18 Burst results for "Mayor Mich Landrieu"

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

04:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"Let me read you a little bit from a column from political. I hate to do this, but I need to do this verbatim. I want you to hear what they have to say. I'm telling you, the Democrat party has moved on from the Biden administration. Biden may not realize it yet, but it's true. Cat tip political, all right? A liberal rag. Let's begin with two matters of historical fact they are indisputable. Now I want you to understand they're going to bash Ronald Reagan. So just rape through this and we'll get through this. All right, let's begin with two matters of historical fact they are undisputable or indisputable. Uncontroversial and they define the dilemma for Democrats in the next presidential election with stark clarity. First, when Ronald Reagan ran for president in 1980, his age was a serious challenge if he won, he'd be the oldest elector president ever, 8 years later when he left The White House after a second term would clear signs of declining abilities. He was younger than Joe Biden was the day he began his presidency. Now, to be fair, I don't know how much of this is true or perceived, I know that was a narrative then, but I wasn't involved in politics, and obviously I was just a young buck fresh out of the mother's the mother's womb, not to and just a few previous years before. So I just don't know much about this. So I'm going based upon this as a columnist, again, from political, a left wing rag. Second, since Alan Barkley failed to secure the 1952 democratic presidential nomination, every democratic vice president has eventually wound up as a party's presidential nominee. Not none of them ever lost a fight for the nomination once they declared that we'll never know if Hubert Humphrey would have defeated Robert Kennedy in 1968 as Democrats began to think about 2024. If only the cover their eyes from the likely train wreck that the midterms promise their thoughts can be summarized simply, will he, and I'm quoting, should he, and if not him, who, speaking of Joe Biden, obviously, in a recent New York magazine piece, Gabrielle D bin daddy, gathered up the hopes a few fears, many, and wide ranging speculation about a potential Biden reelection campaign. It provided not just yeas and a's to the will he should he questions, but a host of possible replacement candidates that the great majority of Americans have never heard of. Governor Roy Cooper of North Carolina, governor Jared polis of Colorado, governor Phil Murphy, Murphy of New Jersey, fresh from a near defeat at the hands of a dyspeptic electorate from other corners come calls for Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer, yeah, right, or former New Orleans mayor Mitch landrieu or commerce secretary Gina raimondo, do you understand what I'm reading? The Democrat party is ready to move on from Biden. This is what they're talking about. They're not talking about, hey, leading up to 2024. We stand a good shot leading up to the midterm elections. We stand a good shot of keeping the house in controlling the Senate. They're looking at 2024. They already moved past 2022 'cause they're already expecting to get their butts kicked. And so now the political is writing columns about, okay, what do we do? Where do we go? Who do we pick in 2024? The column goes on to say all of these suggestions are based on a premise that vice president Kamala Harris is to damage politically to be the party's presidential nominee. Deep benedetti, notes that her approval rating is 15 points below where Biden stood at this stage in Barack Obama's first term and 11 below Mike Pence under Trump. And that she has been burdened by the consistently negative tone of her coverage. Now, we know that's a lie, which she's been burdened by the fact that she stinks. The lady can't communicate. She doesn't even understand what she's talking about. And she doesn't understand policy. And everyone knows it and everyone sees it, and she's not likeable. She's not likeable. It's not working for them..

Biden administration Biden Ronald Reagan Democrat party Joe Biden Alan Barkley Gabrielle D bin daddy Governor Roy Cooper Phil Murphy Hubert Humphrey Gretchen Whitmer Robert Kennedy Gina raimondo White House New York magazine Jared polis Mitch landrieu Murphy North Carolina Deep benedetti
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:35 min | 2 months ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KOMO

"Celebration of the south lawn Friday for soon to be Supreme Court Justice katangi Brown Jackson here to discuss that and more former New Jersey governor Chris Christie former DNC chair Donna brazile ABC News political director Rick Klein and Politico White House correspondent Laura ferrin Lopez So Donna you were there in the rose garden You were also there when the vote was taken on the Senate to confirm her How big a moment It was a huge moment And you know she said but we made it We made it We all have made it That was the moment I think that many of us just started to lose it And then she finished up by saying she quoted the American poet Maya Angelou when she said I am the hope and the dream of the slave Everyone was crying I was sitting next to my former mayor Mitch landrieu from Louisiana We were holding hands And here Mitch who took the statues down in Louisiana Confederate statues And we're holding hands This is a moment a moment to rejoice Now look there's work to be done It's the Supreme Court of the United States But the fact that we finally have made this moment in American history It's a moment of celebration And yesterday John I was in the streets of Washington D.C. there paint a merle right next to a wonderful restaurant called you'll love this one Chicken and whisky That sounds like a good play And I was there Well you were invited You just didn't show up But this is why this model was so important for the country And especially little girls and little boys all over this world And it's a marker for women now in the Supreme Court high water mark for women on the court But let me ask you we heard governor Christie we heard from Mitch McConnell this week not willing to commit that there would even be hearings for if there's a vacancy next year if the Republicans retake the Senate He won't even commit to holding hearings We are in a new era really starting back with Robert bork and moving forward since then Of non cooperation between the parties on these appointments They have become ideological litmus tests for both parties And each party has ramped up the contentiousness of these things And so I said on the show 6 weeks ago that she would probably get two or three Republican votes in the second She got three And so this is the new era that we're in John And if Mitch McConnell is nothing he is certainly someone who plays his cards very close to his vest He doesn't know what is going to happen in the next two years and he's not a guy who's going to make any commitments on anything And by the way if the shoe were on the other foot Chuck Schumer I suspect would be doing the same thing And so that's the era we're in whether we like it or not And we have to be able to find our way forward But despite all that this was a bipartisan confirmation And so let's keep our eye on the ball in terms of what actually happened versus now moving to the next thing that we're all worried about This new justice was justice Jackson was confirmed in a bipartisan way as she will now be on the Supreme Court come October You're listening to northwest news radio You're a stock chart dot com money update on northwest news radio From ABC News Wall Street weekend trading will resume after a mixed end last week The Dow ended higher but the broad S&P 500 and the NASDAQ indexes closed lower Among the reports that could affect stock prices are a look at inflation with the monthly consumer price index Tuesday and the producer price index Wednesday Thursday we get a look at retail sales and the Labor Department's weekly report on initial claims for unemployment insurance Then reports on manufacturing and industrial production Friday COVID continues to squeeze the economy around the world particularly in China Shanghai residents face severe restrictions on movement and activities because of a surge in infections with economic effects rippling around the world ACM research a supplier of equipment for the semiconductor industry that has operations in Shanghai says the restrictions will cause a significant hit to its revenue Its stock fell 6% Friday a jump in COVID cases is also behind airline disruptions in Europe Chuck sievertson ABC.

Supreme Court Justice katangi Brown Jackson Rick Klein Politico White House Laura ferrin Lopez Washington D.C. Donna brazile Louisiana governor Christie Mitch McConnell Mitch landrieu Chris Christie Senate Maya Angelou DNC ABC News Donna Mitch Robert bork New Jersey
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"Here's what you need to know in politics for Tuesday, November 16th. So my message to the American people is this America's moving again and your life is going to change for the better. That was president Joe Biden yesterday at The White House when he signed the bipartisan infrastructure Bill into law. Now the president hits the road to sell what's in the bill to the country. President Biden and his administration are fanning out across the country with an enormous sales job ahead of them. That bipartisan infrastructure Bill, well, it's no longer a bill. It's law of the land, $1.2 trillion in projects and goodies for communities across the nation. And remember, 19 Republicans in the Senate joined Democrats to vote for this bill, 13 Republicans in the house joined Democrats to vote for this bill. That is a more bipartisan vote than we see on almost anything these days in Washington, D.C.. That doesn't mean that it's going to be easy for the administration to convince Americans that all this money coming into their communities for important projects, roads, bridges, tunnels, expanding broadband, that that is going to make an immediate difference in the economy they feel day to day, given all the inflationary pressure that we've been talking about in the economy. That's going to be the trick for team Biden, and that begins today, with Joe Biden up in New Hampshire, a critical battleground state always, and that is where he's going to begin this sales job. He's going to be at the New Hampshire one 75 bridge, which has been identified as structurally deficient. The White House says that the New Hampshire Department of Transportation will use funds from this infrastructure law to fully rehabilitate the historic structure and it'll cost about $4.5 million to do so. Here was the president. And despite the cynics, Democrats and Republicans, we can work together. We can deliver real results. We can deliver real people results that they're going to affect their lives. And that we're taking a monumental step forward in building back better for this nation. Later this week, the president heads to Michigan. We're going to see vice president Harris out in the country on Friday, every cabinet secretary you could think of who has something to do with one of these projects, whether it is transportation secretary Pete Buttigieg, housing and urban development secretary Marcia fudge or interior secretary Deb Holland, all of these folks and more are going to be literally all over the country, holding events to call attention to what this bill will mean for each and every one of the communities that they go visit. But as always, with large government spending from Washington, D.C., you have to keep an eye on how that money actually gets spent because it's one thing to authorize it, appropriate it. It's another thing to actually get that money into the hands of the companies and organizations that are going to be on the front lines of implementation and doing so without waste fraud and abuse that could be a whole new kind of political headache for the Biden administration. That's why President Biden has tapped former New Orleans mayor Mitch landrieu to be basically the infrastructure czar if you will of this administration. He is going to run the implementation of this bill. You may recall Joe Biden himself ran the American recovery act back in the Obama administration, the so called stimulus bill from 2009, he was in charge of implementation and making sure that that money got spent wisely. And now that is exactly what Michelangelo is going to do for the Biden team. One democratic yesterday's bill signing told CNN's Jeff zeleny, this is a big opportunity if it is done correctly for the Biden White House to prove to the country that you can govern competently again in America. And it's not just the president who's eager to get out there and sell it. Democratic members of the House and Senate are very much chomping at the bit to inform their constituents that really important investments are coming their way. Here was Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer, courtesy of NYC media. So we want New Yorkers to know how important this legislation is. It's going to help our airports. It's going to help our eastern eternals. It's going to help redo Penn station. It's a huge amount of money. No one living has seen the amount of money invested in infrastructure that we just saw signed in the law yesterday. And in a place like Michigan, whether you're a Democrat or Republican, it's a huge deal. I was back home this past weekend. There were a lot of high 5s in the diner because people were just excited that they're going to in short order,.

President Biden Washington, D.C. Joe Biden New Hampshire Department of Tr New Hampshire vice president Harris Biden Pete Buttigieg Marcia fudge Deb Holland White House Senate Biden administration mayor Mitch landrieu America Obama administration Jeff zeleny
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:35 min | 8 months ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure Bill Monday at The White House and he has asked former New Orleans mayor Mitch landrieu to spearhead the execution of the bill The White House says Landry will serve as senior adviser and infrastructure coordinator Appearing on CBS's face the nation Sunday Colorado governor Jared polis defended his decision not to impose statewide COVID-19 mandates but the Democrat encouraged Colorado residents to get vaccinated If you're unvaccinated this is the most dangerous time for you no matter where you live in the country or in the world because of the highly contagious nature of the delta variant Southwest Airlines passenger is facing an aggravated assault charge after sending an employee to the hospital Saturday Dallas police report the passenger boarded the flight headed for New York's Laguardia airport and argued with a flight attendant who told her to leave the plain the passenger then walked to the front of the plain and verbally fought with another airline employee before she punched that person in the head the employ has since been released from the hospital I'm Chris courage and I'm Brian Curtis in Los Angeles Let's get you caught up on this hour's top business stories and the markets China's economy performed better than expected in October Retail sales be estimates despite COVID outbreaks and a number of lockdowns Industrial output rose 3.5% and that was better than the estimate of 3% Meantime China's Central Bank rolled over all the policy loans falling due this month that offers some support for the economy The PBOC injected ¥1 trillion or $157 billion through its medium term lending facility and as a result a reduction in China's reserve requirement ratio looks increasingly unlikely Japan's economy shrank more than expected last quarter GDP contracted and annualized 3% in the three months through September from the previous quarter Economists had been forecasting a 0.7% decline In U.S. news treasury secretary Janet Yellen said that controlling the COVID-19 virus in the United States is the key to easing inflation And Morgan Stanley economists are sticking with their prediction that the fed will not raise interest rates until 2023 All right let's get a check of the markets in the Asia Pacific The hanxing index is trading down about a tenth of 1% In China the CSI 300 is down about three tenths of 1% In Taiwan the tax is up 7 tenths of a percent and the nikkei has moved up a 141 points That's a gain of about a half of 1%.

COVID delta variant Southwest Airlin Mitch landrieu Jared polis Colorado Brian Curtis Landry Laguardia airport China White House New Orleans CBS Dallas PBOC
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:04 min | 8 months ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Former New Orleans mayor Mitch landrieu to spearhead the execution of his $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure Bill In Sunday's announcement The White House says landru will oversee the most significant and comprehensive investments in American infrastructure in generations as a senior adviser and infrastructure coordinator Biden is set to sign the infrastructure Bill Monday at The White House The death toll of the astral world crowd surge is now ten 9 year old erz about died Sunday after he had been on life support since last weekend with major organ damage There's attended the festival on top of his father's shoulders but when the surge began his father passed out and the young boy was trampled in the ensuing chaos Closing arguments are set to begin Monday in the Kyle rittenhouse trial witness calling ended Thursday after 31 people were called to the stand over 8 days of the trial written house is accused of shooting and killing two men during civil unrest in Kenosha Wisconsin in the summer of 2020 The trial for three men accused of murdering ahmaud Arbery in Georgia will resume Monday Arbery is the 25 year old unarmed black man who was shot to death while on a jog last year the trial is entering its second week but it comes after some controversial comments were made late last week by the defense council the lawyer had objected to the reverend Al sharpton sitting in the courtroom to support the victim's family adding we don't want any more black pastors coming in here He has since apologized for the remark It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas at least in New York City in keeping with tradition the Rockefeller center Christmas tree arrived in midtown Manhattan yesterday NBC's John fryer has more This tree traveled about a 140 miles coming all the way from Maryland The first rocks in her treat had come from that state The 79 foot Norway spruce was donated by a family in a small town of elkton Maryland the tree will be trimmed with more than 50,000 LED lights the lighting ceremony is set for Wednesday December 1st I'm Chris courage Medicare premiums are going up come the first of the new year Brad Siegel reports The.

mayor Mitch landrieu landru Kyle rittenhouse ahmaud Arbery Biden New Orleans White House Kenosha defense council John fryer Al sharpton Wisconsin Georgia Rockefeller center Maryland New York City
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:22 min | 11 months ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Dr kennedy welcome to the podcast. Oh it's always great. John beyond so the last time you were here you were on with your co editor of four hundred souls community. History of african america sixteen nineteen to twenty nineteen. But i've asked you here so low today because your name was invoked in my interview with a former new orleans mayor mitch landrieu and i thought you know what is a good opportunity to to have dr kennedy on. Here's what mitch said. Dr abram mix kennedy has said something that i had not really thought much about he basically has posited the theory that we've always moved side-by-side good with evil and one overtakes the other from time to time and both are always present. And then mitch goes on to say. And i don't know whether i don't know that he's more right than wrong. But it sure feels like right. Now the forces of what. I would describe as white nationalism white supremacy this notion that somehow whiteness is essential to the future of america for some people who consider themselves to be. Patriots is a very dangerous idea. And this this idea of good and simultaneously basically coexisting in one overtaking. The other i would love for you to since he's attributing it to you talk more about that. Where does that come from. And how does it manifest itself good and evil. Well i mean. I have written about the sort of racial history of this country a history of of of racial progress in an even a history of racists progress. I don't i wouldn't necessarily call it the clash between good and evil because i think it's it's important trustee too complicated even further in that you know you you have people who express sort of or maybe a part of both off forces at different times or or you have people have good intentions but you know it. Has you know a difficult outcome in. And still i don't know if we can essentially call that good or

jonathan kaye Mitch landry dr abram dr candy new orleans boston Dr candy
Why Racist Policies  Not People  Are the Problem

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:22 min | 11 months ago

Why Racist Policies Not People Are the Problem

"Dr kennedy welcome to the podcast. Oh it's always great. John beyond so the last time you were here you were on with your co editor of four hundred souls community. History of african america sixteen nineteen to twenty nineteen. But i've asked you here so low today because your name was invoked in my interview with a former new orleans mayor mitch landrieu and i thought you know what is a good opportunity to to have dr kennedy on. Here's what mitch said. Dr abram mix kennedy has said something that i had not really thought much about he basically has posited the theory that we've always moved side-by-side good with evil and one overtakes the other from time to time and both are always present. And then mitch goes on to say. And i don't know whether i don't know that he's more right than wrong. But it sure feels like right. Now the forces of what. I would describe as white nationalism white supremacy this notion that somehow whiteness is essential to the future of america for some people who consider themselves to be. Patriots is a very dangerous idea. And this this idea of good and simultaneously basically coexisting in one overtaking. The other i would love for you to since he's attributing it to you talk more about that. Where does that come from. And how does it manifest itself good and evil. Well i mean. I have written about the sort of racial history of this country a history of of of racial progress in an even a history of racists progress. I don't i wouldn't necessarily call it the clash between good and evil because i think it's it's important trustee too complicated even further in that you know you you have people who express sort of or maybe a part of both off forces at different times or or you have people have good intentions but you know it. Has you know a difficult outcome in. And still i don't know if we can essentially call that good or

Dr Kennedy Dr Abram Mix Kennedy Mitch Mitch Landrieu America New Orleans John Patriots
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"From W A. B E in Atlanta. I'm Kim. Droves in for lowest rights is and this is city lights in 2000 and 15, comedian director and daily show field. Correspondent, C. J Hunt was filming the New Orleans City Council vote to remove for Confederate monuments. But when that removal is halted by death threats, C J set out to understand why a losing army from 18 65. Still holds so much power in America. What results is neutral ground, an impeccably researched and moving documentary, least with wit and precise comedic timing. A former teacher himself, Hunt hopes the film will one day be incorporated into American classrooms. Earlier this week, City lights host Slows, right says spoke with hunt over Zoom and she started their conversation by asking Hunt. His background is black and Filipino when he started thinking about his own black identity. I understood as a black person, you know, from age four on But I grew up in Massachusetts and New York, and it wasn't until I moved to New Orleans in 2000 and seven That, you know, right after college that I thought about the strangeness of Confederate monuments because I really hadn't been exposed to them before. You know, we have our own, you know, suddenly horrifying monuments to you know, Columbus and to end other colonizers in the north, but One of my first phone calls home to my dad. Upon moving to New Orleans was Oh my God, Dad, they have a they have a giant statue of Robert E. Lee and the streets are named after Jefferson Davis, and that was shocking and horrifying for its own reason in moving here. Let's talk about the title of that You are a documentary. What does the neutral ground describe? The neutral ground is the name New Orleanians have given to the grassy median between two streets. And whereas in other cities it might be where someone spins a sign for a Going out of business, bed Bath and beyond. In New Orleans. It's a place where the community gathers and parties. It's where people fill the neutral ground and meet up for Mardi Gras, and that's where they stand and watch parades. That's where they would be barbecuing. That's right. One parks their car when it's you know, in times of storm, so this is a community space. It's also where the Confederacy chose to build most of its monuments. So I think the film is asking the question. What does it mean that our communal space is literally occupied by folks who were in slavers and in New Orleans white militias who attacked the government to teach black people a lesson and the disconnect comes out so beautifully in the film because Here. New Orleans is the cradle of so much We love about American culture that As a result of black live music, cooking language and dance and yet, you know, surrounded by the names of streets and this retching ongoing controversy. About this statues in the film. Many of the protesters we see believe that removal of these Confederate monuments would be Rewriting the past that this was their history repeatedly. You bring out there, saying the simple war was fought over secession, not slavery. C. J. I'm curious about your reactions and how you responded to these comment. You know, I I think you're right. And I think New Orleans really highlights that dichotomy of being such a black city. I'm giving the world jazz and half of the food we like. You know, these are from black people. But we also have this giant concentration of monument giant monuments, 60 ft. Tall monuments to the Confederacy. And if you look across the country What is the common denominator for the cities where you see the highest concentration of Confederate monuments? New Orleans Richmond, Atlanta. These are black cities. And for folks who honor The Confederacy. It is maybe never occurred to them. What it means that they live in a city that is mostly black people because of slavery. And has its highest places of honor dedicated to those who tried to perpetuate slavery forever. It has never occurred to them. What it must feel like to be a black child going to a school named after a man who would have enslaved them to be looking up at these things every day, and I think that's just how part of Whiteness works that when you see your history reflected on pedestals everywhere, the notion of simply moving that across town moving that to, uh, cemetery. Moving it to a museum feels like destruction to you Feels like how is my history even intact if it's not literally on a pedestal, and I think that was What we saw. You know, in the wake of the Charleston massacre as take em down, Nola and activists were saying We've got to move these things as our white Mayor, Mitch Landrieu heard the call of activists and said Yes, I will use my power to move these things. People thought that moving them was destruction of their history. We are not terrorists. We do not destroy the past. We are not allowing this material. It was Muslims, Jacobins and Communists will bent on destroying memory rewriting the past. It should be clear to everyone north of south that it is not. That is not that it is not sensitivity. Where do we stop about this? Know all the way to Washington and take down every memorial there. Yes, This is our history, And I think that.

New Orleans Robert E. Lee Massachusetts C J Mardi Gras New York 60 ft C. J Hunt 2000 Washington Hunt Mitch Landrieu Atlanta Charleston massacre Jefferson Davis America 18 65 New Orleans City Council Kim 15
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What happened, in fact was every single person who came back used their own resources What few resources they could get from the government in the case of road home payments to rebuild their their own home and rebuild their own businesses, one at a time it was a grass roots recovery. Built by the people who love the city enough to engage in it. A mayor Lander. What's the main thing you want to see from the federal government now when it comes to disaster aid and Louisiana, especially since another hurricane has hit the coast. A couple things. First of all you can if you just take a minute to breathe, and in this moment, that's hard to breathe. And you take a historical view Our 40,000 ft. Do you notice that move? Not responded well to a pandemic, which we should have forcing and should have been prepared for that. We knew that there was going to be a hurricane season coming. We knew when the pandemic started. We are seeing a racial reckoning that has been a long time in coming. One of the things we have to do in this country is think about the design of the country and how things got where they are tendency is to say immediately after the storm. You know? How did everybody get their well? The idea of building back the way it was supposed to be if we would have gotten it right the first time. Forces you to do a very, very deep dive and to look at yourself and say, you know where, while mistakes Harry, who's been a great wonderful citizens advocate in New Orleans and Harry thank you for your work, basically said that from the New Orleans is a deception and the country's desire to have New Orleans provide economic growth and development because of the proximity to the river. Has had a philosophy of living, which is to keep the water out. Our entire sewage and drainage and water system is designed with big pumps to push the water out. The Dutch have taught us how maybe that's upside down. Maybe what you need to do is let the water in so massive system redesigned like that. Take a lot of time. A lot of money, a lot of courage. The same thing is true about how we grow. Are indigenous cultures. The New Orleans is in men so many ways, the soul of America and in order for everything to work well or when it can work well. Both the federal, state and local governments in partnership with community organizations and small businesses and individuals and churches have to all come together. And put their resource is in a focused and thoughtful way in a design that actually produces a good result. That's the 40,000 FT view. Basically, right now, the federal government has been after this idea that somehow Of poor cities like New Orleans, and then many office somehow take care of themselves when a massive storm like Laura hits is just insane. It's just not so And so I'm thinking what the federal government did in terms of getting re sources down here Post Katrina But they were late. It took too long. It wasn't enough on the category three levies, which is much better than they were before, should have been built to Captain. We call category five strength or better yet, a 500 year flood protection rather than rather than you know, 100 Year for protection, So I just think the federal government has the tools to be To do bigger and better things. If it could be rightly focused and rightly resource, you cannot leave communities on their own. You're going to see this with the wildfires in California. You're going to see if you saw it with Sandy and on the East Coast. You saw it with Maria. Some years ago. When you start in Houston, and these things are going to continue to happen. The final pieces with sea level rise of climate change on DH will subside in all of these areas will become more vulnerable, and we have to really be thoughtful. About how we're going to protect ourselves going forward and reality of it that easy to a question from Kokomo Kid who asks on Twitter shut the low part of New Orleans in some other cities be permanently depopulated your thoughts. I think that that's you know, that sounds so easy to do. But you know when, when you actually think about the reality of it, and that the human beings that are there and how many people there it gets to be almost near impossible. That is not to say that When you build back, you don't build back stronger and better. I think that if you came and saw some of the construction in New Orleans now, with people building higher and building stronger and haven't said that it is also true that New Orleans isn't even near To being the most vulnerable city in America. And that question doesn't get asked very much of other cities. So I think we have to be smart about what we do. I think they're divine has to be smart, but essentially, you can't go back just instructors and not build the soul of a community, which is investments and its people. And that's what the long term challenge is going to be not only for New Orleans but for the rest of the country. We're talking to former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and comedian and activist Harry Shearer about the recovery of New Orleans 15 years after Hurricane Katrina. Harry, You moved to New Orleans and you certainly have the means to relocate. But what keeps you in the city?.

New Orleans federal government Harry Shearer America Hurricane Katrina Louisiana Twitter Mitch Landrieu East Coast Maria Sandy Houston California Laura
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let's get back to our commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Earlier today, we were joined by former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu. He served as mayor from 2010 to 2018. He's also the author of In The Shadow of Statues, a White Southerner, confronts history and by actor and comedian Harry Shearer. Shearer is a longtime resident of New Orleans and creator of the big Uneasy A 2010 documentary on the fault of the Army Corps of Engineers during Hurricane Katrina. And a reminder that what we know about the impact of Hurricane Laura is changing fast. We'll get the latest on your NPR station and at NPR dot org's I started by asking me or land drew what His biggest mission was for New Orleans when he became mayor in 2010. Well, before I begin, let me just make sure everybody is focused on to the folks in Lake Charles County Shoes all of north Louisiana 15 years ago, I was standing in the Charles would read hit. Which hit about three weeks after Katrina. Laura is the biggest storm that we're seeing in this state. Since I think 18 60. The damage is going to be catastrophic. We're just in the beginning of it is a long haul from the governor and his team. Have folks out there right now doing search and rescue. So I thought appraisal with all those folks. I was lieutenant governor of the state when Katrina hit New Orleans had a hard time getting its feet underneath it for a couple of years. But when I took office We had already had Katrina Rita. Like Proust, off the national recession. We had just suffered the BP oil spill. The city was on the verge of bankruptcy and not a whole lot of rebuilding, actually gotten done, Miraculously, though, I mean, everybody in the city started pulling in the same direction. And we just started rebuilding the city. But Mr Harwood said before you know, the idea was not to put it back like it. Wasit was try to figure out what had been broken. Why it was broken. What was structurally along with it, and then trying to do a D died with very limited resources. Very limited time. Very limited patients in Hano structurally rebuild the city so that I could survive. A very long period of time. Many people may recall that the damage exceeded about $250 billion, but the level of reimbursement that we got from the federal government was substantially lower than actually trying to squeeze a lot you know, into into small bucket and we have we have had some really could successfully build schools rebuild health care clinics. We built three hospitals. He built the new airport. We built a lot of infrastructure, however. There are structural inequities in the financing system in the cultural system that we have. We have massive police reform that we have to work through. We had five consent decrees that we have to work through. It was a very, very, very challenging time, not the least of which was to try to rebuild the levee system. Which we rebuilt to a category three strength, which was, in my opinion, inadequate to what future climate change. Problems are going to bring us but we do have a strong weather system than we had before, Sandy said a little bit earlier. You know, people who forget about Katrina is that it was not a weather problem. Disaster As big as that storm was, it was a manmade engineering failure on DH. That is one of the things that we have to continue to concentrate on. As we go forward Harry, you created a documentary, the big uneasy about the Army Corps of Engineers responsibilities to the city of New Orleans. Do you think they've made the necessary changes to see something like this doesn't happen again. Um I don't think the basic view of the Army Corps and how it views its mission has changed. No, it's important to remember not one individual at the Army Corps of Engineers. I lost so much as a parking space for being involved in the near destruction of a major American and world Treasure City. They just went to Congress got $14 billion. And got told, do it better this time. I think that what they failed to learn, and I don't think they're equipped to learn is that there is another way to deal with all these problems than to engage in what they envision. A cz their mission. A war on water. When I came to New Orleans, there were all these structures. You never saw what they were. They were the walls of these Three outfall canals, the Army Corps decided to hide them from view. Normally in cities view of water is a good thing. It adds the property values, but there they were conducting a war and so that was their view of the situation early after the flooding. Ah, local architect in New Orleans began conducting something called the Dutch dialogues, bringing Dutch engineers and Dutch city planners. Tio help us learn the lessons they had already learned. That you can't win a war on water. You have to build a modern city to learn to live with water enjoy its features during the good times haven't be able to drain successfully and not flood up during the bad times. There's a little test project in the Gentilly neighborhood of New Orleans, which is trying to put into practice some of those Tenets of the Dutch the new Dutch way of dealing with water and we were watching that experiment. Um would that it had Taken root in more of the city than it already has. But the core followed its old practice of trying to conduct a war on water and building the new system. And their little problems with the new system as well. I want to say, though, that the thing that I found most moving about the recovery was the fact that it wasn't No. They were talked early on about big plans. The former mayor of mayor that preceded Mayor Landrieu was talking about building a whole new role of casinos in the middle of the city..

New Orleans Army Corps of Engineers Hurricane Katrina Harry Shearer Katrina Army Corps Mitch Landrieu Katrina Rita Hurricane Laura NPR Lake Charles County Shoes Louisiana federal government Laura Gentilly Mr Harwood Proust Um
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Katrina 15 years later and watch Laura today What lessons have we learned for future disasters? Later this hour will shine a light on how far the city of New Orleans has come with former Mayor Mitch Landrieu, an actor and longtime New Orleans resident Harry here, But first, let's welcome Andy Horowitz. He's an assistant professor of history at Tulane University and author of Katrina. A History 1915 to 2015. Andy. Welcome to one, eh? Thank you for having me and also with us is Sandy Rosenthal. She's the founder of levees dot or GE, and her new book is called Words Whispered in water. Why the levees broke in Hurricane Katrina. Sandy, thanks for being with us today. Thank you for inviting me. Well, Sandy New Orleans dodged two bullets this week. Hurricanes Marco and Laura both look like they make direct hits on the city. Is New Orleans prepared for a Category four hurricane right now. We are in much better shape now than we were 15 years ago by every measure, So the answer is, we're in better shape, you know, but you will not find a single engineering expert who feels That the system that we have in place now is enough to protect a city of this size people and property and infrastructure. But are we better off? Yes. What about the rest of the state? Are there Other parts of Louisiana that were hit that we're prepared. Well, keeping in mind that coastal Louisiana is very mushy and boggy and not a whole lot of people live on the coast as as they do in Mississippi in Florida. It's very marshy there, not a whole lot of people. But there's a lot of infrastructure that oil and gas infrastructure and they don't hold up very well in hurricanes, But as for people people have have learned to move farther away from the coast because we keep getting battered by hurricanes. Well in any.

Sandy Rosenthal New Orleans Andy Horowitz Sandy New Orleans Katrina Hurricane Katrina Sandy Laura Mitch Landrieu Louisiana assistant professor of history Tulane University Harry GE Mississippi Marco Florida
"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Can tweet us at one eight we're talking to Birmingham Alabama mayor Randall Woodfin black lives matter UK organizer Ali a house enough and former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu I'm Celeste Headlee more from our guests in from you in just a moment if you would like to bring your event service or business to the attention of our Monterey Salinas and Santa Cruz audience join the family of underwriters supporting the news and information on K. easy contact our director of underwriting at eight three one five eight two fifty two ninety support for K. easy you'll come from cost of Monterey county seeking community volunteers to advocate for children in foster care online training begins in July info session registration is available on the events calendar at casa moderate dot org support for NPR comes from this station and from Capital One with capital one's assistant you know which sends alerts about credit card accounts more at Capital One dot com slash you know Capital One what's in your wallet from Jan and Gerald catcher supporting the children's movement of Florida dedicated to helping all children enter school with the social emotional and intellectual skills needed to succeed more information is available at children's movement Florida dot org our conversation today is about the growing movement to rid the country of monuments that honor the confederacy and we want to put this on your radar as well as well early next week we'll revisit a hugely influential writer one whose work feels even more relevant now James Baldwin his writing has always been a fixture in our ongoing discourse about race in America but people are turning to his words once again to give shape and meaning and understanding to this moment and would love to know what impact his work has had on you leave us a voicemail eight five five two three six one eight one eight maybe send us your favorite quote from Baldwin but if you're new to Bob James Baldwin and wonder no more you can leave us a comment or question it's eight five five two three six one two one two our vox pop app is really easy to use and it's a great way to send us an audio message so we can hear.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Station and from the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is at mac found dot org from the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide to address inequality in all its forms learn more at Ford foundation dot org I am from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station we'll get back to our conversation in just a moment but we'd love your help with an important issue will cover on Monday finding child care during a pandemic is more or less impossible and it's making things even harder for working parents everywhere so if you are a parent would love to hear from you about how you're going to solve the child care problem how much help are you getting if any and what tools it taking on you and your family eight five five two three six one a one a tell us how do you juggle a full or part time job working from home and having the kids around tell us your story eight five five two three six one eight one eight or you can send us an audio file with our app it's one eight vox pop and we will share some of your stories on Monday many of you have strong opinions about what is happening with Confederate monuments Rebecca emails who do we want to honor who deserves to be celebrated remembered honored revered put up statues to those people in our public places instead and we're going to return to this conversation about Confederate monuments but also memorials to slavers and colonizers in the U. K. this is part of our one A. across America partnership with public radio stations around the country including WBHM in Birmingham Alabama we are talking to Birmingham mayor Randall Woodfin also black lives matter U. K. organizer Ali asana and former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu and we've asked some of you to weigh in on this conversation here's what you had to say my name is Karen from Tampa Florida I'm from New York originally I live in boy Oct North Carolina Ernie from Lansing Michigan retires stretcher Marshall from Fort Bragg North Carolina twenty seven years every monument.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think when you have something like that yeah it doesn't matter dispatch you all along anything that is tangible on the ground any other city in America it's gonna be a rallying cry around that changes both paying to get rid of it because it represents question it represents systemic racism it represents what's wrong with American accent or and I think even here in Birmingham with protesters a simpler wailing around the statue literally attempting to take it down and pulling with a fifteen hundred truck I knew I had to step in not only to prevent people from being hurt but I'd rather have a civil fine can have more civil unrest in our city I wonder what you make of the argument between legal and illegal Brandon wrote on Facebook those individuals responsible for destruction of the statue should be charged with a crime don't ignore the opinions of a majority who are against taking them down just because the few are loud and childishly demanding that they get their way do you think the statues should come down only through official channels I think statues to come down to your I think where we are as a as a country we need to acknowledge something on the net and definitely here Birmingham I share this now shared again Birmingham was not even a city during the civil war Birmingham was founded in nineteen seventy one salon revisionist history here too but I think people need to remember a couple things one in celebration of this form of the statute is is unamerican because those who serve sporting fighting on a certain size it was treason nothing twenty twenty we can't ignore most things particularly in public places that are are meant to be for everyday people in public parks or even see like Birmingham where seventy four percent of people in black before collapsing in America having the statute in a public square that is commemorating regulating black people to properly insulate resistance is wrong and it needed to be taken down Mitch we have just one minute did you want to respond to what the your fellow mayor gist said well I love I love him and I think he's a great leader for America and I'm proud of what he did I think that he stood up when he's speaking eloquently to in his description of the killing of George Ford and its relationship institutional racism and the connection to the monument is exactly correct these are all the same point in history and we have to route it was out if America ever is going to live up to our aspiration is to our promise that we are all created equal and that out of many that we are once I couldn't be more proud of him and I'm looking for what he did thank you for your courage M. tweeted monuments from the cultural ethos we can't just fix laws and policies culture also has to shift art is a huge part of that it matters we're talking to Birmingham Alabama mayor Randall Woodfin black lives matter U. K. organizer Ali asana and former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu I'm Celeste Headlee more from our guests in from you in just a moment Hey you calling from Charleston South Carolina I just wish we would do what New Orleans has done it sounds really progressive in the way things should be now thank you my name is Marko calling from Colorado I'd like to take issue with a couple of things that are done said you know I I lived in Birmingham Alabama my family moved here when I was six in nineteen sixty by the time I was eight years old I knew that things were drastically wrong in Alabama the racism there was just incredible and it was destructive it didn't really help and I know the governor or mayor Landrieu guesses names he keeps saying you know that's not who we are but I think that he understands too that that's exactly who we are we're a country with a long history of racism and slavery and we need to change that I don't think that's saying this isn't who we are hello so I think that we need to understand we need to change things and we need to become you know our ideals in.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KPCC

"I think statues to come down I think where we are as a as a country we need to acknowledge something has definitely here in Birmingham I share this now shared again Birmingham was not even a CD during the civil war for me it was founded in nineteen seventy one she slowly revisionist history here too but I think people need to remember a couple things one in celebration of this form of the statute is is unamerican because those who so prompt forty nine with fighting on a certain side it was treason nothing twenty twenty we can't acknowledge things particularly in public places that are are meant to be for everyday people in public parks or even a city like Birmingham where seventy four percent of people in black before collapsing in America having the statute in a public square that is commemorating regulating black people to properly insulate resistance it is wrong and it needed to be taken down Mitch we have just one minute did you want to respond to what the your fellow mayor gist said well I love I love him and I think he's a great leader for America and I'm proud of what he did I think that he stood up with the speaking eloquently to in his description of the killing of George Floyd and its relationship the institutional racism and the connection to the monument is exactly correct these are all screwed at the same point in history and we have to route it was out if America ever is going to live up to our aspiration is to our promise that we are all created equal and that out of many that we are once I couldn't be more proud of him and I'm looking for what he did thank you for your courage M. tweeted monuments from the cultural ethos we can't just fix laws and policies culture also has to shift art is a huge part of that it matters we're talking to Birmingham Alabama mayor Randall Woodfin black lives matter U. K. organizer Ali asana and former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu I'm Celeste Headlee more from our guests in from you in just a moment Hey you calling from Charleston South Carolina I just wish we would do what New Orleans has done it sounds really progressive in the way things should be now thank you my name is Marko calling from Colorado I'd like to take issue with a couple of things have been said you know I I lived in Birmingham Alabama my family moved here when I was six in nineteen sixty by the time I was eight years old I knew that things were drastically wrong in Alabama the racism there was just incredible and it was destructive it didn't really help and I know the governor or mayor Landrieu guesses names he keeps saying you know that's not who we are but I think he understands too that that's exactly who we are we're a country with a long history of racism and slavery and we need to change that I don't think that's saying this isn't who we are helps I think that we need to understand we need to change things and we need to become you know our ideals in the country on the next fresh air we talk with Pete Davidson the youngest cast member of Saturday Night Live he stars in the new movie the king of Staten Island which draws on his life as the son of a firefighter killed on nine eleven we'll also talk with Judd Apatow who directed the film will be available on demand Friday join us now on weeknights at eight on eighty nine point three KPCC support from listeners.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To figure out you know where where they're gonna go economically or politically are or how are how that's going to develop all the time well and if you just look at that I'll give an example the Cuban community you have to break that down by age because you've got younger Cubans who view things much differently than older Cuban so it you can't even make the Cuban population a monolith when it comes to voting I think that makes my point people with you know the folks from Porta Rico that have come on to the mainland making different from the people that have come from Cuba the older folks issues after Cuba have a different opinion than the younger folks do you know the folks from Venezuela yep it's all different and and and so what I'm saying to you is that you can expect that there will be some level of disagreement a conflict in you cannot judge people by the color of their skin you have to go talk yeah and we got to ask them what they think which is what we spent you know I did something really rare for me I spent a lot of much listening to people I came away very hopeful I do think that as a country we have shied away from learning how to speak about this in a constructive way because we know it's painful and we don't like going through pain when I good at it I have a great faith in the country and the people of this country that we can get through it I feel very strongly that unless we get through it that we will be lesser of a nation Sir and if we can get through because I think the diversity I think the founding fathers got it right I think they knew it after a big design the laws that way they certainly even though the declaration of independence and the constitution when they said all men are created equal was born a contradiction because we have it's late human beings I think there's a sense of that aspiration idea of America was a great idea and that we should keep trying and no matter how hard it is I just don't think that we've gotten close to being right yeah although I am I do believe that we have made great progress and you mentioned that we have to have these conversations and I completely agree with you I I think the question is gonna be how do we have the conversations because I go back to something I mentioned before it for having them you know on Twitter or on Facebook I where you have people increasingly combat ever or just in their own silos those are constructive conversations I think we have to have personal you know in person conversations like what you did to really get to the root of the problem and and to start to come up with some solutions well I do have one I have one major take whether the absolute wrong place to do that is on the twenty first what what what we have come up with because it's a legitimate question so what now you have all the stuff we gonna do with it and how well we can have a conversation and that's with the poor person wants to do we want to help the country person to person neighborhood the neighborhood school school have this conversation shot we suggested that three ways that we can approach this the first is what we call narrative change and that does have an open mind about the real stories and the real history of the country so that everybody story can be told from a broad objective perspective and that really hasn't been not if you go esco bunch of American Christopher Columbus discovered America they say oh yeah he sure did yeah well you know what now that that's not true and so that's just one issue if you think about the way that with describe historical events you know sometimes a very one sided and they're not they're not con they're not in context and are not rich and you know one of the things we learned is that what brings people together sports entertainment and music so if you want to bring people together around telling stories you know the people that produced TV shows on Netflix on the priest and the right comedy show to the people to do public theater all the sports teams for example you think about the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in their ability to bring your community together yep are the same and who goes into the stadiums as a great opportunity for those NFL players in the NBA players on the Major League Baseball players to touch young kids and show them by example that its competence and it's excellent that matters that's one way to do it the second is to to find community leaders and public officials and teach them about all of this information that we haven't talked to them about how communities who have wanted to come together and had conversations community based neighborhood based ballpark to ballpark base you know coach talking to kids they had we played is Tina doesn't look like us we have to respect them no teacher that we decide to do it and then the third thing is is is really deep research demonstrated people that you know the systems that we have justice system all designed in a way that is not really helpful you know cash bail it we're poor people have to say if you have a long time and lose their job or if they go to jury duty they because they're on an hourly wage they can't get the job actual people can't get tried by you know jury that peers right you know things like that the thousands of different examples but you have to purposefully work on yes in U. communicants gotta be from the bottom up you cannot be I'm not available to them it doesn't have a role what yeah they they they they have proven to us you're logged a degenerate by law just because you pass a law doesn't force people to behave the fact you know in a way that the law says and if you don't change people's hearts and especially if they don't know which other and they can't see each other it's very hard for them to see the other person's humanity and I think I think some of this is just about getting back to basics by getting annoyed neighbor treating them the way you want to be treated and making sure that everybody's got but I got an opportunity so that kids can do better than they did we're not universally some that everybody wants we're talking a former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu here I'm PM Tampa Bay real quick will people be able to access this report and and if so where can they do that yeah they can go online to get divided by design dot org divided by design dot org okay why did by design dot org it will ports on at the polls on it all the collateral information and we would love to hear from people across the country about how they want to participate in their own communities and and and final item for you mayor just listening to you and and everything that you've been working on over the past year with this report in this initiative sounds like somebody who could jump into I don't know say a presidential race any flat out now I haven't yeah as a politician you never say never the world a crazy place right thank you to have a car so I think that bill does that all right well I tell you what I love to have you back on sometime soon to talk a little bit about the field and and some of the issues that the Democrats are are discussing during this race so we really appreciate the time fascinating fascinating information again former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu author of in the shadows of statues a white southerner confronts history and he's leading the team initiative called E. por bassoon which is releasing a report called divided by design findings from the American south mayor thank you so much for the time is a great conversation thank you so much.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"October twenty fourth I'm Ryan Gorman and with me on the hot line right now we have former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu author of in the shadows of statues a white southerner confronts history mayor how are you I'm great thank you how you have their bodies have a bank we're we're doing excellent here thank you so much for joining us this evening Sir you've been leading a team addition to call T. player may soon which is releasing report tomorrow call divided by design findings from the American south tell us about the initiative how it got started and and give us a preview of what you learned in the report well the organization is called easy deplorable and I was surprised to find out that not a whole lot of people were aware that it means out of many we are one and it actually has been around for a couple hundred years and the founding fathers use it as one of our nation's mottos well for one day designed the declaration of independence I and of course the constitution so the notion that we all created equal that out of many we are one we gather strength Iran diversity is in general the idea I think that many people in this country now that no matter how hard we was fired to make that true that we've kind of follows shock from time to time of course in the issue of race are intriguing other people differently from us in a different way we're really not measured up well well over a long period of time and so one of the things we wanted to do was to travel around the south now and we include champion that by the way and talk to people about what their thoughts were you know we're kind of a heightened sense of a racial negativity right now is not the first time we've been here what we want to talk to people with the thought of what their feelings were to see if we can find common ground because the top believe that diversity is a strength in the country and that race and I inability to talk about it I inability to work through it I'm tendency to just the yell at each other and you know go after that's each other we keeping us from finding a higher purpose and a high call for the country and you know I know she does it would be a whole lot better we figured it out rather than just continue to fight about it over the years and so what we did was we spent the last ten months traveling the thirteen states we have been the twenty eight different counties Louisiana would call us parishes and talking to people talk over eight hundred people did really in depth interviews we did a major Paul we did focus groups we did some very quiet community meetings nobody's heard about it because our intention was to do this in a way where people who came to these groups have that freedom tell us what was really on the heart really into mine and as a consequence we learned a lot of great stuff on and we hope to use that to find a way to bring this out together was there anything in particular that led you to want to do these interviews and gather this information yeah I've spent thirty years in public service our hours are I'm a lawyer by training but I served in the Louisiana legislature to sixteen years I was a lieutenant governor of the state we elected twice up to six years and then I was the mayor of the city of New Orleans that we rebuilt after Katrina I have the devastation and the entire Gulf coast and also you know through the B. P. oil spill that everybody you know in this area is a good chance up and I came to a conclusion that there was no issue that I have a talk about the didn't have a race somewhere really close the the million out front or be in underneath everything that we get I really have been not happy that the south is not made more progress that we still lag behind the rest of the country on every indication whether it's economic development you know the life expectancy the number of people that we have in prison low birth weight babies every indicator about quality of life with further behind and we should be and one of the reasons that it was never figure out a way how to work together and so I wanted to use not just take that experience but I wanted to take some time to go listen to people outside of the spotlight CNBC or MSNBC or fox right CNN and listen to what they have to say and hope that I can apply my teams expertise to that and see if we can work our way to a better place in the country and that is what really kind of was the impetus for this new initiative that of course as I said we call you for missing them we're talking a former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu here I'm PM Tampa Bay was there a big picture take away that you got from all of these conversations yes as I said you know we did individual interviews with the focus groups in the community meetings that we did a massive pole we came out with fifteen truths that we think.

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"mayor mitch landrieu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It feels like there's also a generation gap to close. Yeah. And that's just another form of ISM. Right. And you heard that. Again, not to be focusing on Elizabeth Warren here, but I've gotten from a lot of reporters. Well, how is she going to do with young people, and I actually looked it up and in her reelection a few weeks ago here in Massachusetts. She got seventy four percent of voters between eighteen and twenty nine. So again, I think we shouldn't pigeonhole people by gender race sexual orientation anything else. We should just look at everybody. Take their full measure look him in the eye and say who's the best person for this our country right now in the wake of everything we're grappling with and that's what voters are going to do. Speaking of Elizabeth Warren. I should note that the president tweeted in the last hour, what looks like kind of a mockup campaign image that looks like something. He did you see that me cut and paste from somewhere else? It's it's like, they took an image. That says Warren twenty twenty Lauren at the top and then twenty twenty under her name, but they added characters. So instead it says Warren, and it looks like a fraction Warren one two thousand twentieth. Just referring to kind of that whole DNA test thing that came up. So there's that let me get to a few more of your comments. Jeff emailed I voted for Obama twice but was big Chris Christie fan and ended up voting for Trump in two thousand sixteen thinking Christie would play a major role in the administration. I've been down on the Dem's the past few years as lost their centrist messaging and given up on so much of the middle. Of the country. But I'm very hopeful about the candidacies of Joe, Biden, former mayor's Julio Castro and Mitch Landrieu the for mayor of New Orleans and Ohio Representative Tim Ryan, I wonder about that any in terms of dealing with the center. David also emailed. Democrats need candidates who are electable far-left candidates won't take back midwestern states from Trump. What about that? We gotta remember that half of the electorate is independence where a quarter democratic quarter of publican and those voters in the middle are always the one who kind of move elections. Yeah. I mean, I think that's going to be one of the questions that Democrats are going to have to look over the next the next year and one of the pieces, I think is particularly interesting is I'm in Iowa, which is going to be one of the early states. They have there's a particular interest there because of those electoral dynamics from twenty eighteen where they desperately want to. To find candidates who are electable. And I think this notion of electability is much stronger than it was in in two thousand sixteen and there are two ways of thinking about it that I hear quite often. There's this concept that that Democrats, can you know, win the presidential election. You know, when they're up against Trump by going by what they call the northern route. So people will hear this a lot the northern route. And this refers to the upper midwest does upper midwestern states that people like your. Mentioned which is Michigan Wisconsin people who can appeal to that part of the country, and those are the Sherrod Brown's of the world. But the the alternate view is the southern route which refers to candidates that maybe are going to appeal a little bit more to voters of color people who can do well in states like Arizona, potentially Texas this big state that people have Democrats have long wished they could flat bright, Georgia and Florida being the big one. So it's almost like trying to pick between a candidate who in Florida are one who can win a place like Ohio. We're super low on time. I just want to note a few of the other candidates that were mentioned one listener mentioned Amy klobuchar, perhaps global sharp Sanders. Twenty twenty Adrian noted John Delaney, a congressman who is running for the candidate for president twenty twenty von noted Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles. And of course, we heard another listener mentioned mayor. Mitch Landrieu former mayor of New Orleans and mentioned that she would love it. If Adam Schiff decided to run if not in two thousand twenty then at some point in Christian says, I think new blood for the democratic campaign is critical cold to Joe Biden, Bernie and Hillary because we've seen them and they didn't succeed Marianne were super low on time. How do we start to shake this field out? When does the attrition began? Well, pretty soon. I mean, you've got more than thirty people thinking about it. You could have twenty plus people in it. But unless you start getting in pretty soon you're going to start to be behind. And so a lot of the people we've talked about today are still trying to put together staff and other operatives to get up and running in these states. So I think time is of the essence the sooner you get in the better. But it's going to be a great right through twenty twenty democratic strategist mary-anne Marsh Marianne, thanks for talking to us. Thanks so much and any linski national political reporter for.

Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Mitch Landrieu Trump Marsh Marianne New Orleans Ohio president Warren twenty Chris Christie Massachusetts Amy klobuchar Iowa Representative Tim Ryan Sherrod Brown Adam Schiff Obama