20 Burst results for "Mccune"

"mccune" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:43 min | 2 months ago

"mccune" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Jersey, not too long ago for more information on how to enter for the beer awards for next year. You just go to craft beer marketing awards dot com. But let me welcome back to the program. Jim McCune and Jackie Developing the craft beer cast. Jim Jackie, How are you guys? Yeah. Hey, all Uh, doing great. Good, good. That's that's that's awesome. And look, Jim, I'll start off with you first question here with the pandemic, putting a damper on how the awards were held. How is the response from brewers to this year's event? Everything's been great, and we're lucky that pandemic. Uh, really didn't affect inter workings of our award. The only thing it kind of ruined Dinitz was having our lives would ceremony that would have been out San Antonio. So that was a total bummer. And then, of course, much to our dismay this year is, um Show is also postponed. But we've got one coming up in September, so we're super stoked now. Good. Good. All right. We'll get into the details of that in just a moment. Now, Jackie, if I'm not mistaken. Was this the first time that you guys open up the awards internationally. And how was that received by brewers? Internationally? Yeah, we opened up the 2021 awards globally, which in a pandemic, some would question our sanity. Um, but it was actually you know what? It was very well received, and we started seeing those global entries rolling, Really? Quickly. Um, I think people were excited. They saw what went on last year, Um, for the awards, and we're super stoked that they were able to take part this year and we saw amazing work from all over the world. And that's great. I mean, obviously, you have to have. I mean, look, we've been in this pandemic for 14 15 months, 16 months, whatever it is, and you really have to, You know, it's great that people Could see these things and go. You know what? There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that's awesome. And let's do something here Talking with Jim McCune and Jackie develop both of judges for the craft beer marketing awards. For more info on how you can enter for next year's awards. Just go to craft beer marketing awards dot com. We're here on the alga, too. Low craft beer cast on a m 9 70 the answer. Um, last time that you were both on we talked about the 30 different awards that were judged and awarded. Who had the best pandemic marketing around the globe, Jackie Oh, wow. Um You know what I I have to say that America pretty much nailed it just because we're a little bit more. Playful with what we do a little more sarcastic and make, you know light of a terrible situation. The collapse that went on where what grabbed my I, um I just think everybody really jumped in. But around the world, you know, everybody did find ways to support their local breweries in different ways. Those interesting? Yeah. I mean, it was great to see you know, not only people here locally in New York and New Jersey, supporting their breweries. I mean so many of them, especially in New Jersey, so many of them had to shift To a canning operation where they really weren't prepared for that, But a lot of them were able to do it in a short period of time, which is great Jim alternate ending brewing in Aberdeen, New Jersey, a place I've been to a number of times. It's fantastic. They just opened during the pandemic. They won for the most unique logo design in New Jersey. What was it about their design that stood out to you? Um, it was actually 310 judges from around the world that actually looked at that and and gave them its rankings. But, yeah, they took a gold crush E for best local design. So uniqueness. Um I did They take another one. Yeah, they also Yeah, they had to write. Yeah. Most creative savage brewery accessories and pos, and they got a platinum there as well. Yeah, it's really cool. The guy who opened up alternate ending he, um he took a movie theater and converted it into a brewpub, and he kept one of the movie screens there. So what he does is periodically he'll show old movies. And a lot of his beers are movie themed, so it's really cool, and he still has the more key outside and he puts up, you know, signings and stuff. So it was a unique way of repurposing the space, which is really cool. We're talking with Jim McCune and Jackie develop both judges for the craft Beer Marketing awards, and for more info on how to enter for next year's awards to get yourself a crusty if you're a brewery owner Just go to craft beer marketing awards. Com. We're here on the Alcatel, a craft beer cast on a m 9 70 the answer. Jackie were either you or Jim able to get to any tap rooms during the pandemic. Um, yeah, a few. You know, it was tough being in New York. Everything was shut down. I did take a little trip upstate and depend Sylvania hit a few. Actually, last weekend. I was at big my Sarah man skirt over in Jersey. Oh, great. Great. Yes, I think Sig had their, uh, I believe they had their anniversary, right? Yep. Their fifth anniversary party. And if you're listening, you need to enter next year. Their cans are awesome. Cool, Jim. How about you? You're able to get to any tap rooms. Yeah, I haven't stopped life. Pandemic really didn't stop me from going out. And, uh, it's been business as usual for me. So here on the island. I think we have 67 breweries. So Has plenty to I need to head up and Uh And Jim is referring to Long Island. That's where he's based, and so is Jackie. So there is There's plenty of breweries on Long Island. Obviously, that you can go to I mentioned or I saw in the award rundown locally, that Brooklyn Brewery won a number of awards and which is great. But I also saw in the rundown How the New York State Brewers Association which by the way, there's a great job raising awareness for the breweries around New York state. Won an award for pandemic awareness and fundraising. Would either of you like to comment what it was that they wanted for? Yeah, they did an amazing job with their design for they had to take a big event and Make it virtual. Obviously the rest of us. I believe it was. You know a beer fast that they did, um, their merchandise their Uzis. They did, you know collaborations with all the breweries on their beer cans. The whole thing was, you know, seventies and really cool and have it caught a lot of judges eyes. They got a lot of great feedback and, you know, just shout out from just our day to day conversation with judges about those entries. And, um you know, my my last question for both of you guys. Next year's awards are going to get started a little bit earlier here you mentioned September So what is the event in September that for entries to start going in? Are you guys going to have an actual in person event? How's that going to work? So we're launching 2022 at the craft Brewers conference in Denver. Oh, great. We're hoping to. Yes. So we're hoping we're also having a Party with our presenting sponsor, Hillebrand, um, that weekend as well to kind to invite everybody out. Who Who's one and you can kind of high five. Everybody now and give hugs and you.

Jim McCune New York Jim Denver Jackie September Jim Jackie 310 judges San Antonio Long Island New Jersey Brooklyn Brewery 14 16 months Sylvania last year next year New York State Brewers Associa Jersey last weekend
"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

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That's <Speech_Male> been really fascinating. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i'll leave it there but thank <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you so much for <Silence> just like a really <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> really <Speech_Male> stimulating. Like <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kinda hurtful <Silence> conversation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> you know if anyone <Speech_Male> is curious <SpeakerChange> about your <Silence> work <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you yourself. <Speech_Male> If <Speech_Male> you do <Speech_Male> other things where can people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> find. <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> will <Silence> <Advertisement> stuff about your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> well. You <Speech_Male> can find all about <Speech_Male> all about <Speech_Male> at with media <Speech_Male> foundation at <Speech_Male> just <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> with media foundation <Speech_Male> dot org <Speech_Male> A lot <Speech_Male> of our top line projects <Speech_Male> are there <Speech_Male> And you <Speech_Male> can get. That's <Speech_Male> where you can find <Speech_Male> out more about the nonprofit <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> behind which pedia <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> you know. Our projects <Speech_Male> are supported <Speech_Male> by that <Speech_Male> for myself. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> if you wanna come see the <Speech_Male> things that i'm working <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> right now. I'm working <Speech_Male> on a petroglyphs <Speech_Male> project. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What surrey <Speech_Male> hedgerow tro cliff. <Speech_Male> Rock <Speech_Male> rock <Speech_Male> got a <Speech_Male> gut it. Yeah <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> i'm basically <Speech_Male> making a bunch of petroglyphs <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> rock art <Speech_Male> examples from around <Speech_Male> the world and trying to do <Speech_Male> fifty <Silence> by september <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you can follow that <Speech_Male> on my instagram <Speech_Male> which is just <Speech_Male> z. Mccune <Speech_Male> mcc <Speech_Male> you any. <Speech_Male> Yes by instagram. <Speech_Male> Handle and <SpeakerChange> you can see what <Speech_Male> i'm doing with that. <Speech_Male> All that sounds amazing <Speech_Male> and so specific <Speech_Male> in nature <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> socal. <Speech_Male> There's like <Speech_Male> a gap. There's almost <Speech_Male> no documentation <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> at founded and <Speech_Male> i'm working on it. I'm worried <Speech_Male> i it's like <Speech_Male> you find yourself <SpeakerChange> being like <Speech_Male> oh i really like a book <Speech_Male> petroglyphs yet <Silence> from around <SpeakerChange> the world <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> you discover that <Speech_Male> people have only done these <Speech_Male> like very <Speech_Male> studies unlike <Speech_Male> individual <Speech_Male> sites <Speech_Male> and unlike. <SpeakerChange> I really want <Speech_Male> all of them. <Speech_Male> Okay <Speech_Male> i'll will. <Speech_Male> Hopefully you'll get some <Speech_Male> new facebook <Speech_Music_Male> stalkers as a result <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> because that sounds super <Speech_Music_Male> interesting. Zach <Speech_Music_Male> thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> for today's conversation <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Yes they say <Speech_Music_Male> m. i'm show. We'll <Speech_Music_Male> reconnect again. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for having <Speech_Music_Male> me on thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You've <Speech_Music_Male> been listening to design <Speech_Music_Male> a series of conversations <Speech_Music_Male> about the <Speech_Music_Male> big issues that matter to <Speech_Music_Male> all of us <Speech_Music_Male> on design

september facebook wikipedia Zach fifty today instagram Speech_Music_Male Mccune
"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

04:23 min | 3 months ago

"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

"That's worth exploring until kind of the weld opens backup brian. We just one for earth day that was virtual had a number of people. join across. you know all time zones bringing it's actually a surreal topic like the wikipedia article on earth yet is like an incredibly refined article lots of a good example of both the humor and the delight of warring where it's like. Do you put on the earth article when anyone on earth connecticut. Yeah wow it's like try something trying to define itself isn't it. There's also a wikipedia article on wikipedia. Where you could go see that happen. I was gonna say not only. Does the earth page represent. Kind've the delights of wikipedia but also just sort of the the weirdness and even some of the potential for We'd information to be on that. Like looking at flat earth sort of stuff. Does that come into that sort of page it'll from we should look. You should have a look. But i just wonder you know interesting to see of course where you know. There's a lot of people who believe that despite the sort of the the best knowledge that we have available saying the contrary. I guess just as we sort of start to ductile out of this conversation that could probably keep going up forever. What would you say to people who have never really did they tell us in this issue before. Like why should they care. And what are some of the first steps. They could take to be involved. Who wickham pedia is really an effort towards the future So in contrast to a lot of what we do online which is right in email or make a post really all about like timely short-term yup media efforts wikipedia is very much like. You're writing something for the future. You're writing something for somebody else to learn from to understand the world better. And i like to just encourage people real emotional place that like you know something. You probably know a lot of things and you could share some of the things you know. You know the references that you have for those things it could be about. Your community could be about your school. It could be about your favorite You know actors scholars scientists film. You're actually enriching the world for others. It's incredibly generous to to participate in free knowledge because you're basically making a donation to human understanding and to take part in that you should find the things on wikipedia that you care about the look a little. I would say bereft like thin like find the thin areas about things you know about and you will find the in those areas you know. Help is welcome At its are welcomed. Photographs are welcome. References are welcome People want those things to grow and that's also true about other projects which data with comments where we're trying to collect photographs and data points The release like you know. I started editing wikipedia. When i was in high school and i i basically add it. It's very selfish. But i asked to my high school's page. Because i discovered the rival high school had a much bigger page hustle. Like it's okay to be selfish while you can be like things. I care about something to work on them. And later i started to notice all these adjacent topics that weren't really well covered. But were maybe a more neutral like Communities how many people lived there. You know there is a park in my town. It didn't have a almost any definition side. Looked up when it was founded. You start adding small things. It's really a lego brick process. Like you're just like adult who brick and magical thing is you're gonna find out you're not alone..

lego both first steps one earth pedia of people wikipedia day wickham
"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

"Reacts you know that that can happen does happen in our community are the ultimate deciders on on content So they're the ones who are really steadfast in patrolling this At working on it. And you know it's like when we look at moments. When the wikipedia site has been blocked it has happened You know. We're currently blocked in china in both chinese and english and we were blocked in turkey for almost two and a half years. Where you know. There was some concerns about things that were on wikipedia that the government did not find to their alignment. Now here what we you know. We come back to this idea of npr v. Right like we really want people to participate in knowledge making and so to do that. They need to have access yet. Go ahead sorry. Npa neutral point of view neutral. Point of view just just elaborating indeed. Yeah so like when we think of npr v n pov depends on lots of participation. It depends on lots of people helping to make the point of view neutral right because it's actually hard for a single individual to be neutral right. It actually comes across through lots of people touching something kind of standing at it trying to make it into a statement that is true and descriptive That has referenced but that no longer has that strong sentiment in it right. That could be a personal pointed in. It's like you don't see it as the move. From personal point of view to collective quantity right which we compete. It works so when we get lots in a country one of the great losses is the opportunity for people in that country to author the content. That's one of the biggest losses. That's what we really focused on. When we told the story of the turkish block we ran a campaign called. We miss turkey. Because i real loss with that we were missing the turkish perspective. The turkish knowledge community all of the turkish journalists historians photographers You know people who are specialists. In myth and archaeology they all became unable to offer content. Not just in turkish but in english and german and in any other language so we. It wasn't just that wikipedia was no longer a resource to the turkish people. It was the the world was losing turkish knowledge.

china turkey both chinese two and a half years german wikipedia one turkish english npr v n pov single individual
"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

05:44 min | 3 months ago

"mccune" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

"Welcome to undesired. I'm your host costumes and thank you so much for joining the mammoth task to untangle the world's biggest problems and redesign new features. I know firsthand. We'll have so much we can bring to these big challenges listening and see where you fit as we undesired the concept of free knowledge and unconcious culture. You may ask yourself what is free knowledge. Well have you ever been in a conversation with friend in nature like hey. What's the name of that movement that seeks to make sure that all knowledge is free to use reuse and redistribute without legal social technological restriction. And you think oh. Wow no actually show a better check wikipedia. That is free knowledge. It is our ability to access all that we know or think we do and to participate in the creating of what we know at a moment's notice is to create a mirror to society of so that we can turn to at any time and with technology we have to rely on static printed materials from specific publishing houses to learn about events. After they've happened we can. Now do these in real time. But there's another thing that comes to mind for this. One knowledge is power and would these technological advancements the complexities also intensify. Who gets to participate. How we manage differing worldviews. Why is participation in this free knowledge so so important perhaps more than we currently realize helping us untangle this week at problem is allied special guest. Zach mccune zach is the current director of brand for wikipedia and various projects under its parent organization. The week media foundation sack is also an american filmmaker and graphic designer whose work has been featured in mexico the us national park service and the bbc and just like the most surreal journey down a rabbit hole in some random wikipedia page. We got from talking about edit walls on the status of cats to edit to seek to bring neutrality when covering device figures like one donald j trump as we'll see from our chat free knowledge goes so much further than just updating a page and we peoria free knowledge is so much older than the internet read from the printing press which is a basic human. Right so what does it really mean for knowledge to be free. And how can we make sure. People can participate in this important and collective that..

donald j trump wikipedia bbc mexico this week Zach mccune zach national park service american One knowledge peoria
Wright, Acuna power Atlanta Braves in shutout of New York Mets

Dana Loesch

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Wright, Acuna power Atlanta Braves in shutout of New York Mets

"And And that that one's one's driven driven to to write write that that ball ball is is high. high. That That ball ball is is deep deep Conforto Conforto couldn't couldn't find find it it doesn't doesn't matter. It's over the yellow line for a home run. Rainbow Homer Ah, Wall scraper for Ronald Junior Junior Jim Carrey on Fox boards. Ronald McCune, you junior, a solo home run and a bases clearing triple as the brave Shut out the Mets in New York seven to nothing that was final road game of the Year for Atlanta. Team's lead over Miami and the National League East is up to three games and the magic number to clinch the division is down to five. Braves host the Marlins Monday. It's the first of four at truest

Conforto Conforto Ronald Junior Ronald Mccune Jim Carrey National League East Braves Mets Marlins Miami Atlanta New York
"mccune" Discussed on The Middlests

The Middlests

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"mccune" Discussed on The Middlests

"How do you get away from this. Being all things to all people to you know to become successful and the other is Around how you let how other let other people know our see this How good you are and So you can afford to think And the first something that I love to to reference books and one. That really speaks to me with this. Is greg mccune the them..

greg mccune
"mccune" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"mccune" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"I love parks and REC. What's so beautiful about that? Show I think is it's a show about love into show all level off. Yes it is a show about love. It's all about people wanting to do the right thing for the people around them It's funny I think it's such. Here's IT aggression but in terms of like happiness. It's very hard for happiness not to seem sentimental or mawkish are didactic. I happen to love anything tactic but not everybody does that is a show about goodness and love. And it's so funny. It's a masterpiece and then it managed to do that with such a light touch. That's exactly right because I'm writing a book about Love Right now or communism compassionate and it's very hard to talk about it without falling back into cliche. That's a show the density of the humor. Yeah I sometimes. We'll just rewind the scene because so much happened. That is so funny so anyway parks and REC is my go-to treat among others. And but but I've been thinking a lot you know the we in a board meeting the other day with our board members at ten percent happier and we're and our board is usually cautioning us. They Really Smart Investors. Who are actually really engaged in meditation. Most of them and really take seriously what we're doing and participate in deep ways in the practice and usually they're counseling us to prioritize and focus. It's not in this most recent board that they weren't doing that but we were identifying a number of areas that we could do very exciting and impactful work and our veterans particularly care about impact on human lives. And we were identifying areas where we could really help people and we're bumping up against this problem of there are three things massive things. We could do big projects we could lean into. I am super excited. And I think we're all super excited to do. All of them and our future selves would be very happy that we did it for the health of the company in the health of our customers and yet we can't do all of those things. We would not be self compassionate to do all of those things and and I find like a fear based part of me. I think if I'm being honest with myself wants to do all of them right away because I I wanna do everything to you know because it's part greed it's part here but I think below the greed is the fear and of making myself and people around me safe in some way fending off chaos in some way and so I think this is a deep for me. At least a deep discussion between you know hustling and crushing it in this moment. And you know everybody's out there. You know trying to get their instagram game up and bakes sourdough bread and make their side hustle a venture backed startup and all this stuff by the same. Token were rundown are Mittler activated by the ambient anxiety of this pandemic etcetera etcetera. So for me walking. That line is tough. I know exactly what you mean. I suffer from the same thing And I think the end I kind of our like that all the time. Our eyes are bigger than her stomach and in terms of our ability to execute on creative projects and so like many things like any kind of stress or this is an amplifier of human nature. So I think whatever you are. It's probably intensifying that aspect of your personality. I mean for what it's worth what I'm trying to do is really just like what are my priorities for today. And this week like what am I really trying to get done. And it is hard sometimes when you really like trying to get something done then also have the capacity to step back and try to ask yourself like well. What's the urgent versus important? It's the SA- it's the same dilemmas. But just kind of in a context where everything is different. Some things are easier and quicker and a lot of things are harder and more cumbersome there's new opportunities but some opportunities gone away it's like it's a lot of constantly recalibrating it's like the load symbol is going in by brain a lot as I'm just trying to like way what everything means and it's also strange. I don't know about you but one thing I'm finding strange and I think a lot of people are. Printing strange is a lot of times we do and this meditation is all about like being president in the moment as I understand it from you but we just had a huge amount of time projecting ourselves into the future and actually intellectually. I knew this but I hadn't realized exactly how true that was. Tell all of a sudden my future just had this giant tentative pasted all over it and I'm finding that hard because we naturally think about project ourselves into the future and so that uncertainty is making it hard to think about decisions and priorities and plans and if you're thinking about other people's plans family plans or team plans plans for your where your work. It's hard do you have a system or thoughts about a workable system because the notion of setting priorities and ruthlessly holding to them has become even before the pandemic a big. It's become increasingly salient at my mind. Not that I'm doing it. I don't know if you've ever read that Greg. Mccune book I don't know if I'm pronouncing his name correctly. It's called essential ISM. Yeah it's about picking the things that are essential and ruthlessly saying no to everything else. Do you see okay okay. That's interesting so let's see here by problem with that is that what is essential and I feel like a lot of times. You don't know until you have hindsight a lot of times I'll do things and I'm like an unbalanced I do this or not. And then it'll end up. Being something. Amazing will come of it so I feel like I have to maintain in my life some serendipity and I have to over reach to do things that are not essential because sometimes the things that seem the least essential and being really important but of course you can order your life that way. Because you can't say yes to everything because I have no time to do anything at all. I just feel like it's not as simple as saying paradigm to what's essential because I can easily say with that was now but I feel like I would be closing off my life from so many things that I can't predict and camp for C. Because I haven't kind of been an uncomfortable place where I sort of. I'm juggling too many balls at once. Which kind of drags me down and makes me feel Ozzie. But on the other hand gives me all these opportunities and I meet people. I wouldn't have met and have experiences I wouldn't have had experienced. I don't know that's my struggle with this. What do you think well? It's so interesting because I I think you and I've talked about this. I've mentioned it on this show many times. I had three sixty review. Which is where I had all these people in my life comment on what? I'm doing well and what I'm not doing. Well and the big among many big dings was I was pulled in too many directions. So prioritisation has become an increase is such a huge issue for me and what I'm hearing from. You is interesting I I. Sometimes I'm drawn toward the Greg. Mccune like you you you pick what's essential and you stick to it and you just everything else is in the trash. Bin and I'm drawn to that because it's clean yes and I'm hearing from you is you. Don't want to live permanently in a state of hairiness and an over commitment. But if you don't test the boundaries of that a little bit you lose serendipity you lose things that are opportunities that you would never have foreseen and so that strikes me as a razor's edge I think it is and I think it's probably one of these. Tensions with the one tension within happiness is except yourself and expect more from yourself. Both are true and I think here it's like focus on what's essential but make room for what's not essential it's like it's a paradox. And yet I think both things need to be true and and how to find that balance probably is very different for different people different times and it might be that. This is one of those times. This might be like a season of life. Where you're saying. This is not the seasons of serendipity. This is the season of the few things done well. And maybe that's my job and my family or whatever or I'm only going to focus on this aspect. I'm not gonNA work on that to help get through this time to just give.

Mccune Mittler president Greg Ozzie Bin
"mccune" Discussed on Billy Dees Podcast

Billy Dees Podcast

16:21 min | 1 year ago

"mccune" Discussed on Billy Dees Podcast

"We are on I tunes. Which was apple podcasts? Now iheartradio spotify tune in stitcher. The Billy Dis guests and you can follow me on twitter. You can tweet me but you gotta be nice now. You can disagree but you gotTa Be Nice on these studio line a with me. Today is earl mccune. How're you doing? I'm doing well how are you doing? I'm doing okay and what we are going to talk about today is. We're going to talk about what's happening.

earl mccune Billy Dis twitter apple spotify
Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too, study suggests

All Things Considered

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too, study suggests

"If you're a dog lover, you already know, dogs, and humans have a special connection now, new research suggests that when owners are anxious or neurotic their dogs. Get more stressed NPR's Rebecca hersher reports that is not necessarily a bad thing. Not all stress is bad stress. Take, for example, dogs. They compete. In the twenty four inch classes? Kali handle by amber. Mccune for New Hampshire. Eighteen agility competition at the Westminster dog show mccune has to help boom the dog race through obstacles and even on TV. It's clear that they're totally in sync emotionally kabuki is just get this just will not leave amber side. Kyun gestures and coaxes, boom weaves, leaps. They're both focus. It's over focused turns to excitement for animal, and human mccune smiles could boom jumps into her arms at a happy. Yes. Rosemary Strasser is a behavioral neuro endocrinologist at the university of Nebraska at Omaha. She studies dog human relationships, and she also personally competes with her dog in agility competitions. Acre feel like both you and your job are reading each other's body Hughes, so well that you don't need to use. Verbal of command. He wondered about that feeling of being emotionally in sync. What was going on biologically in a study published a few years ago, Strasser found that the stress hormone cortisol might have something to do with it. When dogs and humans were competing or working together. She found that their cortisol levels were in sync rising together, for example, when they were competing. A new study published today in the journal nature scientific reports builds on that work. Researchers in Sweden found that even regular pet dogs appear to have higher levels of cortisol over time if their owners act in ways that are anxious or. Neurotic biologists Lina Roth is one of the study's authors. East owners have stress and the dog is likely to meter that stress and the dog will mirror that stress over months. They found not just right before an acutely stressful event like a competition for those who might be anxious by nature. And to have a dog. They love Roth

Rosemary Strasser Mccune Cortisol Lina Roth Hughes Rebecca Hersher NPR New Hampshire Omaha Kyun Sweden University Of Nebraska Twenty Four Inch
"mccune" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"But now Patrick mccune wrote the oxygen advantage got to know him sort of doing that very very important on nose breathing were the only mammals so from a dog and the dog needs to regulate body temperature. So it has to breathe through the mouth. But we are the only ones aside from that dog that brief through our mouth, and it keeps us in that stress state. So those breathing the exchange within the knows crates natural nitric oxide, which is a a dilated or that opens up blood flow and good for the brain interns on Patou itary all of that stuff. So and then helps to deal with kind of the build up of CO two. And that's usually the impetus. Of of needing to breathe it's the build up not the lack of oxygen? So we've been experimenting with nose breathing. Now changed my life completely. I I work out with with knows knows breathing all the time, and we do some breath holds on X sales and do a bunch of stuff. And then we do a lot of in the pool training over the last ten years, hold your breath. I don't know. It's usually under stress that was like one of the it is, but we're usually doing something. Okay. So it's usually involves some heavyweight pulling down to the bottom of the pool can't breath, or we'll do it on an ex hail. So when you act HALE, and you start something all the bells are going off ready like what the hell you doing breathe. So then you're dealing with. The underwater stuff is tricky because. It's a you have to remain calm, and you can't freak out. 'cause you're you're you're underwater number one. And number two. Is you burn your oxygen really fast? When you're stressed out of like fighters, any kind of boxers UFC guys big weight trainers who come in the pool. They really don't have a good time in it's hard for them to click into that. Okay. I gotta do very hard movement underwater and stay calm because the that's the only way I'm gonna get through it. So and then learn Gabby started this now they have certifications and things like that. And they do groups in the I'm still one of the advisers on, but it's called experti-. So extreme, I don't I think it's still extreme performance training, or whatever it is. But so that came out of a decade of us playing in the water, and we still do that's one of the greatest workouts ever. Yeah. You know, what the reasoning is for why you like the lucidity happens in y you like you're able to almost tap into vicious and stuff, you know, what that is. Way beyond my pay grade of neuroscience, but I definitely know from a high dopamine perspective and an almost tapping the door of creating natural GMT within the brain. Because of those doors got opened with Iowa SCA. It's it's a similar an, and that's where the kind of cool part of it is I don't need to do. I walk again one time. No. This weekend. Did it once but the plant as weird as it is? But if you done I'll ask it's not weird the plant of very clearly said, thanks for coming, basically. And you never need to take again..

nose breathing Patrick mccune UFC dilated Patou dopamine Gabby Iowa ten years
"mccune" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"But now Patrick mccune wrote the oxygen advantage got to know him sort of doing that very very important on nose breathing were the only mammals so from a dog and the dog needs to regulate body temperature. So it has to breathe through the mouth. But we are the only ones aside from that dog that brief through our mouth, and it keeps us in that stress state. So those breathing the exchange within the knows crates natural nitric oxide, which is a a dilated or that opens up blood flow and good for the brain interns on Patou itary all of that stuff. So and then helps to deal with kind of the build up of CO two. And that's usually the impetus. Of of needing to breathe it's the build up not the lack of oxygen? So we've been experimenting with nose breathing. Now changed my life completely. I I work out with with knows knows breathing all the time, and we do some breath holds on X sales and do a bunch of stuff. And then we do a lot of in the pool training over the last ten years, hold your breath. I don't know. It's usually under stress that was like one of the it is, but we're usually doing something. Okay. So it's usually involves some heavyweight pulling down to the bottom of the pool can't breath, or we'll do it on an ex hail. So when you act HALE, and you start something all the bells are going off ready like what the hell you doing breathe. So then you're dealing with. The underwater stuff is tricky because. It's a you have to remain calm, and you can't freak out. 'cause you're you're you're underwater number one. And number two. Is you burn your oxygen really fast? When you're stressed out of like fighters, any kind of boxers UFC guys big weight trainers who come in the pool. They really don't have a good time in it's hard for them to click into that. Okay. I gotta do very hard movement underwater and stay calm because the that's the only way I'm gonna get through it. So and then learn Gabby started this now they have certifications and things like that. And they do groups in the I'm still one of the advisers on, but it's called experti-. So extreme, I don't I think it's still extreme performance training, or whatever it is. But so that came out of a decade of us playing in the water, and we still do that's one of the greatest workouts ever. Yeah. You know, what the reasoning is for why you like the lucidity happens in y you like you're able to almost tap into vicious and stuff, you know, what that is. Way beyond my pay grade of neuroscience, but I definitely know from a high dopamine perspective and an almost tapping the door of creating natural GMT within the brain. Because of those doors got opened with Iowa SCA. It's it's a similar an, and that's where the kind of cool part of it is I don't need to do. I walk again one time. No. This weekend. Did it once but the plant as weird as it is? But if you done I'll ask it's not weird the plant of very clearly said, thanks for coming, basically. And you never need to take again..

nose breathing Patrick mccune UFC dilated Patou dopamine Gabby Iowa ten years
6 arrested on sex charges at Toronto all-boys school highlighting bigger issues

Front Burner

04:35 min | 3 years ago

6 arrested on sex charges at Toronto all-boys school highlighting bigger issues

"Late last week disturbing. News broke about alleged assaults sexual assaults at Saint Michael's college. School in Toronto and elite Toronto high school is being rocked by a sexual assault investigation. The act apparently videotaped and then exchange stunning morning from police to a race any copies or face child pornography charges. Toronto police they're now investigating multiple incidents at the private boys school one of those incidents. It reportedly involved members of the football team and video it reportedly shows a group of boys holding down another student and allegedly sexually assaulting him with what appears to be a broom handle this video. It was reportedly shared on social media on Sunday the school announced it would carry out an independent examination of its culture. And it's values and is shocking. As the story is when I heard it. It was also really familiar university wants to know what really happened. During the alleged hazing ritual back in two thousand five something similar happened at McGill University. When I was studying dursey mccune was an eighteen year old rookie football pair at the time, and is part of an initiation he was sexually assaulted with a broom handle that incident. It also knighted a debate about assault sexual assault and hazing in sports today. I'm gonna talk with Darcy what happened to him. And what if anything has changed since our tried to be the voice of reason, the rookie locker room just letting them know that there's no way that the stupid enough to do that. I mean, they were smart enough to get into this university. So why would they think that that's okay that's coming up on front burner? Hi, I'm Dr McEwen from Toronto Ontario. I want to start in two thousand five when you were eighteen starting to attend McGill University and play for the football team. Why why did you choose to go to McGill in the first place? You know, the university had a great reputation they had actively recruited me along with some other schools, and they really show that they wanted me and how I'd fit in. And you know, there was a certain allure about playing on the same field as the Alouette was really excited to to try to start my versity critter. Can you? Tell me about the beginning of the season. What what was it like being on the football team? It was definitely intimidating coming in because I never been in that type of university facility as a player so you walking through and they're all these first athletes near there about a week or two before any of the other students are for training camp. So everyone there has a purpose. The staff are all fully devoted to training camps. And the players don't have to worry about classes there. The just there to get you know, to learn the plays to get the reps in to get back into football mode, and mentally you could maybe you feel that there's bit of a bigger jump between, you know, your friends in high school and you're playing with on the team they're versus you're playing with on the university level. You know, some post grads could be close at thirty injury eighteen what was it dynamically in those first few weeks? Was there anything that was happening there that made you feel uncomfortable as a rookie player coming in his rookie? You had to. Earn your spot and rookies all new players were in separate locker rooms you weren't allowed in the returning player or what would become the team locker room. We were singled out as rookies, you know, people a rookie can wait. I'm I I need to get taped. I in that kind of thing. So, you know. Trying to shift us a bit more to being second class citizens. Did you did you feel like this was abnormal or in those first few weeks? Are you just kind of going along with it thinking that this is just part of the course, I noted as long as I could you know, there were threats about initiation night and all these things blasting around. And I tried to be the voice of reason, the rookie locker room just letting them know that you know, they're just running their mouths. There's no way that the stupid enough to do that any of that type of stuff. I mean, they were smart enough to get into this university. So why would they think that that's okay? I kind of blew off until it got to a point where in between practices when we're at the lunch..

Mcgill University Football Toronto High School Toronto Assault Private Boys School Mcgill Saint Michael Dursey Mccune Darcy Dr Mcewen Ontario Sports Eighteen Year
"mccune" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

Motorsport Radio

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

"Hello and welcome big Hello to Josh skeleton. Who's tuned in Hallo Josh. Also, Mr. Andy mccune as well. Various touring car championships commentator as well. You will know him from various. BRAC club racing TV programs, TCI UK common tree and other Tauran Cal commentaries as well as as well as swift. He's tuned in as well. Hello, good evening to name Paul Turner all amongst others. Tunin to third, is it third now torn Kartal life because we have tested doing this and we prerecorded it. And then it just turned out to be just easier to do it live because we did it as live and they wanna do edits. And basically that's why we doing it. Live. Free web dog interventional, which university. If you listen to the girls laser. Yes, I think we're doing pretty well. He says, fingers crossed, not bad. I think he adds something anyway because we're able to interact and re people's Cummings. For example, might as well read them because they, you know, the been kind enough to tune in the show and pay attention to a spamming their various Facebook groups. Phil. Promote. Yes. Best actively promoting it. But yeah, Christopher gray and in touch. Hello, Chris tuned in also he says, UK presume needs to make a massive step forward. Next year. He says, the concept is great, but the racing this year has been dull. He says, he's rather watch the pickup truck championship. Well, Chris, we take your point on board. It's okay to watch both of those things and more. Between them. I'll be honest, they're all times court, Ron, Christie, criss rate support. They're all racing hasn't been as t zero series have been around the world, you know, WTO your, etc. Hall of saying discussing the two Tigers stunned Lloyd his as over experience. 'cause amd is racing with the most experienced team only grid. So in in a situation as we've discussed in previous shows, but in Lloyd unrecorded, you've got the best team with the best join Val during the best late leading the championship with a reduced points gap, but still oversee get it from the from Bridgestone. Also the been keeping on in in the Nolan homeless. The XInhua also general thoughts on on Harrington. Do this weekend. Well, it's of a state as you say, his TC our experience and is start to the TC. She should be didn't over recently in the touring cars. He's been focusing more on his TR total batteries folks on the weekend. But imagine as a professional racing vision, we'd have to worry about things like that. But of all the drivers are thinking, it's a thing again about whether you deserve a title if you are an ESP. You have to bring it up at the beginning of the year. He was, he was unstoppable. As for I did watch the first race goes to surprise you that Phil. And yeah, it's, it's, it's his is his to lose at the end if today. 'cause on only Taylor, he may have been. That was fantastic job, but it has been after the three to be has been nervous about the performance things and incidents in shoes, but that's the smartest, isn't his made. It made it exciting instead of just being done void champion after five races and take it right to the end. So good. Yeah, definitely. And like say dense had done one of a couple of joy. So focus on almost Joel campaign they. So he's been getting a law firm resort experience from to GTC calls to to learn enjoy a muster yet as as we say these taking his crossed earlier in the year BTC Nolan and also with west coast racing, he's not to really well to to w a very successful..

Phil Harrington BTC Nolan Chris Josh skeleton BRAC Mr. Andy mccune Val TCI UK Tigers Christopher gray Facebook Cummings Kartal Taylor WTO Lloyd his Paul Turner UK Joel
"mccune" Discussed on What We Said

What We Said

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on What We Said

"Different collection summer free that come with apps. You can purchase a high. Suggests purchasing them because of the ones I use the most. Yeah, they're so good. But anyway, sorry, Chelsea just cracked my phone. For the third time we had such a good conversation with him and I'm really excited to share this interview you guys because I think it will inspire a lot of you. I know unsponsored me and yeah, so I think it will be really good. So without further ado. All right, guys. We're here today with our special guest. Andy mccune. Did I say that correctly? Correct? Correct. So Andy, tell us a little bit about yourself or tell the listeners at home a little bit about yourself, just where you're from, where you live now, kind of what you do and all that good stuff. So I'm from Washington state. I grew up in the Seattle area and then Spokane, Washington. It was Spokane, really? Oh my gosh. Okay, every day and that. So now I live in New York. I live in Brooklyn. And I'm the co founder of unfold and the Instagram account earth. So cool. So tell us, first of all, what unfold is for those of you who don't know yet, which I'm sure if you follow our Instagram or anything like that. I'm sure you know what it is, but yes, so unfold. So we call it a toolkit for storytellers. So basically you can create Instagram stories from templates. So you go into the up and you can choose from five different temple collections. There's like polaroid Frayn's film frames. There's minimal templates. We just released ripped paper collection. You haven't seen it. So, yeah, so you can. You can go into the basically choose from these templates and then click in the different frames. Odd your photos in export to post Instagram stories. It's such a good alternative to what I used to do when I just I don't know how to like compress it when you wanna do like a horizontal story on your story pinch and pension. There's like the black. Right q., and it just doesn't. So we use unfold literally all the time. I use it every single time stories. Thank you. Welcome. And I was telling Andy this before, but I had this genius idea like months ago about, I mean similar similar idea, an Instagram story template app because I hadn't seen anything that I liked and Selena, I just researching talking to developers and stuff and then like a week later, I see all my friends are posting about this new up called unfold, and I'm like, wait, that was the idea of also, this is like this is nice because it's just exists already exactly what I wanted to fill. So, yeah, I was super excited to find it and all the time should us launch your own and we can be competitive. JC Susan for a patent. Okay. So tell us also about your account earth. So I I'm sure a lot of people have seen that account. I had come across a million times and it has a million followers, right? So has a million followers on Instagram. We're about two hundred thousand on Twitter, and then we have another six hundred thousand plus on tumbling. Okay, cool. So when you started that account, what was your goal with it originally? Did you kind of us wanted to travel photos? So I've always just like loved travel and been so inspired by, and I think that like growing up in a small town, like I've definitely romanticize it and I was like, I want to get out and see the world. And so I would like I was like really big into tumbler when I was in high school. So like save all of these travel. Not the cool kids. But I did. I say, Nope, the cool kids. The kids who weren't cooled went into tumbler, but I would go yourself. Say not quote says on tumbler, everyone who's cool now like grew on tumbler. But I would go through with like, save all of these travel photos to this folder. But like nothing was geo tagged like Pinterest is now end like it's just kind of aggregating all of these photos from the internet. So. And this was like the like almost pre Instagram will..

Instagram Andy mccune Spokane Chelsea Washington New York Twitter co founder Seattle Brooklyn JC Susan Selena Pinterest
"mccune" Discussed on What We Said

What We Said

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on What We Said

"Trying so hard because he was even saying in the book, this isn't what I was planning on sharing, but that like African nations are good, but also. No one that believes they're beautiful or believes that they're happy like no happy person standing in front of the mirror saying, I'm happy. I'm happy like that's kind of what he says like you shouldn't really need to do that. Yeah, anyway, does just his take on it, but this is something that I liked and I wrote it down to my notes. So he said Warren Buffett has money problems. Homeless people have money problems. Warren just has better money problems. All of life is like this. There's no such thing as a life without problems and solving problems creates new problems. You solve your health problems. They getting a gym membership, but then you create another problem there that you have to get up early and make time to go to the gym. And he's also saying the person you marry the person you fight with the house, you buys the house that you have to repair your dream. Job is also the job that you stress over. So basically the takeaways that everything comes at the sacrifice and you kind of have to go in, go through. Life understanding that otherwise I don't go for anything because you're scared of the replay what you're gonna the repercussion. Yeah, gonna try and set Wertheim forgotten. So didn't wanna selling. But he was saying people like the idea of ultimate happiness. Like once I get to this point, ultimate happiness and it's just the bottom line is that that's not really real because there's always problems in life. And so it's funny because this book is almost negative in a way, but not because it's just like accepting that is I like that. I like that outlook. Yeah, just kind of like, well, it's the same thing with healthy eating. A lot of the times where when you're so when I've been so stressed about eating perfectly and being healthy, it almost backfires and I'm not as healthy. Yeah. When I've, I've found him the healthiest one. I'm not carrying them when I'm just okay. I'm just going to eat what I feels good and what is genuinely like healthy, but I'm not gonna say here in counting calories, Camac rose. Do all the stuff. I'm getting enough greens and like weighing my food and all that crap. But I agree. No, and that's because another thing I have written down, I have so much down on this nuts, but I didn't wanna go through everything, but he. He talks about the backwards law, which is basically the concept that the less you try at something, the better you do at it and kind of what you were just saying. Because I find that happens to me all the time, and I actually wanted to give the example of calligraphy class that we did because remember when we were doing calligraphy if you listen to one of our episodes did a calligraphy class that my mom taught, and when I would try so hard, I would always mess up. And then I remember we were just talking you and I were just talking and I was kind of just writing the letters out, but not really thinking about talking to you and I looked down and those of us work. Yeah, the best that does true whole class, and it was really, I think, because I wasn't so focused on making it perfect. And I find that happens to me my life a lot where kind of same thing. If I just even just with social media or creating photos, it's like if I just kinda let myself stop caring so much about every little thing is this, I don't know, then I create better work. Oh yeah. You just have to completely stop. Carrying? Yeah, honestly, I mean, we can go on with examples forever, but even singing. I'm all practicing before performance eminent nail this like this. Sounds beautiful. Flawless. Got all the notes in the night. Go to perform and thinking, so don't mess up this high Nive really hope I get this high. No, and I'm thinking about it so hard and I kind of get scared hold myself back in. It's just not as good. And if I were to just be like an who cares. Yeah, so moral story. So trying seriously. So anyways, let's get to our special guests today. We interviewed Andy mccune who is a twenty three year old entrepreneur from New York City, which is where we are right now. So he is the co, founder of the app unfold..

Wertheim Warren Buffett Camac rose Andy mccune New York City founder twenty three year
"mccune" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"Mccune off radio and the fatal nightmares about your wife. I would've whom last week he was screaming. Oh. Bundy coming to get me. Had the bigamous bother which annoyed. Figured out about your way. And I'm gonna say. And the life says, you could. I figured out that much. I know what you mentioned. What you told me met you fifty years ago and camping trip, and that you with your wife ain't no motherfucking puttering. I thought she wasn't a first minute. Walk ahead, those good to meet you. My name is very funny. Gooney Google. What the fuck does gooney. I don't know that day. I thought the new Spanish ship. To my friend. Thanks, Google. The fuck outta here some for years and finally figured out why we met you. Why you didn't meet you on camping trip. You big Bigfoot, isn't she. The big foot. That's why the mustache. Shave a bitch down and taught to speak. I know fucking big. But when I see one. A big for my home, what my kid. Can't talk, can't step. She's not chain. Well. Cannot walk. She climb to fuck out a trio..

Google Mccune Bundy fifty years
"mccune" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Yeah, you don't mean like the macaroni and cheese sound like the? No, that would be great if that was like a mute. No, just press the button. I mean like the hollering and the loud noises in the Mony like erotic sounds just bettle come from porn. Well, that's what I wanted to know. Like does it come from porn or is it part of our human behavior? Or does it added to pleasure or something that when you're a sex mute or silent fucker? Whichever way you want to describe it, not enjoying it as or am I not getting something if the laws like at the beginning is kind of like, you know, I want to be this person who like when someone goes by their bedroom window outside, they're like, oh my God. Is she like having the best sex ever or she getting murdered? I don't know. That's hot. I don't know. Have you tried it to make the sound will that's like hanger material, but but no, one of my favorite things was talking to this grunt expert. I know right. Lorraine mccune for Rutgers who studies the grunt. She studies it about how it's like the beginning. The origin of language is the grunt. Kids start referring to objects with a grunt and but it's also a physiological response to exertion. So it's the sound that's made when you get up out of a chair or your, you know that sound that Hollywood makes when they wanna make you think their sex, but then the open the door and someone's like jump roping, or they're trying to get something out of the bottom of the bed or whatever. And even people who are deaf, who never develop language skills make these vocalisations. Yeah. So in my thinking, like that's also the sex grant, but the it's like there's so many different things coming up in my head right now. But there is also this study that I read about yellow boons that they were making the same sexual copulating vocalisations when they were taking a dumb. Bump. So they were like having orgasmic sounds when they were shitting. And so that's that grunt like we also grunt when we go to the bathroom, right? And some people would claim that shitting is like secondary. Finally, the way he'll. Yeah. And then I talked to this neuroscientist Barry Coleman's Aric when Lorraine mccune was like, I'm sorry. I'm not going to like ideal with language and children, and I'm not going to comment on sex with migrant, which I respected completely. But also she did say that like the grunt can add more force just like a tennis player who's like grunting actually does add force to the ball to the vow Salvin maneuver. Like when you bear down if you like which a little more aero. Yes. So then I'm like, okay. Well, are you adding force to your hump. When you grunt and that might be, but so berry. Are you falling? There's a lot I am and see the wheels. So then berry as Barry. Okay. Like we've got the grunt here and like, but what does it mean are we is that what we're doing when we're having sex? Is it just like the grunt is at the the origin? And he says, it's like seagulls, and I'm like, okay, tell me more. He's like, they're all sitting on a pier. And then one takes off and it goes. And so that's the sound that their body makes. It's like they're grunt, you know their, it's a physiological response to exert, but the Segel's around them come to understand that that sound that's made naturally signifies something else signifies that the bird has taken off..

Lorraine mccune Barry Coleman tennis Segel Hollywood Rutgers
"mccune" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"It's very much left open to the audience, make up their own mind about where this is governed because she makes decisions. But she also does things that you completely agree with and but isn't you'll never told whether that's the case you're sort of just going along with it and and making up your own mind. Absolutely. And it's such a relief, isn't it? Not to know. That you're going to know everything right from the start is a great relief to me to see something like that. Because I, I do sometimes like going to see things that do have a very clear formula. I'll enjoy going along for that ride. Truly, I, I'm a very good audience for that. But this is more like I mean, in a sense, it's like a foreign film. White is show to have subtitles because you think. I'm not used to seeing this kind of thing in a language is me, you know, because it's proper complex, very, very. Subtle were. Mccune, of course, is the master of that kind of understanding of the way in which he presents human beings. So often so true to us. We also complicated and that's why we get relief from stories that make us feel simpler makers feel more comfortable about ourselves. And this story just happens in that area where you you, you can't be comfortable, but you're so right about her her job. This is where it was. Some people have been set me a will issue Hollick driven. No, the job is the driving force in this because in the law, if you're a lawyer, you can choose to work. You can choose to be driven, you can and you can earn lots of money when you undertake to be a judge. You take a cut in pay. You become a public servant your on a rotor. So you you work in a completely different way. You'll responsibilities are different and they're, they're very high, those responsibilities and the women. I know in that. Position, take them extraordinarily seriously and the the amount of work is beyond belief. So when you see coming in having just delivered a judgment about conjoined twins, she'll be the, you know that there'll be a lot of projected hate and transference onto her. She has to deal with all of that emotional transference as well. And she walks into the how she takes his shoes off. An immediately starts work on the next case because she's got no choice because she's the duty judge for the weekend. She has to keep working. She has to keep thinking she has to keep on putting information into our head and then rearranging it according to what kind of judgment she's going to deliver, which involves her emotions, which involves her morality, which also involves everything that she's learned that stuff. She's put into a brain through all the years of loss minutes just beyond my comprehension, but I loved trying to inhabit that. And then of course you think more. Where would you put your your heart? How especially since when you sit in judgment, you literally sit above everyone. That was so interesting you're sitting, you're looking down, you have this overview on everyone. And of course you feel. Like a God, and then you come step down from that and you sit in front of your significant other who says something very. Personal and difficult and wounding, and you have none of your protection and you have none of your defenses and you can't deal with it. I actually I in some ways. I think she can't hear it all, see it. Yeah, I think that was that was one of the things that you know, because it is a complex film and I think that you describe how difficult her job is judge. And I sort of think that. What I was struck by watching that is that if that job is so difficult and so challenging that if you hadn't allowed it to occupy every minute of every day, you probably almost neglecting your GT the importance of what you're doing. That's right. And so she's up against the demands of our relationship. And obviously, your sympathy goes to her husband played by sunny to choose a great in it as well, who is obviously very much in love with her..

Mccune White
"mccune" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"mccune" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The politicians haven't fully recognized was the each of their experiences a facebook with different to another politicians because you have a very personal connection with facebook clearly they contract out their social media to younger members of their teams and not became so apparent with the questions they were asking so what happens because it's not a good moment for tech right now i'm just facebook's just the example of it well i think what the public probably wanted was some source of reckoning they wanted to see a young billionaire get beaten up by politicians for you know for a massive breach of trust and we're seeing a company wrestling with how to rebuild that trust and we're at such an interesting point in our culture in terms of trust because you know half the country doesn't trust the president the other half doesn't trust the media trustees at an absolute crisis point i think an an who do you end up trusting you don't trust the banks they brought about the world's norma crisis kids don't trust their colleges necessarily anymore because they think they're being ripped off over student loans and i think you end up believing in the people that you know and you've had relationships with those of the people you dress right that's where trust resides and so what happens then in that because it feels like things are careening apart i mean in terms of one of the things you say at the end of the last rule of this is not what is it it's slow the line is a face title seats at the taylor and it's really about poor suckers are starving well from anti name it's really about i end the book reflecting on nine eleven in mccune full essay on the rule in there.

facebook president mccune