23 Burst results for "Mcghee"

"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

05:04 min | Last month

"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Like that doesn't really sound good because they're explaining it exactly how they want and no one is addressing encountering it so i think that's that is a really dangerous thing i don't know if you guys heard the The president's speech last week and tulsa. And i have to say as an oklahoma and i was born and raised in. Oklahoma took oklahoma history in high school and college never learned about the tulsa race. Riots but One of the things the president said in his speech just really resonated with me and that was just because history is silent. It doesn't mean that it didn't take place and while darkness can hide much. It erases nothing. Only with truth can come healing and justice and repair only with truth facing it so this goes back to what i was saying before. Only when we talk about this can we move forward. And so i think you made a you made a good point. We weren't scared about cory booker coming into our suburbs right because we have experienced with that right. We're like oh. I have to come to mind. That's okay yes. Come on and cory booker. i think there's a house revealed on the street. Actually but we have experienced that but this is why they don't want us to have the conversation so we have seen this happen even in my little town of hudson ohio so we recently made national news in hudson ohio and it was not good news for our town so during our memorial day events. Lieutenant colonel kempter was giving a speech and he dared to included discussion of the real history of memorial day. A history that includes people of color freed slaves playing an integral role in the holiday. The organizers admittedly cut his mike because they thought it shouldn't be part of the program. It shouldn't be part of our discussion now. The american legion has since responded swiftly to calls including a by my husband. estate reputational l. Asking for their resignations. They actually closed the branch and i applaud their swift response. But what we don't hear in the media is more of the context. This is something you know. That heather cox. Richardson talks a lot about right. And there's more context behind this event just days. Before this event we had a city council member who was caught trying to push down a community conversation about race when police opened an investigation into some hudson students making egregious racial and homophobic threats online..

cory booker tulsa oklahoma Lieutenant colonel kempter hudson Oklahoma ohio heather cox american legion Richardson
"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:06 min | Last month

"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Rachel vigne men and this is the suburban women problem so on today's episode we're going to talk about our kids education and what we're teaching them about race in history in this country later on we'll be speaking with juliet. Kunle a psychologist and north carolina for another mom's perspective on how to talk to our kids about race in american history. And after that. I get the chance to interview the brilliant author heather mcghee so we should stick around for that so before we jump into this topic we wanna start by being open and honest many of us including myself have a tendency to shut down when anyone talks about racism because it feels very uncomfortable. I think about it. Kinda the way. I think about how the disability community has really had to fight for certain things inclusivity into society. There was a time we're handicap ramps. Were not a thing you know. If you couldn't climb stairs you just couldn't go up there. Take that and apply that to black people who are in a place in a in a society where when they were brought here they were not even really considered human. They were considered. Basically a machine meant to to fuel our economy and so we are dealing with having to retrofit society to include black people. And you know you might say well we've come a long way and yes we have. I will not deny that we have come a long way but we are not there yet just like any race. You don't just stop in the middle. Because you're you're making some progress you've gotta keep going. And that's what we have to do as a society. And so i say all this to say that when we have conversations like this we are not trying to indict any individual. What we are trying to say is that this is about an open honest conversation about where we are society where we really need to go and also about not hiding those truths because they can make you feel uncomfortable. Yeah i mean. We can't get there without the information without having the conversation. We need to know the history in order to go on that journey. We need our kids to know the history in order to go on that journey jasmine. You're talking about the history of slavery in this country and how this affects laws and systems even today and so we need to know all of that history to have a good conversation and the information we need to progress and to move forward so let's talk about critical race theory. It's been in the news a lot lately. You but why now. Where's outrage coming from. Well let's be honest. It is coming from the need for the gop to create boogeyman. They've gotta have something to scare us you know. They've been trying to scare us with all these different culture wars. They're trying to scare a suburban moms with you. Know oh the trans kids are coming or oh the black people are moving into your neighborhoods. Or oh the hispanics moving into they're trying to scare some all these things it's not working. So now here's the next thing is like oh man. They're about to teach our children about race in systemic racism in school. And they're going to make your children especially your white children feel guilty for being white. It's just another boogeyman. They don't know they're talking. They just know it sounds scary and because they know that other people don't know what it is they get to create a definition for them. That makes it scary enough. That they'll show up the school board meetings and fight and cry and pulled up signs and you know and fight against this thing that is not even being taught in our schools. The gop throws out a bunch of stuff and sees what will stick. The republicans are controlling the narrative race theory. And the people.

Rachel vigne Kunle heather mcghee juliet north carolina gop
"mcghee" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

06:51 min | 2 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Today. We have heather. Mcghee on the podcast. Heather is an expert in economic and social policy. The former president of the inequality focused think tank demos mickey drafted legislation testified before congress and contribute regularly. News shows including. Nbc's meet the press. She now chairs the board of color of change. The nation's largest online racial justice organization mcgee holds a ba in american studies from yale university and an a. j. d. from the university of california at berkley. School release book is called the some of us what racism cost. Everyone and how we can prosper together. Heather thanks so much for being on my show today and get to be with you. I'm fellow yell alumni. Says so. I wanna talk about the development of your thinking about this topic and why you You know you're so passionate about it. And what kind of traits development a little bit so you spent years working on economic policy for demos right which is a wooden tank. How did that work relate to what you're doing today where some things you saw the kind of conversations you had when you work there that made you Start to go in this direction. While i'm really was lucky to get an entry level job when i was twenty two years old at a startup think-tank that was focused on issues. That wasn't really top of mind for a lot. Of policymakers in media folks the time which was rising inequality the fact that we were having more and more concentration of wealth that the quality of jobs are working in middle class families was starting to decline and the cost for the basics healthcare housing childcare etc was was sort of shooting through the roof and in previous eras in economic policy in the united states. There have been big consensus making efforts to try to address what was beginning to be wide-scale problems. And so we did what you're supposed to do. We brought the research to the policy. Makers we testified. We drafted legislation out. We pointed out what was going on at the kitchen tables of working families across the country and yet so often. The overwhelming statistical evidence seemed to fall on deaf ears. And there was this sort of undercurrent of opposition to doing anything about these big problems that were keeping families up at night and oftentimes the issues. That i was working on were economic shoes and they had racial disparities for example healthcare right. It was an issue where employers were were were shedding healthcare benefits and people were finding it hard to afford health care in the private market. And that's an issue that's sort of an economic and social policy one but people of color were more likely to have jobs that employ employers didn't offer health healthcare benefits and so we sort of saw race as kind of an add on to this larger issue of inequality discrimination and disadvantage compounds the effects of inequality for for families of color but after nearly two decades i can climb the ranks from the entry level role in the economic program at my organization to becoming president. I realize that more and more there was a fundamental disconnect between policymakers and working families across the country that our political conversation about what they owed one another and how we should address really widespread problems was really twisted and kind of warped by a lot of stereotypes and degraded ideas about people who were suffering and a general sort of knee jerk. Anti-government response that seemed just to put the united states as an outlier. So i began. Asked this question. Why is it that we can't seem to have nice things. Scott why is it. That americans can't seem to have nice things and by that i don't mean like drive through espresso. I mean nice. Things like affordable healthcare and a well-funded school in every neighborhood and wages that keep workers out of poverty and modern world class infrastructure and on some of these issues particularly around infrastructure and good paying jobs. We used to lead the world so i began to ask what happened. And why do we keep. Having these policies that make inequality worse and why is our politics so unresponsive to the needs of working families. So i quit my job. I hit the road. I went a number of trips across the country from california missy. Mississippi in maine and back again and and i and i found what seemed to me to be the answer that i was missing. Yeah and and as reading at your story. I think also your experience with pregnancy and motherhood also had an impact as well. You're thinking about. Yeah sure i mean i. I was pregnant with my first and now only job with with for the first time. When i made this decision. I think a little bit of that had to do with the feeling of if i was gonna birth the baby of a book and bertha real baby i needed to not have you know seventy five other babies which were my staff members that i was raising money for and all that sort of like this only so much you know to give here but also it was a feeling of you know if i had spent nearly two decades using the tools of the policy advocacy trade and asking questions that were about statistical analysis and about wages and jobs and benefits and public spending and taxes. And that if i was going to work for the first time it's gonna take me away from something. I loved right in addition to being something i love and i thought you know what. Let me let me. Just do what i really need to do. Let me let me not keep doing what i've been doing. Which has in some ways hit a wall. Let me use my time and us. You know whatever. I have as a person to my utmost. Let me let me be of my highest best use and that's where and maybe this is really relevant to you. That's where i started to inquire about whole different fields of research around psychology and social science public opinion political science not just economics and It opened up a whole new world. Yeah i mean. I think the more perspective the better right. You know trying to kind of integrate them. Yeah so that's wonderful. So thanks for that background. You're in your book. You say it's an invitation of hope. I love that. I love that. What.

Mississippi Scott Today first maine Heather congress heather Nbc yale university first time today Mcghee united states twenty two years old university of california california missy seventy five other babies americans yell
"mcghee" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on Watts Involved

"Capable of anything radi I've always had the smarter that you're only regret what you don't do in that you don't regret what you do less Because if you don't try how would you even know. And i never want to have that question. Mark of coulda shoulda and. I'm not scared of fayette. Navy have been you know. School wasn't easy for me either. I went through very rough period in high school at one stage with an illness. And that's not a story for another day. But i realize that life isn't just debate of rises. And you know you stu really work and try and push yourself and don't bat believer heads and that something. I can be quite stubborn. I think a lot of waste and had a lot of friends wondering why you doing. That's why you going to rural areas and during these projects at one stage. My husband called me philanthropic with no money and some people didn't quite understand why i did what i did at one stage. I didn't even understand what the business was. Because i thought when i'm not really all about profit so what am i and i think having gone to one of these conferences actually learnt. I'm called a social enterprise. I'm a social entrepreneur. Suppose having been given that name and that identity it made me realize cam not alone in this. The many people like me who. It's more botch the impact. The sustainability of what you doing the making the difference You have to make money that at the end of the day doing something that you rarely believing is your purpose and and your passion and i think ya loving what you do. Every day getting up every morning knowing that you're going out the and helping people that don't have a voice and you're trying to make things beta in a very tough situation. I know initially when away into these rural schools. Because that's what i did. After three months of private schools at just completely went to all the rural schools to all the departments of education at the time that was run. Bombay kit that stage then they change to suma. I did so many pilots and these schools to prove the concept i got distribution on the software that was interactive software for matson signs. It was full of three d. animation simulations games and making subjects. That anomaly hard fan and more ya making more satan to you..

fayette stu Mark Bombay matson
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:27 min | 2 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Because he's credible in a whole bunch of different aspects of this conversation like he he's as credible a democrat could ever be to certain types of like working class whites with a lot of racism in their communities But they they like joe But he also served loyally the first black president he has. He's he won. Because of black voters in the south What do you think he could do if he read your book to talk. White people through this is there a white version of the philly race speech that he gives to white america based on his own life his own education to start the conversation. You're trying to force. So i you know when you when you when you're a person like me who's worked in policy advocacy for so long part of what you're doing is trying to do it. Michael lewis said and switch the way some people think about an issue that you feel has been misunderstood. I'm certainly during that. But also one of the things i wanna do is change the way the some of the more powerful people in political communications communicate about this issue and i want to be clear. I never in the book nor hopefully in my talking about the book want us to take our eye off the ball of the communities that are hit first and worst by systemic racism. And in every single instance i found throughout all the samples in the book. Healthcare college affordability environmental pollution. The financial crisis you know. They're i tally up the cost to the whole country. Talk about the dysfunction. And then i also am very clear that black and brown indigenous people are feeling these impacts first and worst but it's also important for us to recognize that if we don't sort of end the sentence about the world we want to create and address zero sum framework had. Aw then we're just actually with all of our claims about white privilege and about racial equity and needing to treat people differently because of where they are situated. We're whistling past the framework that people are sitting in and so and in fact in worse. We're actually feeding it. And so i was really blown away to hear president biden's first speech on race would he Signed number racial equity executive orders. He caught up zero zero-sum explicitly. he said for too long. We've had a narrow cramped view of progress in america. And they said we've had this zero-sum idea then he gave like five different. Colloquial joe from scranton is about how that you know zero shum. Plays out the the idea that if i get a job you know you lose yours the idea that you know said like a dollar in my pocket. The daughter of yours. I haven't memorized what he said. but then he made the case that think about it. You know if we deal with all these inequalities basically if if the people who are currently suffering from systemic racism have a better shot at a better life who could argue that. That's not better for everyone. And he talked about the cost of racism to everyone. I think that's really important because we can't solve a problem without facing it and naming it and think about like the knee jerk reaction among so many people to the phrase black lives matter that is like.

Michael lewis joe president biden america White scranton
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"We feature a conversation with heather mcghee. For nearly two decades mcgee has been involved in the fight against inequality by designing advocating for policies in the public and private sectors. She has advised presidential candidates and fortune. Five hundred companies testified in congress and led the think tank demos which argued before the supreme court and helped pass provo reforms in five states in two thousand twenty one mcgee published her first book the some of us what racism costs everyone and how we can prosper together which became an instant national bestseller in this conversation with author. Journalist a non geary. Data's mcgee tells a social and political history of the twentieth century in america. That explains how and why we've arrived at this particular moment in the fight for social justice. Nothing that is happening now should be surprising. In light of mcgee's narrative at the center of her argument is that racism hurts all of us and is rooted in a zero sum psychology. In which one person's gain is another loss. She points to alternative ways of community building in which collective contributions uplift all citizens be that in healthcare education. Our civic life. This event was originally presented by west by midwest. A collaboration between black mountain institute literary arts. The lots wordplay and wisconsin book festival. Here's our moderator. A non dot us. Hi heather hi. I'm so excited to be in this conversation. I am too. We start tonight with the question. Why can't we have nice things. And i want to ask you that question. What you mean by that. But i wanna say the audience welcome. It's one of the silver linings of kobe is that there can actually be a book. Event bringing together four different institutions in four different parts of the country representing four different troubled racial histories to talk about these issues. And there's something very exciting about that. So are you begin by asking. Begin the book by asking. Why can't we have nice things. What are the nice things you mean. Who is we and why not shell. Can't we have them. Well thank you so much on for this conversation for the conversation. We had early on in my book tour for your wonderful sub stacked newsletter which everyone should subscribe to the anc. Thank you so much for being part of this evening tonight. Thank you to the sponsoring organizations. Thank you. I know that there are a lot of people that i know particularly madison. Wisconsin i wanted to say hello to them This is a really exciting night for me Because the way that i came into this conversation and into my career was with an obsession over these issues of inequality that i know are near and dear to your heart on in some really looking forward to this conversation so nice things you know what i mean when i opened the book saying have you ever wondered why. We can't seem to have nice things. I did not mean self driving cars. Which i don't think we need. I did not mean laundry. That does itself which i could really use. I've meant things like universal childcare and universal healthcare public health system to handle pandemics world class.

mcgee heather mcghee black mountain institute liter heather hi provo supreme court congress midwest america wisconsin anc madison Wisconsin
"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Know. Thousand plus grand resort style. Swimming pools That could hold over a thousand swimmers at a time and we used to have nearly two thousand in this country. And i talk about the pools in many ways. They were sort of the cherry. On the top of a broader commitment to public goods into a decent standard of living for the american people including things like social security for people who could no longer work minimum wage and maximum laws and virtually all that i just described was racially exclusive for whites only and that included the pools and when in the nineteen fifties and sixties the civil rights movement empowered black families to finally be able to say. Hey those are our tax dollars that built those public pools. What ended up happening. Time and time again was across the country. Cities and towns drained. They're pools rather than integrate them. They literally drained out the water. Backed up. truckloads of dirt paid it over with grass in montgomery alabama. One of the many places where this happened. Although it wasn't just in the south it also happened in ohio. New jersey washington state. You actually had the city of montgomery close. Its entire parks and recreation department for a decade rather than integrate it in one thousand fifty six nineteen sixty two thirds of white americans believed. The government ought to guarantee a job and guarantee a minimum income to everyone in the country who couldn't find job in the public sector whose wages were to blow that is like a radical left-wing idea in today's politics. But can you imagine what it would do for families who are struggling and people who are looking for decent jobs and between nineteen sixty and nineteen. Sixty four watt support for that idea fell from nearly seventy percent in half to just about thirty five percent and has stayed ever since so. I thought what could have happened between sixty and sixty four to dramatically change white americans opinions about you know what the government should do to provide economic security realize. Of course it's the march on washington. Nine hundred sixty three which included a job guarantee in a living wage universal living wage as part of the demands so in a large part we replaced a formula for broadly shared middle class prosperity. That had a racial asterisk for whites. Only with what. I call drained pool politics. And that's what we've had over. The last fifty years in economy where one percent of the population owns more wealth than the entire middle class. Forty percent of adult workers before the start of the pandemic were paid too little to meet their basic needs for things like housing and food. We've really replaced a. We're all in this together with your on your own and racism in our politics and our policy-making has a huge role to play in that. Yeah you see that. The trend of this hollowing out of the middle class. But you don't often hear about it from this racial lens and how it has really hurt all of us. And i think about also you know with the paving of the pools in the getting rid of the parks department. It's actually my own research and economic shows that women actually show stronger preferences for parks. And if you think about it makes sense because moms would like to get out of the house occasionally and take their kids somewhere. We would like to take them to parks. We like to take them to pools and so for women. This has huge implications of her mom's that we are taking away these amenities that would really help us and we just didn't see it through that lens..

ohio one percent montgomery washington Forty percent about thirty five percent nineteen fifties One one thousand fifty six ninetee over a thousand swimmers nineteen sixty nineteen nearly seventy percent New jersey washington today half Nine hundred sixty three Thousand plus Sixty four nearly two thousand
Matt Gaetz sought blanket pardon from Trump

Real Time with Bill Maher

01:11 min | 7 months ago

Matt Gaetz sought blanket pardon from Trump

"Matt gaetz listen to this. He asked before. Eddie we knew any of this. He asked the trump white house. When i was still office. If you can have a blanket preemptive pardon as as innocent people do for any future. Crimes isn't even festive. I just a blanket. Pardon donald donald trump today spoke out on this. He said that is bullshit. He said it is a total fake news story. Everybody knows that. When i was in the white house all legitimate requests for pardons had to go through the kardashians and today it's in the news with matt gaetz a report. It was reported. I don't know but that his associate in this endeavor with the young woman is pleading not guilty but is going to change it. Guilty and probably testify against matt gaetz and say that matt gaetz. Listen to this us then mom to send nine hundred dollars to this guy who then sent the money to the women which ironically is one of. The only times that trickle down economics has actually worked.

Matt Gaetz Pardon Donald Donald White House Eddie
Heather McGhee explains how racism keeps everyone from having nice things

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:02 min | 7 months ago

Heather McGhee explains how racism keeps everyone from having nice things

"Heather mcghee welcome to the podcast. So glad to be with you so your your book is called the some of us. What racism costs. Everyone and how we can prosper together. i'm going to admit right now. I'm not done with the book but a deep in the book and it is terrific in helping folks understand. Basically as the question starts why we can't have nice things and the key lime and see if i can find it here and all my in all my notes Comes in when you talk about Swimming pools which people have read reviews of your book or even your your op-ed in the new york times. The swimming pool is a metaphor for so much in this country. But there's a key line in in that chapter. That has stuck with me. As i've been reading the book and as i read about things in the papers today and you right warren and montgomery these are two towns in alabama warned in montgomery were just to of countless towns in every region of america. Not just the south where the fight over public. Pools revealed that for white americans. The word public did not mean of the people. It meant of the white people talk about phil flesh that out for us so this is really the question john. Has you know. I spent twenty years in public policy as a wonk trying to move economic policy solutions to insecurity and inequality trying to convince lawmakers to do the right thing in an economy where one percent of the population owns more wealth. The middle class where nearly half of adult workers are paid too little to make ends meet and and it just felt like i was hitting an iceberg. And i didn't know how deep it

Heather Mcghee Phil Flesh The New York Times Swimming Montgomery Warren Alabama America John
Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

Democracy Now! Audio

04:20 min | 7 months ago

Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

"Joe biden and vice president khama harris head to atlanta today where they plan to address tuesday's mass shootings at three spa. That killed eight people including seven women. Six of whom were of asian descent. The trip to atlanta was originally scheduled as part of biden's campaign promoting nearly two trillion dollar american rescue plan democrats hailed. The deal has the largest anti poverty law in a generation. One study projects. It will lift. Almost fourteen million americans out of poverty including five point seven million children while the relief plan has broad public support. Not a single republican supported the legislation. We spend the rest of the hour with heather. Mickey author of the new book. The some of us what. Racism costs everyone. And how we can prosper together. Have there is the board chair of color of change and former president of the think tank. Demos thanks so much for joining us. Heather congratulations on your new book. Thank you congratulations on twenty five years. Thank you so much. The whole team at democracy now is celebrating. Hopefully soon we can celebrate together. Well you just sat there and watched once again. The reverend warnock you tweeted while he was speaking and said everyone should do themselves a favor and watched the speech. Can you talk about the significance of what happened in georgia for this whole country. Reverend warnock the first black democrat to be elected from the former confederacy. It was so moving. I mean i really think of the crucible of the twenty four hours between january fifth and january sixth as american promise in american paralyzed nutshell. I we saw a multi-racial coalition a multi-racial anti-racist coalition that was standing up to four years of division pain and suffering and putting the man who is the successor to reverend dr martin luther king marching through the pews of that story to church and putting him in office. Along with reverend with jon ossoff. That was an historic moment. So many of the political class had counted georgia out and yet a coalition that went from black folks who had been organizing for years with stacey abrams and the touch brown Two white women in the suburbs who turned away from the republican party for the first time and generations young people really overcoming a number of barriers to the ballot in the middle of a pandemic. Did the impossible with the promise of relief from this pandemic. it's self disease that has retaliated disproportionately on people of color. But that has shown that our fates are inextricably linked and then not twenty four hours later the dark spirit of american white supremacy. Fueled by a big lie that has as its core logic racism. The idea the common sense that of course a man who was rejected by the majority of people of color could not possibly have lost the presidency. That of course when people of color vote it is somehow suspect and criminal. This is the tension and explore this tension in my book because fundamentally racism has been the most powerful tool wielded against the best of america against american democracy against cross racial solidarity against the american dream itself. I talk about how it's brought us. The inequality era and figures like reverend warnock who put into perspective who in their own lives have so much of the course of american history on display are whom we need to look to right now to remind us that that tool always robs this country. It's best

Khama Harris Atlanta Reverend Warnock Joe Biden Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Jon Ossoff Biden Stacey Abrams Warnock Georgia Mickey Heather Republican Party America
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:40 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"This idea to pay the way to make it easier for administration but has said that they wanna put racial equity of the center. The reason why. I sort of put down the spreadsheet and you know when out around the country was Know that everything that we believe comes to restore it. We've been told and so. This book is full of stories of ordinary people who really have either believed the zero-some and caps believing and it costs them or they laid it down and found what i began to call these solidarity dividends these games. You can lock only through collective actually cross raise things that we simply can't achieve her loan and that lets inspiring. And that's i think what we need more of the storytelling about people who are nonetheless. Despite january despite everything that's going on dj creating their in their own little pocket of america. You know the america. That's coming now in a minute. I am going to start getting questions from all of you. And i just want to say give this four different geographies in the country. This is a little zero sum. Contrary i'm gonna notice which region is sending the best questions the most questions. This is very much zero-some so so make your region proud by sending better questions and more abundant questions than the other regions. And i wanna ask you a quick question about writing before we get to those questions not the substance but the but the process of writing. I'm always so curious because writing is one of these funny things where so many people are doing something that ends up looking quite identical in the finished product. But there's like no process sharing and so we all come up with these like weird work arounds. That look like they kind of look like the electrical wiring in india that i used to see like you just like the plumbing in my basement and exactly exactly. So what are some of the weird things that no one knows about that. You came up with to write this book and thank you for asking. It has been a real journey to go from running an organization to just me and my pen. You know the computer Let's see. I love a good breakfast and so i'd lived in a bunch of different places over these past few years. I was pregnant when i quit my job to write the bog so i had my son sort of early on. I remember talking. We went onto dinner. We went to dinner at your house. My husband and i appreciate your wife and you guys have like twenty four books between you and pre maybe pregnant..

india twenty four books january one america zero four past few years many
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Because he's credible in a whole bunch of different aspects of this conversation like he he's as credible a democrat could ever be to certain types of working class whites with a lot of racism in in their communities But they they like joe But he also served loyally the first black president he has. He's he won. Because of black voters in the south What do you think he could do if he read your book to talk. White people through this is there a white voters philly race speech that he gives to white america based on his own life his own education to start the conversation. You're trying to force so. I you know when you when you when you're a person like me who's worked in policy advocacy for so long part of what you're doing is trying to do it. Michael lewis said and switch the way some people think about an issue that you feel has been misunderstood. I'm certainly during that. But also one of the things i wanna do is change the way the some of the more powerful people in political communications communicate about this issue and i want to be clear. I never in the book nor hopefully in my talking about the book want us to take our eye off the ball of the communities that are hit first and worst by systemic racism. And in every single instance. I found throughout all the examples in the book. Healthcare college affordability environmental pollution. The financial crisis you know. They're i tally up the cost to the whole country. Talk about the dysfunction. And then i also am very clear that black and brown and indigenous people are feeling these impacts first and worst but it's also important for us to recognize that. If we don't sort of end the sentence about the world we want to create and address zero sum framework had. Aw then we're just actually with all of our claims about white privilege and about racial equity and needing to treat people differently because of where they are situated were whistling past the framework that people are sitting in and so and in fact in worse. We're actually feeding it. And so i was really blown away to hear president biden's first speech on race would he Signed number racial equity executive orders. He called up zero sum explicitly. He said for too long. We've had a narrow cramped view of progress in america. And they said we've had this zero idea. Then he gave like five different. Colloquial joe from scranton is about how that you know zero shum. Plays out the the idea that if i get a job you know you lose yours the idea that you know they said like a dollar in my pocket. The daughter of yours. I haven't memorized what he said But that he made the case that think about it. You know if we deal with all these inequalities basically if if the people who are currently suffering from systemic racism have a better shot at a better life. You know who could argue that. That's not better for everyone. And he talked about the cost of racism to everyone. I think that's really important because we can't solve a problem without facing it and naming it and think about like the need jerk reaction among so many people to the phrase black lives matter that is like.

Michael lewis first president one five first speech democrat biden scranton single instance zero idea a dollar things america south so zero shum black
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:39 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"And you're only heard. I only hear you through the frames. That i have to understand what you're saying and so we don't tailor our way of speaking as if we want to actually be heard by people who have been relentlessly sold this zero-some story and i'm very clear and this is probably something that You know it's a lesson for from me. I have learned over the years that i share in the book is that i am much more interested in holding accountable but people who are selling racist ideas for their own profit than those who are desperate enough to buy them and i think that we have to recognize where the zero-some degrading stereotypes come from how much they are like the coin of the realm of conservative media in conservative politics and it would be pretty difficult for someone steeped in that world view who's also experiencing what they've experienced in their community which is yes actually. A market decline tens of thousands of factories lost right the loss of affordable college the stagnation of the minimum wage. I don't mean a caricature to say that people who believe this are all economically anxious but the country is doing much worse than it was back when there was a segregated pool. You know we imagine. That's my point really in the book and in the final chapter i go to lewiston maine. Which is a place that i think is really ground zero for the zero sum story and it becomes clear to me that folks believe zero. Some are just in their believing what they've been told by people who look like them and you know claim to speak for their interests in politics in the media and they're just saying it used to be easier to get by and get ahead. There used to be more good jobs. There used to be a higher standard of living there used to be less poverty inequality and what changed. It's true the civil rights act. It's true the immigration act of nineteen sixty five. That's not the story..

civil rights act tens of thousands immigration act of nineteen si lewiston maine zero
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:30 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Pools were for whites. Only or there were some some black people and what happened was in the nineteen fifties and sixties. The sort of. You know organizing that that burst onto the scene in the early sixties as the civil rights movement began to empower black communities to sue to advocate. And in fact actually one of the things that spurred black communities into action was people. Young people were being were dying. We're drowning in open water. Like a little boy in baltimore Who died a little black boy named tommy who died because he wanted to swim with his white friends like to black heads into way kids and they had to swim in the river because there was nowhere for them to swim together and so as communities began to be forced to integrate their pools. Many of them again. Not just in the jim crow south opted in dad of integrating their pools to drain them. They drained the public pool which meant they drained out. the water filled it in with dirt in montgomery alabama. The place. i visited a couple of times research for the book. They actually closed down the entire parks and recreation department of the city of montgomery. They sold off the animals in the zoo and they kept it closed from nineteen fifty nine for a decade. We were almost at nine thousand nine hundred seventy before the good people of montgomery alabama had a parks and recreation department that they could enjoy all to keep up the sharada of white supremacy. Now what does that mean. Obviously it meant that like so much of the new deal and the sort of era of shared prosperity of the mid century. That black people and black families never got a chance at at all right. It just a dried up and was drained before black people got access to it. Hadn't had it before and didn't get him get it again But what happened. Was you saw this boom of private pools. The backyard suburban pool really became a new director amenity. And you had these private swimming clubs these membership only swimming clubs that were like a couple of hundred dollars initiation fee a couple of hundred dollars a year in washington. Dc after integration over one hundred twenty them cropped up in the suing years these membership only swimming club so that meant that was once a public good then became a private amenity until yes you know like so much like our public schools. You can as a white person run and run and run to avoid what systemic racism has wrought on our public goods and you can spend more and more of your resources buying it in a private way but it's less efficient. It's.

washington early sixties tommy montgomery alabama montgomery nine hundred seventy one mid century nineteen fifties and sixties civil rights movement jim crow south one hundred twenty a decade couple of hundred dollars a ye couple of hundred dollars things nineteen fifty nine baltimore times black
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"That's that's right. So i can answer that question by telling a story of when i went to. I think newly relevant as we look at the fight to to organize in bessemer alabama the amazon warehouse. I went to mississippi to jackson. Which by the way is going now. Two weeks without running water Feel like i should take every opportunity to call attention to so. I went to a nissan factory outside of of jackson mississippi. Right in the wake of a failed union organizing drive that had been ten years in the making and sat with workers and talk to them about why it was that they voted a majority of the workers. Eligible to vote in. The plant voted against organizing into a union. Now i'm from chicago. I'm from the midwest. So i know sort of like in my bones. That unionized manufacturing jobs particularly auto factory. Jobs are like the prize of the american economy. And so the idea of someone willingly saying matt that's fine. I'd rather have lower wages more precarious health care and retirement benefits. No job security. No voice on the job to bargain for more safety precautions. It was just something that i felt like. I had to tease out. And what i learned from the workers. They are white and black for the union against was that what. Wbz boys in his amazing book black reconstruction in the south called the wages of whiteness. The psychological wage that is a promise of elevated status. Were actually more important to the workers at the plant. Particularly white workers who overwhelmingly voted against the union than the taste of material wages. And after my first day there. I went back to the hotel room where i was staying and i was kind of rattled. Because you know coming from my mid western perspective. I thought that it would be clearer. That white workers should have voted for the union. But the whole first day all i heard about was the little perks with the called. The buddy buddy system the idea that sort of who you hunt with matters more than.

amazon chicago Two weeks ten years alabama jackson first day mississippi bessemer nissan american western
"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Hi heather hi. I'm so excited to be in this conversation. I am too. We start tonight with the question. Why can't we have nice things. And i want to ask you that question. What you mean by that. But i wanna say the audience welcome. It's one of the silver linings of covid is that there can actually be a book. Event bringing together four different institutions in four different parts of the country representing four different troubled racial histories to talk about these issues. And there's something very exciting about that so there you begin by asking begin the book by asking. Why can't we have nice things. What are the nice things you mean. Who is we and why not shell. Can't we have them. Well thank you so much on for this conversation for the conversation. We had early on in my book tour for your wonderful sub stack newsletter which everyone should subscribe to the anc. Thank you so much for being part of this evening tonight. Thank you to the sponsoring organizations. Thank you. I know that there are a lot of people that i know particularly madison. Wisconsin i wanted to say hello to them This is a really exciting night for me Because the way that i came into this conversation and into my career was with an obsession over these issues of inequality that i know are near and dear to your heart on in some really looking forward to this conversation so nice things you know what i mean when i opened the book saying have you ever wondered why. We can't seem to have nice things. I did not mean self driving cars. Which i don't think we need. I did not mean laundry. That does itself which i could really use. I've meant things like universal childcare and universal healthcare public health system to handle pandemics world class infrastructure. That's reliable and modern to keep the heat and power on when predictable. Storms come through in the era of climate change. I mean wages that keep people out of poverty. Those of the nice things and when i say we can't have nice things i actually mean..

tonight heather Wisconsin madison one four four different troubled racial this evening four different parts silver
The Actual Cost of Racism in the U.S.

Our Body Politic

03:34 min | 8 months ago

The Actual Cost of Racism in the U.S.

"Heather mcghee spent years as an economic policy wonk and was president of demos from two thousand fourteen to twenty eighteen. Transforming it into a think tank that describes its work as race forward. She just published her book. The some of us what. Racism cost everyone and how we can prosper together in it. She said out to analyze. Why white americans believe in a zero sum racial competition. That's the idea that progress for people of color comes at the expense of white people and she uses social science research to show that. This belief harms everyone. Heather it's great to have you on our body politic. If so great to be with you tell us about the time that you write about in the book where you're twenty five and you have a sort of a moment where the race class narrative clicks in for you so fat nearly twenty years helping to build and then being president for four years of progressive economic think tank called demos and i was just a young economic policy. Staffer and i was working on the issue of debt. Consumer debt household dead should most credit cards mortgages and i was in the russell. Senate office building One of my first. Lobbying visits down there. We were trying to bring our economic research to policy makers to show them that it was going to be a very bad idea to change the bankruptcy laws as the credit card companies. Wanted to make it harder for people who had lost everything to get a fresh start. Get back on their feet and we felt like kind of hat. We had the math right. We we could make the point that this was just a really bad economic policy decision that it wasn't personal irresponsibility. That was driving bankruptcy. It was these structural issues our economy and people just haven't borrowed to make ends meet and we came in with our numbers and i was wearing pantyhose. You have to wear pantyhose. Dc you did at the time and they kept slipping off. And i remember. I went down to fix my shoe. And i was close to the bottom of a door that i could hear a voice and it really sounded like it was the senator senate office building sound like it was the senator the way the people we're talking to him and he said you know the these they. They haven't these babies by multiple mama's than they are using the government to avoid the personal responsibility through bankruptcy. And it was you know he didn't say anything about race he didn't say he's black man. He didn't say these brown men. But it made my heart rate feed up right in the hair. Stick up on the back of my neck. And i had this moment where i felt like. How did i spend all this time. In this predominantly white world of economic tanks and economic research. Forget one of the first lessons. I ever learned as a black person. In america bat the majority of white people have you pretty negative views about our worth in this society and that that more than anything helps explain why majority of white people support a political party and ideology that is bankrupting. The country that is leading to us being unable to handle the pandemic all of these dysfunctions that so many of us are scratching their heads. About why is it. That america can't seem to get its act together. Why can we. Not as i say in the first line of the book. Why does it seem. We can't have nice

Heather Mcghee Senate Heather Russell America
"mcghee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"mcghee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Ted radio hour from NPR I'm a new summer roadie today on the show Ted's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rogers is bringing us talks to eliminate some of the more surprising effects of racism on every all right so let's go from words and language to data and policy because the next week or that you have chosen is public policy expert heather McGhee tell us about heather yeah so heather McGhee as much as the policy expert and she gave this talk at Ted women in the December twenty nineteen called racism has a cost for everyone and I think the thing that I love about this talk is that she is looking at racism through the lens that I you know I think speaks to every single one of us is dollars and sense and really breaks down you know that there are no winners when people are racist yes so heather resurgence problems like rising household debt or declining wages or benefits and I wonder if people may have heard of heather McGhee because of a moment that went viral a couple years ago she was in the middle of live TV appearance on C. span when they were taking calls in a white man named Kerry called in to ask her advice over how to overcome his racial prejudice I'm a white male and I am prejudiced this car is something that I learned what can I do to change it out to be a better American heather McKay thank you so much for being honest and for opening up this conversation because it's simply one of the most important ones we have to have in this country so what can you do get to know black families who are this was a moment for her she kind of took a step back in and many offer something will highlight how does my work connects to this idea of thinking about systemic racism and the impact it has on all people and center on this tour where she spent a lot of time researching going to different parts of America to see what the the actual impact is of racism economically on on different communities let's pick up from right there let's listen I wondered is it possible that our society's racism been backfiring on the very same people set up to benefit from privilege my conclusion racism leads to bad policymaking it's making our economy works racism is bad for white people tip INS this is for example America's under investment in our public goods the.

Ted Whitney Pennington Rogers heather McGhee Kerry heather McKay America
Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

Environment: NPR

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

"Joe Seventy National Park has been closed for nearly three months because of stay at home orders but today the park is reopening in a limited way Cap Radios Ezra. David Romero reports that the closure has had a huge effect on nearby businesses. On the way into Yosemite National Park from Fresno sits the Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain Railroad, which shut down with the rest of California in March Scott. mcghee runs the operation. We lost every single tour group and school group that we had coming up here. Yosemite is opening with a lot of restrictions. Only about half of the average June visitors are allowed in, and they must make online reservation for each car in advance, Jamie Richards Yosemite spokesperson. We're going to be monitoring condition daily. We're GONNA make adjustments as needed and we're going to work to maintain safe conditions for visitors. Only two campgrounds are open in the larger one. One is operating at just fifty percent of capacity. Other campsites are closed due to staffing Richard says she's interested in seeing how the animals in the park respond again the people we've seen a lot of bears out in active we will see when the park reopens. How the animals continue to reopen adapt to visitors coming back last year, visitors spent more than one point seven billion dollars in the four California counties that surround the Park Brooke. Smith with visit Yosemite Madera. County says that could drop by as much as half this year between fires in government shutdowns. This is definitely the longest we've ever gone with you Ashleigh. Up when she first heard, the park was opening Amy George and her husband Kyle Mon- Holland from Davis. California rushed to book a few day passes. I was drinking coffee I'm like I'm just GonNa. See and says I go. July twenty second has day passes Great. That's our twentieth anniversary. The pair of teachers spent their honeymoon in Yosemite. George has visited the park since childhood and the reservation system has long term effects. Maybe this'll lessen the impact that humans have had on the environment on Yosemite. George hopes unlimited spaces. Don't discourage people from trying to make it to the park. She wants everyone to enjoy Yosemite like she always has for NPR. News I'm as David Romero in

Joe Seventy National Park Yosemite Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain R Yosemite Madera David Romero Amy George California Park Brooke Fresno Jamie Richards Scott. Mcghee Richard Smith NPR County Kyle Mon- Holland Davis
"mcghee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"mcghee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And singer brownie McGhee simply heavenly opened on Broadway followed by shows in London don't go it alone broke another strange but I'm still going to lay these blue I got some if his if you were leadtools if you the if you let three this call the if you go to then if you and then I've been making my way through this world I keep on trying to because with in some after simply haven't thanks to dust.

brownie McGhee London
"mcghee" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"mcghee" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"A brief announcement that we're going to be taking a little break. After the first of the year for a few weeks when we return we'll have some exciting news about the X.. Files podcast and now. Here's my conversation with Heather. mcghee I think you know the the disinvestment than disengagement from not just public the schools but the public period. That has happened over my lifetime. I was born in nineteen eighty. You know I think it started under Nixon but really etc celebrated under. Reagan has been one one of the saddest part of American politics and American policy making and the book. I'm reading right now about the cost of racism to us all Really one of the chapters is about how racism starves the public. How you have a very close correlation between A community becoming more diverse. Whether it's you know in the nineteen late nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties when what was a segregated town or community community or public resource then is forced to integrate and then you saw in towns across the country not just in the American south towns deciding to close. Is there public pools. Their public parks public schools. White parents you know. Pulling out of Public Infrastructure and public schools you know the growth of private private schools segregation academies and parochial schools and ultimately. I think everybody loses out white. Children lose out from the gift and and The resource that is you know learning in a diverse environment whites white parents have to pay a lot of money to to avoid what is public And of course you know students of color were left behind Are Are not invested in the way that they would have been had you know the the Commons remained kind of a white only space. So I think as I started out as an economic policy person You know those questions. I talked about in terms of my childhood. The kind of big economic story that was happening You know in our politics which was really scapegoating. I think Single MOMS Where the the real economic story that was happening in my backyard was the closing of the factories? It's an incredible economic decisions. Have Iraq Obama came to Chicago. Right in the you're three. I think the arrived here to work work In the shadow of those closed steel mills which had such devastating effect on the communities around it and Particularly Wrigley on the South side. That's right and I mean that deindustrialization You know which was followed by the growth in crime and in Las In public you know public sector resources which then hit you know the other half of families that are often You often have like a man working in the steel mills and A woman working in the public sector in some way. And you know it was sort of this this one two punch you know. That's the economic problem that I kind of started out my career to solve which was why is it so hard for for working families to get ahead and David I will say that over the course of the ten years the first ten years of really working at a class organization right my organization was founded by a handful of white men. It was seventy five percent white. When I became President Komo News? And you know the goal was to address inequality and race was a sort of accelerate of inequality right. There's disparities when you talk about inequality but what I discovered over the years was that race wasn't just an acceleration of inequality it was a driver of inequality. And so many of the stories of just bad economic policy making and self sabotaging economic policymaking and predatory economic policy making exploitative. We're really driven by By you know racist attitude. Racial Animus You Know Bryan. Stevenson was here last year and was very moving and re challenged The audience as he does everywhere. He goes To really confront the legacy of race in this country which is of course his his mission And it was to me you know and I consider myself pretty thoughtful on these issues and I were you know for a lot of ground. Groundbreaking leaders who people of Color and but the But just focusing on the the the legacy of essentially abducting millions of people bringing into this country enslaving them and all the ensuing developments since the compounding of it how do we How we confront that legacy and how do we have a conversation about it? That doesn't doesn't become you talk about trying to find paths for people to have these commerce. How do we have this conversation particularly environment? We're now you know the plants. The plants have closed at a lot of different places. You've you've got a bunch of people who are white who are who've been displaced in the economy opioid addicted Depressed and don't feel privileged. You Know Oh and so you know The concept of white privilege is inflammatory concept. You know even though you can make a strong case as for what it means. I mean I think part of the problem is that we approach We have the American mindset is often and falls into a zero sum trap where progress for one group is coming at the expense of the other. And that's because that was the way a brutally reinforced racial hierarchy would have it be in a slave based economy you did have the exploitation and a miseration of millions of people you know become the wealth of a nation right. That's pretty zero sum. But that's not where we are anymore and yet we still have zero sum mindset. And so aw I do believe that when we talk about there's been a vested interest on a personal level on a political level to just diminish the role of slavery of Jim Crow. redlining of mass incarceration in shaping the America that we know today you know not to mention the near genocide of indigenous people. I mean the list could go on on and so I think I. We need to recognize that. We can't move forward while still telling ourselves ourselves lies about who we are and what we've done. It means that will always be locked in this fight about what the truth is instead of. You know joining winning arms and rolling our sleeves up and having some American sense of pride about moving pasta right I mean we could actually say in not in a way that feels hollow but really tones and is true about what we've done on Stephen Imports as the Germans. Do exactly exactly exactly so i. I fundamentally believe that and I think you're sort of alluding to what. What could the reparations conversation be I it needs to be a truth? The Commission Right I. We really need to get closer to a common narrative and I think that's really hard right now because we have a sort of racial resentment meant for profit factory in conservative media conservative corporate media which will try to fight tooth and nail as they do? Every time I remember winchell Obama said that you know she was living in a house built by slaves on the right wing. Media went crazy bill Riley was on talking about how slaves had potatoes. I mean it just it just it. It makes it makes their session. Investment in denial is that it's hard to get to a commonplace but I don't think it's impossible. I think Americans put a man on. The moon invented the lightbulb in the solar ban on the congestion. And we could do. These things are of course different Because because they don't they don't involve human you know he he the emotional components that this discussion has so oh just returning to the point of before that I asked before how. How do you have this discussion? And can you have this discussion with people who say I'm I'm Kinda flat on my back here and so you know I i. We've faced this. I mean whenever I was in campaigns Particularly later in the later years people felt like You know white working class. People people felt like the the wealthy got bailouts Poor people got what they would call handouts and that they worst I that that that you talk about narratives that was the narrative and we're we're in the middle now notwithstanding the fact that many of them were using using You know we're we're failing so's food stamps and other things so I mean this is what I'm yeah because because these the you know the Dow trump has has done is he has he has weaponized this really big way That sense of loss that sense of resent Batman. Yeah I'm so on well we D- most demos action our political arm. You know we wanted to go straight to this question you know how do you create a multi-racial working and middle class coalition You know what is the story that allows you to talk to someone who lost their a a black man who lost his job in Gary Indiana. You know thirty years ago and a white woman who lost her job on the line in a rural part of Oklahoma five years ago three years ago and what we discovered. This is a project with a notch. Shankar who's a wonderful linguist and inhaling Lopez is a law professor Berkeley the author of Dog Whistle Politics. Was that the story about the economy that we tell needs to have a villain right. You can't actually actually say this is the economy's like the weather and this is just sort of happening so we know that the popular story the Progressive Story is. It's the people who are you the wealthy and powerful enough to be setting the rules right. There's you know those. Those factories didn't just close right. People multinational corporations close them and open them other places except for whatever it is You know the the Wall Street firms didn't just get bailouts. They needed them because they cheated they crash the economy but now how particularly race is so loud in the conversation because of what happened on the right and trump is the manifestation. Shen of it is player. He played to an audience. I think that was created much earlier on the right in the right wing media you think in response to Obama. Of course yeah I mean I think it's old right. I mean this is Nixon stuff. Johnson talked about yes this right but I think it it accelerated and it grew into a bigger commonsense sense with the unhappy happenstance of Fox News becoming powerful and Obama being president for years at right after a financial crisis where where we didn't do enough to save people's homes and we didn't do enough To make sure that someone was held accountable. So you racist really loud in the room and so progressives don't win by ignoring race which is what we try to try to. Hey if we can just do an economic populism white people will be like yeah. It's the plutocrats fault. Not You know Jesse Jackson. I remember when he was running for president. Used to say everybody's the same color when the plant lights go out right and I think that color blindness narrative narrative is insufficient today. Because everybody knows that everybody's not the same color right and everybody you know. Immigration is a huge flash point on on on on these racial issues. You know black lives matter totally changed the conversation by the way you know trump is he. He's seized on a narrative that is not just listen American narratives. Oh yeah but a global narrative so the election in Britain but you overlay that Brexit vote and it looks very much like the TRUMPF. Oh that's right. It was very similar types of people in some cases similar. Same people Using immigrants scapegoating message to get Britain's to to vote for something that would cause them a lot of economic pain certainly in the short term But so what we discovered was you have to talk about race but specifically typically talk about who is using race to divide us to divide people who are ultimately in a similar boat as you know as Jesse Jackson said and and so what we discovered was you have to call out and in the trump era. It's very obvious you have to call out the fact that we all want the same things but the wealthy and well-connected and the politicians that they pay for are telling us to point the finger at Brown people at immigrants at poor people so that we ignore what they're doing which is you know rigging the rules in lining their own pockets and only if we come together across racial lines can we You know build a movement that will take power back for working people. Let me ask you Thank you for listening to the X.. Files presented by Luminary Media and the University.

winchell Obama president scapegoating Nixon Jesse Jackson Public Infrastructure Britain Heather. mcghee Reagan trump Commons Oklahoma Luminary Media Stevenson David Bryan Chicago Stephen Imports Wrigley
"mcghee" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"mcghee" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Like to thank you for coming with me in spirit and electronically to McGhee March this year again and we will try and get together soon and let's go to cold water river preserve and let's do some birding would do a show there and let's see if we can find that snotty guy who didn't believe that there is a really inwardly there what what say maybe we'll have a dustup interview with garlic polar garlic must polar yeah so that's it for life radio this week for war were you thinking and you can email me at life radio dot com you can look me up on Facebook and bill would you like the listeners to friend you on Facebook all right thanks so much bye bye about buying a monkey how about a force then check out the show that will add to the burning questions where do you get them what do you feed them how do you take care of them and most of all what were you thinking what exotic expert and author Bob tart every week on demand from dot com this is true if your family dog sits in your glove compartment jul feeling good about yourself what do you have a dental floss for release and I had a dog have people have poodle not much of a guard dog this is off the actually I have a DOCSIS my wife brought into the marriage my step dog is it was it was so bad driving a minivan now walking a Wiener dog it's easy to much of the kielbasa market don't dragging on the ground you know those images are look big fat can you verify well the for the crowd to.

McGhee Facebook Bob tart
Starbucks stores to close today for anti-bias training

Morning Edition

01:43 min | 3 years ago

Starbucks stores to close today for anti-bias training

"In new york you may see a closed sign on your local starbucks this afternoon today the coffee chain is closing all of its company owned stores for part of the afternoon to conduct racial bias education the trainings in response to an incident last april at a philadelphia starbucks when store manager called the police on black men who had not yet ordered marketplace's nancy marshall genzer is following this well starbucks says it'll be training nearly one hundred seventy five thousand workers the training is geared toward preventing discrimination in starbucks stores starbucks says the training will address bias that can lead to stereotyping prevent discrimination and promote inclusion in a statement starbucks says the goal is to quote ensure everyone inside a starbucks store feel safe and welcome starbucks says it received guidance on its curriculum from former attorney general eric holder sherline eiffel of the nwc p and heather mcghee the president of the public policy group demos begi says she'll hold starbucks to a high standard and won't be a rubber stamp to validate its training marketplace's nancy marshall genzer thank you let's do the numbers via talion failing to form a populist government in building the far right and inroads in spain by the left are among the reasons that european stocks are down sharply today the footsie in london down one point three percent sp spain's main stock index down two point four percent dow futures here down seven tenths percent the euro is down at a dollar fifteen the trump administration wants to change the rules to allow shortterm health insurance plans to become permanent the argument is these could be affordable alternatives to higher cost coverage under obamacare no doubt shortterm plans are.

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