania? Almost the opposite of depression is highly off energy decreasing in Indonesia, Philippe, depictions become stock achieve the thinking process becomes faster and inconsequential patient would be we some kind of Josie. And that could lead to some consequence like spending too much money talking sinks that should not be telling secrets on each other. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. So. The opposite side. Regard into disease is that despite the manic phase being the like say most remarkable most baller. Beijing life is in depression. How often do these episodes? Are they daily weekly monthly what where's the episode tied fall and rise? So when start disease. Today. The day they last at least weeks. Okay. So and it to be longer as as more treatment. We'll be postponed it. Okay. So far camp. We remain yet. Andrew start doing seeing that are not exactly appropriate. You will be and their treatment. Maybe that could last for weeks or even moment, we've consequences. Depression. Let's go back for a second to how many people have this here. It's about two and a half percent of the of American adults is that number higher or lower in other countries. There are very interesting studies compare the American population with the European population. Especially you capably in all these studies. Always they prevalence in US is higher. Wow. Okay. Yeah. And who's at greatest risk because it's something we inherit is this something how how do we get this? So what did they researchers are discussing? So we need to remember that the US is countered that was formed by immigrants. People that they left. They home county is they cross it the ocean. And they came here. Place without the resources wherever so what did they researchers understanding deck? Maybe people we have high-level, off empathy. We trying for by baller like profile. Maybe they wear more prone to take adventure. Then people doubt implicity interesting. Yeah. That's an interesting take on that. Yeah. Dr. Yeah, they convey Vado on fifty. Plus any difference in percentages of numbers of cases by sex or race? No. It's exactly about the same the same amount women and men different races. So it's a groups social classes economic status, so privilege is more or less disabled while let's let's go over some of this. I've got a list of symptoms here on on the mania episode and the depressive episode eight or ten things long like, for example, an increased energy and activity restlessness. That's sounds to me like a five hour energy drink. But this is something that's going to call or gonna last for like five days or five weeks. Right. Exactly. To to be calling mania the patient needed to have the symptoms for at least one week. Okay. At least when weeks. Boy, I I can't imagine extreme irritability for at least a week. But that that would be tough to live with wouldn't it? Exactly. Patience is in mania esprit de uncommon that the patient is able to realize by themselves. They need to some kind of care. So most of the time in the manic episode, the family or in the employer or to work colleague is are the people that come with the patients parchment notice. It says denial that anything's wrong that actually sounds kind of like alcoholism, doesn't it? No, I'm okay. I'm okay. I'll be all right. But they're really not. Ended the day recover from the man. Yeah. And they go back to what we call team. Yeah. Or being normal? They change. So they wait to see things. So they they they tell my all my God. They did that with that. Yeah. That's not me. I couldn't have done that. I could see that. Yeah. On this depressive side too. They're just so feel feelings of guilt and worthlessness loss of interest in activties. You liked to used to do and the decreased energy now the creased, energy and fatigue. That's kind of like me. I'm tired who's not tired. Sometimes. Two weeks are. Yeah. So after the same each something good in your life happens. Maybe you'll be kind of far for hours but not for one week make a hole in one. I'm not going to celebrate it for two weeks. Well that might. And so my listeners don't panic if they see themselves. I mean, I'm looking at sleeplessness change in appetite all these things that a lot of people would say, well, golly, that's kind of like me. But once again. Number one. It's gotta last for at least a week number two. Just because you've got a couple of these symptoms that doesn't automatically mean you've got bipolar disorder. Does. Be in off do their your life. Boy. Yeah. That's that's the big kicker right there with and once again, it goes kind of back to addiction of any alcoholism or drug if it's messing up your life. Then you really need to get some help for it. Don't you? So where do we turn? If we have if we feel like this might be going on to go to the GP we go to a psychiatrist where do you turn for help? Peak would be very good starting point. Okay. At least to talk about the main from the watch where having your feelings and the day we for sure refer to psychiatry to confirm the diagnosis. GP can probably say. Yeah, that's probably. But it it's going to take a psychiatric professional a mental health professional to really pinpointed. That's. Now is is there have to be treatment. Or clearly, it's not curable. I talked about that. And the intro to this thing. But but it's is treatable how does that work? So what happens most that we have have humankind's? They are not. They are. Yeah. Okay. So he's not. That's not affect traffic is David. So bipolar ardor street bowl is very manageable is likely possible to have real real normal life patient, take the proper medication. We call bipolar medications and mood stabilizers. That stabilize your mood. The most. Old and common medication mood. Stabilizers is call it lithium. But so do the classic. Okay. So we have him ending the past few years the fire McComb day release it several other medications. So currently we have good too. Stations so bipolar disorder. Not something that we're ever going to get rid of. We just learned we'd learned how to live a comfortable.

bipolar disorder Depression Dr. Yeah Mel Gibson professor of psychiatry and be Dr yaldo Vado Mariah Carey US manic episode UT McGovern medical school Beijing professor Vado Indonesia Andrew McComb David activties Josie
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"Son. Welcome back to fifty plus. Appreciation listing. A certainly do a lot of people in this audience. I'm sure we're saddened this week. By the news of Luke Perry death, fifty two years old. He was came shortly after a massive stroke. My wife's reaction was holy cow. That's too young mostly because she's got a right in that wheelhouse. But as my next guest will will tell us it's actually not that young. The odds go up we continue deeper into seniority, but the chance for stroke has as much or more to do with lifestyle in general health, then with age, I think to help me with all of this is Dr Louise McCullough will push that button and get her all she is chief of neurology with McGovern medical school at UT health and memorial Hermann, Texas medical center, welcome to fifty plus Dr McCullough. Oh, thanks for having me. Sure. So you, you know, how many how many roughly how many people in this country have made your strokes every year. It's about eight hundred thousand. Yeah. It's a very prevalent condition. And unfortunately, it's the most common cause of long-term disability. So once you have a stroke. We can do a lot to try and treat you acutely. But if you have that stroke, there's often disability that goes on for many, many years after the stroke. I just talked to somebody in the office couple of days ago who said that his ex wife had had a major stroke years ago. And just as you said there, he said, you know, she's almost back but just not quite in. It's really a massive stroke. I don't think really leaves anybody whole even after a long time does exactly and there's a lot of potential for recovery. And it really depends on you know, how big the stroke is obviously younger people when they have a stroke tend to have a lot more improvement because the rest of their brain can kind of rewire and take over. But yeah, it usually leaves it leaves lasting deficits about thirty five percent of people do completely recover, but still. The majority don't let's go to just worst case outcome to what percentage of them tend to die just within a very short term after that stroke. So usually in the first Munster, depending on the severity of the stroke. It can be as high as ten or twenty percent..

Dr Louise McCullough Luke Perry McGovern medical school Hermann Texas medical center thirty five percent fifty two years twenty percent
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

10:28 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"By millionaires now on this station. By the time. We hit our ages. Most of us have done one or two dents in the hospital. I guess some of us stay there longer than others. But sooner or later sometimes too soon, maybe we'll get discharged and sent home and to talk about something called post hospital syndrome who knew that was a thing to talk about P H S is PHD now he'd. I want to get this, right? Right. Would you please pronounce your last name for me? So I don't get it wrong ever again. Okay. Thank you very much. I I'm an old newspaper guy. And I like to make sure I get names. Right. All right. Thank you know, where I really appreciate that. So let's start as we usually do on, by the way, I'll introduce you as professor of geriatrics with McGovern medical school at UT health, and as all wonderful caregivers are a member of UT health consortium on aging. What exactly is post hospital syndrome? So close hospital syndrome is defer to a vulnerable period after discharge from the hospital about thirty days after the start of the hospital when patients develop are made of up new health problems that brings them back to the hospital and get readmitted it. Why is it that people out in that first thirty days, what makes them so vulnerable once they've left the hospital. So when they come in the first place to the hospital for any medical condition that they needed to be admitted for they Wendy stay in the hospital. Oftentimes, they get new prescriptions. New medications that adds to the number of medications. They used to take before coming to the hospital. We sometimes see fit is not simple hard to follow instructions. They go back and to start taking the medications. They had at home and forget how it was supposed to be taken and these new medication sometimes falls out of their list, or they cannot follow the deduction of taking it properly that could be one reason. But when they stained the hospital few things happen because of age related changes like when we're laying in bed for more than eighty percent of the time. How the day we lose muscle strength. So we become weaker. So their chances are falling more boy catches falling because we are weaker are balance is off. And then also a fifty percent of the patients when they're in the hospital. Don't really finish their meals or become malnati's because they are not eating well, while a lot of factors contribute because sometimes you have to be fasting because of the procedure that will have the next morning or the food doesn't taste as well. Medications added on top of that some patients may develop problem with swelling. So yeah, this is really kind of a broad brush thing. It's not anything very specific into cabinet is it to a whole lot of reasons why you might wind up with post hospital syndrome, which was a dentist. If I read correctly back in two thousand thirteen by somebody. I can't remember Dr krummel's in it was. It was published in New England Journal of medicine. Good is is a risk for developing some other condition or maybe relapsing into the previous condition higher. For some groups than others. Identified reasons, but what about particular people? That's correct. So people who are frail what I mean failed by Dave already have problems with mobility. If they already have problems with the balance and falling if they have memory impairment or dementia. Those are the people who are more vulnerable in development sales just to me like kind of it's pretty plain and simple. When you look at it that way, if people already had problems, they come out, and they've got other medications are supposed to take. And they forget their already weakened from being in the hospital and having whatever it was sending. So it's pretty simple. I guess I see that is the would seem to be a factor. Also, maybe that the insurance companies are getting people out of the high cost care too soon is that a realistic concern, so often time it depends on the reason of admission so let's for example, someone comes in with pneumonia. And we. Any monja? And we think okay now, we have treated what you have coming for go home. Well, in the meantime, these are the other things that had happened. You know, they. More frailty became weaker. They could not swallow. These new additional problems are going to the address windy are out of the hospital is always not the appropriate way to do it. But yes, there is no other reason to keep them in the hospital for pneumonia anymore. Yeah. So that happens, and those are the I think. Stay a little longer. And we could arrange everything take care of those problems after they go home or wherever they're going after the hospital because often some patients do not go home straight from the hospital that would actually be preventing some of the problems. Unfortunately, when we discharge them early are not early because of the problem, they came in for but early because there are new problems that we couldn't address that that happens. Does that make sense? Yes. It does professor from McGovern medical school at UT health on fifty plus talk about what in home or assisted living, a rehab caregivers can watch for that might signal something going on that needs to be addressed more more than just what they were in the hospital for. So you mean, what will look for when their patient discharge? Let's say my wife was in the hospital for two weeks, and she comes home. And I'm there whether those first thirty days, what am I looking at looking for that might tell me that I need to call you back. Right. So if they become confused their mental status changes from what they were before. Or they are having new fever or they're falling. They're unable to swallow or eat any change from what we call baseline it. How they were at home order the police they were before coming to the hospital are red flags, and they need to communicate with their primary care physician right away. So that is an important step when you get discharged from the hospital, there should be follow very promptly right after discharge with the primary care physician. So that they can reassess like, maybe maybe go by there a week or so. So after you get out of the hospital just to that primary care. That's right. Yeah. Okay. Because they can be made aware of everything that went on in the hospital. And and how you felt after that have you been that it's incumbent upon that doctor. I guess then to ask the questions have you been eating right? Have you fallen AB any trouble with balance all those things, right? All those things. But I would also encourage the caregiver. So the patient is taking care of the patient because patients are often not totally aware of all the things that were going on in the hospital. So whoever is taking care of the patient if they could after questions not only to their primary doctor, but when are getting discharged to ask for a specific things to look for you know, if we were to go back to the hospital or winter being back to the hospital, or what what are the signs that are that will tell me when to take my mom or dad or my to the primary care doctor earlier also to ask for a discharge summary all that what happened in the hospital. There's the discharge summary and the primary care physician. Sometimes do not have that in hand when they're following up on these patient after discharge so it will be very useful to have that information for the primary care physician. I think it's something that's extremely useful in my wife is really good about this. And I'm kind of not if you're going to be in there in the hospital with someone who's being treated if you're going to be that caregiver instead of just listening to the doctor bring a pen and a piece of paper for goodness sakes. And write it all down. So you have some reference when you get home. That's right. And and the district somebody that I mentioned would have and that sometimes is is not ready at the time of this charge. But if you can ask your primary care doctor to get it from the hospital or or request physician to give it to you or fax it to your primary care physician before you are falling or whoever is being discharged. They will follow up the patient. Then they will have it ready and. It is very useful. To know what new medications were given what medications were discontinued. What are the new things? For example. Someone may have low-sodium doing that hospitalization. If the sodium is still low or is it improving. That's the kind of lab they wanted to get done when they're following up. And it's easier to do that when they have these information ready in their hand. Dr no heat from UT health. Let's make it clear. We're not telling people to stay away from hospitals. Well, we want to prevent hospitalization. But when they need to come this, you need to come wanted him to be in the hospital to get better, man. It's just you got to make sure that I guess the bottom line on this, and we need to summarize we're down to about a minute is that any change in that especially in that first thirty days when you're still in a kind of a weakened and vulnerable state needs to be conveyed to a doctor. Whether it's your primary care, whether it's the person who did the surgery somebody needs to be made aware so that if that person needs to be readmitted or change meds. You guys can make that decision. Help them. Stay well. That about it in a nutshell. So so when you come to the hospital, make sure that you are getting the information like you said, and then we are following up. Go to your primary physician with those information and know about those red flags on you hate to cut you off. But we've gotta run coming.

hospital syndrome McGovern medical school professor pneumonia New England Journal of medicin UT Dr krummel Wendy memory impairment Dave fever thirty days eighty percent fifty percent two weeks
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on KTRH

"He's a Houston mayoral candidate. Tony busby. Now calling for the resignation of police chief aren't osservato in a letter sent to our TV partner channel to that high profile river oaks attorney said this mayor hired the cheap. He now needs to ask him to resign is because questions are mounting over that controversial drug raid that left two suspects dead for Houston. Police officers wounded the agent who obtained a warrant could soon face criminal charges himself because confidential informants used to justify the warrant now deny that they ever bought drugs at the house Busby statement adds accountability starts at the top. We posted the complete statement at KTAR dot com. Now, the chief was facing angry residents at a town hall meeting last night discussing that deadly drug raid. Here. We should not be here. Asa Vado says using police will no longer use so called no knock warrants like the one that was used in that Harding street raid. And here's his reasoning. There is no excuse you, do not lie about anything under oath as a police officer blaming it on the cause for the warrant. He said any situation where a no knock raid would be required would have to receive a special exemption from his office. So we're asking you to Jay he's under fire. Do you think HP chief artists evader should resign over that deadly drug raid, cage dot com sound off on our Facebook page. It's seven oh two. The mayors have some problems himself more than three months after Houston voters approved a pay raise for firefighters. The city at the mayor's request asking a judge to invalidate prop. Be fair. Sylvester Turner insists the city's still trying to implement. The property adding the court challenge only to resolve any remaining legal questions what he's trying to do is keep this tied up in the courts for as long as he possibly can to the way. Putting this employee me oral challenger Bill. King says lawsuits are nothing new for the city of Houston over the hero ordinance. I got tied up in court in this case the firefighters had to go follow lawsuit even get them to count. But petitions words, the good faith attempt to what the tax payers. Ask you to do. The king says the biggest losers are tax payers for the lawsuit in any back pay owed the firefighters Nick Reich, if it's News Radio seven, forty KTAR each meantime, the state capital, the governor and Lieutenant governor they've made property tax reform a priority this session, but it goes hand in hand with school finance reform to van skin Texas, public policy foundation says both efforts actually are advancing. Did it education will start hearing the school finance Bill soon? That'll be the next step. And so really this will all be kind of a package deal. Yeah. The deal right now would cap the annual growth rate of property taxes unless the rate increases approved by voters gin calls that a good start. This is gonna cut the growth rate of property taxes substantially which is a great reform, but we'd also like to see is actually lower property tax bills. And I think there's plenty of room to do that as well now, although as of the moment, no votes have yet been scheduled on either Bill it's now seven four so you'd think after being called out by watchdog groups, the mainstream media would finally start treating the president fairly Katyushas Cassandra's is live is new you'd be wrong. Yep. According to the media research center since twenty seventeen d- nightly network news, your ABC, CBS NBC. They've dedicated more than twenty two hundred minutes of their precious airtime to the Russia scandal. But almost no airtime exactly zero minutes to the report from the Senate intelligence committee that said there was no collusion between Trump and Russia. They pretty much ignored the whole thing political analyst Kathleen McKinley says they've already got their excuse ready to go what they would say if you were talking to them that the actual final report is not filed away and put into the public records. And she says she was hoping the media would have changed by now. After all the times they've been called out. They say would be more. Thinking about that. Like, okay, I do need to be more professional. I need to be more unbiased. But unfortunately, they're still being driven by their hatred for the man in the White House. Okay. Thanks luck cliff. Meantime, here's another win. The media miss in a story. We told you correctly yesterday an eleven year old Florida boy was not disciplined for refusing to stand for the pledge of allegiance as nationwide headlines suggested. Now, the child does face misdemeanor charges after creating a disturbance in allegedly hurling threats as he was removed from the classroom. The lakeland school district says it has no policy against refusing to say the pledge or to stand for the national anthem. He could have just sat quietly. Our news time, seven oh, six measles. Scared. Laporta elementary school is over health officials say further testing on a pre K student proved that the child did not have that highly contagious virus. There've been seven confirmed cases of the measles across Texas, including. Five in the Houston area. Health advocates will meet with lawmakers in Houston tomorrow. They want them to support stronger vaccine legislation did, you know, your cardiovascular health, especially my men could be tied to the number of push ups. You can do men who could do forty or more pushups word ninety six percent less likely to have developed a cardiovascular problem compared to those who struggle to reach ten McGovern medical school at UT health. Dr John Higgins says this is a free way to check your risk, especially if you could do more than forty four shops and the magic number in this study was forty one or more per day. Basically that was the lowest risk the American Heart Association finds that nearly half of American adults currently have some form of cardiovascular disease artery Morton, NewsRadio seven forty care age. You're looking at me like you want me to ask, you know. So you're saying, I'm not alone. Okay. Okay. You, but you start every everything starts with one start with one push up one. Ten okay. They're twenty kind of work at it. Forty forty. Oh, come on. No, really, even I was in really, really good shape. I don't think I could do forty. All right. I won't tell you your own body. Top priority of President Donald Trump is a paid family leave plan and use political consultant Chris Carmona says workers, well, the way it would work. Maybe you wouldn't get full pay at the outset that you could receive some compensation. Think you'll see some are, you know, fifteen or twenty percent maybe twenty five percent to start off with and eventually work its way up over time to see how the market can take that see how that gets implemented. He says paid family leave is not really a Republican or democrat issue. It's an American issue that can unite families. I'm shiver fryer and Houston's news, weather and traffic station. Newsradio seven forty KTAR h. Keep your.

Houston officer Tony busby Donald Trump Texas KTAR dot president Asa Vado Russia HP partner Sylvester Turner Facebook attorney ABC Laporta elementary school Jay
"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

07:46 min | 3 years ago

"mcgovern medical school" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Center, Texas medical center. Now, I could go on and on her research mission is to advance the progress of the safe and effective use of health and cancer through innovative thinking systematic methodology and collaboration interactions through the university of Texas system and global research community in the long and the short of it all is she's a terrific researcher lecturer, she's on a mission to help educate people how they can avoid some of the pitfalls related to developing health problems, which are preventable. She's here with us today here today. Absolutely great to hear your voice again. Hope you and your family are doing fantastic. Yes. Absolutely. It's been off to a good start in twenty nineteen. All right fantastic. Let's get right into this. Again, Dr Smith, what is your role at the university of Texas health, and what is the focus of your current research. So I know you just officially get my official title. But my role is basically to take what we learn in the lab and bring it to clinic and in clinic to make observations and develop research questions to bring back to the lab and evaluate them further to hopefully, advance patient care, and my research is really focused primarily on the human papillomavirus and obesity, and using nutritional supplements to help eliminate both of these factors in cancer prevention arena for both men and women are are researchers apparently Ben in women, but it all extrapolates to men as well. Okay. So then you have students that are also what following you and helping you with your research. I work with those pharmacy students as well as medical students here McGovern medical school, and in various components of our research project, both on the lab side and in clinic. Okay. So tell our audience because I think a lot of people have heard about human papillomavirus or HPV. There's certainly television commercials trying to compel adults to get their attention related to their children how prevalent is HPV, and how can we protect ourselves against it. Okay. So the human papillomavirus HPV is fairly prevalent overall. There is over two hundred strains one hundred that are found in human and about forty strains are low with HP and fifteenth strains are high risk. And when we what do we mean by high risk means that they could cause cancer. And we asked me, but the CDC estimates that about seventy percent of the adult population has been infected with H P B at least once in their sexual life in a sexual history as long as you've been sexually activity. You probably have a high likelihood you've been exposed the good news is majority of people with a healthy immune system. Clear the infection on their own in about six to eight months. You can clear the virus on your own with a good, strong how the immune system. So protecting yourself obviously, minimizing exposure good barrier. Protection is the only way to prevent sexual transmission? And using some kind of barrier methods like a condom and how ever and that's not always feasible to. So and the other way is the vaccination, and there is a nine valid vaccination that's out now. Ideally, it's to help prevent HIV infections. However, it doesn't change any of the screening guidelines. And the jury is still out on the long term benefit of HP vaccine. You know, there's a lot of research on going looking at the long term follow up. It's only been about a decade. And so we're still learning about it. But it definitely is one possible way to help prevent HIV infection and both men and women. And then there is ways to help strengthen your immune system. And that's really where our research has focused in on looking at nutritional supplements. And particularly we've been working with HEC to help strengthen the host immune system to work more effectively to clear the infection. Even after you've been infected. All right. If you're just tuning into the program, our special guests is doctor Judith Smith. She's a research researcher and associate professor of the department of obstetrics gynecology and reproductive sciences at the university of Texas health govern medical school and director of women's health and integrated medicine research program there and Joseph, you know, when you say that people are listening to this conversation for the very first time that seventy percent of people who are sexually active are exposed to this HPV or human papillomavirus. That's pretty scary that I, you know, the person hearing this for the very first time seeing what you're kidding me. I think I'll stop having sex that if that's the case. It is intimidating, and it's also kind of the counter argument is that I I like to put people's mind at ease. 'cause when we think about a sexually transmitted disease people generally get very down on themselves and shameful when they've been diagnosed with an S T D. Well, the human papillomavirus is so prevalent that you know, it's more women than men that you know, it's it's almost every not everyone, but a good majority of people do get infected with this eight virus because it's so easily transmitted and undetectable for the most part, you're as dramatic until we've tested for it or develops into a problem. Now, you mentioned seventy percent of people are exposed to that are sexually active of that seventy percent. How many people have you determined that will actually develop the HPV the one that's dangerous that can lead to other health consequences? Well, HP becomes a problem when it becomes persistent infection, which means extending beyond that two years. So like, I said majority of people will clear the infection on their own. It's when it becomes a persistent infection. And that's about ten percent of the people who become infected develop that persistent infection. And that's when we have a problem. Okay. All right. Very good stand by Dr Smith, we're gonna take a break and come back with you got more questions of you. And just a moment. It just seems like you hit on something that's very important for our audience to know about. And that is that it's inevitable that the majority of people are going to be exposed to this this microbe in some manner at some time, therefore, it'd be hooves a person to be ready for immunologically. So that you have the opportunity to rise to the occasion get rid of it quash it. Your immune system. Take care of it. If at all possible, and that's exactly what she's here to tell us all about Dr Judah Smith. We're going to get more of that what you can do personally to help yourself out. She mentioned something called a H CC..

HPV HIV infection Judith Smith HP university of Texas researcher Texas medical center Dr Judah Smith university of Texas health McGovern medical school obesity official CDC lecturer HEC Ben director Joseph