3 Burst results for "Mayo Clinic On Research"

"mayo clinic research" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"mayo clinic research" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And now, back to the show. You know, this isn't just a book about, okay, here's the tactical ways that you can tap into what you're really, you really love and what you should be doing. And then how do you translate into that to work or a hobby? Because that's kind of the thing too, right? I mean, isn't that what if I find something that I absolutely love, but I can't pay the rent for it, you know? Well, that's still a hobby in the hobby is still value, right? Yeah, I mean, that's the big, that's the big takeaway for all of us. I mean, there's two big takeaways other than the work stuff that we're talking about. How do you live successfully and build a thriving career? The other two chunks of this, of course, are I'm really trying to address in the book is number one, how do you change your relationship to your own life? Yeah. So many of us think our life is the enemy. We wake up. There's a bunch of to dos that we didn't do yesterday. And so you get through the day. That's the language we use. You get through the day. Or you withstand the day. If we could change our mindset to go, wait a minute. Actually, no, every day, life's trying to put on a show for you where it's trying to show you what I call threads. Your day is a fabric of many different activities. Many different situations, many different contexts. Some of them are gray threads, black throats, white threads, they don't move the needle very much. A little up a little down. But some of those activities in a day, a red threads. They're red. You find yourself leaning into them. You find you just feel like you have self efficacy when you're when you're doing them. They lift you up. For no good reason, but they're just like, I love it when she does or when I do such and such, or I love it when, and if you could look at your life that way, your life's trying to show you every day. How about this? How about this? How about this? It's like your loves are the clue to that 1 trillion synaptic connection network. And it's like, wow, what a beautiful thing. Life's showing you stuff that only you know. Now, no one teaches you how to do this, but wouldn't that be great if we flip the language on that? So that's like the first big thing that we're changing here. And then, of course, the second thing is that life isn't about balance. Yeah, you're not right. You're not nothing healthy in nature is balanced. Right. Everything's moving. I mean, you're an aviator. You know, better than anyone that everything's about angle of attack. Everything is. And you have to figure out motion. Well, the stars aren't hanging there. They're moving. Everything in nature that's alive is emotion through an environment, hopefully drawing enough nourishment from the environment to keep moving. Well, you've got one cup. You don't have 5 O family, faith, community activism, work 5 cups, I got a grandparents, my parents, but 5 cups got to figure out how to balance them. No, you don't. You've got one cup that is filled with a thing called love. Now you could call it energy, I guess. So you could call it nutrition or but it's one cup that you can fill for many different domains of your life. And there's no work life balance, because frankly, work is part of life. That's just almost immediately wrong. How do you fill your one cup with love? Because when you are, you're better. What's your point? If you've got some things that you love to do, that you can't actually get good enough at, which is true for many of us, to earn a living, well, that's called a hobby, and that fills your life with a little bit more love and that's okay. Yeah. That's a good thing. That's intentional, and that sensible, some things you'll get good enough, though, to practice and practice in the appetite drives the practice. And so love drives practice Joe's performance and logo. You do get look at you, you're doing a podcast for ten years. Well, you know, it is an issue. I was going to bring that up because I can't tell you how many times and this kind of maybe speaks to some of the Devils that kind of stop you from stop you from finding your love strength, right? I can't tell you how many times people have told me. I was like, well, what are you doing this for? Why are you doing this? How are you making money doing this? And I'm like, well, I mean, you know, and I give him some examples, and I'm like, but I'm doing it because this is my favorite thing to do. And they're like, well, I don't understand why you're doing it. I said, because it's my favorite thing. And they're like, well, how are you going to make money at it? And I'm like, I don't know, figure it out. And I've made money doing it. And I still make money doing it. I've made more money every year doing it. And it's because I haven't. But I haven't. I didn't get into it to make the money if that makes sense. I got into it because I love having these conversations. And the more I did it, the more I want to do it. And I know that if I don't do it, I feel like I'm in a shame the universe. That's why I keep doing it. Because does that make sense? And what was that phrase you used shame? I feel like if I don't do it, I shame the universe because that because it's laying on me that I have to do this. And I can't articulate that to anybody. No, I mean, I don't know what the articles of your faith are, but I believe in God, and I believe that we have been blessed with a uniqueness, and that uniqueness is manifested through the fact that we love it really is manifested at the 5 foot level. It's not like I love challenge. No, no, no. I love challenge in this way with these sorts of people at this time for this reason. I mean, love lives in the detail. And this is the kind of thing we hope I try to get into in the book is how do you use life to put detail to that which you love? Which is so interesting because everyone is like this undiscovered country of uniqueness. Right. And we like to say, well, you know, she's an extrovert. He's an introvert. And it's like, no. Like, feel the onion on that, won't shift for a while. But the glorious thing about that truth of how unique you are is that you then have to express it. And it's irresponsible not to express it. Now that doesn't mean it's narcissistic and self involved. Right. Because that's why it's called love and work. It's like contribution. You're trying to value your podcast. You're trying to my value. And if in the world the work goes or the world goes, Richard, I'm sorry, dude. It's just not valuable. Then that's nontrivial. That's interesting. But it's almost like, as I wrote in the book, is I love is for work and workers for love. Love is for the expression into something you contribute, which then gives you more raw material to add detail to that which you love, which then adds detail to that which you contribute. If you could wish anything on your four girls. It would be that you would teach them that infinite loop of energy flow. Where love has to flow, girls. So if one of your girls says, hey, I'm just going to pay my juice. I'm just going to start off on this job. I hate the job. But you know, it gives me good experience. I put that on my resume on LinkedIn and what you would hope to be able to do is say to her, never do that. You never pay your dues for three years. Hate every day and then imagine you're going to pop out after three years and then find the job that you really fits you. Because you'll be a damaged human after three years. You're not the same human. So whatever job you take, you might not love all of it, and that's why in the book I quoted that Mayo Clinic research that shows it's actually 20% red threads. You don't need to level that you do. You need to find the love in what you do and the threshold seems to be somewhere around 20% of your activities in a day should be read threads. So for one of your daughters to go, I'm going to pay my Jews, you would say, well, look, you may be paying you juice, but you better find some red threads..

Devils Joe Richard LinkedIn Mayo Clinic
"mayo clinic research" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"mayo clinic research" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Mean emergency room. Nurses have ptsd devils twice as high as veterans that returned from warzone. So you've got like that's a problem but some nurses and doctors have strong and high levels of resilience and no not so they studied them and it turns out that if you say that you have twenty percent of your day is activities that you love to do just twenty percent. You are far less likely to burn out and if you go down. nineteen eighteen. Seventeen sixteen percent. Fifteen percent with each percentage point reduction. In how much time you spend doing that you love at work. There is a commensurate. One percentage point increase in risk. It's a perfect linear relationship. So twenty percent. George is like a threshold of doing what you love. But interestingly above twenty percent. Let's say you have thirty percent doing what you love fifty percent doing what you love. It doesn't seem to drive more resilience. It's like twenty percents threshold. You get further above that fine. But it doesn't seem to bump up your resilience. It's like a little love goes a long way so what this really says for you or for the people that you lead is help them will help yourself thicker out every day. What are the particular activities that you love to do today because it won't be every activity and you don't need it to be every activity but you can't have it be below twenty percent because then you start getting into really bad territory you gotta get every day. Have some sort of intentional attention. On what are the particular activities. That i look forward to today. Or what are the activities. Where when i do them time seems to fly by like there are some activities for every one of us the feel like that. That's loved okay. I'm sorry the world doesn't know what you love and you can't expect your managing necessarily to know what you love. So you've got to figure out. I call these red threads. Everybody's job was made up of many different threads some blacks and browns gray but blah but some are read. These are the activities that you really look forward to and that you and that you vanish into and you do them the mayo clinic. Research says you don't need a red quilt in order to be resilient and productive. You don't need an entirely red blanket. You can just have twenty percent red threads but in order to do that. You better wake up every day and say to yourself. Every day. Like a mantra. What are the red threads i can. We've today if that feels like a strange thing to be saying to yourself because no one's ever told you to do that all right then. No one's told you to do that. But the truth is the most successful people. And the most resilient people do that really religiously markets that is a mic. Drop moment right there. I love these concepts. We've got living through change. Trust and leadership feeling loved at work and finding love in work which all lead to this pinnacle point of resilience so this idea of red threads is so powerful and i want you to unpack how the leaders listening out. There can make sure that they have these red threader team. Have these red threads in all of their work. How do you go about finding that. Well the first place is put your own oxygen in on first. You can't lead people effectively. If you are this close to breaking point you can only lead people effectively if you know how you we've read threads in your work. Everyone is so uniquely different. Every single entrepreneur is different in all my work on studying the traits of highly successful entrepreneurs. They're really annoying thing. Frankly georges that you take the best entrepreneurs and you line them up and you interview them and you interview them and you interview them and you find out. They don't share that. Many traits entrepreneur already different. And there's no sort standard set of talents. A particular entrepreneurs gotta have everyone of them is unique. But i'll tell you what they all do have same with leaders. They do know which bit of themselves they love enough to lead others. It's like we all have bits of us that we don't like very much. We will have bits of ourselves that we're not that proud of actually we'll have bits of ourselves that we don't wanna shine a bright light on but we also have bits of us activities on moments situations or responses to those people and how we did that thing and that thing that we go. I loved myself while that was happening. I was my most me when that was going on. That's why i read. Threat is so to begin with it starts. It starts with you as a leader. You better take your red thread seriously. The simplest way to do this by the way when there's lots of ways to do it but one of the simplist is just take a blank pat around with you for week. Endure aligned down the middle of the pad and then put loved it at the top of one column and loathed it at the top of the other column and take remedy for a week and anytime you feel one of the signs love like before. You're doing something you sort of instinctively look forward to it or while you're doing it. Time seems to fly by. And you feel like you've been doing for five minutes but you look up. It's been hopping out or when you're done with it. You don't feel drained. You actually feel invigorated like you feel like you've taken a leap of learning performance that ooh that was scribbling down and the it column and then the inverse scribble down the loads. Before you're doing something you keep trying to procrastinate shove after the new guy because it'll be developmental something right when you're doing it even doing a half an hour but for you it's dragging on and on and on it feels like five hours. Scribble down in the loathed. Now there's going to be a bunch of kind of gray and white and brown threads in the middle but if you can use the regular activities of your life your work to try to figure out what your red threads the activities in the love dick column other starting point for you enquiring about what you read threads. Aw and that doesn't mean that you should have a job where every single thing is a red thread. you don't need. There's as. I mentioned the mayo clinic. Says you don't need that but you can't have nothing in that love to call him. I'm sorry if you've got nothing in that locker column for two weeks in a row you won't be able to lead well and people will sniff you out. So the simplest way to do it would be to do a love it low the activity. George doesn't cost anything. No one's ever done it for you and no one can do it for you but you can do it yourself. You'll sit there looking at that. Love column and you're basically say to yourself. How can i make sure that every week has some of this stuff in it and then frankly simplest way to help you. People do this. First of all you've got to set it up right you have to say. Look i want your work here to be a place in which you feel like your best and part of being. Your best isn't just raw raw. It's going what are the particular activities that you love to do. I want you to find some love what you do. I do and come back to a week. And we'll just talk about what you put on the list and you don't have to have a job with everything in it. That's not the point the point is. Do you want to share with me. Some of the things every week that you get a kick out of. That's not nothing. In fact it's a huge.

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Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

20:33 min | 4 years ago

Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

"Network. Hi, I'm Vivian Williams for the mayo clinic news network, opioids continue to be in the news. A mayo clinic study found that despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients. The research published in the b. m. j. shows that opioid prescription rates have remained flat for commercially insured patients over the past decade rates. For some Medicare patients are leveling but remain above where they were ten years ago. Dr. Jeffrey Molly is the lead author of the study and scientific director of the mayo clinic division of emergency medicine research. He says the data suggests not much has changed in prescription opioid use since about five years ago. Now based on historical trends of opioid use pain medicine specialist. Dr. Michael Hooton says, there are Maine's an unmet patient need to better target the use of prescription, opioids. Leads the centers for disease control and prevention has previously reported that opioid prescription in the US has increased dramatically from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand ten mayo clinic is broadly researching opioid prescribing practices to find ideal doses for individual patient needs. The researchers say the goal is to achieve the best possible patient outcomes and experience with minimal exposure to opioids. This research has been translated into opioid prescribing guidelines, tools for medical practices at mayo and beyond. And in other news, what you might call the dog days of summer, maybe something more menacing for a person prone to migraines. So how and why does summer weather sometimes trigger these headaches? That's a great question. Says Dr. Rush me, hawker sing, a mayo clinic neurologist. She says that patients ask her that all the time and there's just not a great answer for some people. Extreme weather conditions may cause imbalances in brain chemicals. Which eventually can lead to severe throbbing pain of a migraine. Sunlight could also be a trigger and other weather triggers include high humidity, extreme heat and dry air. Dr. Hucker cing says, these conditions may lead to another migraine creator dehydration. Lots of people forget to drink enough during hot weather and dehydration concert, be risk for migraine attacks to happen. Her advice to people with migraines is to avoid extremes in summer weather and everyday schedules. She also says to be consistent with your eating habits and your sleeping habits, the mayo clinic news network. I'm Vivian Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom jive and I'm Tracy McCray for teenagers issues like peer pressure, academic expectations, and changing bodies. You're going through that right now or at your. It was a long time ago that I was a teenager Dr side. Thank you. All those things can cause a lot of ups and downs, highs and lows. But for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings. There is symptom of depression. Depression can affect how your teenager thinks feels and behaves. And in extreme cases it can lead to suicidal thoughts, the centers for disease control and prevention reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people. Age ten to twenty four. Fortunately for most teens, depression symptoms can ease with treatment such as medication and psychological counseling in here, disgust teens in mental health is mayo clinic pediatric psychiatrist, Dr Paul cork and welcome back to the program Dr Croke and it's good to see you glow. Thanks for having me today. Thanks for being here. So Dr, Carr, convince increasing number of suicides in this country has to be of some concern is very concerning and it's it's probably complex causes. It's something that's being as you point out, talked about and written about quite a lot quite often. And it's been been estimated that the the overall rates have nearly doubled less twenty years. Much of that involves teenagers. As you pointed out with young people, it's the second leading cause of death. Sadly there are in the neighborhood of, you know, forty, five thousand completed suicides annual in the US young people account for usually about ten percent of that. So there there's a host of things to think about. And I, I would argue that my field in particular we need to, we need to brace this as maybe failure that we need to relook at things and continue research in ways to do better his problem in the future. So you said suicide rates for teenagers as doubled over the last twenty years. So have the rates of depression doubled as well. That's one of the one of the considerations. The thought is that actually exhibiting depression is increasing as well. But there are other there are other factors to to present a balanced view here. There has been the argument made, perhaps we are just getting better at quantifying and qualifying into things, and we have more mental health professionals. Now, psychiatrist to identify these things. People are talking about mental health as well, and there's hopefully less stigma and people feel feel freer to talk about it as you point out. There's also as far as causes that are driving this potentially. There's been a lot of speculation is life becoming more fast paced and stressful for for teenagers general? Some of us at our age. We have sometimes difficult time wrapping our brain around that. But indeed, if you look at look at some of the things that are going on in the challenges teens face today, it's not. It's not benign another. Another, very very, I would argue poorly understood but important consideration is the internet. Did you. Title social media things like Facebook, Twitter, and the platforms that I don't even know about the using, how does that contribute? I mean, what's the relationship there? Well, the thought the thought there have been there have been studies Dr shops that can that suggest that that more time spent on that thing contributes to depression, but it's probably not that simple. I mean, the arguments been made, and this has been looked at that overall. Maybe maybe teenagers into some extent, adults are spending more and more time on these platforms with these technologies and overall feeling less connected in the genuine face to face empathic sort of fashion. The other pernicious aspect of these technologies. Something that I see in my day to day practice often is that there's a fair amount of negative behaviors broadly describe it that there's what's called cyber bullying. It's rampant with a lot of the lot of the young people that I work with and it some thought that there's been some suggestion that it the effects of this may be more. More lasting severe than face to face based face bowling, for example. So Dr shaves alluded to the fact. I've got two teenagers at my house, so I'm gonna ask a question and went to expect a choir of angels to start to rise up around me as I ask it, how can apparent distinguish normal teen moods, team behavior swings from signs of depression hut. Can you tell the difference? It's a great question and it's a, it's a deceptively simple to in that as you point out teens in general, have a host of neurologic integral suck logic changes because can bring his getting up and can contribute to meeting us and predictably. They tend to think that moms dads are less interesting to be around in the less at this age. Can you imagine didn't happen? I'm sure I know that's why I'm so confused by it, but getting on getting more on point with your question, pervasive changes in what you could you could refer to personality, so dark, dark, irritable moods that are there. All day long day after day after day that are per she added in more than one environment. So if there's feedback from teachers, schools, sports teams, the, you know, Joey, your Sally is just not not the same as they were before declining functioning academics is a as usually big telltale sign that previously a or b students suddenly see your or student changes in peer groups, changes in behaviors, changes in sleeping patterns, and then a focus on dark kind of things. Thoughts are or talk about suicide, for example. And the again, a related question I think would be, what do you do about these these various social media platforms and internet use? And that's another another thing I think broadly, did you stay engaged with your your children and it's not easy in teenagers. A couple of things I wanted to ask you about first of all access. I mean, there are so many more people who seem to be depressed, isn't access to a mental health prof. National more difficult because there are more so many more people out there and not enough of you. And I think the second part of that question is even if you are pretty certain that your child is is depressed. There's concern about how effective the treatment is in what the treatments going to pay. Those are great questions, and the short answer you're absolutely right on the first count that access is to mental health professionals. Psychiatry in particular is not not at all what it should be, and it's even more problematic for young people collectively, we are trying to address that. No mayo clinic is led the way things, for example, that are called collaborative care models or integrative behavioral health where we actually do things like we embed psychiatrist within a large network of primary care clinics for very different kind of role than what we're used to. It's more of a role of supervision coaching consultation on cases, so that family practice doctors, Tournus and pediatricians, for example, get more more depth and more comfortable with. Treating identifying treating things like depression, anxiety, youngster teenager, good things. All good. And to get your to get your other question identification and the definition diagnosis of this is challenging and for parents, it's often the way we do. This is often hard to understand in that we don't, you know, it's based on interviews and questions. There's no lab test or x Ray for this, but ongoing monitoring in mild cases, watchful waiting is appropriate where, again, parents and teachers have awareness. We do very simple, but important things like help youth structure, their sleep hygiene, their habits, their study patterns. But overall, if if symptoms are moderate to severe, they're impeding functioning and academic social and family treatment is important in the first. The first line for depression is usually a combination of psychotherapy, things like cognitive behavioral therapy or what's called interpersonal therapy and the judicious use of medications, and how can parents support thirteen. NHS ongoing communication about about their life in general encouragement, sometimes reminders to to take care of their health overall and setting that example as well making time for family dinner every day, those kind of things. And if parents think it is an emergency, they should call nine one one. Well, unfortunately, depression in suicides in America and including among teenagers is on the rise. It's important though to if there is a problem to get access to mental health care, even though it may be difficult and you've got some effective treatments. Exactly. We've been talking about teenagers and mental health when mayo clinic pediatrics, Kaya trysts are all Corcoran Dr. Clarkin thanks for being with us. Thank you decker shaft. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we'll look at some new research on diet and dementia. You're listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom shy and I'm Tracy McCray Tracy. We know that a diet that's filled with fruits and vegetables is good for waistline, but it's proving to be good for our brain as well. A recent study published in the journal of Alzheimer's disease showed that people with normal cognitive function who followed a Mediterranean diet had lower amyloid deposits in the brain. As we've learned before on this program, amyloid deposits in the brain are one hallmark of Alzheimer's disease in here to discuss is the lead author of the paper, mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr, Maria vassal, Laki, welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. That was pretty, you're Greek is pretty good. Thank you. I assume you are Dr Solanki. Great to have you with us. I, you know, I married into a great family, and so I set nice people. We have. So what's good for the body is good for the brain? Is that what we're saying? This is what we think that is accumulating evidence suggesting that died has been officially fact for the brain to and for against the climb. The my says, well, although we don't have definite evidence for that, but that is good body of literature supporting that. Is that what prompted you to the study? Yes. In the mayo clinic study of aging, we are studying cognitive decline and also by Marcus of Alzheimer's disease. So one of them would be the the position in the brain, and we had this cons and the date do study that inside of the association with diet. So when we talk about amyloid deposition in the brain amyloid is a as I recall, it's been a while protein, right? Yes. And we knew from autopsy studies that patients who had Alzheimer's disease before they died, had these deposits amyloid for whatever reason, there's an association between the two. And now if I'm correct, we can actually. Detect those amyloid deposits under numerous Gan, correct. We, we detect them in, for example, in pets can so we introduce some only gives through the blood and they go and highlight areas of the position. So we have the scans and we know the as where we have elevated amused and you said that you studied people with normal cognitive function. So how do you determine if someone buddies brain is normal and they can be in the study? So in them out participants in the mayo, Cain, excite the venting. They go a very comprehensive competition with nine defense near psychological tests, and then they are evaluated by physi- centers. Well, we also take information by informant the partner. So we have a lot of information. And then by consensus, we gather all the information and the nurse that helped the the coordinator, the physician and the psychologists, they decide based on data that we have. Whether someone would be within the normal function range or someone would have a little more cognitive decline than than we would expect for their age or whether someone would being the dementia, what was the age? They average age of this today participants. So for this Pacific style, the was seventy years and older. So the me Nate is about seventy eight years old fifty, five percent of them were men and what do the studies show ultimately? So we asked them about their eating habits. They last twelve months. So the head Thuan cer- about one hundred and twenty eight different questions on the food groups that they think that the amount and also how often they would. And we found that vein vigils were falling closer, the Mediterranean diet, and those that had the higher Sam shown of vegetables were less likely to have elevated levels of amyloid position in the brain. Now we have to point out that this is a. Sectional study in our terminology, which means this is like a photograph. We don't have the dimension of time, so we don't know what came first and what game second. So as we say in our area of research, we cannot assess the Kazadi between the two. However, we, this is information that supports previous information that we know that that has been officially fact. There's also the possibility that another factor could be in place that we haven't measured that we don't know about yet, but this is a first sign that our study showed supporting evidence of beneficial association. We all talked about it and we've talked about it on this program, but refresh our memories of regard to the Mediterranean diet. We know that it's mostly fruits and vegetables, but what what can't you eat or shouldn't you eat if you're on that diet? So it's it's a very colorful diet. It's high consumption. Oh fruits and vegetables, legumes nuts, also moderate to high consumption face less consumption of meat and saturated fats and more fat in the in terms of olive oil are consumed in the diet. Also, there is optional. Moderate use of alcohol is well mainly wine. And usually it happens in social occasions where it was wine on the list or not on the list. Why was on the list for them died when we started status the nineteen sixties. Now, alcohol is is optional in a way because for some of the conditions, we should not drink. It's very, there's incredible if we cannot control the amount of wine. So it's really optional. All right. The question is people who followed this diet for their entire life. People who live in the Mediterranean, I guess, do they have a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease than we have? I don't. Don't have a definite answer that as far as research is concerned, very rigorous clinical trials research. So we don't have definite evidence to suggest dietary interventions in our life. Today we have though a big amount of survey tional data in some clinical trials that would support that good violence died like the Mediterranean diet, but also other diets like the dash diet or the mind. Diet were societas with slower cognitive decline. Certain familiar with either one of those, the dash and the what was the other. Mind so that does diet. These, they enter approaches to stop hypertension and the mind is Mediterranean dash interventions for new the generative delay. So haven't studied this. Are you pretty much convinced that murder? Mediterranean diet is a good idea not just before overall health, but also to prevent cognitive decline. Are you convinced? I think we need to learn much more, but with we have enough to follow the advice of the gates now to have a good balance, healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet, but that is one of them. The good thing is that although we don't have any new commendation based on this data, and although we said it's like a photo Akra sectionals Patty, it adds an additional motivation that what is good for my general health. What is good for my cardiovascular can support my brain health, and that can happen directly may be. Through defense mechanisms or indirectly, supporting my cat. Vascular system puts also would be very important for brain health and dimensions. What's next in your research? So what we would like to do and other sets us also doing is to follow people onto the to see whether we follow the Mediterranean diet or any other beneficial diet pattern, whether changes in our bio markets in the brain. I'm for example or changes in our coq nation, beneficial changes associated with a good balanced diet. We've been discussing how diet may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and dementia with mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr. Maria vessel Ocoee. Thanks for joining us Dr. Bustle Ocoee. Thank you for having me, and that's our program for this week. Find more information on the mayo clinic news network to this, your health and medicine questions. Anytime at hashtag Mayo Clinic Radio, you've been listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network producer for the program, Jennifer. Era for Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom. I'm Tracy McCray. Thanks for joining us. Any medical information conveyed during this program is not intended as a substitute for personal medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting healthcare professionals for more information. Please go to our website, radio dot, mayoclinic dot org. Please join us each week on this station for more of the medical information you want from mayo clinic specialists. No.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Radio Depression Alzheimer's Disease United States Migraine Dr Tom Jive Vivian Williams Tracy Mccray Opioid Abuse Maine Dr Side Medicare Dr. Hucker Cing Dr Shaves Dr. Michael Hooton B. M. Maria Vassal