25 Burst results for "Mcchrystal"

Commission on Presidential Debates says it will make changes to format to 'ensure a more orderly discussion'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

Commission on Presidential Debates says it will make changes to format to 'ensure a more orderly discussion'

"So that we don't see a repeat of the first one. Debate Number two will be a town hall style event with Only 15 to 20 people in the audience asking questions. The vice presidential debate is October 7th. Today, President Trump holds a Campaign roundtable at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey. Joe Biden takes part in a virtual fundraiser. Biden today also picked up an endorsement from retired General Stanley McChrystal. 70 degrees. It's mostly sunny. We're headed up to 72 wins news time. 1

Joe Biden President Trump Bedminster New Jersey Stanley Mcchrystal.
Miami won’t have an NBA voting site after county picks Frost Museum over AA Arena

The Steve Holland Retirement Wealth Show

00:20 sec | Last month

Miami won’t have an NBA voting site after county picks Frost Museum over AA Arena

"Arena N. BA players proposed The idea of using sports arenas is voting places and other n BA venues around the country will serve as such because they're large enough to keep people apart from each other. While casting ballots. The county says it will adapt the Frost Science Museum into a polling site instead. With Lord his news. I'm John McChrystal

Frost Science Museum John Mcchrystal
Murder Suspect Shot By Dallas Police After Car Chase And Crash

KRLD Saturday Morning News

00:47 sec | Last month

Murder Suspect Shot By Dallas Police After Car Chase And Crash

"Shot shot and and wounded wounded a a murder murder suspect suspect that that they they followed followed into into mesquite mesquite Friday Friday afternoon. afternoon. Police Police say say they they got got a a 901 901 call call from from 58 58 year year old old Gerry Gerry Ford, Ford, who who said that he had killed someone in an apartment complex. On Park Lane. Deputy chief Ruben Ramirez says police who responded to the call spotted the car of that victim 40 year old coal McChrystal uniformed officers got behind that vehicle. In a small chase ensued. That Chase led up to the 500 block of Parkwood trail where that vehicle eventually crashed, and four officers for Dallas officers were involved. In a officer involved shooting. Ford was hit taken to a nearby hospital. He's in stable condition. Police say he will face a murder turns Dallas

Police Police Gerry Gerry Ford Murder Ford Mesquite Mesquite Chase Ruben Ramirez Officer Deputy Chief Parkwood Trail Dallas Mcchrystal
"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Thanks again to General Stanley McChrystal for coming on the podcast order. His New Book Leaders Myth and reality on Amazon audible for wherever books are sold. The flat iron school will teach you everything. You need to get a job in code data science or design. But they'll also prepare you for the jobs that don't even exist yet in school dot com slash podcast and read about graduates new careers salary ranges upcoming courses and explore these exciting new careers. You can start building your own career and coding data science or digital design at one of flat irons local. We work campuses or you can take courses online go to flat iron school dot com slash. Podcast read.

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

14:40 min | 5 months ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Retired from the US army as a four star general after thirty four years in the military and having commanded the joint Special Operations Command or J. Sock in Iraq and then he commanded the International Security Assistance Force and US forces in Afghanistan. He is a senior fellow at Yale. University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and a partner at the McChrystal group. A leadership consulting firm based in Virginia his previous Books Mike Share of the task in team teams were both New York Times bestsellers and now he's followed it up with his latest bestseller titled Leaders Myth and Reality General Stanley McChrystal. Thank you for your service and thanks for sitting down with me today. Thanks for having me. I thoroughly enjoyed reading leaders myth and reality but I have to confess that I usually don't enjoy books that have the titles like say. Churchill leadership or Lincoln on leadership because the moment and author identified someone as a leader to be emulated. It's just a given that. They then have to whitewash their entire biography and ignore all of the flaws and all the mistakes in order to make their case that they are a leader to him united And My thinking I guess has always been what good is a leadership book if you can't learn from the leaders mistakes as well as their successes with leaders myth and reality. You seem to be trying to change that. We are after many years of trying to learn leadership being taught it and had demonstrated to me the opportunity to practice it and then studying it and writing about it to an extent at this point in life pretty late. I came to the conclusion that I and my co-authors didn't really understand what leadership is So we wanted to go back to first principles and truly identify what is it. And why can't we get our arms around it and you talk about how your decision to throw away a portrait of Robert e Lee in the aftermath of Charlottesville actually lead you to rethink how we define leadership as a fellow west point alum. That can't have been an easy decision for you. Know is a really tough decision. In fact I had grown up with. Robert Lee is probably the penalty an example of leadership for me and There've been a personal connection. I'd grown up living near his boyhood home. I'd gone to Washington Lee High School. I'd gone to West. Point many years after robbery leap but I'd follow the same path. He served thirty two years in the United States Army. I served almost just about that number thirty four and at West Point when you arrive. There are many statues of generals and people to emulate but Robert e Lee was always special for everyone. He was this character that was nearly perfect and he was depicted that way. There were paintings of him. I lived in Lee barracks and so you couldn't be robbery leap but he could be a beacon that you could to move closer to so I spent a career thinking about that. And when I was a second lieutenant my wife young wife now forty one years of marriage gave me a painting was cheap actually was a print with painted over clear. Quick look like a painting. She paid twenty five dollars for this thing framed and gave it to me and treasured up for the next forty years. Every quarter said accorded. We lived in. I hung it up because for me. It was an example of the values that I believed in and when people came to my house it was my way of subtly telling them what I valued in leadership And then after Charlottesville in the spring twenty seventeen any my wife came into me and said I think you need to get rid of the picture and I disagree. I said No. Why would I do that? You gave it to me honey. And she goes. Now I think its signaling something you don't believe in and I said No. He's a non-political general and she goes well. Maybe he is to you. But to many people he may be a symbol of white supremacy. Were people that have hijacked the idea we we talked for about a month till I Became convinced and one Sunday morning. I took it off the wall and throw it away and that was just when we're beginning this book and so we made the decision to profile Robert Lee in the book and take a very careful re-look at how I thought about Robert e Lee and leadership in general and you said the painting was sort of a symbol for all of the qualities of leadership that you found valuable in Lee. What were some of those qualities that you use to admire about him and for perhaps still admire embarrassed about him? I still do. He was a Connecticut West Point known as the marble man by his fellow cadets. Now that wasn't completely a compliment because he was a little stiff. You're kind of guy you hung out with you said marble men not Marlboro Man. That's right this and he was very upright duty was the word he would have associated with himself who is a serious guy whereas other army officers on the On the frontier posts used too often. Drink too much or gamble. He didn't do those things. He was focused on being studious being upright he was courteous and when people would describe him they would describe him as slightly larger than life. Maybe a little too perfect kind of the STOIC IDEAL. I guess exactly but then seventeen years into his career. The Mexican war erupts and Robert. E Lee goes to Mexico. And he's a staff off Susan Engineer Officer at usually not a position where you come out a hero. But in fact in the combat of the Mexican war he shines and maybe the most respected mid grade or young officer in the army to come out of the war so much so that General Winfield Scott. The overall commander described him as the best soldier in combat that he'd ever seen. I always hear people talk about how he was so honorable and he was the consummate military officer something to aspire to and yet I mean isn't the first job of a great military leader and honorable military leader not to wage war against your own country. How do we reconcile that well? It's hard to because for years. I reconciled that he had just been loyal to his earlier association with Virginia You know I took the oath on the planet West Point to support and defend the constitution of the United States. And so did he. And the country had been founded by his role model. George Washington and so when Robert e Lee faces his plutarch Ian Moment in the spring of eighteen. Sixty one has to make a value judgment. And what's interesting is he almost doesn't make a judgment when you read the stories he said. I am against secession of the south but I will do what my native state does and Virginia was awaiting a popular vote referendum and so he basically gave his decision to the popular voters of Virginia. Who became emotional over president? Lincoln's decision to reinforce for sumter and so they voted to and so the most important decision of his life he almost didn't make and then he spent the next four years trying to destroy the United States. Yeah it's interesting that this consummate leader of abdicated his leadership duties at the most critical point in his career to voters. And it doesn't make an evil. Yeah what it makes miss human. It makes him flawed. It makes him like you and I right and to that point you open the book by comparing two different paintings of lease hero. General George Washington crossing the Delaware. There's a course that famous one that we've probably all seen and then there's another more contemporary painting tells about that second one. Sure they the Well the first picture of course is the one that's hanging in the White House and it's got Robert or George Washington in a small boat crossing the Delaware River to attack the British on Christmas night. And we've all seen it. He's standing in leaning forward and everybody else's down there row and when we talk about we said well that's a leader that's George Washington but if you really look at that picture it's absurd in a a small both that would tip Easley. He's leaning forward you standing. Yeah no no military guy. No Sane person is going to do that in an icy river at night at least twice so not too many years ago. A gentleman commissioned a painter to do a more realistic version and now it's on a flat bottom barge which is reportedly the boats that were actually used. He is standing essentially holding onto a canon. That's being moved across and it's realistic. It's how a sane person would cross a river at night the way that he's depicted in the painting. It's the way a general who wants to get killed. We're probably would've crossed the Delaware. Not a smart military commander. Try and yet. That's how we want to view our leaders. We wanted to view them. As Day. Bit beating Goliath. We want believe that they are larger than life that they are almost incapable of error and brave to the point of being foolhardy which is completely unrealistic. That's right exactly and you take apart Actually three of what you call the biggest myths about leaders in this book and WanNa deal with each of these one by one First of all. There's this idea that there is a recipe for success at West Point. I know that you must have spent gosh countless hours studying history. Great Military Battles and looking for replicable strategies. Is there something wrong with that? Well it's education and it's helpful. It's a template but it's never solution because there are no two battles no two wars new situations alike and so when people spend the rest of their career looking for a time to do what Hannibal did it. Can I or somebody else did a battle? They're going to be disappointed. There are principles that you learn but same with leadership if you if you look at George Washington and Robert e Lee or an elite leader you WanNa pick and you say okay. How were they knew right? That list of traits or behaviors. Some people even try to stand like the person that their hero. My father told me he was in the military out of Westport right after World War. Two and he said there was a whole population of patent knockoffs. Us Army officers tried to act. Like George Patton. And of course only George Patton can be George Patton but the profanity that that the pistols. And that you. You can't try to do something that worked for someone else. So there's no list. There's no genetic leadership plan in patent himself was a pretty deeply flawed military hero. And I imagine those people just completely overlooked all of those aspects as well. That's right if you look at someone like pat and you see someone who was colorful and profane an aggressive. But if you really decide why he was effective he was a student of war. He knew the battlefields from world. War One of where he fought in World War. Two people don't spend a lot of time thinking about that side of patent. They think about him yelling at people and slapping soldiers and push in tanks on and that's a superficial almost cartoon version and we do that often with leaders the second myth which is this tendency to miss attribute success to the person at the top. You said that you came to this realization when you were writing your own memoir a few years ago. What did you learn about successes in? Google gets credit when you were doing that. Yeah that we call it the attribution myth and I I started writing my memoirs in two thousand ten. When I I thought about it I said well how hard could it be? I was there so I know and I brought a young man who was about a year out of Yale University in English. Major to come help me and we worked together for two and a half years to write this and so the first thing we did was we did a detailed time line and all the significant again events. I've been a part of in many cases. I've made a decision and there have been outcome for which I received either credit or blame and that was the castle effect but when we did the work we did a whole bunch of interviews like one hundred interviews with people who are involved and the result was very humbling. Because what happened was I had a view of something and it was almost never wrong. But it was always stunningly incomplete. Like I would make decision. Then something would happen. And I'd say well that's why but then when we did the interviews we found so many other people doing so many other things that affected it more than I did of which I was totally unaware until after the fact when we did the interviews and other contextual factors that suddenly I realized that I was a figure in my memoirs but I wasn't even the central figure in the story of my life. Every situation was so complex that I was just a piece of it and that was an eye opener. That was a little humbling pretty disturbed. Yeah and if if we really made this public you know we pay. Ceo's all these incredible amounts of money for the success or failure of the company when in many cases there are much smaller factor than people want to attribute and that that plays out time and again when you study when you're studying and so understanding that leadership is actually at interaction between leaders followers and contextual factors. It's almost it's an emergent property. Almost like a chemical reaction and so it's not something that I put on my pocket and throw at you throw some leadership. Betcha instead. It's this thing that happens. And it's different every time and so it's never repeatable with exactly the same personality and whatnot and that's a second myth and then the third myth was results with right. You sort of give lie to this myth that leadership is always merit based and leaders are always chosen based on results coming up through the ranks in the military bureaucracy. Is this something that you personally witnessed probably more than a few times in fact absolutely I mean you you pick leaders you elect them you select them..

Robert e Lee George Washington Virginia United States West Point Robert Lee Yale University Washington Lee High School Charlottesville Delaware officer Robert George Patton commander Lincoln Stanley McChrystal United States Army senior fellow Lee barracks
"mcchrystal" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

13:42 min | 6 months ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Stop so don't be afraid of trion stuff and have it not work because that's part of figuring out what what will in will not and. I felt very uncomfortable. Because I'd gone in command. And that's very tribal organization that the Special Operations World and I was from one tribe arranger and so the other tribes look at you with a fair amount of skepticism and so I- I worried about my legitimacy and then I said well and if I stand up and tell people I got no idea what we should do. I'm not going to get this a huge vote of confidence. I think what happened? Was I think people one understood how confusing it was and to appreciated that? I didn't try. To assume that didn't try to say okay. Here's the deal. And they also like to be part of the solution because talented people in an organization. Want to have some say in in how things are done. They were the people with the most expertise to the most experienced. Not May you started doing an hour and a half daily meeting and for seven and a half years you are running this meaning when you were running counter terrorism and then in Iraq and then Afghanistan. How do you avoid burnout? When you're on that kind of intense footing for that long like how do you turn from being sprinter to a marathoner without slowing your pace yes? That's a great question. I'll go on a personal level in log on an organizational level as well a personal level. What I found was I had to devote myself completely to it so I took this command. It was supposed to be two years. I stayed for five Jay sock and then I came back for ten months and then went back and took Afghanistan. I felt the during that period. That command needed all of me so I basically went and stayed deployed and part of that was because to keep my own focus and part of that was to demonstrate to the command that I was that committed. It was that important. I couldn't ask them to do things unless I was willing to do it. I'm blessed with a wife that her calculus on this was. I understand this do this until the task is done and then come home. I tried to set myself a complete focus but then on a daily sort of cyclic basis. I knew certain things were critical to me. I knew I have to work out every day. If I don't I'm an ugly person and I'm not that good anyway so is better if I do. I had to set aside about an hour and a half to work at every day and that starts my day whenever it was in Iraq. That happened to be late morning because we worked all night. Went to bed right at dawn and then. I'd sleep until late morning in the workout. That's sort of put me in the right mindset and I do operations and connect with people I would try to pace myself so that I got a predictable by sleep. It was only about four hours tonight but in that environment that felt about right and I tried to keep my focus even keeled and to be honest. I didn't do much back home. I had my son in college and my wife back I e mailed. My wife wants a day but I didn't do any other distractions because in my standpoint that was very important for me to focus now for the command. This was even more important because different from most forces. Special Operating Forces are in the war all time. No so what they do. Is You have these elite forces and you rotate them by squadron. And so they'll go over there for four months at a shot and they'll come home but they'll be back on alert back when they're in the United States. So they're really not unplugging from the war. What you had to do was try to set it up so that everybody sprinted when they were in the area of operations in Iraq Afghanistan. And then when they're back there you try to set it so that the pace is slow enough so that they could meet her that with their families and physically on one hand. It got hard on the other hand. It was easy because it was simple. We fought the war. We worked out. We ate and we slept. We doing out. There was no other foolishness involved. You can't do that in most jobs but there are times when you take incredible. Focus on the part of an organization and at that time I think one of the key things for leader to do is to offer real priorities and when I say priorities someone says well. Here's the priorities of what I want the organization to hear the top twenty parties and I just start laughing if you have twenty priorities. You don't have parties if you've got three you've got priorities. The real courage and a leader is not in telling people what to do. It's telling them what it's okay not to do. Because there's a whole bunch of other things that they kind of think they should do and the leader has to sign up. Say if you don't do any of these I'm okay with that as long as you do these things that really matter. Yeah prioritizing at these times becomes more and more essential and being intentional about every step that you're taking I can already sense in some of my conversations with execs. I don't know whether you feel this at all. But a sense that they've absorbed the first blow the first shock of the crisis right and they've kind of settled into this new reality like they've figured it out and maybe the urgency and the speed that marked the first few weeks is slowing down a little bit. And I'm curious. Is that a trap. How do you instill agility? That's not transient. But that is this sort of constant marathon approach Bob. That's exactly what we're seeing and we describe it as at the interface. One what happened? Is We have this? Approaching PANDEMIC AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS. And then everybody had to work from home and revenue stopped for a lot of companies. And they did that. And there was a period of two maybe three weeks and then suddenly people were able to communicate from home. They could get their systems to work in a lot of normal things that they were doing seemed to work and so everybody kind of pats themselves on the back and go. This is not that hard I got it? I think two things. One is in many cases organizations. Aren't doing a lot of things that have to be done long. They are doing sort of the basics right now the bare minimums operating from home. They haven't yet been developing strategy. They haven't been doing longer term leader development. They haven't been doing things that have to be done over the long haul and they haven't dealt a lot with in many cases customers. They haven't tried sales over this so I think that it is a trap. You start to say well okay. We got this. The reality is that the economy's in this Cup right now and as soon as it starts to sort itself out certain organizations are going to sprint ahead. Because they've been figuring it out. They've been going to school on this. They've been preparing for a changed market and they are going to come out of the starting gates. Some we're GONNA try to go back to status quo ante and they are going to be absolutely crushed because you're going to go back to a time that no longer exist others are going to dog paddle in circles kind of where they are now trying to figure out what it works and they will be left at the starting gates. I think that organizations have got to understand now that there's a temptation to focus on the here and now the crisis. The crisis is true. But you still have to do all of the long term things you still got to push the organization Ford for the future and I think people have got to put senior leader eyeballs at and the focus of the organization on that kind of Ford Movement. And it's almost like you see there's going to be sort of three different groups. The folks who are really getting this are going to be that much further ahead when we get to the other side some folks are just not gonNa make the transition and all and others are. GonNa Kinda become secondary also rans because they didn't really adjust to the new reality. I think that's exactly right because many things of the new reality are more subtle than we think. They're not just working from home and talking to people on your computer. They are doing many things about product development this way about building teams because we're still operating off muscle that was built up before many organizations went home and they're working from home but they all know each other. They spent years together in offices. They built up relationships. They built trust. They build things they do. Take this a year to in the future or create an organization in this model. You don't have any of that shared background. You don't have those relationships suddenly. There's a different dynamic. That's gotTa be used same with dealing with customers fire suppliers. The longer we go from what was before the more. We've gotta be adapting to what we think will be the new normal. You talk a lot about leading with compassion and in this time. There's a tension because you feel like Oh. This is a doer. Di Moment Right. If there's any time that I should go all the and work twenty four seven and ask everything of my people now as it. 'cause there may not be tomorrow for my business on the other hand you want to take care of your team. You want to be compassionate you understand. The people are stressed out. How tolerant can be. How do you find that line? I think leaders. Now it's a careful balance point because we send people home and we may go home to a pretty Nice Home Office and we're pretty well situated. But what if your employees goes home and you say we still got a job? They should be thankful for that. What if they got two or three kids? Who Schools of closed? They live in a small apartment so the kids are underfoot. Their spouse has lost their job. Apparent has cova nineteen suddenly. It's a much more complicated environment for them and working from home is not that easy now. Work is at home so you're always at work so I think at first takes a fair amount of empathy that people are actually under more difficult working conditions than they were in an office or a plant or whatever even though they might not be directly exposed to dangerous covert nineteen. So you start with empathy. Empathy only gets you so far. Empathy is not sympathy. Empathy is being able to put yourself in the other person's position to understand it. Good leaders in the military have to understand how a private feels when they don't know what's going on. They're frightened their feet hurt. They're carrying a heavy load. It's really hard. The leader still has to say this is what we have to do. This is the task in front of us. I can't make the hill and the smaller. I can't make your pack any lighter. I can't make the enemy less dangerous. All I can do is tell you. That's what we have to deal with. So I think leaders do have to be tough enough now but a lot of that starts with being absolutely upfront with people. I think in small organizations now every small businesses under pressure. You have to get in front of your people. We got in front of the people in my company and said here is the economic reality here all the numbers. Exactly what it is. Here's what we have to do. Everybody needs to understand that. And if that changes will let you know and so I think leaders have got to be brutally candid with their team members but not to the point of being unable to either make tough decisions or push people when we need to push hard use. Use this phrase creating a shared consciousness among your troops. And you know it's not something people expect to hear from lifelong military man and I kind of phrase but this idea of common purpose you feel like is particularly valuable in getting teams to operate and getting organization to operate under any kind of crisis or any other condition. Absolutely my father. He was a soldier as well as his father had been. So we had a lot of old barracks sayings and one of my dad used to joke says. Put your brains in the footlocker. I'll do the thinking around here but that was the opposite away. My father really was and the opposite of what works with soldiers if you tell everybody what tasks to do but don't paint them a picture of what you're trying to do what the purpose is what the intent is then. It's really hard for one to them to believe in their task. Because it may seem narrow and mundane but also they can't adjust so what we found is if you give people contextual understanding of the situation of what we're trying to do and what a good outcome would look like. And then they go forward to execute in many cases. What you mind of envision them. Doing for specific tasks may be very different from what was really needed in. Afghanistan. We developed this rule because we knew that we came up with this brilliant strategy in Kabul and we sent it out to everybody. But when you get in the hills and valleys of Afghanistan. The conditions are very different than we might have envisioned and so we said when you get on the ground if the order we issued you is raw execute the order. We should've issued you. And you're saying wow that's required them to use their judgement. Well that's right because they got a Lotta judgment but only if they understand the big picture and so in.

Afghanistan Iraq Special Operations World trion Kabul United States Ford PANDEMIC Jay product development Bob Ford Movement cova
Jobless claims jump another 4.4 million

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

06:17 min | 6 months ago

Jobless claims jump another 4.4 million

"Labor department just out with its latest numbers on unemployment across the country last week another four point four million people filed for first time unemployment benefits adding to the twenty two million people currently out of work it means in the past five weeks a total of twenty six million Americans have found themselves either laid off or furloughed and that still doesn't include those who haven't been able to log on to state unemployment sites this represents by far the largest streak of US job losses ever on record this month some economists think the unemployment rate could reach a twenty percent again nearly four and a half million more Americans filing for jobless benefits according to the labor department this is been a special report from ABC news I'm sherry Preston nine oh to the coronavirus responsible for over forty more deaths in South Florida the Florida department of health announcing twenty more yesterday each in Miami Dade and Broward for more deaths in Palm Beach county Miami Dade state high death toll climbing to two hundred fifty two and statewide sixty deaths were reported yesterday Florida will soon be able to increase the number of code nineteen tests that can be processed per day by eighteen thousand after the state signed contracts with two new testing companies come around his chances in dissipates we'll be able to provide results within a two day period these tasks that these labs will primarily be where we send our samples that we collect in the long term care and assisted living facilities and at the community based walk up sites and governor Ron DeSantis says that these walk up testing sites will be in Miami Dade Palm Beach orange Hillsborough Duval and Leon counties nine oh three Broward county teacher is in need of life saving help to beat the corona virus fox trail elementary Stephanie Miller is is on on a a ventilator ventilator at at memorial memorial west west hospital hospital her her mom mom says says a a plasma plasma donation donation from from a a recovered recovered patient patient is is needed needed those those interested interested in in donating donating plasma plasma can can contact contact one one blood blood more food dot drives are taking place today our own mobile Mike is out of the U. S. manor academy in Hialeah he's been hosting a luncheon for hospital worker exactly link clinic in Weston feeding South Florida is out and about just all over the place they're hosting a food drive from now until eleven at mills pond park in fort Lauderdale in Hialeah they're a good look Park City and Miami holding a drive thru only distribution and ultra down that the Catholic Church from ten to one and the city of north Miami has went from ten to one also at the Joe Celestin center in the fifteen hundred block of north west one hundred thirty fifth street and small business relief bills being voted on in the house this morning after sailing through the Senate the bipartisan measure will pump more than four hundred billion dollars into a popular small business loan fund that's run dry southwire congresswoman Debbie McChrystal pal says the bill provides three hundred ten billion for small businesses fifty billion for disaster landing seventy five billion for hospitals and health care workers and we've also secured twenty five billion for testing which is the key to re opening the economy and resuming our lives she says she's working with banks and lenders providing assistance so that they're ready to process applications as quickly as possible no word yet how long it'll take for the money to be doled out Sino foreign tonight is a must see TV for sports fan even though there's no timetable for football to return to the field of the NFL is going through with a virtual draft it'll be different we're ready to go Miami dolphins general manager Chris Greer says because a social distancing coaches in upper management will be in different draft rooms urgency about this process if and start the day with fourteen picks in the seven rounds including the fifth overall aircraft Regis news radio six ten WYO D. sun five universal Orlando plans to use modern technology to help it reopened safely universal exact John Sproule says that doubt they didn't actually say when the park will reopen but when it does yeah that virtual line technology will be used to enforce social distancing guidelines virtual line technology is already used at volcano bay to minimize the amount of time someone has to wait in line and spouse wants to to expand it to as many attractions as possible also adding that when the park first reopens there may be restrictions on how many people are allowed inside chipotle is now donating burritos to those fighting corona virus just buy a burrito on the website or app and add the code the number for heroes that's the number four followed by the word hero is in all caps each time that happens the restaurant will donate a burrito to health care workers coronavirus it's affected all of us we want to hear from you please go to W. I. O. T. dot com complete our quarantine survey we promise it short I'm Natalie Rodriguez Jimmy all right thank you marker puto political reporter for politico gives his thoughts on the race the president of course Joe Biden that is straight ahead at nitro dragon identities radio sixty MW I owed a as for the publication of finding what you need to know at the top and thirty minutes fast newsradio six ten W. Y. O. D. well you know cutters it's total it's could be solutions they are the official a landscape of our media in Miramar and they want to let you know they are an essential business taking extraordinary measures to ensure the safety of their team at Keller said she and the customers as well they're following strict CDC guidelines sanitizing equipment daily providing their team complete personal protective equipment as well cutters edge is a locally owned business that provides a full range of landscape services for your business or your socio Haitian there really are terrific they service owners association condominiums corporate park CD districts shopping plazas in north Dade all of Broward and south Palm Beach counties as well they they they they've done an extraordinary job with us listen to our win quickly the owner of cutters as his radio show Sundays at noon other guy do you find out how landscaping can help your business it's outdoors and I heart media it's improve not only the value of our property that goes without saying but our actual business because it is our calling card it's what customers see first it's that first impression call cutters as today nine five five four four four four four four seven seven seven two two two zero zero zero six six six two two two two two two nine nine nine five five five four four four four four four seven seven seven two two two zero zero zero six six six two two two two two two or or or online online online at at at cutters cutters cutters ads ads ads pro pro pro dot dot dot com com com he's he's he's one one one shy shy of the record just

"mcchrystal" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:39 min | 7 months ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on 710 WOR

"As the president said it's a battle we're in a war let's talk to too great war heroes first the general Stanley McChrystal of McChrystal consulting and navy seal Chris Fussell the author of the book one mission they do great work general McChrystal let me start with you the average person sitting at home on the couch terrified fear panic as a great war hero can you give me any tips mentally on how to get through this sure I think the first thing is don't feel special or weak because you're scared this is an amorphous by will threat and it and it gets under your skin once you get that past that don't be callin to inaction what we need now each of us to be a leader each of us to stand up each of us to show commitment to getting through this crisis and we will yeah Fussell navy seal I mean you did the most dangerous stuff on earth what would you tell people mentally how to how to keep cool yeah well I appreciate that thanks robin Amazon and you know to echo a bit what Stan was saying there one thing that we're encouraging all of our all the leaders were talking with over the last few weeks is be present yes you step into this fight there's a saying in the seal teams run the sound of the guns well we know where the fighters and leaders need to get it into it right and then you don't gauge their people their families their communities and start communicating pulling people into dialogue coming up with solutions at sector there's a there's a tendency in times of crisis to retract into your did your cubicle into your small unit your tribe more than ever now leaders need to be broadcasting out down into their organizations and speaking with as many people as they can on a regular basis and they can manage otherwise especially with social isolation our distance from one oh one another's gonna get even worse so it's gonna be harmful to industries can be harmful to communities and so leaders need to step in now and start to solve that so you were the seal so I would imagine in your work there were times were totally alone and isolated in the woods what is the secret of mentally not feeling L. alone well it it didn't interesting point there were times when we were physically alone separated around the world into small teams two person unit of tetra but you were never alone or separated from from the culture because what we did in this it is also a very remote shepherded environment under the leadership of Stan McChrystal it's a layer and a what we started called a digital leadership a culture that existed through digital means and we communicated each with each other every single day seven days a week for it for years on end constantly and there was there were daily forms were McChrystal would bring together thousands of us literally from around the world into one video conversation just to get update what's going on around the world what's happening in your corner at centra and so you never felt why you might be physically separated you were never felt like you were alone in the fight and that's critical for leaders to to start to corporate and other running organization right now general McChrystal you talk about communicating so the president does these briefings where he'll stand there for two and a half hours and answer every question is is that is there too much communication or is they're never too much communication well I don't think there's ever too much communication I think that what a leader could do is potentially stand up in front of for example show a map of the United States and tell people this is a national challenge is actually a global challenge it's one that we should hi as a nation not as fifty separate states and give people the sense that together we are stronger we make people get the sense of what beyond what they she just from a personal perspective and a sense that everyone else is in this together we're going to share resources we're going to share lessons learned will connect communicate constantly not just from top to bottom but the cost to our peer cities between Sunni states between states I think we get a lot better the general what would you tell an employer right now who's got employees their home they're not working and they're not getting paid to tear for what would you tell employer to do for those employees mentally I think the first thing is to reach out to them and communicate very candidly with them tell them exactly what the real situation is financially which is Clive and the decisions that have to be made and that you're committed to trying to move on for the next thing I remember is when people go to work from home a couple of things happened one although the connected digitally they can feel very alone they should talk about with Christian the shields pourtant thing is connecting to them on a very frequent basis not making people think they're in their kitchen working on a laptop and it got no connection to anybody and also remember that everybody's life is multiple angles to it you can have a person who may be working from home with your company and still being paid but their spouse may have been laid off their parents may be under threat of cold in nineteen there are all these things that certainly make life complicated and I think that we as employers which is to make sure we only have to take that into account yeah Hey Chris you guys the navy says you got the toughest missions in the world you're on this mission like you know the president says the next couple weeks will be very bad so imagine a mission it's going well then it goes very badly when you try to turn that around so how do you how do you do that yeah there's there's a a a natural sort of personality in the in the communities that stand I both grew up inside out that teaches you how to compartmentalize very quickly and and and build a personal and team level resilience this is in all of our all of our DNA humans are just naturally good at that and in case studies throughout history have proven this to us this will be a forging for our country and for the world but I think the mindset of taking each individual challenge as as a unique situation work through it and then be ready for the next one so breaking your view on the pointer for six months you have good days and bad days some really horrible times but the best team in the best leaders could immediately compartmentalized that learn from it do you agree with the team and get ready for the next challenge they were saying I can't do this for next six the next six months they were saying we've got to do one more thing and they were gonna get the rest of them we didn't do another thing and right now we have to see the big picture like Stan was just saying but also individuals families etcetera look for little goals get through the day gets through the afternoon get through the next window I don't think every single morning when you wake up there's another six months twelve months of tetra best good advice the general McChrystal I guess you've this is what you guys know how to do logistics talk about that from a because when you set up a base or you know certainly gonna get five hundred thousand beds and meals let's talk about how logistics works it's interesting when in the military they say that amateurs talk strategy of professionals talk logistics just extra terminal what you can do or not do and so at the end of the day I think that this is largely operational logistics problem you know there is the science to do with developing vaccines and what not but the reality is we have to get ventilators protective equipment all the things that hospital beds that will allow us to be as effective as possible and taking care of people I would argue that across the fifty states there's an awful lot of equipment that isn't all needed at the same time the reality is it's needed very badly in New York now and a few other places but in other parts of the country the way the military would do this they would inventory everything and then they would search it to where it's needed and then when the need shifted they would shift quickly just like you chipped forces to fight an enemy threat I I think it would make us more efficient yeah well you guys have been great Chris Fussell has it above book of cold one mission and general Stanley McChrystal you do you run a consulting firm now Christian I Christian the president and the CEO of McChrystal group okay and give them a call if you need any.

president Stanley McChrystal Chris Fussell
"mcchrystal" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:04 min | 7 months ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Amanpour

"And the whole nonsense about conspiracy theories and. Oh He's just trying to take down the president. I mean really at this time that can happen. Lorenzo Christiana. I don't think politics has any place in the current format. I don't think it's I think it's it should be people on an trump side. She'd be denigrating. Dr Chee I don't think Speaker Pelosi should be denigrating the president. I think what people in America want to see is kind of the cooperation and collaboration. You've seen between Governor Cuomo and president trump and governor newsom and president trump. I mean there. There are people who are not even close on the ideological spectrum who are working together and and cooperating and talking despite their very very strong differences I think that should be the model for how all Americans are moving forward doing this incredibly trying time in our nation's history. I WanNa ask you because again. You form a military couple of things you've seen this. Pretty massive airlift coming in from China. Now I mean we're used to seeing the US do massive airlifts of aid to many many other parts of the world but Chinese Have well there's a civilian? Plane chartered with a huge amount of required equipment from China. And there may be many more. What do you make of that? Yeah so Christiane a couple of things. You'd asked General McChrystal who have a great deal of admiration for about the military. The military is is really surging forward here in lots of different ways you correctly point out. The Army Corps has gone up to the JAVITS center in New York and building hospitals and converting hotel rooms to to bed space sending two hospital ships to both the one to the east coast. One of the West Coast you know. The military is surging greatly of interest though. You should note that the primary spots in the military in these types of situations is each state's National Guard in the state of New York for example. It's the forty second division. They have roughly twenty thousand individuals who serve in that unit. And I believe that to date only been about three thousand of those folks called into action so I think before any there's a federal response by the US military they will be called been mobilized as to the airbridge from China. Unfortunately this is the president and lots of other instead pointing to. Nothing's made in America anymore. So P P protective equipment parts for respirators. Lots of the things that we need to move forward throughout this crisis are made overseas. And so it's very difficult to get them here. We we love to see more respirators made here but it's hard to turn a car factor into respirator factory very quickly. These are complex medical pieces of equipment. And it's very difficult to do and you you talked about General McChrystal about the Defense Production Act. I think lots of folks have been kind of building up to the bar so to speak and offering to make things the challenges getting some of those critical parts which come in from certain factories in China. Unfortunately yeah I mean this is a challenge also with saying it as it is. You know it's ridiculous to invoke the idea of nationalization like the president did comparing you know getting companies to do something in a time of crisis to Venezuela which is a total basket case. I mean it's just not not apples and oranges isn't that and the other thing I wanted to ask you. Is You heard Stanley? Mcchrystal's say one of the things. A Great Leader has to do in times of crisis is level with the people. Don't dissemble don't say one thing one day and have to retracted another day. Don't try to play down the crisis so I'm trying to figure out what you think of. President trump suggesting for instance corona virus was comparable to flu or desktop over car accidents. You know all of that kind of stuff in your view. Has that been helpful or is it just added to a sense of some confusion? And and sort of haphazard this certainly at the beginning of the response to this crisis. Christiane I would say in the clip. You just ran. There are a few moments ago you had Dr Fallacy talking about total number of this and Dr. Chee said look this could rant. There could be a range it could be upwards of X. In downwards of of why and he used the flu comparison there as well so even the the best experts used comparisons to To try to give a frame of reference. I think the president is trying to do what he tried to initially was and continues to try to do is provide hope for the American people. He's he steps back he he. Lets Dr Faucher Dr Burks and others answer the substantive questions but he tries to be be optimistic hopeful aspirated. I don't I don't think those two are incompatible. I wanted to ask you something about how the US has been looked at from overseas. Well all these other countries all your allies of facing the same issue you know. Angela Merkel has done an amazing job. Everybody says that the testing and all this very rigorous moves that she has brought in has has been very very important and in fact there was a tweet just just a couple of days ago whereby the Germans were telling people in the United States. They're citizens to get back to Germany asap to be able to have a chance over there which is pretty extraordinary when you think about it and on the other side you've got giant both an ro the president of Brazil. Who's busy saying let's go out? This is just over hyped by the media we need to take care of our economy and this and that in Brazil you've got organized crime leaders in the favelas keeping social distancing. Because the government's not doing it. I just told me a little bit about leadership for a moment. Look I think there is during these times of crisis. I think it is important. I look you don't have to take my word for word for it. I think the American people are speaking. You see this. Most recent Gallup poll most recent Washington Post. Abc News poll sixty percent of the people in the Gallup poll. Feel the president's doing a a very positive job very good job handling this crisis and the Washington Post. Abc News poll fifty one percent of the people. Do I think the way you see the president leading through the Lens? You've you from him from to begin with so I think he's doing a good job. I know there are others. That don't share that feeling but I think he is listening to the experts. I think he defers the experts. I think he starts each day with. Briefings gives an overview and then steps back and lets the surgeon general speak director the CDC Dr Fouled. She Dr Burks so I don't see where the president is not leading from the front here. So you just mentioned those polls and I was actually gonNA come to that because it's true. His poll ratings are up. I believe that the Washington Post one is forty nine percent approval forty seven percent disapproval. It's the highest but it still is not cracking fifty percent. Why do you think that Chris Christie? I always say during the campaign during the two thousand sixteen campaign in the State of Pennsylvania which President Juan for the first time in a Republican water the first time in thirty years When when we won the election the president was at thirty nine percent. So I'm not quite sure that there's a lot of. I'm not quite sure. The accuracy of veracity of polling is an accurate reflection of the mood. I think it's it's it's it's one tool to measure but it's not necessarily an overall toll and again as I as I say it point out. I believe that where you come this where you where you sit. If you like the president you think he's doing a good job. If you don't like the president you don't think he's doing a good job and those numbers are reflective of his overall numbers throughout his presidency last question because it's it's the president being the president trump doing trump his tweet yesterday in which he quoted an article about the ratings now on television for the daily briefing. He tweeted president. Trump is a ratings hit since reviving the daily White House briefing Mr Trump and his krona virus updates of attracted an average audience of eight and a half million on Cable News. Roughly the viewership of the season finale of the bachelor so he's repeating what was written. Obviously the rest of what was written. Was that stuff that we've just talked about some of the information in those briefings on misleading. Or just wrong. Sometimes it's what do you make of that? I mean the president loves those ratings right list. The president understands the television the media television better than any other president in modern history. I think he using his that. He's been able to get his message out to many people across the United States and and and he feels their success by by the those pure numbers. I think it's pretty self. I think I have to explain. I think it speaks for itself. The TWEET SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. And so very very finally. I mean it's not really. I don't know whether it's the right time to talk about this but you know where do you put him for the November election because this obviously this crisis for obvious reasons has has knocked the election campaign right off the map for the moment? Christiane Yo. It's obviously when you when you and I last met a few weeks ago. The beginning of March one. You couldn't anticipate that this level we get to this level all across the globe. I don't WanNa make any projections. I hope and pray. Everybody in their families across America and across the globe get through this with minimal loss of life garbage can have huge economic disruption around the world. I think that we need to focus on that. To begin with getting families healed individuals healed businesses back going and then we can really begin in earnest discussion of Election which are becoming up this November. But we have lots of time between now and then I hear you David Urban. Thank you so much indeed for joining us now the. Who's said that the best way to tackle this virus is to test test test. This is a call to action. That pioneering biochemist's Jennifer Dowden and her colleagues at UC. Berkeley are working on now as they aim to use their biology labs to test up to two thousand samples per day Bowden. A CO founder of the gene. Editing tool crisper is using that technology to try to fight cove in nineteen and she explained to our Walter Isaacson now and full disclosure. Of course Walter is currently writing a book on Bowden and her work with crisper. Dr Jennifer Dow DNA. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me in early. March when you watch the spread of the corona virus. You suddenly decided it was time for scientists to kick into action. So you took your Berkeley lab and some of the surrounding labs in the San Francisco area and you mobilize tell me what you did. And why we held a meeting to discuss how the scientists at UC Berkeley and our surrounding institutions could get together and address this terrible pandemic and one thing that emerged from that meeting was that we should find a way to use our resources in our knowledge to test for the virus many of us agreed that one of the most the most important things to be done right now to address the disease is understand who's infected and how to keep others safe and if you decide you're going to test you do a regular test would you have to get it approved by the CDC and once you've done that what can you do. What five hundred thousand tests per day? So it's important understand we're academic scientists. We don't do. Clinical testing to do. Clinical tests with patient samples requires regulatory approval from multiple agencies..

president United States General McChrystal America Dr Faucher Dr Burks Mr Trump China Washington Post Dr. Chee President Juan Lorenzo Christiana Governor Cuomo Berkeley Christiane Dr Jennifer Dow Angela Merkel National Guard Walter Isaacson governor newsom West Coast
Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

"Boston Boston mayor mayor Marty Marty Walsh Walsh bringing bringing it it out out big big gone gone to to try try to to help help the the city city deal deal with with the the coronavirus coronavirus crisis crisis WBZ's WBZ's Karen Karen regal regal as as that that part part of of the the story story the the city city of of Boston Boston is is hiring hiring a a consulting consulting firm firm to to tighten tighten the the city's city's emergency emergency response to the covert nineteen pandemic the goal is to update our plans and service to reflect our needs of our residents who have today prevent any gaps in service that might arise in court make the best use of our resources moving forward it's a team being led by four star general general Stanley McChrystal among what's being done examining how city agencies and direct and communications to residents well she could not say the cost

Marty Marty Walsh Walsh Karen Karen Boston Stanley Mcchrystal
"mcchrystal" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"And I think it's something that society at large is discussed as this this balance of what what makes us who we are combination of genetics the environment regrowed up in I I don't mean to play therapist here. But what do you what impact other than the impact may have had on on what you wanted to do with your life in terms of going into the military? What impact did it have for you as a young guy? My father traveled a lot. When I was a kid. I think it had a lot of made a difference my life. What what? What impacted that have on on you as a young boy? Yeah. I think. A great believer. That your experiences in the people who are examples in front of you. Whether they're intentional examples are not have the biggest impact on you. My father was a very quiet guy. He was very self effacing. But he was a very successful soldier. So on the one hand, I I was never had come out with him. But I knew about it. I read about it. I saw the the awards in the whatnot. He got for that. So I started with the assumption that it was a very good combat soldier like the kind you see in the movies. But at the same time, I saw this guy was very courteous gentleman, and he was not a braggadocious person or or pushy. And so those two things sort of connected for me as you start to say, okay. How do you? What's the right way to conduct yourself, and you start to I think a lot of people wanna be their father is. Certainly get into the day died. I think that has a big impact. And do you recall what it was like when he was gone and your with your siblings, and your mother what was that? If you could if you if you wouldn't mind speaking a little bit to what that what that was like as a family because it's in a lot of ways rethink of you know, you are they listen, your general Stanley mcchrystal. I mean, you are one of the world's leading thinkers yet you like so many other of us were sitting there, maybe at a dinner table ten years old with with a dad who has gone and a mom trying to trying to hold down the house. If I have it. Right. Would that? Exactly. Right. It just to put it in perspective. They were six kids, and my mom and my dad he went in the summer, sixty five is the first thing. I remember the at Phnom war was really just ramping up at that particular point. I didn't have a huge. Appreciation for for that particular war. But I watched a lot of war movies. And also, I was able to extrapolate I remember without making this too long. My dad had to go to a course before we went to before he went to Vietnam. So we drove down from outside Washington DC through Chattanooga, Tennessee, where my mother had grown up down to forbidding Georgia. So my dad could go to this course. And in route my mother has an appendicitis so got this. Station wagon a Chevrolet BelAir station wagon to parents six kids put in their two of them. Very young one of them's a baby. And before we arrive at Chattanooga..

Chattanooga Stanley mcchrystal appendicitis Tennessee Vietnam Washington Georgia ten years one hand
"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"One of the other guys who was way up there with me and my class. Frank, Ernie also ended up as three star on a great warrior, so. Yeah, quite but it was lucky at the beginning of my junior year several things happened. We shifted out a hard sciences and into history and English more. And so I was little more mattress. Yeah. I started dating this little girl who is an army brat, and she and I have been married forty two years now. So she gave me a little bit of stability and discipline. And then I had this tactical officer come in and the beginning of junior year. He does this counseling session with me right at the beginning. And he says you're going to be a great army officer. And I'm looking at him saying, I get the wrong file STAN mcchrystal he goes now. And he pulled it. I said let me show you what you're good at what you're not good at you're going to stop all that discipline stuff. They just announced it he didn't ask me, and you do X and you're going to be a great soldier. And it was amazing was something in there about your the peer peer review from your your peers. What did he say about that? Well, yeah. Because you have your great academic grade. You're let grades my peer review twice a year actually three times a year. They do this thing where everybody waits all your peers. And I had done very well there, and they actually found out that that is a very high correlation to success in the military, and he was a West Point graduate of Vietnam veteran, and his sense was the things that really matter your ability to work with people. And so he just announced to me that your peer reviews are very strong. I focus on this. And you're going to be a great soldier someone somewhere. I read that you that your your peers compared you to cool hand, Luke, not maybe not in a positive, maybe hard headed. So I wanna talk a little bit later about your your latest book leaders myth and reality, but you are a certify ably. Great leader, I think those who served with you and under you would say that what what at that experience with that TAC officer teach you that you carry it with you going forward because you must have seen a bunch of raw undisciplined people as you are moving up the chain of command who you saw. Y-, you know, talent and promise. Yeah. Exactly. I remember at the beginning of my West Point career. I got in trouble with this Colonel gave me a hard time for not having collar. Stay in my shirt, which kept your. Collar down, and he acquainted it to not bringing amunition to the battle. And I remember thinking at the time. It was just a plea by said that stupidest thing I ever heard I still was pretty stupid. This guy came in. I trust you kept that thought to tackle you. This guy came in, and he just exist it he understood what was important leadership trusting people building their confidence. And so later in my career, what I found is if you are genuine, and you are real in your view to be competent when you extend confidence down to somebody who's young when you show them trust. Even if they they're going to have some challenges they're gonna screw some stuff up when you throw that it has an amazingly powerful effect. He did that to me and it just for the rest of my career. That's one of those lessons. I never forgot. And so you try to do it with young people particularly made them whether going to really took time, maybe just screwed up. I just two years up. And yet he said does matter it's past let's move forward. Yeah. I think most people who are successful in life can. To that figure in their life often. It's a teacher who who who pick them up and gave them a sense of possibility really important. So you you enter the service at the end of the Vietnam war. I wanted to ask you about. I think about it often. You know, I go to these go to sporting events, and at every sporting event now of veteran is introduced an invariably people stand and cheer. But I remember the seventies. And how and how hard it was for Vietnam veterans coming home because the war was so reviled..

officer STAN mcchrystal West Point Frank TAC Ernie Luke forty two years two years
"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Visit the institute of politics to talk about his career, the nature of leadership and the leader we have today. General STAN mcchrystal? It's great to see you again. It's great some. You know, there's so much to talk about going on right now. But I'm I'm really interested in in your journey. And the first thing that striking is that it was it seems almost preordained that you should have ended up in the military as as as a general maybe that wasn't preordained, but tell me a little bit about your your family and that history. Sure, I was one of six kids my father when I was born was an army, captain thirty years old mother's twenty nine and she was from the south from Tennessee and had a pretty traditional southern upbringing all very liberal and pretty politically involved. My father was from a military family. His father had been a soldier occur soldier. And so how did they meet my great story? My father was introduced when he was four. Benning Georgia to her and. He by mother was very attractive young girl and pretty she was once quoted as saying, I don't know what to do there. So many minute could make happy. And so he met her fell in love. And then he did what was she doing? She living. She was she was living there, but reporter Oakland newspaper, and so he goes off to Germany as he graduated in nineteen forty five. So he's occupation army with this southern ballots, his fiancee and his mind well, in her mind, she's not fancy. So he comes home cutting awkward at tackle. He comes home a couple of years later to marry her, and she is not at all decide whether she's getting married this guy, but he lands he gets whether and my mother brings her sister along her younger sister, and they ride in the car with the system between him, and it's very awkward and finding that the sister goes to the lady came mom if you don't want I'll take after twenty four hours talking my dad convinces her to marry him. They get married and begin this wonderful life and she died young age forty five. Yeah. I know. I will I want to ask you little bit about that. 'cause you dad, you know, as in most. Military families. He was gonna he was. And so your mom was kind of the hub of everything yet. My mom was this amazingly energetic, charismatic personality. And so when I was young with the six kids, she was the glue that held the family together or you in the os four there were four, and then there was a six year break and then to those two lived a much better. Life three always say. But my dad was a soldier, but we spent most of the time in the DC area. So he worked in the Pentagon and in different places. But he was always my hero. I always knew from like h three I wanted to be a soldier sort of reflexive. You asked me what I wanna to do at age five. I'm going to the army. My mother was not so sure that that was a good idea. Yeah. Why? Well. She was against Vietnam war. She didn't go out. And my dad was fighting it. So she can go out and protested. But she thought that may be out of think about other things, you know, I I was very close to my mother, we read a lot of the same things if there were any of the six kids who just had sort of an intellectual collection, my mom. It was probably me and have quite a literary bent and that must come from proper. Probably sounds better than it is. But she was always interested in methology when she was young and nights at around table and she shared those old books with me. So this really close relationship, and my father would do tours in Vietnam, and then come back, and my mother would hold this family together while we were gone, and then my father came back and in nineteen seventy-one literally my mother got sick one morning, and by after midnight, she was dead or kidneys had failed. Just suddenly. She's perfectly healthy athletic tennis player. Boom. My father's now, a Brigadier General relatively young six kids widowed. And it was a really tough time for the family..

STAN mcchrystal institute of politics methology Tennessee tennis Vietnam reporter Oakland newspaper Georgia Germany Pentagon twenty four hours thirty years six year
"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"From the university of Chicago institute of politics and CNN the axe files with your host, David Axelrod. Stan mcchrystal is an interesting amalgam of four star general who was commander of allied forces in Afghanistan, the leader of special forces who hunted down terrorists in Iraq. And now a scholar at Yale University writing thoughtful treatises on the nature of leadership, including his latest book leaders myth and reality I sat down with mcchrystal in Chicago the other day when he came to visit the institute of politics to talk about his career, the nature of leadership and the leader we have today. General STAN mcchrystal? It's great to see you again. It's great. You know, there's so much to talk about going on right now. But I'm I'm really interested in in your journey. And the first thing that striking is that it was it seems almost preordained that you should have ended up in the military as as as a general maybe that wasn't preordained, but tell me a little bit about your your family and that history. Sure, I was one of six kids my father when I was born was an army, captain thirty years old mother's twenty nine and she was from the south from Tennessee and had a pretty traditional southern upbringing all very liberal and pretty politically involved. My father was from a military family. His father had been a soldier a career soldier. And so how did they meet my great story? My father was introduced when he was at Ford. Benning Georgia to her. And he by mother was a very attractive young girl and pretty she was once quoted as saying, I don't know what to do there. So many minute could make happy. And so he met her fell in love. And then he did what was she doing what she living? She was she was living there, but reporter Oakland's paper, and so he goes off to Germany as he graduated in nineteen forty five. So he's occupation army with this southern ballots, his fiancee and his mind well in her mind, she's not fiance. So he comes home cutting awkward at tackle. He comes home a couple of years later to marry her, and she is not at all decide whether she's gonna marry this guy, but he lands he gets whether and my mother brings her sister along her younger sister, and they ride in the car with the system between him, and it's very awkward and finding that the sister goes to the lady came mom, if you don't wanna I'll take after twenty four hours of talk my dad convinces her to marry him. They get married and begin this wonderful life and she died young age forty five. Yeah. I know. I will I want to ask you little bit about that. 'cause you dad, you know, as in most. Military families. He was gonna he was. And so your mom was kind of the hub of everything yet. My mom was this amazingly energetic, charismatic personality. And so when I was young with the six kids, she was the glue that held the family together or you in the six os four there were four, and then there was a six year break and then to those two lived a much better. Life three always say. But my dad was a soldier, but we spent most of the time of the DC area. So he worked in the Pentagon and in different places. But he was always my hero. I always knew from like h three I wanted to be a soldier sort of reflexive. You ask me what I wanna do at age five going to the army. My mother was not so sure that that was a good idea. Yeah. Why? Well. She was against Vietnam war. She didn't go out. And my dad was fighting it. So she can go out and protested. But she thought that may be out of think about other things, you know, I I was very close to my mother, we read a lot of the same things if there were any of the six kids who just had sort of an intellectual collection, my mom. It was probably me and have quite a literary bent and that must come from proper. Probably sounds better than it is. But she was always interested in methology when she was young and nights at around table and she shared those old books with me..

Stan mcchrystal university of Chicago institut institute of politics David Axelrod Yale University CNN Chicago Tennessee Afghanistan Iraq commander methology Ford Oakland Georgia Germany reporter Pentagon twenty four hours
"mcchrystal" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on KGO 810

"You? When you hear someone like mcchrystal say that the president of the United States is immoral and untruthful. Does it disturb? You does it upset you because I'm gonna tell you something. I know it's December thirty first I know it's the end of the year. And I know that on a day like today generally want to go a little lighter in the news. But can anybody site for me a time when a leading American military figure who commanded our US forces in Afghanistan. Issued this kind of public rebuke to the president of the United States. I don't think he tells the truth. And the general as you heard responded affirmatively when asked whether he believes Trump is immoral. Four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten. It's a serious question. It's one that I want to know how you react. Do you think that general mcchrystal is right or wrong? I want to tag onto mcchrystal general Kelly. General Kelly gave an interview. With the Los Angeles Times. And I went particularly to the times to see what it was the general Kelly said remember, this is the man who until the first of January. Is the chief of staff to the president of the United States of America. And did you hear what he said? About the president. What.

general mcchrystal president General Kelly United States Los Angeles Times Trump Afghanistan chief of staff America
"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"And then we love it. We in some respects to give up on a leader is meeting that you made a mistake in the you were wrong. So we're always reluctant to do that. I guess Zach. I want to talk about how you went about writing this book and the cry. Not that you were looking for and leaders in selecting the bios to include in the book. What were you looking for? Well, it's it's funny when we started we knew we wanted to do number profiles of leaders, but it was a little contradictory because we were going to write a book about leadership that we knew one of the arguments would be we get too focused on individuals not or wider picture. And so you say, well, why are you writing about him right one? That's because that's how we've always thought them. So we went back to Plutarch the original biographer who had done by of Roman Greek leaders, and we use that as a basic model, but the idea was we wouldn't try to compare leaders in terms of traits or what worked the real question was why did they emerge as leaders? What about them or what about the times or people around them that actually did it and pretty early in the process, we came out with it sort of recognition that leadership isn't what we? I think it is. And it never has been and you you referred earlier to the the myths that we came up with and we started with this recognition that we've always looked to leadership through these mythological ends is. And I had this child's book that my mother got when she was five in one thousand nine hundred twenty nine and Chattanooga, Tennessee, and she's to read it to me, and it was Greek tales for tiny tots and one of my remembered with atlas and there was his handwriting picture of a guy in a g string standard on top of a mountain, hold up the sky, and I'd look at that. And I go at strange, but then as we think about it for years and years and years people assumed that at the sky didn't fall in something or some bodies holding it up and knits are designed to explain what's otherwise unexplainable. And so people said, well, if it's not fallen in somebody's holding it up atlas on stop them out and doing it that good excuses or a good at. Explanations. Any and they just bought it. What we've done the same thing with leaders. We look at leaders and someone says that the person who saved the west in World War Two is Winston Churchill, and we sort of look at that. And we go okay write that down. But of course, that's an incredibly simplistic description of one leaders role. He was part of this, right? Larger equation. And so we came up with these three myths, which we call the the formulate myth, which is the idea that there's a checklist of how to be a great leader. And when you actually look at results that doesn't equate doesn't correlate to success respect was in those don't translate across different careers in different eras, and so forth. And one of the reasons we pick these very different thirteen leaders for book is because they were all leaders, but other than that there are very few similarities between their background how they operated times at cetera. We found that leader. Ships intensely contextual. We're going to take a quick break. And then I'll be back with more with general Stanley mcchrystal when we come back in just a minute..

Winston Churchill Zach Stanley mcchrystal Chattanooga Tennessee
"mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

"Yeah. And and thinking about entirely different. Yeah. And we've been talking about leadership on on a grand scale. But you're also the head of the mcchrystal group which works with businesses on leadership development. So after having worked in with a bunch of different industries off and on much smaller skills. What would you say is some of the the most common mistakes that new leader makes? Yeah, I think often a new leader comes in and wants to prove themselves because they've been hired typically they've been given a role and fair amount of money. And so they think they've got to prove themselves, and there's a reticence to say, I don't know there's a reticence. To look at the team and say, what should we do? And to have the team do it because you're worried about your own credibility. I think leaders actually if they're willing to I'm not saying take a subordinate role, they're responsible, but taking much more inclusive rel much more role in which you ask people to help lead actually works much better. Some of the best I've ever seen that have been particularly been in jobs while have reached that. And and it's magic to say and on the flip side of that should people in who are followers should they see leadership in a new light, maybe their relationship to their boss, their boss's, boss? Yeah. Yeah. Think about it. How many times have we sat back and you've got either a new leader your leader in the auditorium in the room. And they're saying, okay. Here's what we're gonna do. And you're sitting back kind of smart ass going. This is stupid that won't work. Boom, boom, boom. You know, rare up on your high lines embark, and maybe we'll think about doing it leader. Have a role, but the followers have a huge huge responsibility, huge responsibility in doing their part. But also shaping the leader. You see the leader making a mistake. And you don't say something to them you fail in your job. And then when you see them fail and you get smug, and you go. Yeah. Thought that she was never that good or he was never that. Good. Shame on you. Because you own part of that. And in reality when they go wins fire and time they had a fire. All you, not only should we not put figures of the past on pedestals. We shouldn't do that with our own bosses. Absolutely. And bosses should put themselves on pedestals. There's a few who keep wanting to step up there. And then I think it's much better for the leader to stay away from the pedestal and at this point, how do you personally define success? It's the team. I'm part of I've got this company now hundred people it's grown, and I'm not critical to the business except my name's on the door. You know, I show up occasionally, and you know, the very nice to me and whatnot. But the reality is the work gets done by the team. And I take the greatest pride in the world when I sit one of our meetings, and I'm not saying much, and it's happening, and they're just doing things they're pulling their saying we're going to go in this direction. And nobody looks to me to say can we go in that direction or should we and they're not being discourteous? They know that that's not the best thing to do if they turn to me or or somebody else to let you know, the old greybeard to do it. It's too slow. It's often not the right answer. So I am really happiest when I see that. And it just it gives you great pride. So success to you being. I don't know. Would it be not having a non integral role among your team? How do you wanna be integral to I wanna feel like a part of it? But I don't wanna feel like the critical cog. I don't wanna feel like the keystone to the arch. I want the company the organization to be confident in themselves. If I got hit by a car, they'd say, we're gonna miss STAN. But guess what? In his honor. We're going to move forward..

mcchrystal
"mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

"For general Stanley mcchrystal. This is success. I want the company the organization to be confident in themselves. If I got hit by a car, they'd say, we're going to miss stand. But guess what? In his honor. We're gonna move forward mcchrystal lead America and satellites in the war in Afghanistan before retiring as a four star general in two thousand ten he revolutionized the joint special operations command j sock and he's best known for taking out the leader of Qaeda in Iraq. Crystal just published a book called leaders myth and reality he explains how revisiting the legacy of confederate general Robert E Lee helped him realize it was time to redefine leadership. I grew up figuratively. Speaking with Robert Lee grew up in Virginia. I grew up in northern Virginia not far from his boyhood home, and I went to Washington high school, and then when I got seventeen I went to West Point as Robert Lee hit, and when you go to West Point, you don't. Escape properly. I lived in the barracks there were paintings property. And while every other leader at West Point is famous and taught he special and then when I got older, and I was retired. And I had this picture that my wife had given me forty years before my wife had paid twenty five dollars for when I was a second Lieutenant and hung it proudly number set of quarters we ever had because for me it represented. This is what I believe when someone came into my quarters, they'd seal robbery lead. Those are the values that he believes it, and I was proud of that. Then after Charlottesville in my wife, any we'd been married forty years at the time. She goes, I think you ought to get rid of that picture. And my first response was you gave it to me. Honey, I can never get rid of that. And she says now, and I said, well why? And she says, I think it's communicating something you don't think it is. And I said, what do you mean, he was general officer? He just did his thing. He was a military guy out of politician or something she said, you may think that but people in our home may not think that they may think you're trying to communicate something deeper white supremacy and all those things so one morning, I took it down literally threw it away. And it was it was a pretty emotional moment for me. And then as we started writing this book and we'd already begun the initial work. I realized I couldn't write a book about leadership. I wrote about Robert Ely. And I knew that was dangerous because robbery Lee become a controversial character. There's a part of American society that is just passionate in his defense part of it that is passionate against him. And everybody's going gonna weigh in. But you know, I'd grown up with Robert Ely. Both as a person in my mind, but also is an ideal and just recently I walked down just to walk the distance between his childhood home and the slave trading house in Alexandria, Virginia. Which was the second busiest slave trading house in the United States. And this is where northern African Americans were bought some Friedman were were captured, but others were bought from farms that were profitable and shipped to the deep south where cotton was so profitable. And so it was right in front of him. It was ten blocks from his home..

Robert E Lee officer Stanley mcchrystal West Point Virginia robbery Robert Ely Alexandria United States Charlottesville Qaeda Washington high school Afghanistan America Iraq Friedman forty years twenty five dollars
The appendix is implicated in Parkinson's disease

The Big Biz Radio Show

17:37 min | 2 years ago

The appendix is implicated in Parkinson's disease

"News. Now, there may be a connection between your appendix and your chance of developing Parkinson's. USA radio's Chris Barnes with details. Study finds that proteins believed to cause Parkinson's are present in everyone's appendix. But individuals who get their appendix removed early in life are then nineteen to twenty five percent less likely to develop Parkinson's later. The researchers now say they want to find a way to keep the protein from leaving the appendix and causing the illness. The study finds removing the appendix after the onset of Parkinson's. Doesn't cure it or slow it down. The study was done by the van Andel institute in Grand Rapids. Michigan and the Lund university in Sweden, our retired US army four star general out with a new book and some new ideas on how to bring civility back to politics USA radio's Timberg with the story Stanley mcchrystal's a former US army general he served for over thirty four years in the military. He has a new book out, titled leaders myth and reality. It's funny almost can't give advice to politicians because they're responding to the environment. They learned that if they are civil in the other person's negative the other person wins and the further to the edges that they moved better for them. We've gotta look in the mirror as Americans and say, we're all complaining about it. The only way we. Fix. It is to change things with voting with demanding people more in the center, they may not be as exciting. But the reality is if we're going to make the government work, we've got gotta move it towards the center from both sides for USA radio news. I'm Robin will landscape. This is an urgent health notice for all residents. Suffering from back, neck knee pain. You may qualify for our pain relieving brace at little or no cost to you. But the deadline is fast approaching simply call the health alert hotline. Now you heard right. You may qualify for a pain relieving neck or wrist brace. These items may even be covered by Medicare or your private insurance. The health alert hotline is your brace company, specialized braces have been tested for pain relief. Call us toll for right now to determine your eligibility and to learn how to use your private insurance or Medicare to minimize your out of pocket costs. Don't wait at the deadline passes. You may lose your opportunity to get a pain relieving back neck or wrist brace at little or no cost to you. Eight hundred three zero six one seven six zero eight hundred three zero six one seven six zero eight hundred three oh, six one seven six that's eight hundred three oh, six seventeen. Sixty. This is the best show. What's so funny about investing money? You ask the big show with Russell Sally hope to answer that top rated inciteful financial analysis. If you're looking for insightful, financial perspective on key market strategies. Keep looking this is Michelle. This is Russ and Sally. Television studios and sunny City, California a hundred and ten million broad fat. Don't forget. We're also on the radio. We're talking. Iheartradio. Local updates during the radio. Yeah. The reason we started start tie TV show. Started the top radio shows hammer you with news traffic weather today. Big show dot com. Take a look very quickly. Just once again at the chart of the Dow Jones because I want to spend a little bit of time. Just because sure. So you have a point. You got a two and a half week moving average ten weekly blue line. That you see trending down. Here is a ten day moving average Redline, right? There is a fifty two and a half weeks crossed paths crossed paths. It's a technical indicator saying that the world is going to come to an end. On the bridge, and you should start investing in things like street, Canada's personal turns cryptocurrency, no, I mean, this is this is this is where you see the emotions in the market is to steer ingredients. Fine. No, fundamental reason for the market crash other than a couple companies have bad earnings what it's really top heavy. We we've had. Oh, I don't know. I'm going to say twenty five hundred updates overall. I mean, I know we've we've got a couple of pullbacks. But overall we've been we've been on a town this market and we've hit support levels here. You can see the same support back in may and June a little bit in July. We touched on it for the day. But the problem is is that now every new low is lower than the previous slow. Okay. You only hope you can show is the very bottom. There's so cast the cost later. It's cheap. Now, get the pool. But here's what I have to warn because something is cheap. Doesn't mean. It's not going to get cheaper confirm that with me. Because these are things are now. You gotta be careful. But this is the difference between term investing long term. I mean, I'm new technician. But if I'm looking at a chart like that minds usually a little longer term. I have just a fifty fifty zone. We we looked at. We're looking at a six months. Television. So, but if you look at what are you looking at forty quarters, he'll look at like ten years years, absolutely. Jerry, pull up that one chart that shows when we went from two thousand nine hundred thousand sixteen is exactly what you're talking about. If you take a fifty thousand foot. It's it's not as panicking, smooth Salat. The other part of this thing too. Is that when you see a thousand point drop over two days? Look at that. There's two thousand nine hundred two thousand sixteen you take it back. That's looks pretty good. Start doesn't. To hone in on Twitter. Terrifying. I was to go. So the long story short is Christina zorich. I'm gonna give you a cell phone number. So. We're not gonna do that. Feel scared. So how'd you guys handle in? Your phone's ringing off the hook and days like the last couple of weeks, something they don't because you're drained. Your clients. And the a lot of them have been investing for so long that people understand the elderly with you. I. People understand this is what the market does long-term investors. We say, we're investors not traders for the long term. So well, by the way, stock market corrections. Don't always mean a bear. Mark all bad news. That's a big piece of sometimes it's healthy. You take some money on the table. Sometimes strategically for me, personally, if I don't do a lot of day trading. My individual stocks. Senator I'm gonna take that money off the table. Over the course of several months, if it goes up ten percent of a not a long-term holder or something like that. I usually take everything back to the kospi philosophy because I'm a little more risk than my time. Looking at a computer, that's probably not the philosophy of long-term by and and it's not so explain to us because we haven't talked about the titans. We'll flash now. Talking about the long-term holder versus the trader because there's there's two philosophies long-term holders win every time. Although the traders way more excited about yes. The trader may have a little more fun in the short term is also a lot more agony. I think you know, when the markets are going down, you know, the the long-term investors gonna look at, you know, deep fundamentals of a company, we're going to pick a broader asset allocation fixed income versus equity that we think is appropriate. You know for your stage in life your retirement goals. All those exist is a multi year process. It's not a matter of months or days or weeks. We're looking at really long term. This is the return of volatility. We haven't seen volatility like this for a while exciting since earlier this year it hasn't been that long. October ten months ten months of sleeping giants. Yes. Yes. Philosophy where if you buy today, you keep it if you wouldn't buy today, you pull it out of your portfolio. You do that every technical. Revisit every year, depending on your quarterly. I mean, I'm looking at things more often. Sometimes we do. So we have some tactical equity portfolios where we'll have a specific dividend stocks or whatever, and we'll have a specific allocation for each sector and reach stock, and as they move we we rebalanced so we go back to like, you're saying whatever the initial allocation was. The other thing too is you know, sometimes selling selling because the market runs on these emotions yesterday. Yeah. People get scared and they're going to jump out, and they don't take that fifty thousand foot view. How do you guys do that? By the way is a money manager. Two and the walls are Romans Romans burning and you're sitting. She was a robot. Do they teach your psychological training on how not to jump off the cliff everybody, hold her do study behavioral investing? I mean, we have this incredible incredible research team at UBS. So there we have this constant stream of research, and we're always educating ourselves also about how to manage your emotions as an investor too, much info and not enough gut. You know, I don't think it's ever much info. I think there's so much out there. I think it's all she uses paralysis by analysis, and you're not you're missing. Sure. What are you guys? I don't I don't wanna say what are you guys looking at? But anybody here to talk about specific sector you wanted to him. Yes. So oncology, our research team put together what they call longer term investments team. So they're saying beyond market cycles. Maybe multiple market cycles. Are these mega trends like population growth, aging and longevity the world getting cancer? And the fact that the longer you live in more likely, you are to get cancer muzzle invested your sickness us. Cancer therapy right now is a hundred billion dollar business. Okay. And they're saying that the incidence of cancer is going to outstrip the population growth by factor of three to one. So there's opportunity there and a lot of people that say they want to align their portfolios the misery index. This is like you don't like by shorting stocks betting against anything. Right. Bad for the company. But honestly, you're talking about something that you can actually capitalize you can capitalize. And you can also encourage this. You know, the increase in the excessive ability of these treatments the affordability of these treatments. The cancer trends are going faster and higher in the emerging markets where people don't have access to healthcare like we do. So so my question about those type of companies always look at a million companies that are in clinical trials. Let's say. Clinical trials is getting close. But you're still a couple of years out. Is that is that isn't that still a risk? The fact that they may never hit. So it's definitely risk in this. Pressure medicine. Here's a new protocol Viagra. Hey, I'm not kidding. Sometimes that happens. But that doesn't happen all the time. Clinical trials, and they never ever make. This won't surprise you. When we're putting together a c Matic portfolio like this. We're going to recommend stocks across the spectrum of what stage of clinical trials do they have the FDA approval yet? Are they going to market how how commercialized they become? And as a sector is this is this something new for you guys are always been involved in the biotech, we have. But, but I think just in a broader way, this is more kind of sustainable responsible investing focused on on the team specifically among college. You know, we I met you Christina Guston, by the way from UPS, and she's she's a regular on the program when you first came to us, we did this would be a perfect millennial investment millennials are one of the leaders and asking us for these socially responsible, investing themes. This is something that they call it socially responsible. What they're really saying. Hey, my parents are dying. The big little sales. A little bit more money when they want. I just wanted to go to a doctor right now, they want strategies that are aligned with their values. They wanna have meaning in their investments. So a way to do that is by improving healthcare, Arthur, relentless investing more. They're saving. I'm getting more investors now. Yeah. The top. But they're willing to take. Yeah. Christina. Thank you so much Christine Augusta and UBS bringing that up today. Arcadi wealth management for the company that is under the UBS umbrella through San Diego. So if you're in southern California. Retrieved out yourself from the toll free number right now, she's the tallest one of the office. Christina. It may have been a messy divorce that suddenly cut your income in half. But not your bills. It might have been an injury or illness or your boss, just cutting back your hours. It doesn't really matter. How you got in over your head? It only matters that you are and that we're here to help. If you've got over ten thousand dollars in credit card debt, and you can't ever see breaking free call action and do it now being in over your head is a vicious cycle one day late. They charge. You miss a payment w rate. You just don't think it's fair. And neither do we. This is not bankruptcy or just as simple rate reduction plan. 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That's when I knew I needed life alert with just one press this button. I'm connected to the life alert center where I can get the help I need even when I cannot reach a phone with life alert. I'm never alone. One eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight for your free life alert brochure. That's one eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight one eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight call for your free life alert brochure today at one eight hundred four one four nineteen fifty eight. Greece is cheap. But the airfare costs a fortune Paris not much closer. And again, airfare. What about Puerto Vallarta? Let's face it. Flying anywhere is just too expensive. Wait, what's this low cost airlines with one call to low cost airlines, you'll drastically slash your travel costs. We're talking insanely low airline prices to any of your favorite destinations. Where would you like to go? 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United States Parkinson UBS California Usa Radio Medicare Van Andel Institute Knee Pain Grand Rapids Russell Sally Stanley Mcchrystal Christina Lund University Michelle Canada Chris Barnes Paychex Sweden Titans
Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

"Our retired US army four star general out with a new book and some new ideas on how to bring civility back to politics USA radio's Timberg with the story Stanley mcchrystal's a former US army general he served for over thirty four years in the military. He has a new book out, titled leaders myth and reality. It's funny almost can't give advice to politicians because they're responding to the environment. They learned that if they are civil in the other person's negative the other person wins and the further to the edges that they moved better for them. We've gotta look in the mirror as Americans and say, we're all complaining about it. The only way we. Fix. It is to change things with voting with demanding people more in the center, they may not be as exciting. But the reality is if we're going to make the government work, we've got gotta move it towards the center from both

United States Stanley Mcchrystal Timberg Thirty Four Years
Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

Bucket Strategy Investing

01:23 min | 2 years ago

Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

"A four star general weighs in on. The president's latest move to combat an immigrant caravan that's making its way from southern Mexico to the United States with more. Here's USA's Timberg. The Pentagon announced they're sending over five thousand troops to the US Mexico border. The troops will be helping to build fencing assists border patrol agents in hot hotspots and provide support as the government braces for the migrant caravan heading towards the United States. I had a chance to chat with retired US army general Stanley mcchrystal he also has a new book, titled leaders myth and reality. And I asked him about the president sending troops to the border wherever you use the US military. There is a practical side of it. And then there is a symbolic part of it. You know, they announced we're sending five thousand troops to the border. It almost sounds like we're going to relieve the Alamo where we're going to defend the borderline if that's what we're gonna do. We're gonna shoot the bikers when they come then that's one sort of middle picture people. Get. And so didn't use our military in something like that always carries great risks of symbolizing something we don't want our nation or military to be. So I would urge real caution here. I would urge you know, we've got some time before the convoy gets here. We've got a decide how we want this to play out. It's a chance for the United States to show our values in very overt way.

United States Stanley Mcchrystal President Trump Mexico Alamo Pentagon
"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"All right, here's general Stanley mcchrystal. The books that I've read from you are really well researched. It's not just say, hey, as general and all this stuff. There's a lot of stories. There's a lot of history, especially in leaders, myth and. The newest one in it's it's an intimidating, read, man, I got this book general, and I thought this is like a twenty three hour long audio book. It's a big Thome. There's a lot in there. That's exactly right. And it was intention that I mean, we don't want it to be intimidating, but we wanted to have real content. What we didn't want to write was one of these superficial things. Here's what we think we actually wanted to do the the research in NFL for way. I thought it was interesting. It's loaded with a historical examples of leaders. I thought it was really an unusual choice or maybe interesting for some other way that you choose general Lee is one of the first examples talk about picking a controversial figure and then just throwing that out in front. We wanted to do a Plutarch based study of leadership, go back to sort of first principles because we realized we really didn't think we understood leadership. Like we thought we did. And so as we try to assemble a number of people that we would profile. We figured out who should we do. And at one point we said, well, we should have John res- and we determined that powerbrokers would be one. Geniuses would be one in heroes would be one and in heroes I had grown up with Robert E Lee is one of my heroes. I'd go into Washington Lee high school. I'd grown up near his boyhood home. I gone to the same college as he had West Point. I'd followed a career in the military is he had many parallels, except obviously he did better all those things and I did. So he'd been a hero mine and I realized that I could write a book about leadership. But if I didn't include Robert E Lee because he has become controversial, it'd be a cop out because I essentially be denying the fact that for much of my life, I wanted to be as much like Robert is as I could. In fact. For forty years. I had a picture in my office or different places in our military quarters that my wife had given me and it was a painting or it was meant to look like a penny. It was actually an inexpensive print that they'd painted over with clear acrylic to look like a painting. And I was very proud of this framed painting in my quarters for many years because it represented to anybody who saw and reminded me that this is what leadership should look like. And this is why ought to try to be like. And so for forty years, I, I really followed that. And then as we got in the last couple of years and you saw Charlottesville and and people starting to to raise questions, my wife told me, she says, you should get rid of that picture. And I said, but I can't because you gave it to me. I love it. Robbery lease a hero mine, and she says, I don't think it means to other people what it does to you. I think it symbolizes to other. People something that you don't believe him and that is things about white supremacy and whatnot. I said, no, no, he's just general. She said, no, he's a symbol, and you got to be careful about what unintentional message you said. So we went back and forth for about a month, and then I did more study and I thought long and hard about it and I came to conclusion. She was absolutely right. And so at age sixty three. After having this picture for forty years, I took it off my wall and threw it in the trash. Oh, wow. It didn't even make it to the garage straight to the trash straight to the trash. And at the same time we were starting to write this book and I said, but still I can't duck studying and writing about robbery these. So as we studied it more gave me the chance to to really think more deeply about what Robert represents. Because at West Point, he represented leadership in excellence and loyalty..

Robert E Lee robbery Stanley mcchrystal West Point Washington Lee high school Thome NFL John res Charlottesville powerbrokers forty years twenty three hour
"mcchrystal" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"I attribute my success and selection to might time in the ranger regiment specifically when at the time attendant colonel his name he was a j commander mcchrystal mcchrystal yes i can't believe sorry retired general mcchrystal for forgetting your name kipah joan but he was a huge influence in the ranger battalion at the time and specifically for myself and i was in in the ranger regiment and 'cause he instituted a battalion wide policies that each ranger rifle squad had to road march a minimum i think it was like twelve or fourteen miles a week so and then so as a squad leader your i said battalion commander says we're gonna walk twelve miles southbound fifteen next week you know how it is of course the standard so because of that you know we were just hard hard rangers back then and and it made me mentally tough physically strong just like the rangers are today i'm curious about you know from someone who has a inside perspective on mcchrystal 'cause from what you read in from interviews he's done like he is such a strict and and really just out there regimen when it comes to sleeping eating training it's just like the amount of hours he sleeps tonight i think he said something like four or five hours right it's like it's really outright yeah i was i was super fortunate to to have i think the closer relationship with at the time to tend to colonel mcchrystal and then later of needs to chase up commander when he was a battalion commander i was the seventy seventy fifth ranger regiment and seal the year so i think because of that he knew of being the most squad leaders in the ranger italian aren't known by the battalion commander would i think that's what helped him remember me and i can remember being deployed in iraq and linking up within he wanted to talk with me and he's citgo buddha my hooch lb there in about fifteen twenty minutes i have this meaning and he just wanted to talk about some stuff overseas in iraq and so i go to hooch and looks like mine and here he is the jason commander if you sleeping on a makeshift cut very minimal support he's got a little lamb and some books next to his bed nothing fancy i was like wow this is a man of character he's living just like that it's like i am which is somewhat unheard of you know in the military ranks and he's three star general that time i was like okay this guy is the same person that i do in the ranger regiment and he was telling commander because we loved everybody loved him and even as day stop commander buddy left them i guess that's just a great mind stay hungry mentality of that you're you're gonna keep living that way and not you know get to pampered to you know to break out of your old ways in old habits yeah i think that he's always been that way and i think part of him was just take if he's asking his to do something he wants to do it just like them or to the best of his ability and it really hit home when i when i was talking to him and we were just sitting there by his bunk and nothing special i was like wow this guy and his questions to me were inciteful and and he was just trying to get my perspective which meant a lot to me at the time i'm just lonely i think i was in the seven or eight at the time but he's still remembered me because he was i was one of the soldiers and he was telling commander in second battalion truly what a great man i have nothing negative in all positive things to say about general mcchrystal rob what then took you on your path to the unit yet you start it you know you're a ranger you're quite accomplished.

ranger regiment fifteen twenty minutes seventy seventy fifth five hours
"mcchrystal" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Under under general mcchrystal who would really the the the general who who took jaesong and and the most to make it what it is today between two thousand three two thousand eight when he would become onto and heath former commander all the certainly v granger recommend um he he gave the rangers afghanistan as their own sort of area of operations where the ranger a regiment commander would be the guy who basically ran that that task force in uh uh a in afghanistan meanwhile seal team six runs slipped off both in the horn of africa in yemen and and delta run slipped off for sits uh a against iraq and a big biden against the islamic state in in iraq and syria armed said the the ranges that would require them to be doing almost three three missions night on but that's not that's that's that's not beyond the realm of off the bellizzi across a concrete asahi's all uh uh class and strong in a row one of the things again that that that that look mcchrystal uh was one of the ways that mcchrystal was able to transform chase out was to get it out of this mentality of doing very act that saudi me on and and really beneath so that so that uh each strike force strike force can be arranged a platoon of thirty or forty sold cruise or or a delta force oh of about two you know maybe fifteen and each one of those can now eight.

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"mcchrystal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mcchrystal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Travel in europe millions of people stuck on the ground including general stanley mcchrystal the top military commander in afghanistan and his staff they were in paris and so it was journalist michael hastings he was reading a profile of mcchrystal and is michael hastings told npr back then he was only supposed to be there in paris with the general for two days but then you or they don't i noted i ended up strategy to them uh and instead of going back to wash aimed to require i followed emperor lion and then later so a few days turned into a month with general crystal and his staff and during that month the group which was already tight net probably got a little too comfortable around hastings who later published at profile in rolling stone mcchrystal was in afghanistan at the time he had emerged suddenly in the middle of the night yeah we knew the guy was working on the story but it was complete surprised when it came out the tone of it i thought it would be completely positive but it wasn't um it basically said that we were pushing the war in a direction that that maybe was right and then it the alleged uh discussions of my team about different people in us leadership positions in a way that you those kinds of combat should not be met i we were on our well you're on the kripo prepared a speech it gave that you're going to given pair your outlook for corporate i did a question about the vice president abided how fun at that moment dude let you go about vice president biden and on the record and that was really the least of it pasting article published with the headline the runaway general included a lotta quotes we can't repeat on the radio it was an embarrassment to the white house in a made it look like the president wasn't.

stanley mcchrystal commander paris michael hastings vice president biden europe afghanistan npr two days