35 Burst results for "Mayoclinic"

Microsoft, Salesforce and Oracle back plan to develop a digital Covid vaccination passport

Wall Street Breakfast

01:13 min | 3 months ago

Microsoft, Salesforce and Oracle back plan to develop a digital Covid vaccination passport

"Tech and healthcare coalition that includes members like microsoft oracle salesforce and us nonprofit mayoclinic are working together to create a covid nineteen vaccination passport the vaccination credential initiative or vci would allow businesses airlines in countries to check if people have received a coronavirus vaccine to demonstrate their health status to safely return to travel work school and life while protecting their data privacy. How would it work. Vci's vision is to empower individuals to obtain an encrypted digital copy of their immunization credentials to store in a digital wallet over their choice. Those without smartphones could receive paper printed with qr codes containing w3c verifiable credentials. Some hurdles privacy and ethical concerns surround whether a person who can prove. They are sedated. Should have more freedoms than someone who is not. Another obstacle is getting health centers to participate even if they would want to need resources to incorporate these credentials to digital standard people in the us currently given paper cards when they get their covid. Nineteen vaccinations while patient. Information is logged in their state. Immunization

Tech And Healthcare Coalition Mayoclinic VCI Salesforce Oracle Microsoft United States
Health and tech leaders including Microsoft and Mayo Clinic are developing digital COVID-19 vaccination passports

Coronavirus 411

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Health and tech leaders including Microsoft and Mayo Clinic are developing digital COVID-19 vaccination passports

"Oracle and healthcare company. Cigna and mayoclinic are part of a coalition pushing for digital records of those who get vaccinated. It's called the vaccination credential initiative and the idea is to let people get encrypted digital copies of their immunization records stored in a digital wallet of their choice. No smartphone you'd get a paper. Qr

Cigna Oracle
Why do practically all of us need our wisdom teeth removed?

The How in the World Podcast

08:52 min | 4 months ago

Why do practically all of us need our wisdom teeth removed?

"How's it possible that we all need our wisdom teeth removed. Well let me give a little background. I okay go for wisdom teeth or the third and last set of our four molars and the biggest ones that you get in your mouth at least that most people get in their mouth somewhere between five and thirty seven percent of people. Don't get all four and some don't have any at all but most folks do in. They usually start to come in between the ages of seventeen and twenty five which is why they are called wisdom teeth because they are older and wiser in theory than baby with emphasis on in theory. Exactly i have always wondered about that. Well i'm glad i could be so. Yeah it's pretty crazy that you're still growing teeth into your twenty s it really is and then. They often are removed shortly thereafter. But why well according to web. Md it seems that ninety percent of people have at least one wisdom tooth that's impacted. this means it can't come in like in the normal way because it stuck on the tooth next to it usually sort of a forty five degree angle ish and pushes into the side of that tooth and although the sound awful you probably won't even feel any pain but it can cause problems later on when the wisdom tooth weakens the root of the molar next to it from that constant pressure or when you get gum disease for it or more cavities or whatever so your dentist may want it out before it ever causes you any trouble so either. The tooth is growing weird. Or your mouth simply doesn't have enough room for it or both. Yeah but your dentist will be keeping an eye on this and will advise you on what to do. And by the way this is different than hyper donncha which is when you have too many teeth so an adult should have about thirty two teeth. If those thirty two don't all fit in your mouth you may have to have your wisdom teeth pulled but if you have more than thirty two adult teeth you have hyper donncha which basically just means you have extra teeth. We'll put some crazy extreme photos of this in our show notes. If you're interested no lord now everyone's going to go to show notes for that and not for the main topic of this podcast. I'm just saying you should go to our show notes for both reasons. That's all and because some of those photos are really wild. I've been down a rabbit hole all day. You know freddie. Mercury had hyper donncha. He did yes and his case was more typical. I think he had four extra teeth. But i've seen photos of people who have like an entire extra set of teeth but anyway back to our main questions. Let's get back on track. Can it be that. Ninety percent of us are flawed. In this way well. The answer is simple evolution. And by the way we're not going to try to jive evolution with christianity in this podcast. Although i'm sure that topic is covered elsewhere and some other podcast for our podcast. Let's just say that. Many scientists believe that overtime our jaws have moved to become smaller and more narrow in. This means that teeth at once fit easily into our gigantic freak mouth usually do not fit anymore we we used to need those molars to help to rough or hard items like nuts and roots and meats and leaves but now we use forks knives and spoons and eat softer food. So we really don't need those anymore in our mouths have just adjusted for that. Yes evolution but pretty cool and of course it makes total sense. I also read on health. Line dot com that the wisdom teeth were like replacement teeth in our distant ancestors to replace other molars which had likely decayed or come out by then. Y- scientists classify wisdom teeth as a vestigial organ or novum saying that right Which in that's v. e. s. t. I g. i. a. l. which basically means it something. Anatomical that no longer seems to have a function or a purpose in our bodies. Other examples are goosebumps The appendix The tailbone ear muscles tonsils nipples on a man hair on our body and the knicks membrane of your eye which is that pink thing in the inside corner. And i'm not sure if i'm pronouncing that right so the muscles are important for you honey since you can make your ears move though that's true. Well port hardy tricks anyway. That is also fascinating and probably worth an entirely separate podcasts. Because i never thought that we have a bunch of body parts that we no longer need. I wanna find out about goosebumps but go ahead and the appendix like so. Many people have to get that out right so anyway if ninety percent need their wisdom teeth removed. What's up with that other ten percent. Do they have big gigantic freak mouths like you mentioned well. People in that ten percent have healthy. Wisdom teeth fully erupted and that sounds awful but it just means that they've grown incompletely and our position correctly and are binding properly in could be clean as part of their normal daily hygiene which means they can get to them to clean them. So this is how the mayoclinic determines whether wisdom teeth might be allowed to stay in your mouth. Sometimes these molars can even grow in horizontally or partially emerged through the gums and this is ripe for bacteria so they'll be removed if that occurs. Remember when you were getting your wisdom teeth removed and afterwards the oral surgeon told us that you really didn't need to have it done because you had plenty of room in your big gigantic freak mouth. sounds familiar but i may have still been under the anesthesia at that point. Well evidently you one of those ten percent that have a big giant. I'm just enjoying saying big giant freak mouth right now you know. It's really painful for me to talk about teeth stuff though. No and i'm surprised you chose this topic. I guess i was just thinking of it academically without having to actually talk about dennis and teeth and look at pictures online. I'm actually feeling kind of squeamish right now. Okay let's move onto the list squeamish stuff then okay. The debate about removing wisdom. To yes please. Dennis are actually torn on whether all of the preemptive wisdom teeth removals are in fact necessary. Yes as good to be proactive. And yes you want them out. If they're going in in a way that will mess up your perfectly straight in wonderfully aligned post orthodontic treatment teeth especially if your parents have spent thousands on exactly in. Yes you would want them out if they're causing you any kind of trouble at all. But what if they're not what if you don't even know that they're they're maybe they're crooked maybe they're impacted but they're not affecting your bite they're not causing you. Pain not becoming havens for cavities. Should you get them out. We'll some dennis. And i think most in the us are in the camp of simply removing them always to avoid any potential future problems. And i understand that. That makes sense being very proactive in conservative others like the nih equivalent in the uk. However say that if they're ace symptomatic without any symptoms pain issues. Leave them be because there's no real evidence to suggest that they'll cause problems later. And therefore it's not worth the expense and the risks of the procedure and understand that too and that makes sense to so regardless of which camp your dentist is in here. She will monitor the growth of your wisdom teeth and how they affect your other teeth and your oral health in general ask a lot of questions do your own research and make a decision. That's best for you absolutely and if you do have to have your wisdom teeth. Extracted fear not. It's honestly not that big of a deal mark and i both had to have ours. Cut out 'cause they were impacted they put you to sleep. Or maybe you're wake but you certainly don't feel a remember anything when you wake up you eat soup and soft foods for a few days in your mind.

Donncha Freddie Knicks Dennis NIH UK United States
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Ovarian Colon and uterine cancer, and his scoops. One of the best ways to do that is to. Cascade from the index person who has to genetic mutation and likely has the cancer at presentation. So we cascade out to unaffected family members to see WHO's inherited that same genetic tendency or genetic predisposition, and try and target cancer prevention to those groups. Both of these orders, for example are autosomal dominant. So if you have that genetic predisposition, your children, your siblings, your parents have a fifty percent risk of having that same genetic condition and therefore be at risk of those same cancers that we may potentially be able to prevent altogether. If someone undergoes a generic genetic testing. To look for on propensity toward cancer, it doesn't necessarily mean they won't develop cancer because not all cancers we know the genetic link get would that be correct about fifteen to twenty percent of cancers are H-. Are associated with genetic inherited mutation. So the vast majority eighty percent, we don't have a clear genetic 'cause. It's probably a combination of genes, your environment, and then some amount of bad luck as well, and we'll get a chance to learn more about the work that you're doing at. The upcoming Virtual Center for individualized medicine. Conference on October the fourteenth. Can you tell us a little bit about what to expect from that conference that'll be really a meeting of the minds bring together some of the authorities across mayoclinic that have expertise and inherited cancer cancer treatment.

cancer uterine cancer mayoclinic
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

01:46 min | 11 months ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"That were probably going to have to dial back again this fall. It is very likely that we're GONNA see a resurgence of cases. All the model suggests that all of us who studied these viruses. Believe that's what's GonNa Happen. We could be surprised but we think that's what's going to happen. So how do we do the at thoughtfully wisely knowing that may come rather than having to do it as we did last time in an emergency and not really understanding everything that was happening to me at the family level? That means we probably need to take it seriously. We need to be well-stocked to be able to shelter in home for thirty ideally sixty days or more. We need certain supplies. Are we going to deal with school? Maybe get the kids in this summer. Not Wait to get caught up with their immunizations. That's been a big issue nationally and worldwide and then the thing that I think is really important is often people wait to get their flu vaccines in their Monja vaccines until you know Christmas. Time and later this is a year to get those vaccines caught up in him as early as you can before. We start seeing a resurgence of covid nineteen. We don't want that confusion in symptoms. We don't want people to be ill every year as you know. We have a major surge demand on the medical system because of flu so we'd be really wise to attend to that early on. I thanks touchable and for being with us today closure. We always appreciate your insights. This is Ben Mayoclinic. Thank.

flu Ben Mayoclinic
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

Mayo Clinic Q

16:21 min | 1 year ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

"Coming up on Mayo Clinic. Qna The last day in the United States the number of cases increased by forty percent or oh new corona virus questions answered by an infectious disease specialist that we are indeed seeing more and more cases and evidence of wider spread community transmission in various parts of the nation. How can you safely isolate? When you're tight quarters. They get their own bedroom. They don't come out of that room without a mass. They're not having dinner face to face with the others in the family. What's the best plan for recovering? If you're diagnosed with the virus get enough. Sleep adequate nutrition copper exercise in this case outdoors. It's really a question about what? What about the people who have symptoms? Most of them can be managed at home. And what's the latest on medicines for people who've contracted cove in nineteen? This is really been the race if you will. Because it's GonNa take a long time to develop there are a number of them in clinical but nothing has been published that would tell us definitively yet answers to these and other covert nineteen questions next on Mayoclinic. Qna hello.

Mayo Clinic Mayoclinic United States
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

16:21 min | 1 year ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Coming up on Mayo Clinic. Qna The last day in the United States the number of cases increased by forty percent or oh new corona virus questions answered by an infectious disease specialist that we are indeed seeing more and more cases and evidence of wider spread community transmission in various parts of the nation. How can you safely isolate? When you're tight quarters. They get their own bedroom. They don't come out of that room without a mass. They're not having dinner face to face with the others in the family. What's the best plan for recovering? If you're diagnosed with the virus get enough. Sleep adequate nutrition copper exercise in this case outdoors. It's really a question about what? What about the people who have symptoms? Most of them can be managed at home. And what's the latest on medicines for people who've contracted cove in nineteen? This is really been the race if you will. Because it's GonNa take a long time to develop there are a number of them in clinical but nothing has been published that would tell us definitively yet answers to these and other covert nineteen questions next on Mayoclinic. Qna hello.

Mayo Clinic Mayoclinic United States
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"One of the labs to what Mayoclinic McLeod was reporting for Gene Tutti six we had more variants meaning that we will not the probability of Messan a gene of question is less is likely compared to some of the direct to consumer testing that is okay so a greater depth now depth of data the pack. Well sometimes this information if it goes in the patient's record Can suggest they may have certain problems with insurance is that affecting their insurance rates are candid affect insurance rates. No there is actually law Gina which actually Do protect back to the patient against this for for health pep assist the cannot be discriminated against Based on the information that is in in the medical record. Okay what do you see the future of pharmacogenomics. Where do you see it going? I think we've just touted The Jenny from Oxygen Auto Auto many DR which bombed at the long have been in this space for many many many years. I think as we continue to split the data and understand What's we think? If you know typic- Results can do clinically. We've just started and so my recommendation is that we escalations nations need to continue to stay engaged And and utilize the latest tool knowing that what we know clinically. In addition to democracy in America results ultimately will help our patients. Okay well let's finish up by asking you to summarize what you feel. Are the important points regarding pharmacogenomic. Could you nominate testing so the information that I would like to share has to do with what I usually tell patients. which is if you're doing well on a specific medication irrespective of whether pharmacogenomic testing may say you may want to continue to drag If if your patient WHO's had pharmacogenomic testing Dan? Please share that information with your clinicians Because there's usually more just what if you know typic- results may be so as clinicians RCB receptive to what Patients may bring into you for General Discussion And then Ted is if you find a variant of significant in a specific patient if possible test. The siblings The cubie taking the same medication vacation and having the same issues that way we can start thinking about population health in this way. We've been discussing pharmacogenomics with Dr Eric. A A pharmacogenomics expert at the male clinic. Eric thanks for stopping by. Its been fascinating..

pharmacogenomics Dr Eric Mayoclinic McLeod Gene Tutti Gina America Ted Dan
How to Hit Your Target Heart Rate

Mayo Clinic Radio

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

How to Hit Your Target Heart Rate

"Radio health minute i'm ian rock regular exercise. Make your heart stronger and more efficient and that means we're working hard enough that our heart getting beneficial unofficial activity and beneficial exercise ed lescaut ski co director of mayo clinic sports medicine says you should get about thirty minutes of moderate activity at least five days a week and and modern is something that you're you're breathing kind of hard but you can still hold a conversation that should get your up to that target range and study showed that the level i love exertion. We feel correlates quite well with our heart rate or getting good blood flow or training our heart muscle to work more efficiently and actually strengthening at if we don't do that if we're if we're doing something to light we won't get much of the beneficial effect but dr lous cousy says the actual numbers aren't as important as the effects as long as we feel. We're working moderately heart right and we're getting some good activity. We're doing good things for ourselves. We don't have to worry so much about the monitors of the numbers for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Dr Lous Cousy Mayo Clinic Director Thirty Minutes Five Days
Huawei Threat Is Already Here, FCC Commissioner Starks Says

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Huawei Threat Is Already Here, FCC Commissioner Starks Says

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers. The Trump administration has big concerns about Chinese telecommunications, giant Weiwei here. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo on Fox News. While way, is an instrument of the Chinese government, they're deeply connected. So the US government is trying to prevent American companies from buying always equipment. But what about the equipment that's already being used here in the US? That's what Jeffrey stark says worried about. He is the Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission or the FCC and he joins me now. Thanks so much for being with us. Good morning. Great to be with you. Do you have a firm understanding of how much while way equipment is currently in the US? I think that's something that we are all of us trying to focus on right now is, what is the scope of the problem. Here. What is the scope of how much while way equipment is in our networks right now? And a lot of the focus has been on correcting the amount of Galway infrastructure. That is currently in our networks, going forward the issue that I wanna focus on is, we know that while way has a, a position already in a number of small rural carriers networks already and we need to focus on that issue. So I wanna get to your prescription. But when you talk about why we equipment being used in these rural networks how so how's it employed? It can be deployed in a number of different manners. It can we know for a number of the wireless networks that it is in their very core. It is in. They're intent as it is in their radios, it is in how they tr- transmit signals over their networks. And so it is fully deployed in a lot of wow equipment, fully throughout these small rural carriers. So it would be your concerned that this equipment could be of could be manipulated for surveillance, by the Chinese government. I mean is that your word? I think there are two main concerns that folks have I think the first risk is, of course, that there could be some espionage. The second concern is that there would be an ability by wall way through the Chinese and the Chinese government to disrupt or disabled, some of our communication networks, particularly in times of a national emergency. So you wrote in an op Ed in the hill that, that you want all this equipment removed, as you noted the Trump administration is focused on moving forward, but you say they quit here. We got to get rid of it. How would you do that? And that is the crux of the issue that a lot of us in particular here at the FCC were, we are in control of the networks. This is a national defense issue. That's what certainly are executive agencies are telling us. And so I think it's going to be imperative that we come up with a practicable solution that finds it fixes it and funds it and by that, I mean, making sure that we find the full scope of the wall way infrastructure, that is in our networks, that is presenting a vulnerable, national security issue, making sure that we fix it. And for most for the most part, I think that's probably going to be replacing the Queant that presents that security risk. And then making sure that we funded a lot of these small rural telecommunications carriers are, in fact operating on a very thin budget. And so, I think it is going to be important that. We find a way to ultimately be able to help folks, make sure that we take care of the security threat, and that most likely is gonna mean paying for it, right. As you point out that this is a problem. They these smaller companies didn't create. And so you say the government should be responsible for making them whole after after taking away. I think that's right going back to twenty twelve twenty thirteen and even even more clearly in two thousand seventeen twenty eighteen it has been clear that the US government is growing increasingly uncomfortable with having this way equipment in our network in our infrastructure. But a lot of these folks until the executive order was issued about two weeks ago, which made it completely official that the national security risk was very clearly there. A lot of folks were making the business decision on their own about where they settled on the fact of what they going to go ahead and purchase for the this equipment. A lot of this equipment was while we has particularly made it very cheap and made it available to a lot of these small rural carriers. And so we know that there's a lot of it out there. FCC Commissioner Gregory Stark's for us this morning. Thank you so much for your time. We appreciate it. Thank you so much.

Chinese Government United States Federal Communications Commiss Mayo Clinic Mike Pompeo Jeffrey Stark Executive Fox News Weiwei Galway Commissioner Gregory Stark Official Two Weeks
For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 2 years ago

For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers in much of the United States. Thousands of native Americans are living without some basic necessities, like trinity a running water. A new poll shows more than a quarter of native Americans living in rural areas of Ed problems with basic infrastructure, including electrobi-, or water, or high speed internet, which is becoming quite basic, of course, on Navajo lands in the southwestern U S utility crews from around this country are now volunteering their time to install power. Laurel Morello's of member station. K J, Z Z reports need a Billy has been waiting to turn on lights in your home for fifteen years. We've been living off their nose per pain, lanterns, did you ever think this day would come? Not really now, we know have to have Fash lights everywhere, all the kids have Fash light. So when they get up in the middle night, late to use the restroom, they have a Fash light to go to. Yes. Billy her husband and their five kids live in a tiny one room on a traditional Navajo home. There three sheep graze on sagebrush the carpets the rolling hills of Dil Khan era Zona on the largest reservation in the country. We watched two men and a cherry picker hook up the last wire to their home. Billy says they've gone through too many generators to count why two boys. They have really bad allergies and they have asthma. So sometimes they beat the nebulizer. So usually go to my mom's house travel in the middle of the night over there back and forth. The Billy's are not alone about one in ten Navajos live without electricity. And as many as forty percent of the tribe has to haul their water and use outhouses Opole of rural Americans conducted by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard, teach Chan school of public health found more than a quarter of native Americans have experienced problems with electric city water and the internet northern Arizona university professor Manley. Gay is Navajo. Says the numbers are probably even higher became says he recently saw something strange when he pulled into a hotel parking lot in window rock the capital of the Navajo nation. He noticed a bunch of teenage. Gers in their cars. You could tell that they were high school students in so doing their homework outside of this hotel parking lot, and they had to light on their cars and do their homework. And it became quite clear that they didn't have the internet outside the Billy's home the couple waits patiently for the crew to finish the job, Brian Cooper from pm electric has an update. That will energize your power. Can wait to see the real small here. See don't cover it up. I want to see it. That's what joy looks like traveled from New Mexico, along with several other crews from around the country, volunteering their time to connect people like the Belize to the power grid on the Navajo nation. The homes are so spread out. It costs on average forty thousand dollars to hook up one home to the grid and half the tribe is unemployed. So you can't raise rates to energize all those homes. The Navajo tribal utility authority in the nonprofit American public power association, have put a call out to you till ladies across the country to help our no idea that, you know, it was people still in twenty nineteen without power. Finally after waiting for so many years, the Billy's watched the foreman turn on the meter behind their house and snap. The cover shut Nita then runs inside flip the switch to find you have electrobi- here after so many years without it. My kids. Don't be so happy. Keep asking that. We they. We have like finally out white. Now, the family will wait and pray for running water and internet for NPR news. I'm lorrimore Ellis in flagstaff.

Billy Mayo Clinic Navajo Laurel Morello American Public Power Associat NPR Allergies United States ED Flagstaff Lorrimore Ellis New Mexico Brian Cooper Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nita Arizona
Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers. Anybody who has a kid with a fever makes a discovery at the drugstore. There are two options for Tylenol one for infants one four children. They contain the same amount of medicine, but the infant version costs, three times more. Why would that be? Here's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin turns out. There's a backstory for a long time. Infants Tylenol was stronger than the children's stuff. It was three times more concentrated. That's in my Hernandez of the university of Pittsburgh school of pharmacy. The thinking was, you don't want to give little babies, lots of liquid medicine and you can give them less if it stronger. Hence the cost difference, deprives per milliliter was five times higher, but there was a problem parents were making mistakes with dosing babies got sick and some even. Died. So at the urging of the food and Drug administration in twenty eleven Johnson and Johnson announced a change instance title is now offered in the same concentration as children's what the price is still different with Storebrand's of acetaminophen, it's the same story. The infant version is generally three times more than the one for children. I asked Johnson and Johnson, the maker of brand name Tylenol, why the company says the infant version comes in a sturdier bottle and has a syringe for accurate. Dosing the children's version only has a little plastic Cup in Hernandez isn't convinced by that. She says what's expensive and producing a drug like this is the active ingredient, not a piece of plastic. The cab, this was this eerie inch doesn't release plane, the price difference in my opinion. But Johnson and Johnson's explanation makes sense to Edgar daursky. He's a consumer advocate, and founder of the website, consumer world is an extra thing in the box and extra things usually cost money. He says. There's a convenience element here. Thank of, you know, a spray cleaner. You can buy the spray cleaner in the spray bottle, and that costs, little more money or you can buy the refill that gives you more ounces, but it doesn't have the sprayer on top. It's kind of the same concept. But this, of course, is not a spray cleaner, it's medicine for your baby. Parents can be sensitive to marketing, because the stakes are so high Dr Shaw at children's national in Washington DC, says when it comes to infant and children's acetaminophen, the most important thing is to get the dosing right? When you start doing more than recommended. There are serious side effects that can happen. So the bottom line know what you need if spending that extra couple of dollars for the syringe will help you get the dosing just right. Maybe the markup is worth it. Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Virgo struggling to find the perfect vacation home verb. Oh, does the. Hard work for you, matching you to the perfect place to stay every time download are be o- in the app store. Let Virgo find the home that matches you.

Johnson Selena Simmons Duffin Tylenol Hernandez Edgar Daursky Mayo Clinic University Of Pittsburgh Schoo Fever NPR Food And Drug Administration Founder Storebrand Washington Dr Shaw
TMD: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:00 min | 2 years ago

TMD: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, I'm Vivian Williams. The temporal dealer joint or t m j let you move up and down inside decide if you press just right in front of your ear, and you open and close you can feel a little bulge that bulge says Dr Jonathan Fillmore is the TM j and just like a knee, hip or other joint. You can have issues that's called T M D or temporal men dealer disorder. You can have problems with jaw posturing or with grinding and clenching. Those commonly will cause problems associated with the powerful muscles that close your jaw in some cases. Those can contribute toward having problems with the joint itself. Dr Phil Moore says over time a lot of TMD's resolve on their own. If the problem is with the muscles around the joint, physical therapy and other conservative treatment may help only if the problems with the joint itself is surgery and option for more information talk with their healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Dr Jonathan Fillmore Dr Phil Moore Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams TMD
Endometriosis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

00:59 min | 2 years ago

Endometriosis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, I'm Vivian Williams. Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside the uterus. It can cause a lot of pain and for some women fertility problems. What causes an atrocious? Dr tat Newburn net. Says there are several theories probably the most widely held theory is that we know that eighty ninety percent of women actually meant straight backwards through the flow can tube. So that probably deposit some enemy chill cells in the pelvis now, not all women experienced symptoms. But when it comes to treatment, Dr Bernard says, you can manage the symptoms with medications or their surgery medications don't change the disease in a fundamental way. So most experts now or recommending that we excise Michio says that means cut it out where we find it. For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Dr Tat Newburn Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams Dr Bernard Michio Eighty Ninety Percent
Cancer, Dr Douglas and Westwood discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Cancer, Dr Douglas and Westwood discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"Other cancers are kept in check by genes which prevent cancers from forming and win those genes are broken due to hereditary traits. Dr Douglas regard says patients are at increased risk for cancer genetic testing can help unravel that risk in the past people were primarily being tested for knowing their own risk. And then their children's risk. It didn't change their immediate cancer treatment. But for both breast and ovarian. And now, Colin if you have one of these traits you receive a different more, effective chemotherapy. Then if you didn't for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org. The Westwood

Cancer Dr Douglas Westwood Colin
Fainting: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Fainting: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Vivian Williams thinking happened when your brain doesn't get enough blood and you lose consciousness temporarily, it's often brought on by an emotional trigger, such as being upset or excited. Look, you don't have to be so excited. Let's slow down to heart rate. Let's lower down the blood pressure. So with that reflects sometimes goes overboard. And the patient ends up with low pressure or a low heart rate. The combination of the two leads to insufficient blood supply to the head. While most thinking spells are benign, cardiologists. Dr. Wind Hsien says, there are times when fainting is more concerning that includes people with known heart conditions, and somebody has just pain palpitations piety fainting that's important and to usually with a lot of tension to if a person has fainting spell doing exercise, any of those instances would be reason to see your doctor for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams Dr. Wind Hsien
Does gum get stuck in your stomach: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Does gum get stuck in your stomach: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Jeff Wilson. Chewing gum can be a fun treat, but if swallowed, does it really get stuck in your stomach? Folklore would suggest that if you swallow it stays in the stomach really long time up to seven years. That simply is not true. Yester- winter Dr. Mark Larson says your body treats in occasional gob of gum, like any other foreign object at can't digest. It will travel through uneventfully and generally excreted quite rapidly still Dr. Larsen warns anyone, especially young kids against routinely, swallowing the sticky stuff. They could cause a bees or affect which is a medical term for collection of material such as gum, which could cause blockages symptom tenants. Small children could lead to intestinal concern to be safe when you through all the flavor and fun. Put gum in the trash, not your tummy for more information. Talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Mayo Clinic Jeff Wilson Yester Dr. Mark Larson Dr. Larsen Seven Years
Steam treatment for BPH: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Steam treatment for BPH: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Joel street benign, prostatic hyperplasia or h is an enlargement of the prostate gland, situated between the bladder and the Aretha and I like to describe it to patients as a Donut, then UP through the Donut, hole treatments seek to basically increase the size that Donut hole a relaxed, the pressure around the Donut hole. So men can urinate better. Urologist, Dr. Toby Koehler says there are lots of treatments for medications surgery, but it's a relatively new approach that can be done right in the doctor's office that has him excited. We put a little tiny needle any hit a button, nine seconds. Machine goes paying. And then you form two centimeter steamboat in the prostate. Everything that's team ball touches essentially dies. And that's a good thing. Because after a few months, there's gonna be a giant crater there and you're gonna be able to urinate a lot better. Doctor Koehler says it's very effective with little in the way of side effects for more information. Talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Donut Hole Dr. Toby Koehler Prostatic Hyperplasia Mayo Clinic Aretha Two Centimeter Nine Seconds
Erectile dysfunction and heart disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Erectile dysfunction and heart disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Vivian Williams. Gentlemen, listen up. If you're to embarrass to talk to your doctor about erectile dysfunction. Consider this, we call it the canary in the coal mine meaning that the artery problems that cause erectile dysfunction precedes heart attacks. By about three years. It was really no other relationship like that within the body arteries. Now, cardiologists. Dr. Steven kopecky says, having e d doesn't guarantee that you're gonna have a heart attack or even develop heart disease. But if you're a a man who seventy years old, no, if your man who's forty and your rectal functions not due to prostate surgery or something, then you have a fifty times greater chance of having heart disease than another person just like you without a rectal dysfunction. You can also help lower your risk by exercising maintaining a healthy weight, keeping an eye on your blood pressure and not smoking for more information. Talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Heart Disease Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams Dr. Steven Kopecky Seventy Years Three Years
Erectile dysfunction treatments: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Erectile dysfunction treatments: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Vivian Williams more than thirty million men in the US are living with erectile dysfunction when it comes to treatments, it can range from oral medications to surgical interventions hills work and fifty percent of men, but they will stop working after about five years. Not because you've become immune says urologist, Tobias, colour, but rather because the blood flow problem that's behind the gets worse than you got such to options left that that potential could work. One is doing Jecht these oil medication leg medicines directly into the penis and they're much more effective. The other is surgery and implant. So that's a device so that when you wanna have sex, essentially the patient manually pumps fluid or normal sailing into the device in that same space where blood used to flow. But now you're putting that fluid. They're very discreet and Dr Koehler says, patients are usually very happy with the result for more information. Talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams Dr Koehler Tobias United States Fifty Percent Five Years
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Hope this cancer needs more than a knife surgeon. Dr Mark Schutte says there are really three prongs to treatment surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. All three have seen major advances in the past few years. But the key is how do we take what we have and apply it in the right sequence to get the outcome. We're looking for it used to be that surgery for the few who qualified would be followed by chemo and radiation. But Dr Trudy has flipped that script, chemo and radiation. Come first because of all the therapies they'd gotten ahead of time these patients now, we can offer them much more complicated operations even patients whose cancer would traditionally have been considered inoperable. For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org. A better life with Dr Sanjay Gupta. Here's a tricky. Question. Is it ever okay to drink? If you're breastfeeding. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. CNN's chief medical correspondent. The CDC says you really shouldn't drink any alcohol if you're breastfeeding. But if you're going to have just one drink every now, and then that should be okay. But this study out of Australia recently got a lot of attention. If found children's exposure to alcohol through breast milk may cause a drop in their cognitive abilities up until about age six or seven that negative effect. However did dissipate by age ten or eleven by that point. They say other environmental factors. We'll start to play a bigger role. If you are breastfeeding, and you are going to have a drink every now, and then then you should know this should wait at least two hours before nursing because breast milk has the highest alcohol content about a half hour or hour after a woman consumes a drink and the alcohol is usually still detected.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Mark Schutte chemo Dr Trudy CNN CDC Australia milk two hours
Reconsidering hormone replacement therapy

John Batchelor

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Reconsidering hormone replacement therapy

"Hormone therapy is still be most effective treatment for management really bothersome hot flashes and night sweats and for those women who are newly menopausal and younger in their fifties. This is still probably a very safe option for most people. However, Dr Stephanie faubion says there are some people that should not take hormone therapy, and those include breast cancer survivors and women with existing heart disease. This is an individual decision, and it involves talking with your doctor. So that together you can weigh the risks and benefits in your particular situation. For more information talk with your doctor or visit mayoclinic dot

Dr Stephanie Faubion Vivian Williams Dallas
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Harm, Robert, Robert, somebody burned down my, she shed no burden on your. She shed Cheryl. All really Victor because my she sheds burning up in the backyard. Is she shared with struck by lightning? Cheryl, Robert state farm cover my, she shed shed. She turned our shared with her hideaway, Robert, that's covered here that Victor, I'm getting a new, she she or she had. Can we stop? She shared now go with a one that's here to help life go right state farm. Talk to an agent today With your. Mayo Clinic Radio. Health Minute I'm Vivian Williams we often laugh. And make fun of them but for many women night sweats and hot flashes are no joking matter while hormone therapy remains the most effective treatment for really bothersome. Nights wets and hot flashes we go through a number of lifestyle modifications that they can try before we ever talk about considering hormone therapy according to Dr Stephanie faubion that includes avoiding or cutting back on things that can, trigger, hot, flashes, like caffeine alcohol. Warm beverages and spicy foods stress management is also very important techniques like, acupuncture or massage, or meditation or yoga class or Taichi class might be helpful products such as wyking sheets or. Pillows that you can chill even. A fan may, provide relief doctor phobia says there are also prescription medications that work for. Some women for more information talk with your doctor, or visit mayoclinic dot org Streamed every. Giants game on, your desktop laptop on KABC dot com on the internet VR six eight. San Francisco ASEAN HD two San Mateo Cumulus station.

Cheryl Robert Robert state farm Victor San Mateo Cumulus station Dr Stephanie faubion Mayo Clinic Radio Giants Vivian Williams San Francisco caffeine
Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

20:33 min | 2 years ago

Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

"Network. Hi, I'm Vivian Williams for the mayo clinic news network, opioids continue to be in the news. A mayo clinic study found that despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients. The research published in the b. m. j. shows that opioid prescription rates have remained flat for commercially insured patients over the past decade rates. For some Medicare patients are leveling but remain above where they were ten years ago. Dr. Jeffrey Molly is the lead author of the study and scientific director of the mayo clinic division of emergency medicine research. He says the data suggests not much has changed in prescription opioid use since about five years ago. Now based on historical trends of opioid use pain medicine specialist. Dr. Michael Hooton says, there are Maine's an unmet patient need to better target the use of prescription, opioids. Leads the centers for disease control and prevention has previously reported that opioid prescription in the US has increased dramatically from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand ten mayo clinic is broadly researching opioid prescribing practices to find ideal doses for individual patient needs. The researchers say the goal is to achieve the best possible patient outcomes and experience with minimal exposure to opioids. This research has been translated into opioid prescribing guidelines, tools for medical practices at mayo and beyond. And in other news, what you might call the dog days of summer, maybe something more menacing for a person prone to migraines. So how and why does summer weather sometimes trigger these headaches? That's a great question. Says Dr. Rush me, hawker sing, a mayo clinic neurologist. She says that patients ask her that all the time and there's just not a great answer for some people. Extreme weather conditions may cause imbalances in brain chemicals. Which eventually can lead to severe throbbing pain of a migraine. Sunlight could also be a trigger and other weather triggers include high humidity, extreme heat and dry air. Dr. Hucker cing says, these conditions may lead to another migraine creator dehydration. Lots of people forget to drink enough during hot weather and dehydration concert, be risk for migraine attacks to happen. Her advice to people with migraines is to avoid extremes in summer weather and everyday schedules. She also says to be consistent with your eating habits and your sleeping habits, the mayo clinic news network. I'm Vivian Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom jive and I'm Tracy McCray for teenagers issues like peer pressure, academic expectations, and changing bodies. You're going through that right now or at your. It was a long time ago that I was a teenager Dr side. Thank you. All those things can cause a lot of ups and downs, highs and lows. But for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings. There is symptom of depression. Depression can affect how your teenager thinks feels and behaves. And in extreme cases it can lead to suicidal thoughts, the centers for disease control and prevention reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people. Age ten to twenty four. Fortunately for most teens, depression symptoms can ease with treatment such as medication and psychological counseling in here, disgust teens in mental health is mayo clinic pediatric psychiatrist, Dr Paul cork and welcome back to the program Dr Croke and it's good to see you glow. Thanks for having me today. Thanks for being here. So Dr, Carr, convince increasing number of suicides in this country has to be of some concern is very concerning and it's it's probably complex causes. It's something that's being as you point out, talked about and written about quite a lot quite often. And it's been been estimated that the the overall rates have nearly doubled less twenty years. Much of that involves teenagers. As you pointed out with young people, it's the second leading cause of death. Sadly there are in the neighborhood of, you know, forty, five thousand completed suicides annual in the US young people account for usually about ten percent of that. So there there's a host of things to think about. And I, I would argue that my field in particular we need to, we need to brace this as maybe failure that we need to relook at things and continue research in ways to do better his problem in the future. So you said suicide rates for teenagers as doubled over the last twenty years. So have the rates of depression doubled as well. That's one of the one of the considerations. The thought is that actually exhibiting depression is increasing as well. But there are other there are other factors to to present a balanced view here. There has been the argument made, perhaps we are just getting better at quantifying and qualifying into things, and we have more mental health professionals. Now, psychiatrist to identify these things. People are talking about mental health as well, and there's hopefully less stigma and people feel feel freer to talk about it as you point out. There's also as far as causes that are driving this potentially. There's been a lot of speculation is life becoming more fast paced and stressful for for teenagers general? Some of us at our age. We have sometimes difficult time wrapping our brain around that. But indeed, if you look at look at some of the things that are going on in the challenges teens face today, it's not. It's not benign another. Another, very very, I would argue poorly understood but important consideration is the internet. Did you. Title social media things like Facebook, Twitter, and the platforms that I don't even know about the using, how does that contribute? I mean, what's the relationship there? Well, the thought the thought there have been there have been studies Dr shops that can that suggest that that more time spent on that thing contributes to depression, but it's probably not that simple. I mean, the arguments been made, and this has been looked at that overall. Maybe maybe teenagers into some extent, adults are spending more and more time on these platforms with these technologies and overall feeling less connected in the genuine face to face empathic sort of fashion. The other pernicious aspect of these technologies. Something that I see in my day to day practice often is that there's a fair amount of negative behaviors broadly describe it that there's what's called cyber bullying. It's rampant with a lot of the lot of the young people that I work with and it some thought that there's been some suggestion that it the effects of this may be more. More lasting severe than face to face based face bowling, for example. So Dr shaves alluded to the fact. I've got two teenagers at my house, so I'm gonna ask a question and went to expect a choir of angels to start to rise up around me as I ask it, how can apparent distinguish normal teen moods, team behavior swings from signs of depression hut. Can you tell the difference? It's a great question and it's a, it's a deceptively simple to in that as you point out teens in general, have a host of neurologic integral suck logic changes because can bring his getting up and can contribute to meeting us and predictably. They tend to think that moms dads are less interesting to be around in the less at this age. Can you imagine didn't happen? I'm sure I know that's why I'm so confused by it, but getting on getting more on point with your question, pervasive changes in what you could you could refer to personality, so dark, dark, irritable moods that are there. All day long day after day after day that are per she added in more than one environment. So if there's feedback from teachers, schools, sports teams, the, you know, Joey, your Sally is just not not the same as they were before declining functioning academics is a as usually big telltale sign that previously a or b students suddenly see your or student changes in peer groups, changes in behaviors, changes in sleeping patterns, and then a focus on dark kind of things. Thoughts are or talk about suicide, for example. And the again, a related question I think would be, what do you do about these these various social media platforms and internet use? And that's another another thing I think broadly, did you stay engaged with your your children and it's not easy in teenagers. A couple of things I wanted to ask you about first of all access. I mean, there are so many more people who seem to be depressed, isn't access to a mental health prof. National more difficult because there are more so many more people out there and not enough of you. And I think the second part of that question is even if you are pretty certain that your child is is depressed. There's concern about how effective the treatment is in what the treatments going to pay. Those are great questions, and the short answer you're absolutely right on the first count that access is to mental health professionals. Psychiatry in particular is not not at all what it should be, and it's even more problematic for young people collectively, we are trying to address that. No mayo clinic is led the way things, for example, that are called collaborative care models or integrative behavioral health where we actually do things like we embed psychiatrist within a large network of primary care clinics for very different kind of role than what we're used to. It's more of a role of supervision coaching consultation on cases, so that family practice doctors, Tournus and pediatricians, for example, get more more depth and more comfortable with. Treating identifying treating things like depression, anxiety, youngster teenager, good things. All good. And to get your to get your other question identification and the definition diagnosis of this is challenging and for parents, it's often the way we do. This is often hard to understand in that we don't, you know, it's based on interviews and questions. There's no lab test or x Ray for this, but ongoing monitoring in mild cases, watchful waiting is appropriate where, again, parents and teachers have awareness. We do very simple, but important things like help youth structure, their sleep hygiene, their habits, their study patterns. But overall, if if symptoms are moderate to severe, they're impeding functioning and academic social and family treatment is important in the first. The first line for depression is usually a combination of psychotherapy, things like cognitive behavioral therapy or what's called interpersonal therapy and the judicious use of medications, and how can parents support thirteen. NHS ongoing communication about about their life in general encouragement, sometimes reminders to to take care of their health overall and setting that example as well making time for family dinner every day, those kind of things. And if parents think it is an emergency, they should call nine one one. Well, unfortunately, depression in suicides in America and including among teenagers is on the rise. It's important though to if there is a problem to get access to mental health care, even though it may be difficult and you've got some effective treatments. Exactly. We've been talking about teenagers and mental health when mayo clinic pediatrics, Kaya trysts are all Corcoran Dr. Clarkin thanks for being with us. Thank you decker shaft. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we'll look at some new research on diet and dementia. You're listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom shy and I'm Tracy McCray Tracy. We know that a diet that's filled with fruits and vegetables is good for waistline, but it's proving to be good for our brain as well. A recent study published in the journal of Alzheimer's disease showed that people with normal cognitive function who followed a Mediterranean diet had lower amyloid deposits in the brain. As we've learned before on this program, amyloid deposits in the brain are one hallmark of Alzheimer's disease in here to discuss is the lead author of the paper, mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr, Maria vassal, Laki, welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. That was pretty, you're Greek is pretty good. Thank you. I assume you are Dr Solanki. Great to have you with us. I, you know, I married into a great family, and so I set nice people. We have. So what's good for the body is good for the brain? Is that what we're saying? This is what we think that is accumulating evidence suggesting that died has been officially fact for the brain to and for against the climb. The my says, well, although we don't have definite evidence for that, but that is good body of literature supporting that. Is that what prompted you to the study? Yes. In the mayo clinic study of aging, we are studying cognitive decline and also by Marcus of Alzheimer's disease. So one of them would be the the position in the brain, and we had this cons and the date do study that inside of the association with diet. So when we talk about amyloid deposition in the brain amyloid is a as I recall, it's been a while protein, right? Yes. And we knew from autopsy studies that patients who had Alzheimer's disease before they died, had these deposits amyloid for whatever reason, there's an association between the two. And now if I'm correct, we can actually. Detect those amyloid deposits under numerous Gan, correct. We, we detect them in, for example, in pets can so we introduce some only gives through the blood and they go and highlight areas of the position. So we have the scans and we know the as where we have elevated amused and you said that you studied people with normal cognitive function. So how do you determine if someone buddies brain is normal and they can be in the study? So in them out participants in the mayo, Cain, excite the venting. They go a very comprehensive competition with nine defense near psychological tests, and then they are evaluated by physi- centers. Well, we also take information by informant the partner. So we have a lot of information. And then by consensus, we gather all the information and the nurse that helped the the coordinator, the physician and the psychologists, they decide based on data that we have. Whether someone would be within the normal function range or someone would have a little more cognitive decline than than we would expect for their age or whether someone would being the dementia, what was the age? They average age of this today participants. So for this Pacific style, the was seventy years and older. So the me Nate is about seventy eight years old fifty, five percent of them were men and what do the studies show ultimately? So we asked them about their eating habits. They last twelve months. So the head Thuan cer- about one hundred and twenty eight different questions on the food groups that they think that the amount and also how often they would. And we found that vein vigils were falling closer, the Mediterranean diet, and those that had the higher Sam shown of vegetables were less likely to have elevated levels of amyloid position in the brain. Now we have to point out that this is a. Sectional study in our terminology, which means this is like a photograph. We don't have the dimension of time, so we don't know what came first and what game second. So as we say in our area of research, we cannot assess the Kazadi between the two. However, we, this is information that supports previous information that we know that that has been officially fact. There's also the possibility that another factor could be in place that we haven't measured that we don't know about yet, but this is a first sign that our study showed supporting evidence of beneficial association. We all talked about it and we've talked about it on this program, but refresh our memories of regard to the Mediterranean diet. We know that it's mostly fruits and vegetables, but what what can't you eat or shouldn't you eat if you're on that diet? So it's it's a very colorful diet. It's high consumption. Oh fruits and vegetables, legumes nuts, also moderate to high consumption face less consumption of meat and saturated fats and more fat in the in terms of olive oil are consumed in the diet. Also, there is optional. Moderate use of alcohol is well mainly wine. And usually it happens in social occasions where it was wine on the list or not on the list. Why was on the list for them died when we started status the nineteen sixties. Now, alcohol is is optional in a way because for some of the conditions, we should not drink. It's very, there's incredible if we cannot control the amount of wine. So it's really optional. All right. The question is people who followed this diet for their entire life. People who live in the Mediterranean, I guess, do they have a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease than we have? I don't. Don't have a definite answer that as far as research is concerned, very rigorous clinical trials research. So we don't have definite evidence to suggest dietary interventions in our life. Today we have though a big amount of survey tional data in some clinical trials that would support that good violence died like the Mediterranean diet, but also other diets like the dash diet or the mind. Diet were societas with slower cognitive decline. Certain familiar with either one of those, the dash and the what was the other. Mind so that does diet. These, they enter approaches to stop hypertension and the mind is Mediterranean dash interventions for new the generative delay. So haven't studied this. Are you pretty much convinced that murder? Mediterranean diet is a good idea not just before overall health, but also to prevent cognitive decline. Are you convinced? I think we need to learn much more, but with we have enough to follow the advice of the gates now to have a good balance, healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet, but that is one of them. The good thing is that although we don't have any new commendation based on this data, and although we said it's like a photo Akra sectionals Patty, it adds an additional motivation that what is good for my general health. What is good for my cardiovascular can support my brain health, and that can happen directly may be. Through defense mechanisms or indirectly, supporting my cat. Vascular system puts also would be very important for brain health and dimensions. What's next in your research? So what we would like to do and other sets us also doing is to follow people onto the to see whether we follow the Mediterranean diet or any other beneficial diet pattern, whether changes in our bio markets in the brain. I'm for example or changes in our coq nation, beneficial changes associated with a good balanced diet. We've been discussing how diet may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and dementia with mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr. Maria vessel Ocoee. Thanks for joining us Dr. Bustle Ocoee. Thank you for having me, and that's our program for this week. Find more information on the mayo clinic news network to this, your health and medicine questions. Anytime at hashtag Mayo Clinic Radio, you've been listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network producer for the program, Jennifer. Era for Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom. I'm Tracy McCray. Thanks for joining us. Any medical information conveyed during this program is not intended as a substitute for personal medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting healthcare professionals for more information. Please go to our website, radio dot, mayoclinic dot org. Please join us each week on this station for more of the medical information you want from mayo clinic specialists. No.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Radio Depression Alzheimer's Disease United States Migraine Dr Tom Jive Vivian Williams Tracy Mccray Opioid Abuse Maine Dr Side Medicare Dr. Hucker Cing Dr Shaves Dr. Michael Hooton B. M. Maria Vassal
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Minute I'm Vivian Williams texting behind the wheel is more than just a. Distraction mayo clinic research shows texting actually changes brainwaves in the front of the head we saw this. Rhythm occur repeated the inconsistently with text messaging Dr William Tatum and colleagues found an alternate. Brain rhythm by accident while performing routine e. g. studies that people with epilepsy who happened to be texting. During the test Dr Tatum says the changes seen in the brain rhythm are temporary and not likely to be dangerous lends more support to the. Fact that texting and driving is probably something to be, avoided Dr Tatum and his team are studying, triggers and the role of emotions in this new tax related rhythm he says more information may have. Implications, for areas, such as gaming and learning more about the, effect of, computers on brain function. For more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayoclinic dot org This, is talk radio five, sixty years, old San, Francisco, San Jose Oakland. A Cumulus station, now on Amazon Alexa open, the Kosovo skill Death and destruction officers. Down I'm, Barbara Kusak the fast-growing car wildfire continues to weave. A path of destruction through, northern California neighborhoods in Shasta county correspondent Dan Simon says it's already, destroyed five hundred structures out of control it has charged some forty five thousand acres. As firefighters tried to contain. It in some neighborhoods the difference between a home, spared and I hope scorched is just a few feet the Ferguson fire near Yosemite national park also continues its rampage park officials now say Yosemite valley won't be open to all visitors for another week because of the wildfire that's grown, to nearly seventy two square miles to police officers and film with Massachusetts were. Shot while answering the, call as police chief, Edward done, explains the, call, was disturbance call. Of an individual, breaking glass in the roadway When they got there they engaged the suspect He then like I said at one point retrieved the, gun from the home At which point he shot the office the suspect was shot. Multiple, time, by the officers and relatives say he had been experiencing mental challenges Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says that North Korea's return of. Remains from the Korean. War sets a positive tone for diplomacy on other issues correspondent will Ripley reports the remains are now being sent to a military. Lab in Hawaii for analysis as other matters have yet to. Be settled here we are more than, six weeks after the summit in Singapore there is still no timetable, for denuclearization no transparency from, the North Koreans, about how, many warheads they. Possess where they're producing nuclear fuel. Where they're hiding their warheads all those. Things the United States said they need they still don't have what they do have those fifty five sets cream war. Maine's that, took significantly longer to return than anyone in the administration would've expected Twitter's stock plunged twenty and. A half percent. After.

Dr William Tatum mayo clinic Vivian Williams Yosemite national park Yosemite valley Kosovo Barbara Kusak United States Maine Twitter San Hawaii Singapore Amazon North Korea Jim Mattis California Massachusetts
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KGO 810

"With your doctor. Or visit mayoclinic dot org Louis Good. Evening I'm John, bachelor this is the John Batchelor show The historic meeting between President Trump and, President Putin much to say later in the program right now I begin. With comments from reading the, editorial, in the Wall Street Journal the president showed weakness today I I follow the Wall Street Journal's case for this because he did not speak, forthrightly to Vladimir Putin about the bad. Acting of. Crumlin agents and, we will address that showing weakness Is danger because it imperils operations in all, directions the photo asks the foes colleagues Might we get lucky today the US has has its head doubt that is. Why showing weakness on any venue is risky and certainly on national television international television we'll, discuss that the facts of the matter are that the Russian agents for many years certainly since, two thousand fifteen, have been seeking, to penetrate, the intelligence operations, of the United States the White House the State Department the Pentagon the joint chiefs and that the targeting of the election of two thousand sixteen was an also thought about by the same units that. Had been going up against major national security apparatus showing weakness is not good geopolitics we now go to Tom Joscelyn and Bill Roggio of the foundation for the defense of democracies long war journal where they illustrate how it is that our foes are. Extremely sensitive as well to any Suggestion that they are less than powerful way begin with the Taliban the. Taliban winning victory after victory in Afghanistan these last years but now touchy touchy about a report from the United Nations assistant mission in Afghanistan you you an AMA Tom a very good evening to you On the. Face of it looks? Like the UN a? UN AMA, Afghan. Mission. In Afghanistan, is making a very dry statement fifty one hundred and twenty two civilians were killed or wounded during. The period of the first six months of two thousand eighteen wise the Taliban exercised about. This what's it to, them good evening to you good evening John..

Taliban Vladimir Putin Wall Street Journal Afghanistan President Trump Louis Good United States UN Tom Joscelyn John Batchelor president AMA Bill Roggio United Nations White House Pentagon State Department six months
Dr Don Davis, Mayo Clinic Radio and Fifty Minutes discussed on The Voice of Nashville Real Estate

The Voice of Nashville Real Estate

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Dr Don Davis, Mayo Clinic Radio and Fifty Minutes discussed on The Voice of Nashville Real Estate

"With your mayo clinic radio health minute i'm ian rock most of us know we should use sunscreen when we head outside to protect exposed skin from getting sunbird dermatologists that you need a sun protection factor or spf of at least thirty but most people don't know that skin covered by clothing can still get sunburn natural clothing without sun protective factors will have an spf of approximately one to four so it actually does not give you that much sun protection but mayoclinic dermatologist dr don davis says there are special types of clothing that will protect you industry has now allowed the integration of a wave of micro fibers into certain clothes that allow it to have a ups universal protection factor that's equivalent to spf of sunscreen ups is calculated the same way spf is so if you can spend fifty minutes outdoors with the piece of clothing before developing mild redness versus ten minutes without you would have a protective factor of fifty over ten which is a ups.

Dr Don Davis Mayo Clinic Radio Fifty Minutes Ten Minutes
"mayoclinic" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"With your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org balch was doing what works i'm sure you've heard of the dvd the secret it's likely that you bashed it at some point in your life i challenge you to bash it after you hear more from my guest today robert crown whose mother tried to kill him and his sisters when he was eleven and you can just imagine the terrible challenging life he had as the results but then things started to change for the better and robert you credit watching the secret how did you even get the idea to watch the film i don't even remember i don't know if it was near my wife but it actually the homelessness actually made me stop and think about the way that i was thinking and then when i saw that movie i started to put it together but slowly it took me so many years after that to really change but it was really what michael beckwith said in the movie and what he said it really resonated with me and he said the moment that we begin to think properly this power within us we'll begin to emerge it will feed clothe us guide us direct us protect us sustain our very existence if you let it and then he said this is what i know for sure and i have like goosebumps all over my arm right now when people talk to you you know if there's some syrian you know you can feel that vibration frequency coming out of them and i felt that i knew that this man what he was saying was true i could feel it from the depth of the heart in my soul and that kind of kept me going although i didn't really understand it yet but i knew what he said was true so as i went along to try to figure out what was going on with me and why i was always suffering or having a difficult time in my life i realized it was the way that i use my thoughts i would always think about the negative and attract that to me and what could go wrong right instead of thinking the positives and what could go.

robert crown michael beckwith
"mayoclinic" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"In the next two decades i wanna know discuss mayoclinic opthalmologist dr gets don't even keep track put some of your ideas so when we do an eye exam the things that we check our the vision and we usually check division often the distance and also at near sure because when you get older people say that well i have to hold the material farther away and that harms are to show and that's a condition called presby opium in that's a normal aging process you can almost diagnose that one over the phone so that's one of the things that we look for just the vision at distance and near then depending on what other information you'd gather from the history you might check their their pupils you shine a light in there i then you watch to see how the pupil constricts with the either certain types of visual problems where the people would not constrict as vigorously when you shine the light at it for example you'd mentioned ms earlier and ms can sometimes present with an eye condition called optic nerve and when optic nerve is present your.

opium two decades
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KGO 810

"For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org lawrence von dr drew monte at trump lashing out at the press we'll talk about that right now we're talking to gary sound political strategist we're talking about the possibility of a gavin newsom governorship possibility well look and and what he would do with some of these issues we just been discussing which is trying to make our tax base sustainable and that and i'm going to gary say that you know i keep hearing he's not as fiscally responsible as jerry brown so what's he gonna do well the interest of full disclosure iran gavin newsom first campaign for governor in two thousand eight two thousand nine before he pulled out of the race and i know i've known very well i don't think he's talked a lot about the tax structure or about tax reform can you get i'll tell you what gets a governor's attention because this happened with governor davis when i was working governor davis i mean in nineteen ninety nine when he came into office that was a small budget surplus that he inherited from pete wilson the next year in two thousand we had a multibillion dollar budget surplus and we were trying to figure out ways to spend the money and literally within two years after his reelection in two thousand and two i remember on election night even though he'd won reelection you know he called me aside sort of ashen faced and said he'd just gotten a call from his department financing now facing a budget deficit of over thirty billion dollars which was on fathomable what what gets the governor's attention is when you're sitting in that office and you think times are good and the cash is rolling in no all of a sudden there's a there's a there's a bump in the economy or there is a you know the the cycle downturn in the economy and the tax revenue starts falling off at gary let's be let's be mature about this there's going to be a downturn we have to wait until there's a crisis government can't we have our positioning itself for that like any other investor or business businessperson or anybody in the real world you prepare for these things.

jerry brown gavin newsom governor davis pete wilson gary iran thirty billion dollars two years
"mayoclinic" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on WDRC

"And people two eight you may nine have heard five of for five example zero nine ernest or hemingway visit our treated website for bipolar glasco but he shot himself hvac in the head with dot a shotgun com no gimmicks terrible story just and comfort influenced me greatly michael savage it actually brings killed you me in a the certain savage way when hemingway nation when i read he am shot himself thirteen i sixty was devastated six ten because he was my and hero fourteen seventy adventurer the talk of connecticut genuine adventurer and a fine writer began as a journalist hemingway was and then when i read that he went out there and mayoclinic killed him in my opinion with electroshock therapy yes warning he suffered depression yes he was a raging alcoholic and yes alcohol is the worst possible thing of the press a depressive could ever take the worst thing you could ever take if you're a depressive is alcohol because it press is your central nervous system we all know that right so hemingway couldn't take the swings any more so some quack up in there in ketchum idaho talked him into going to the mayo clinic she comes back from the mayo clinic after shock therapy which was all the rage dentists coming back again today and hemingway tries to walk into the propeller of a turboprop that he a private jet private turbo property fluent on try they pulled him away from the prop right didn't die not too long after the quacks game another another electrocution of the brain he lost the ability to write because the electroshock therapy and because he could no longer right he was totally impotent as an artist and therefore he was useless as a man in his own eyes and he did a horrible thing he took a shotgun put it under his chin and blow his brains out now there's more to the story much more than that but i was young i wanted to be a famous novelist like him an adventure a novelist i wanted to go into tents and africa with beautiful women in the safari outfits i you know what i'm saying it was a very romantic spanish civil war all of that stuff great writing and so it redesignated me why did my hero shoot himself.

hemingway connecticut writer ketchum idaho mayo clinic michael savage mayoclinic depressive africa
"mayoclinic" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Mayoclinic dot org so this is the end zone come back g dmz zone jamie morris leach on the other side of the glass or opening up the phones on a thank you for coming through tropical smoothie cafe i mean folks if you really looking for something refreshing that cactuses the citrus cactus is out of sight it is the bomb and i mean all all of this smoothies that he has their the jetty punch the peach silk all of those things i can name them all off if you want me to me it's incredible but also the nice thing is everybody comments when they listen to calve whenever he comes in everybody talks about oh man you guys are having so much fun having so much fun because that's just kev exact blame me if you go in you go see him at the store at six or seven ratified right next michigan theater he's even more in his element so gosh he is he's a great guy he's a lot of fun stopped by grandma grandma blueberry muffin it's matt's favorite l matt sent you and you want the matt special that blueberry muffin it's the only place you berry muffin that would be a smoothie folks here it's not a real blueberry muffin tastes like one no it does taste like one i'm excited to try that peanut butter and jelly man that was a staple of my my lunch has a child so i wanna see if it really does taste like eating like meat when you're young now i did.

jamie morris leach michigan matt
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"But when this person i came in within five weeks her allergies went away completely went away and then the the next allergy season came mile the next year none here's another person that had allergies and sinus infections not see how they are related so the immune system is jeopardized okay it's compromise one way or another in the area that you work in boost what the immune system not to mention the thousands of dollars medical costs that were unnecessary that's just like that so many times people have been after that for years i'm not talking about a few months i'm talking about for year after year after year they keep trying this and they hear about another treatment they try that and they try this and everything too many times until they get us and it just seems almost seems too easy for some of them to i believe that that that that can happen well and i mean even mayoclinic makes us some very simple nih saint saint mayoclinic allergies occur when your immune system reacts to a foreign substance such as pollen pet dander or a food that does that you know that doesn't cause any type of reaction to other people but when you come into contact with an allergen your immune system reaction can inflame your skin sinuses airwaves or digestive system so your eyes can be watery your skin can be rashy you know all of it but the idea is your body's overloaded with other things and therefore a can't handle one more toxic reaction so it reacts in giving you a hyper reaction which is an allergy reaction we we talk about this and talk about this and how can happen and be there for years or whatever but you know we we do comment that we do do they talk how the four keys to health once a month and it's free to the public and four or five zero zero nine nine zero if.

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"mayoclinic" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"That's why he's the intern i i didn't tell him to ask that by the way what are you wearing times faster this means you'll feel less stressed and more comfortable in situations you may typically avoid if you put off looking into hearing devices before you'll yourself a free test drive with this new technology i promise you won't be disappointed call three four one thirteen hundred today with your mayo clinic radio health minute i'm streep twice a year mayoclinic conducts are national health survey called the national health checkup the latest survey focused on cancer and found that more than sixty percent of people have been touched by cancer personally or through a loved one questions were asked again respect to hell were you touched by cancer if you were touched by cancer and what your barriers might be to seeking care if you're healthy but also if you have a diagnosis of cancer what do you foresee is the barriers to care and the most common barriers that were cited where finances as well as time medical oncologist dr mineta liu says ninety five percent of respondents indicated they wanted to be proactive and there are things we can all do to lower our cancer risk eating well not drinking alcohol exercising not smoking and those are the basic tenets again of healthy living in general for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org org feeling uninspired or sluggish about your job kick things back into gear by trying these methods i'm alex wehrley with the business rockstars minute number one get an outside opinion sometimes you're to deepen your problems to be able to see way out an outside influence whether a trusted friend counselor or family member can be instrumental to helping you fashion a healthy plan to move forward yet you donald number trump two each no fine one prosecuted to push for quite through you can't even being prove aware of your your particular prophecies weaknesses pathetic is extremely dan bongino important when it comes subscribing to battling download burnout free out in on fact apple it may podcasts be that the best and google thing to play do is from push the westwood through the sticking one point podcast knowing network that you'll feel better on everyone's the other side listening i'm alex wehrley abc and this has guns been a is business playing rockstars let's make mittens a.

cancer dr mineta liu alex wehrley intern mayo clinic radio streep donald apple google ninety five percent sixty percent
"mayoclinic" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mayoclinic" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Mayoclinic dot org westwood one podcast network here's the deal baltimore has major problems right now between skyrocketing crime race and heartbreaking failures in the school system the city needs to focus on its citizens not illegal immigrants baltimore city leaders have twisted their priorities here's the deal subscribing download free on apple podcast and google play from the westwood one podcast network everyone's listening westwood one podcast network invites you to check out some of our new podcast free just listen here's the deal with deneen borelli baltimore has major problems right now between skyrocketing crime rates and heartbreaking failures in the school system the city needs to focus on its citizens not illegal immigrants dan bongino show so there's mounds of evidence of maccabees malfeasance and misfeasance right he gets fired he's not titled to a government tax payer pension and you're all upset about it yet you donald trump impeach firing prosecuted for a crime you can't even prove happen relatable which allie stuck the real tragedy is that the me too movement could be added foundation of good thing intersection ality and third way feminism as they always do have ruined it it is now about demonize all men in the mass killing me grab and download free on apple podcasts and google play from the westwood one podcast network everyone's listening westwood one podcast network the jason stapleton program you think there's a gun problem that's not going to get solved by out long guns the question is how do we solve this crisis and i have to believe that this has more to do with how we are raising our children and the expectation that we are putting on them or not putting on them that's creating this type of tragedy jason's deeply deprogrammed subscribing download free on apple podcasts and google play from the westwood.

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