35 Burst results for "Mayer"

Diana's last moments: French doctor recalls 'tragic night'

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Diana's last moments: French doctor recalls 'tragic night'

"The first physician on the scene recalls the moment 25 years ago when Princess Diana died in a car crash in Paris Doctor Frederick Mayer was off duty when he drove into the Alma road tunnel in 1997 a few seconds after the high speed crash four people were in the car Two were apparently dead no reaction no breathing and the two others on the right side were living between severe conditions Princess Diana's companion Dodi Fayed and their chauffeur died on the spot I didn't realize that the young lady was the princess not one of the most famous woman in the world And I didn't expect that she died so quickly My a tells the AP he said second thoughts about his treatment of Diana Did I do correctly my job and yes I couldn't have done anything better Those grieving the loss of Diana in Paris still visit a statue near the scene of the crash I'm Ed Donahue

Frederick Mayer Princess Diana Dodi Fayed Paris Diana AP Ed Donahue
"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

15:39 min | 5 months ago

"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"You really felt like you had to do? The first year I had to figure out how to keep the great people who were there and I had to figure out how to get more great people in. And I talked a lot about a flywheel that I really believe in, which is you hire great people. They build great products. Those great products attract consumers, those consumers attract advertisers, the advertisers pay you, then you take the money and you reinvest it in the people, you hire even better people and more people and they build better products and they get more consumers and you get this very positive flywheel. And if you look at Google and Facebook and others in the space, they're on that very positive flywheel. And because you've got a business that's really working and attracting all of the users and the advertisers, it makes it much easier to attract employees. And so the focus was the people it was on hiring and ultimately would develop into a talent acquisition strategy because over the years at Yahoo, I would go on to buy approximately four dozen companies. And some of them were big strategic acquisitions where they changed the overall course of the company and our product offering, but a lot of them, the vast majority of them were talent acquisitions, you know, for, you know, in some cases, a few $100,000 a few $1 million, but we're most of the value is actually in the forward stock packages for the employees. So they were big dollar numbers, but they were basically bringing in teams that could hit the ground running. Did you find? I mean, coming into a company like Yahoo. I mean, you essentially were tasked with this huge responsibility with saving this company, right? And that is a, that's an enormous challenge, right? That's a possibly an impossible task. Did you find that the people around you the people at Yahoo really believed in that mission, or was there, I don't know, was there was a doubt did you sense that there was sort of doubt baked into the culture of the company. I'll answer that question in two parts. One is with an anecdote and another is with sort of a sort of a process we went through. On my fourth or 5th day at the company, I'm an introvert by nature. It was hard for me to do this, but in trying to get integrated as deeply in the company as possible, I would make a point. I would go down to the cafeteria, get my lunch and the lines that everybody else, and I would sit in the cafeteria for about two hours. And just like, and anybody wanted to walk up and say whatever they wanted to say to me, could walk up and say whatever they're going to say to me, and I went and I went on that way for probably like two to four weeks when I first got there. Just anybody who wanted to come up and talk to me could come up and talk to me. And when I was in the lunch line, somebody came over and tapped the front of my tray, a little fast tap to get and get my attention. And I looked up and he said, is it go time? And I just got the report right before lunch that 24% of the company had left in the previous eating 5 months. And I said, no, don't go. I've only been here for four days. Please don't go. I thought he was saying, I'm about to leave. Lady, I'm leaving, just let you know, like, today's my last day. I'm sorry, I had sort of departures on the brain. And he said, no, that's not what I'm asking. He's like, we've all been sitting here waiting for a few years for management and the board to figure itself out. Is it go time? Can we run? Can we actually execute on the ideas that we've been excited about, that we think could matter? And I was like, by all means, go, run. Don't let me get in the way. The second piece is, you know, we basically had to come up with a process and we looked at two different things. One was performance and ability, and the other was attitude. You had people who were like, wait, they're amazing in terms of what they can get done. And they've got a great attitude. They're all in it. They're just in it to win it. And that's easy. Just keep them going. If you have a bad attitude and you're not a good performer, it's also easy. They should absolutely not be there, and we had to clear out a lot of what people would probably call Deadwood at the beginning. And then it's the two in between cases that are tricky. And what we basically did is I really think that if you've got a great attitude, but you're not performing that well. It's leadership's job to find you a role where you can be really effective. Essentially, that employee in my view is usually miscast. Another other people where you'd say, okay, like if they're a great performer, but they have a terrible attitude, our attitude is give them 6 months and watch it. But if at the end of 6 months, their attitude hasn't really turned around and it really seems like it's not going to. It's sad because they're performing well, but they probably have to go. Yeah. What did you think, did you see your role as CEO, the state positive focused cheer people on and kind of no matter? Because you had access to information about the company, which showed mixed results, right? Some acquisitions did okay, some didn't do well, obviously, tumblr is an example. The stock price was up, but the profits were down and despite that, did you feel like it was your job to go out there and always show a positive face? No, I felt like it was my job to try and get us on that positive flywheel. Right. Hire the right people, help pick the right products in the areas to invest in, figure out how to attract more of the users to these new products. Make sure that we've got advertisers that are lined up and making the business work. Folate was my job to try and get that positive flywheel started. And we had early successes there, right? Our traffic grew, our users grew. We built a beautiful suite of products. I was one of the compliments all treasure forever was about 6 months before I ended up leaving Jerry Yang, who was the really the products for a long time. Basically came to me in the founder said, you know, the product suites never been as good as shape as it is right now. Yeah, I mean, the suite of products was obviously a success. And there were others. I mean, I think the stock price doubled at a certain point from the time you started. But I have to assume that at some point along the way, you must have come to the realization that Yahoo, as a stand-alone company, just couldn't be saved. Was there a particular point in a moment? In December of 2015, we had been planning since January of that year, the past 11 months to execute a tax free spin off of our Alibaba assets. And so Yahoo, this story was complicated because we had both the operating business with its users that were increasingly mobile and growing to more than a billion. And our Internet advertising business that was stable and beginning to start to show some signs of growth, not nearly the growth of some of our competitors had, but some growth. And then we also had two very valuable investments and investment in Yahoo, Japan, and an investment in Alibaba. And by 2015, that had really become the focus of the majority of our external shareholders. And as I said, we had developed a plan to execute a tax free spin off. That plan was met with some resistance, not I guess not that surprisingly, on the part of the IRS and in parts of in some ways in China, to try and get some of that tax revenue. We are ultimately coming up with a plan that based on our reading of the tax code and our law firms reading of the tax code was going to save approximately $10 billion in taxes. And in December of 2015, after those 11 months of planning, our board canceled the tax free spin off. And so from that point on, we said, okay, what are the other options? And one of the cleaner and faster things to execute was the sale of the operating business, basically sell the operating business out of the entity and therefore leave behind an investment company that holds the Yahoo Japan investment and the Alibaba investment and at that point. I would say that is really when it became clear to me that we weren't going to be able to achieve the outcomes I had hoped for for the operating company in terms of a turnaround as an independent company. To put it in context in the greater sense for me, we made that decision. We announced it on CNBC on December 9th. Of 2015, my twins were born that night. Actually at one in the morning. Wow. And so I do remember that decision in that realization settling on me over the course of the following week or two, but there's a lot overall going on. And so I will say, can I remember an exact moment when it really hit me that we would be selling the operating business and giving up the chance for an independent turnaround? I don't really, but also those kinds of decisions are things that are arrived at over weeks, not minutes. And so it became obvious sometime between December of 2015 and the end of January 2016 when we formed a formal committee to assess those alternatives that that was the direction that the company was heading. So Yahoo sold its core business to Verizon for about four and a half $1 billion. And you stayed on while the sale was being negotiated and then you stepped down. I think in June of 2017, if you were mrsa, if you were sort of assessing your time as the CEO of Yahoo, you were doing like a 360° review of your own time. How would you assess your own role as a leader as the leader of Yahoo? I would say, you know, overall, I feel really good about the team. We were able to attract and the products, as I said, I will treasure Jerry Yang's comment forever. I feel really good about the products and the strategy in the path that we overall ourselves upon, I feel like it was a test where pencils down was called too early. And there was a comment that when I first got the CEO ship, Eric Schmidt said to me that definitely rang true at the end where he said, you know, it's interesting as CEO how few decisions you really need to make. He said, you know, you can actually delegate most of the decisions and the more decisions you delegate, the better and the better those decisions will get made. He's like, but there's a few decisions where U.S. CEO you have to make them, and you have to make them absolutely perfectly. And I definitely feel that I wish we had had more time, but ultimately our efforts ended up being cut short and we weren't able to see some of how those investments were ultimately going to work out. And I would say for the investments that we did see work out a lot of them worked out really well. They weren't all perfect. There certainly were some misses, but seeing the condition that we handed the team and the business off to in Verizon performed really, really well for them for the first few years and I would just say even during the sale and close period at Yahoo, which lasted about 18 months, the business outperformed where our internal expectations were, which as I said, that wasn't necessarily obvious at the moment we had to decide whether or not to sell the company. But hindsight is 2020. Do you think did you ever feel like you were unfairly criticized as a CEO at times because you are a woman? As I said, I tend not to focus on the gender aspect of it. I think that, you know, I'm certainly not perfect and there were a lot of decisions that deserved criticism. I feel like there are certainly were times when there was a decision that was misunderstood from the outside. That with more context wouldn't have been criticized the same way, but I think I feel it has more to do with the context that was offered as opposed to the gender. The other thing I will say is certainly there were times where the word choice around some of the criticism would have a very gender focused bend. So, you know, I think people might agree or disagree with my overall acquisition strategy. I get that and that's something that investors and the public and the companies should debate. And so I was prepared for criticism on that. That said, I don't think they would call men buying companies a shopping spree. Right. And in fact, now, with the benefit of hindsight, you can look at other companies that were active acquiring at the same time and most of the other male CEOs bought more companies and spent more money and never had the word shopping spree used with thumb. Yeah. So there were things like that where to me that's just very clear on its face that that was a gender loaded criticism. That said, you know, criticizing are we buying too many companies? Are we buying them too fast? Are we integrating them properly? All that is reasonable and rational criticism for a CEO. As I said, if anything, for me, it was more some of the word choices and the particular slants put on it, not the fact that there was criticism overall. After your experience running, I mean, you are still young. I mean, you were a young ex CEO, and really at an age when you would be recruited as a potential CEO and probably even young to be recruited as a potential CEO. Even now, could you ever imagine running a fortune 100 company or a Fortune 500 company again? Would you want to do that again? For me, it's not about fortune 100 and Fortune 500 and the size of the team. And the size of the business, I realized when we sold the company to Verizon, we needed to write the blog post that would basically announce it to the world. And at the end of it, we really said, you know, Yahoo is a company that changed the world. And very few companies do. There's a lot of very successful businesses out there. But there's only a few that change what people do all day and how they think about things. And Yahoo is the company that popularized the Internet. And Google, I've been privileged to be a part of two different companies that changed the world in my view in a really fundamental way. Yahoo popularized the Internet, Google absolutely democratized information in a way that no other invention to date has. And for me,.

Yahoo Alibaba Jerry Yang Japan tumblr Facebook Google Verizon CNBC IRS Eric Schmidt China U.S.
"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:17 min | 5 months ago

"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"I can remember, I think a lot of people can remember the moment when they stopped using Yahoo as their search engine and then Google, for me, it was like 2001. Everybody was talking about this new thing Google and Yahoo had been in my homepage and that's what everyone used and I remember around that time making that transition to Google. And then over the next decade, Google really became a more prominent at least search engine than Yahoo. And around 2011, they were looking for a new leader, new CEO, when they approached you because you were a prominent executive at Google to lead the company and you took the job. Tell me what before you got to Yahoo. What was going on at the company? What was the sort of the state of affairs at Yahoo? In 2011. Oh, I think it helps to go back to September of 2011. I've always been a big fan of Carol barts. Amazing CEO of autodesk, and then of Yahoo. She and I share our Wisconsin roots. And so I had always really looked up to Carol, and was really sad and shocked at sort of the way that she had to exit Yahoo in September. And I remember reading about it in the news that morning and being upset about it. And then a good friend of mine came for his one on one, a guy named Gabriel stricker, who worked in Google's PR department, communications department, and he closed the door and he said, before we start our one on one, can we just talk about something? He was like, Yahoo CEO. Raise your hand. And I was like, and I remember putting my hands out in an X in front of him. And I was like, no, no, no, no, no. I was like, that board is, they don't know what they want. Are they trying to rebuild the company? Are they trying to sell it off for parts? They Carol's incredibly talented and that just fell apart. And this board is just confused. The leadership of the company is confused. And he was like, no, look, it's male. It's maps. It's mobile. It's social, it's everything you've ever done. It's news in a new context. He's like, he's like, this is the job for you. And I was like, no, no, no, no, no. That fall, they went on. They hired Scott Thompson by about January and by April or early May. He had resigned. And at that point, I thought to myself, oh, you know, Gabe told me last fall that I really should go for this, and I didn't. And maybe I should, but interestingly, at that point, I was 5 months pregnant. And so I was like, you know, it's just too bad because it's a great job. And the board has gone through a lot of changes recently. And so maybe they are trying to figure out what they want to be, and if Scott wasn't a good fit, then maybe I am, but I was like, nope, you're having a baby in October, and you're working on Google Maps for Apple and just stay focused. And so I didn't raise my hand. I didn't go to them. And then about 6 weeks later, I got a phone call from an executive recruiter, and he said, I'm calling you about this other opportunity and it's a CEO role and is in your neighborhood and it's in the domain that you've worked in, and then all of a sudden, at the end, he said, it's Yahoo. Are you interested? Wow. I was like, I just heard myself say yes. And he said, well, what would you need to be sure that you would want to be considered? And I said, I would, I want to meet with the board and I want to get a feel for, do they really want to work on products and making Yahoo's products relevant again in the mobile age, and if they're interested in products, I could be a very good fit. And if they're interested in financial engineering, then I'm not the right person, but I'll need to know based on the board. And so I met when I met with the nomination and governance committee. Who was leading the CEO search and it was really clear that they did want to work on products. And then ultimately went on to interview with the whole board. And it was all very secretive. I remember the day of my interview, they told me I had to stay home from work, so I came up with some reason. I did not go to work, and then they said a 10 o'clock black town car will pull up to your driveway and you're supposed to say project cardinal and they'll say project cardinal and you'll get in and you'll be taken to an undisclosed location for this interview. Wow. And it was all very, it was all very cloak and dagger. But you know, it all kind of happened like clockwork. And then ultimately they decided that I was the right candidate. Yeah. Tell me, what was it about that opportunity that attracted you at the time? Because you must have known that Yahoo was. Was going through some tough, a tough period that they were facing some pretty strong headwinds. For sure. And one I like hard work. It looked like hard work. And it was. And it's such a compelling brand. It's such a compelling company and story. And especially the people. And especially for me, I had a glorious plan of having my first child going on a 6 month paid maternity leave with stocking the whole time. And to give that up, it would have to be something really spectacular, but Yahoo as a company was that. And yes, it was also really troubled. But I love art. Probably because of my mom and I talked once to an art dealer and I said, you know, how do you decide which artists work you're going to represent and which ones you don't. And he said, you know, look, one, I only work with people who are nice because life is too short to work with people who aren't nice, but two with art, if an artist isn't nice, you feel it in their work when you look at it. And I think that's really true. And I also think it's true for most things that get created and built. You can tell a little bit about the disposition and the values of the people behind it in the way it works and feels and looks. And I think it's really true for technology as well in terms of how thoughtful are the people are they fun, what are their values like and you could just say, wow, Yahoo's board has been really, you know, really all over the place in terms of direction in recent years, the leadership has, but the products themselves have a levity and a softness and a funness to them and a thoughtfulness and they're so usable that there's just got to be good people there. And when I got to Yahoo, I was really pleasantly surprised because despite all the chaos at the top, the people who work there are amazing, they're talented and they're nice and they're fun and you really feel that in the products and.

Yahoo Google Carol barts Gabriel stricker PR department, communications Carol nomination and governance comm Scott Thompson autodesk Gabe Wisconsin cardinal Scott Apple
"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:26 min | 5 months ago

"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Issue. Sure. And at that company with the 48 male engineers and they were saying, look, you need to come. You have to be our first woman higher, you know, just the feeling of the place, the way the guys would talk to me, even in the interviews about technical concepts, like you could just be like, I get it, I understand why it has been hard for you to hire women. Where Google was the opposite, Google thought they were like, wait, we're like 7 engineers already, and we don't have a woman engineer here yet. We don't want to get to ten or 20 people without having a woman engineer. We know we need to get a women engineer in here. It meant that we had a much more balanced culture from the very beginning. Did you did you find given that the company was so small and you were such an early hire, you were given and you were still so young, but obviously talented and had these skills that they needed, did you find that they gave you quite a bit of responsibility quickly or did that take time? They gave everyone a lot of responsibility quickly, and I mean, it did mean that it was a intense learning experience. They really, you know, you got thrown into the deep end of the pool, right? I remember came in and it would be like, okay, Marissa, you're doing ads. Not joining the ads team, but your ads. You're running it. And then obviously Google grew really quickly and more formal teams and senior people joined. But in the beginning, in June, that was literally the structure. Yeah. I mean, it sounds like it was just, I mean, obviously super exciting, but just crazy, right? Like, I get a bad, what was the workload like? Were you just living there more or less working all the time and those early days? Well, it's a funny story because it's pretty frequent that we would work until two or three in the morning. At the office before heading home, most nights, whether we were we weren't always productive at late, sort of at the end of the night and be like, okay, I'll kind of clean up the code I've written today and finish up some code reviews for other people and I also remember conversations we'd have late at night. There was one night when that was kind of the exact scene. It was like three in the morning. We're all sitting on these exercise balls because we thought it was more fun to have the exercise balls in the office to sit on. And Harry, Harry Chong, who ran the crawler, was about to start the crawl process up. And at the time, we didn't really have any checkpointing in our systems or any way of sort of backing up. So basically crawling the web entailed Harry typing about 300 commands in succession. And if he actually mistyped one, he might have to back up and start all over again. So that meant that part of the working at Google at the time was making sure that Harry was well caffeinated and feeling really good about that next that next command. So we were all just there for moral support by being like, how are you feeling? Do you need more coffee? We got you know. We're like 6 or 7 days into this process and we don't want to make a mistake now. But in that, it was sort of interesting because when we were all sitting around talking about and could you take pictures of all the physical locations in the world so we even were like brainstorming about things like street view there was a notion of like could we have a companion in a browser, much like the one I had worked on during my research that could help people get even better search results and more personalized search results, which would later go on to become the Google toolbar in chrome and we kind of brainstormed all these different ideas that during that late night chat and all of a sudden one of the early engineers jumped off of his ball into the center of the circle and said, you know, I just want everyone to stop because I don't know what happens with the company from here, but it's just never going to be better than it is right now. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy Roz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, vos water. Voss water is a known for its beautiful outside, but the inspiration behind Voss has always been about what's on the inside. One of the purest bottled waters in the world. Vos water has a uniquely crisp, refreshing taste. Available in classic glass and portable on the go options that will keep you hydrated no matter where your day takes you. And look out for our enhanced waters, including vos plus collagen, vos plus vitamin D, and Voss plus Aquaman. This message comes from our sponsor Wix who knows a thing or two about turning a scrappy startup team into a global organization serving millions of people. And they want to share what they've learned with you in a new micro podcast series called ready for takeoff by Wix, where the company's founders and leaders share super short lessons designed to help you build better products and teams faster. Subscribe and follow ready for takeoff by Wix right now on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to this show. It's Gregory Warner from the podcast rough translation. What if your company gave you a new work alias? From here on, I'm not shining, but I'm Hannah. Could a new name give you a different work personality. Hannah is a braver version. We're at work in South Korea with rough translation from NPR. This is wisdom from the top. I'm guy Roz. You were given a lot of responsibility and more and more senior roles very quickly. Obviously because you were super talented and you were showing a capability to be able to do those things. I guess at a certain point, you move away from actually coding and programming and doing that to leadership roles by 2005, you are the VP of search and user experience. Did you make the transition from being an engineer to actually being an engineer, but really being more of a manager of people was that was that tricky was it hard to learn? I would say for me the experience was more organic and less segmented than it might seem from the outside. Which is to say, when you got a company growing that fast, you fill in gaps where they're needed, and now I can look back and say, wow, that progression was really fast, but at the time I'll tell you it often felt slow. And late, we'd be like, wait, I've been like, thank you for giving me that role. That's the job I've been doing for the last year or a year and a half. It's not because people aren't recognizing your efforts. It's just that there's so much going on with the company, a lot of times you'll be like, oh, wait, did we not formally give that job or that responsibility to that person? Like, we should make that official. And in terms of my transition, out of coding and in to more management, it felt, again, more gradual because I think the last time I coded something that actually went up on the Google site formally that was more robust was probably Google news. I did some of the front end work on Google news, which I think was 2002 or 2003. And even after that, I would still do some coding work on the homepage, I would go on to help with the Google doodles and some of the promotions on the homepage. And I was kind of the keeper of the homepage for about a decade there. And I would do some of the coding work there, but so I kind of ease out coding more slowly than that. And for me, I would say, I like managing people. It is something that I needed to learn about for me. I had transitioned from writing code to managing the product, as opposed to managing people, really managing how does the product work and look and feel, and then ultimately later starting to actually manage people, and Eric Schmidt was a terrific mentor through that whole process because he reminded me I remember early on talking to him and I said, you know, look, Eric, I think at some point I would like to become a manager right now, I'm managing products and maybe at some point I would manage people. And he said, you know, he's like, managing people, it's important and it's important to do well. You need to understand how to motivate them and how to orchestrate all the nuts and bolts of a team. But the goal is leadership. Your goal really should be to lead people. And management is what you need to do in order to effectively lead people, but really think about what it is you want to achieve. And.

Google Harry Harry Chong Roz Marissa NPR Gregory Warner Hannah Voss Wix South Korea Apple Eric Schmidt Eric
"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:03 min | 5 months ago

"mayer" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround, and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm guy rise. On the show today, former Google and Yahoo executive, Marissa Mayer. You know, there was lots of different factors to weigh and it was still even a hard decision to make. And I waited through with a good friend of mine, a guy named Andre veneer and Andre gave me what I still consider the best advice I've ever gotten, which is just go to bed, and when you wake up in the morning, the first thing you think of, pick that. And so I did, I went to sleep, I woke up in the morning, and when I woke up, Google was the first thing I thought of. Marissa Mayer broke into the all boys club of engineers at Google. And went on to run Yahoo. Where she spent years trying to prevent its eventual decline. So if you started using the Internet regularly in the mid to late 1990s, there's a pretty good chance at some point. Your homepage was Yahoo dot com. For millions of people, Yahoo was the Internet. It was the first place you went to search or where you got news, possibly where you got your email. But by the mid 2000s, Google started to cast a long shadow over Yahoo. And while Yahoo was still a major force, the company was being out innovated and outmatched by its upstart rival. By 2012, Yahoo had gone through 7 CEOs in just 5 years, and the company was in crisis. And so the board decided to place its hopes in Marissa Meyer. At the time, there was a lot of excitement about the decision. Marissa had been the first female engineer at Google, where she started her career at age 23. She was brilliant. And she had nearly a decade of executive experience under her belt. So at the age of just 37, Marissa Mayer left Google to see if she could help turn around the ailing tech giant. Yahoo. Her tenure would last 5 years. It was a period of incredible optimism, but also incredible challenges. And one point under her leadership, the stock price doubled. But as you'll hear, in the end, even Marissa Mayer was unable to save the company. She would preside over its sale under intense pressure from activist investors. And while her legacy at Yahoo is mixed, Marissa Mayer helped pave the way for more women to lead tech companies. She was almost destined to become a big player in tech, even from an early age, when her mom taught her how to code. She actually was the person who introduced me to computers because she went for a graphic design course where they had her learn logo. So she was learning to move the turtle around the screen to make drawings and pictures. And so I, you know, she had me, I was looking in the third grade program a little bit alongside of her, and that was, you know, I had my exposure to computer science then in the third grade, and then not again until high school, but actually my first exposure to computer science and was programming the logo turtle on a Commodore 64, and it was actually for one of my mother's art classes. Ironically, as opposed to one of my father's engineering tasks. So when you got to high school, is that when you started to get into computers and what did that mean? Were you like programming or not quite? Yeah, I took one, I think I took one or two computer science courses in high school that they were pretty basic. But I really didn't get back to computers until I enrolled at Stanford. Did you I mean, I have to assume that you're super talented, high school student, you probably were at the top of your class or close to it in high school. And I had to assume that there were adults who were saying Marissa, you know, you're going to go places, what did you think you wanted to do with your life when you were 17 or 18 years old? I developed a vision when I was 12 or 13 that I wanted to be a pediatrician. And then as I was doing my college search, I was like, okay, I want to be a pediatric neurosurgeon. So when I came to Stanford, I was really certain that that's ultimately what I wanted to be. And then when I got here to Stanford, I ultimately realized that there were a couple of different things going on. One, I realized I wasn't as interested in cutting up a brain as I was interested in learning how did it work. How do you learn? How do you express yourself? How do you reason? And I also realized that I was getting an education that was coming at a great cost to my parents, but wasn't that differentiated from what I saw my Friends doing at some of the other schools that I had turned down. At less cost. So I was like, okay, I'm spending more to go further away and I'm not getting an education like I went home after freshman year and I was like, you know, we're learning literally off the same flash cards the same carbon the same carbon atom sets built to build off of a lot of the same curriculum. And then between my freshman year and the spring I took my first computer science course, which was actually called computer science for non majors that fell to requirement. In the first day of class, the professor said, you know, there's 400 of you here, extensive studies of Stanford students have shown exactly two of you will go on to do any future computer science at all. Wow. So I'll make this easy for you. And it was interesting because this was spring of 1994 and they had us, for example, some of our homework was install the mosaic browser and go and find out the price of some restaurants in Palo Alto to put their menus online and find out the price of a certain dish. And then we also did some programming. And I think I got an a plus in the course. And I thought it was just great. But I thought I was done. I thought that there was just like, okay, it was kind of a one and done for me. Went home, freshman year, and then on my way back to Stanford, I was studying the course catalog trying to figure out what I was going to take in addition to sort of the pre med core that I would need to take sophomore year. And I found a program at Stanford called symbolic systems. And as I read about a symbolic systems was ultimately a student designed major that then became an available major in the school, but it was interdisciplinary and it combined psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science. Psychology is cognitive psychology, how do people learn philosophy is logic? How do people reason? Linguistics is how do people express themselves and computer science? Can you create a computer that can do the same that can learn and reason and express itself? And that just really caught my fancy because I was like, okay, these are a lot of things I'm interested in. They're actually specializations and concentrations you could do. My concentration would ultimately become artificial intelligence. But there were concentrations there for neuroscience, a lot of the areas I was really interested in and excited about and I thought, wow, this really actually hones in on exactly what I'm interested in, which is less about the physiology of the brain and a lot more about how it works. The only discipline I didn't know a lot about was linguistics. And so it turned out the chair of the department, Tom wassau, was teaching introduction to syntax that ball. And he also happened to be the chair of small systems, so I went and saw him and said, you know, I'm thinking about becoming a symbolic systems major. And I knew that professor wassa would try to sell me on it. But he did it in the most interesting way, which is that he said, you should absolutely become a symbolic system students. Because all of the most interesting Stanford students are. I was almost like, okay, one, you'll be surrounded by really interesting people who will challenge you, but two is almost this kind.

Yahoo Marissa Mayer Google Stanford Andre veneer boys club of engineers Marissa Meyer Marissa Andre CEOs Palo Alto Tom wassau professor wassa
Top seed Kansas opens 50th NCAA with 83-56 win over TSU

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Top seed Kansas opens 50th NCAA with 83-56 win over TSU

"The best game of the day in fort worth that Trey Alexander converting a three point play late in overtime carrying crate into a seventy two sixty nine win over San Diego state what you do every day after practice before practice whatever you wanna say the actual work that you put in I feel like it just takes over in the late moments and it's not really you thinking about it just happens Alexander finished with eighteen points Matthew Mayer scored a career high twenty two points and Baylor approved a twenty seventy six by ripping Norfolk state eighty five forty nine freshman standout Jeremy so Han added fifteen points and seven boards for the bears Remi Martin had a team high fifteen points off the bench is Kansas hammer Texas southern eighty three fifty six north Carolina blew out Marquette ninety five sixty three is Brady Manek scored twenty eight points and Caleb love had twenty three I'm Dave Ferrie

Trey Alexander Matthew Mayer Fort Worth San Diego Remi Martin Baylor Alexander Norfolk HAN Jeremy Marquette Ninety Brady Manek Kansas Texas North Carolina Caleb Dave Ferrie
Sochan and shorthanded No. 7 Baylor get past TCU 72-62

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 10 months ago

Sochan and shorthanded No. 7 Baylor get past TCU 72-62

"Seven Frank Taylor had five players score in double figures in the seventy two sixty two win over TCU Jeremy so had matched his season high with seventeen points and Matthew Mayer added sixteen for the bears who led by twenty one with five minutes remaining the defending champs were without guard Adam Flagler in LJ Cryer Cryer had played only one game since missing five in a row Kendall brown had thirteen points and James king Jo O. eleven for the bears or twenty two and five overall ten for the big twelve Emanuel Miller and Michael Peevey had sixteen points apiece for TCU I'm the ferry

Matthew Mayer Frank Taylor Adam Flagler Cryer Cryer TCU Kendall Brown Bears Jeremy James King Jo O. Emanuel Miller Michael Peevey
Mark Levin Confronts Comments by Jane Mayer on Justice Clarence Thomas

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 11 months ago

Mark Levin Confronts Comments by Jane Mayer on Justice Clarence Thomas

"Cut 13 go Your story lays out Jenny Thomas long history of conservative activism Talk about what you found Well I mean she has been an issue for quite some time because she's such a vocal activist in politics and the court is supposed to be seen as kind of above politics And her husband has made a point of saying so Is she on the court I guess I'm confused You see on the court no she's not on the court Go ahead Looking at was her ties to issues directly in front of the court And there are so many of them It was just directly in front of the court We have the Speaker of the House who has many many issues she actually controls That affect the finances of her and her family As a matter of fact we have that throughout Congress We even have that with Biden and his family paid off by the communist Chinese Where's the evidence of any kind whatsoever The clarence Thomas thinking process is values his constitutional originalism are affected by anything but that those three elements

Jenny Thomas Biden House Congress Clarence Thomas
Will John Mayer Move in on Bob Saget's Widow?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:38 min | 11 months ago

Will John Mayer Move in on Bob Saget's Widow?

"That I have a sneaking suspicion that in due time in due time, bob said it's very pretty younger widow Kelly would be leaning on John Mayer's shoulder for support and maybe just maybe she'd be leaning on another part of his anatomy too. Okay? I'm sorry. This is how John Mayer operates and listen, I know a lot about situating yourself as the guy from moral support when you know a woman is gonna need some strength. I've done it. I've been there. Many of you have, I just feel this is what John Mayer will do and is doing right now. Doesn't make him a bad guy. Might make many of you feel he's a shit friend, but people are people in misery loves company and if that company can sing and play guitar as great as John Mayer Campbell, then it's bound to happen. I just see John Mayer and Sagan's widow Kelly being together and having to explain why this is nothing crazy to look at. Bob would have loved this. You know, it's going to be fine. We're just Friends. You just wait. There's going to be pictures and People magazine or radar online of them hooking pinkies walking someplace. You watch John Mayer will never miss an opportunity like this. And I don't want to look, I don't want to be looked upon as a crazy person or a piece of shit. I just see this happening and my Spidey sense has been on

John Mayer Kelly John Mayer Campbell BOB Sagan
How Greta Garbo Got Her Hollywood Start

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

How Greta Garbo Got Her Hollywood Start

"And here I am doing this show about garbo who got her start in 1924 because one day the studio had Louis B Mayer, saw her in the movie joyless street, and he said, you know what? I'm taking a chance on garbo. He signed an MGM, moved at a Hollywood, and for the next 15 years, she ruled the film world. I don't know if you've seen classics like mana Hari or grand hotel or Anna karenina. Good stuff. And while she was making movies in Hollywood, she met the actor Melvin Douglas, never slept with garbo, but he did costar in three movies with her. And he just said that garbo oozed sex.

Garbo Louis B Mayer Mana Hari Hollywood MGM Anna Karenina Melvin Douglas Grand Hotel
"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Does that crossover with your taste in romance or no? Peculiarly no, because I have found very few things that hit both genres. We're talking about fantasy romance crossovers. I can not pass up this opportunity to mention one of my favorite series of all time, although I'm unembarrassed romance habit, I am embarrassed about this. And bishop's black jewels. Oh, no shame there. Oh, come on. Tell me, tell me what this is. Oh God, so I actually wrote a piece about this from PR. It's a series where, okay, she has kind of an interesting project. The idea of this series, and it is hurt fantasy. Everybody has AE in their names. You know that's how it's right. Yeah, sure. The heroine is Jane now. Sure. And so it's set in this universe where there's three different layers of world from the normal world down to hell. And the fantasy tropes of light and dark are flipped, right? Power comes from the darkness, women rule, the witches. The magic uses are ranked by their jewels and the darker jewels of black jewels are the ones that rule, but it's just so incredibly it's like a 15 year old's fantasy of emotional fulfillment like the men are incredibly hot and incredibly emotionally protective and incredibly. They go mad. I mean, one character spends most of one but completely insane because he thinks he's hurt the woman he loves. It's funny because when we were first talking about remembrances of Petro, one of the things that I told people was, you know, she had this way of she would come to me and she would be telling me about something that she was reading and she'd be like, okay. So it's like an 8 book series. And it's sisters, but one of them is a wolf and another one is a lawyer. And the reason I put it that way, it sounds like I'm making fun of the stuff that she liked and it wasn't that..

bishop Jane Petro
"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Okay, first up, I have to give this one a little bit of background. A lot of background. Until 2017, there was an FM radio station called NPR Berlin. And it was out of Berlin. Like as in Berlin, Germany. And one of the things that they did at NPR was up in programming. They would get people to read the weather, and it was the weather in Berlin. I did it once, maybe twice. Yeah, me too. It would just be like a thing where you would randomly get to go up there and read the weather. But for some reason this was always a thing that people chuckled about being asked to read the German weather. And we sat down to do a taping. So this tape comes from the studio before the official taping had started. And I was talking about the fact that I had just done the German weather. Now you will hear me do a silly German accent at the beginning of this which a is terrible and B is a joke because I did not actually do the weather with the celiac accent. But Petra picked it up for me. I want to do the Berlin weather. That's like my goal, yeah. It was a German. It was a German. It is very enjoyable doing the job. I'm totally adding it to my to my resume. I wish to be a German vinegar. Yeah. I end veteran beer. Her hair and it was indeed German. She talked about that actually quite a bit. And we actually have another clip of her talking about that because she was with us while we reviewed pitch perfect two. Yeah, she was. And specifically, she talked about flula bark. Go ahead. The amount of effort it takes to keep up that bad of a fake German accent while you're singing. I actually looked them up to discover if they were really German. And I discovered that the guy is and not only that guy, can I just say, with the best name ever? Borg. He's a DJ, but he got his start as a shoe platter. And if you know anything about German culture shoo platter, is their version of Morris dancing. It is the most Bavarian thing you can possibly do. They used to do it at blobs beer park up in Merrill in where the later hosen and you wear the silly hat and you dump jingle jingle thump and you slap your shoes a lot. It is the best. And, you know, perhaps it is uncool of us to make fun of Germans, but frankly, I'm about as German as a truck full of cabbages crashing into a pickle factory by this. Come on. I can make fun of Germans. We recognize they are German jokes, but they are funny and we give them a little bit of a delight. I could listen to her describe dancing styles. She had a many passions that included, by the way, she was a singer. She was involved in lots of out there performance stuff. You know, there's a photo of her reporting from Comic-Con. While in costume, of course, oh my gosh. A prolific wearer of costumes. Oh my God. Costumes. The highest. Yeah, came one year for Halloween as the AP style guide as AP style, I believe. Spider Jerusalem from transmetropolitan. Yep, that was also a thing. She definitely dressed as rose quartz from Steven universe. Yes. Remember that? So we talked a little bit earlier about the romance novel episode that Barry and I did with Petra and Sarah Wendell. And we have a little clip from that as well. I am like Barry a historical girl. I love the regency. Or the Victorian era or fake elizabethan or fake medieval..

Berlin NPR blobs beer park Petra Germany Borg Merrill AP Sarah Wendell Jerusalem Barry
No. 8 Notre Dame Survives Toledo 32-29 After Wild 4Q

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

No. 8 Notre Dame Survives Toledo 32-29 After Wild 4Q

"A Frank Notre Dame escape with the thirty two twenty nine win over Toledo one Jack Collins eighteen yard scoring strike to Michael Mayer with sixty nine seconds left the rockets took a twenty nine twenty four lead on freshman quarterback dequan Finn's twenty six yard bootleg TD run with one thirty five remaining it took Colin just twenty six seconds to directed three play seventy five yard touchdown drive colon threw for two hundred thirty nine yards and two touchdowns both to mayor Colin also was sacked six times fumbled once and had an interception return by Chris McDonald for a touchdown I'm the ferry

Frank Notre Dame Jack Collins Dequan Finn Michael Mayer Toledo Rockets Mayor Colin Colin Colon Chris Mcdonald
Man Dies After Falling From Balcony at Dead & Company Concert in New York

Z Morning Zoo

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Man Dies After Falling From Balcony at Dead & Company Concert in New York

"Rock band, the Grateful Dead right course. So they still chore, But they're not called the grateful anymore. They're called the dead and company because it's some guys that were in the band and then some friends just sort of it. What is it? John? Marriage John Mayer often tours with I don't think he was at this show over the weekend. New York at a dead end Companies show a fan legit, died after he fell off a second floor balcony. Well, that's one way to girl there are there. I've done the math. There are three groups of people who go to a grateful dead show stoners, senior citizens and senior citizen stoners. Who? Okay, balconies at this show. They need like netting or something up. There shouldn't even be stares at a grateful dead shot at this point.

John Mayer John New York
The Electric Grid-Lock

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:02 min | 1 year ago

The Electric Grid-Lock

"Robinson. Mayer is a writer at the atlantic and author of the newsletter. The weekly planet so robinson. Let's turn up very basically How is the power grid in the. Us organized nationals state by state. Oh well it's it's a disaster honest basically. There's three grids in the us. There is the eastern grid which kind of runs to the middle of the country. There's the westerner connect and then there's texas and we are just going to set x aside. So here's the thing. All the grids within those big interconnections like talk to each other and are connected so you could move electricity from like connecticut to new york to new jersey even though those are kind of like three different local grids. Yeah but like. You can't move electricity super easily from oklahoma to new jersey. The dream of a national grid is that you build those across the country so that we have like basically like an electricity interstate highway system linking the whole country. What is so bad about the current situation. I mean what would actually be so much better if everything were fixed and perfect like i dunno with power bills be like a quarter as expensive. Would they be like a couple of bucks. Plus would it be like our carbon emissions would go down by eighty percent. I mean what are the stakes here. The stakes here. I think are really two fold. The first is gonna need transmission to solve climate change. We just need it. that is blowing. My mind is not that big of a deal transmission. It's really so. It's a huge deal to fight. Climate change right. We need to build as much low-carbon electricity generation as possible right as many renewables and so it is just true that we have a power system that right now. Basically relies on kind of power plants to generate electricity. A lot of the time and we're moving to a power system where we have to be kind of more entrepreneurial about where electricity is flowing from anyone moment

Robinson Mayer New Jersey Atlantic United States Connecticut Texas Oklahoma New York
"mayer" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"Very much looking forward to today's interview. Chris mayer is one of my favorite people in the whole investment universe. What can i say. Chris is the portfolio manager and co founder of woodlock house family capital a private investment fund. He has written four books including one hundred baggers stocks that return one hundred one and how to find them and most recently he wrote. How do you know a guide to clear thinking about wall street. Investing in life which one twenty nine thousand nine hundred sl hayek. Ou- book prize awarded by the institute of general semantics. Chris has traveled to over thirty countries in search of great investment ideas. Chris welcome back man. Hey good to be on with dan as always. Yeah well. i don't think. I knew about the hirakawa price so a much. Belated congratulations on that. Thank you. I mean that book You know it's more intellectual kind of books not day It's not hundred baggers. I tell people but Kind of a funny story. Because when i went to present that to a publisher absorbing the idea and they thought we wouldn't sell and They were right but it did get some attention some in some areas. That was nice to win the hayek our award that was a nice appreciation for it and he was one of those books. I just had to write myself. I had it in me as bursting out. And i had to get it done regardless of whether it it's sold or not. Yes so i remember asking you about this topic of general semantics. And it's i know nothing about it. You recommend books and i don't remember if i bought them or not. They might be in here somewhere. I have too many books. But what what. The heck is general semantics. What is it yeah. It's kind of a hard thing to describe. Because it's sort of a broad discipline. But i would say i think of it is. It's kind of an aide to critical thinking and it has a lot of different tools that help you sort through problems than and so it's it started with a guy named alfred khris..

Chris mayer woodlock house family capital Chris sl hayek institute of general dan alfred khris
"mayer" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"They <Speech_Male> listen to podcasts. <Speech_Male> Yeah and <Speech_Male> they get excited and they're like. <Speech_Male> How can we participate. <Speech_Male> Where can we put <Speech_Male> money. Where can we. <Speech_Male> How can <Speech_Male> we support this work and effort <Speech_Male> energy. So <Speech_Male> i think we're now in <Silence> a perfect storm <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> both good and bad reasons. <Speech_Male> People are <Silence> suffering so much <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> they're looking for answers <Speech_Male> we just had <Speech_Male> this global pandemic <Speech_Male> which is totally <Speech_Male> knocked. <Speech_Male> The world on its socks <Speech_Male> and his trying <Speech_Male> to recover from <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> New media <Speech_Male> and resources <Speech_Male> are coming out to people <Speech_Male> so your message. <Speech_Male> Ken <Speech_Male> go out there. You're not waiting <Speech_Male> for cnn to call <Speech_Male> you anymore. You <Speech_Male> can be on five podcast <Speech_Male> and get way more <Speech_Male> than listeners. <Speech_Male> That way who actually going <Speech_Male> to buy your book. <Speech_Male> So i mean <Speech_Male> it's exciting times. <Speech_Male> You know it's exciting time. <Speech_Male> I always feel <Speech_Male> like we ended up here for a reason. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> there's people that are willing to do <Speech_Male> something about it to get <Speech_Male> to the next. I <Speech_Male> see us being <SpeakerChange> one of those people. <Speech_Male> That's doing something about <Speech_Male> it with. Thanks very much <Speech_Male> drew. I really <Speech_Male> appreciate. This was <Speech_Male> really famille <Speech_Male> so fascinating conversation <Speech_Male> dairy <Speech_Male> high level. <Speech_Male> Yo you <Speech_Male> you're a yobs <Speech_Male> is somebody who knows <Speech_Male> the field really well <Speech_Male> and have talked to a lot of the <Speech_Male> players <Speech_Male> which makes a big difference <Silence> you know i <Speech_Male> mean <Speech_Male> the way the messages <Speech_Male> conveyed and <Speech_Male> what kind <Speech_Male> of answers that <Speech_Male> i give have a <Speech_Male> lot to do with with <Speech_Male> with people like yourself <Speech_Male> you know. So i'm <Speech_Male> i'm. <Speech_Male> I'm really thankful <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> we had this <Speech_Male> opportunity to talk <Silence> really good. <Speech_Male> Absolutely <Speech_Male> well the gut <Speech_Male> immune connection. <Speech_Male> It's out <Speech_Male> i think you <Speech_Male> just heard. I just heard you had <Speech_Male> a really beautiful book <Speech_Male> launch party. I think one of my <Speech_Male> friends was Attending <Speech_Male> there are congratulations <Speech_Male> on that <Silence> <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> know it's on amazon. <Speech_Male> People can buy it <Speech_Male> in addition to <Speech_Male> different bookstores. And things <Speech_Male> like that. anything <Speech_Male> Interesting <Speech_Male> that you're doing to keep <Speech_Male> the conversation <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> all on gut <Speech_Male> health whether it's <Speech_Male> the gutten mind <Speech_Male> connection whether it's got <Speech_Male> an immune connection <Speech_Male> do you have a newsletter <Speech_Male> or some way that the listeners. <Speech_Male> Who enjoyed this. Conversation <Speech_Male> can continue <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> participate in your world. <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> we have a newsletter <Speech_Male> the mind got compensation <Speech_Male> us <Speech_Male> later comes every two <Speech_Male> weeks <Speech_Male> Every <Speech_Male> <hes> other week we <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> got health insight <Speech_Male> emailed. <Speech_Male> it goes. art actually <Speech_Male> will go out tomorrow <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> these are topics <Speech_Male> picked in white <Speech_Male> range from <Speech_Male> you. Know <Speech_Male> the mind brain. <Speech_Male> The gut <Speech_Male> also sometimes <Speech_Male> about the environment. <Speech_Male> This one <Speech_Male> health concept <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> it's a wide range of <Speech_Male> topics by computers <Speech_Male> by myself. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> We also add <Speech_Male> recipes <Speech_Male> into which <Speech_Male> are always popular <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> just illustrate that <Speech_Male> you can eat some <Speech_Male> delicious <Speech_Male> food items. <Speech_Male> You know that <Speech_Male> that are <Speech_Male> microbiome <Speech_Male> targeted and got friendly <Silence> so <Speech_Male> beautiful. <Speech_Male> Why going sign up for that <Speech_Male> myself. And we'll have the <Speech_Male> link to that <Speech_Male> instead of show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> This was a fascinating <Speech_Male> conversation. <Speech_Male> Dr mayer and i really <Speech_Male> appreciate you for coming <Speech_Male> on and really contributing <Speech_Male> and dedicating <Speech_Male> your last forty years <Speech_Male> to this body <Speech_Male> of research that <Speech_Music_Male> now <Speech_Music_Male> we all get <Speech_Male> to do episodes <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Poo knows maybe we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wouldn't be talking about this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> now. If you didn't do the work <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that you did <SpeakerChange> so a <Speech_Music_Male> deep sense of gratitude. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you very much <Music> same

cnn amazon Dr mayer
Heres Why Tesla Is so Important

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Heres Why Tesla Is so Important

"Everybody raum our here and today we're gonna be talking about a couple of really important reports. First tesla's most recent impact report which has a ton of fascinating details and it won't go through the highlights. There that release also coincided with a huge new report on climate change by the will spend some time on that as well and then we've got a few other quick hits of news which will run through at the beginning. Quick look at tesla stock another relatively low volume day to day to start the week off just under fifteen million shares traded but tussles up two point one percent on the day to seven hundred and thirteen dollars. Seventy six cents that compared to the nasdaq up about two tenths of a percent. Cosstalk did see an upgrade today from jeffries and almost philippa who schwa- upgrading from neutral to buy which as we've talked about upgrades like that where they're actually rewriting. The stock those are more significant to analysts than press targeted adjustments. But that being said he did increase his price. Target from seven hundred dollars per share up to eight hundred fifty. From the note quote valuing tesla is as challenging as ever we raise our discounted cash flow base price target from seven hundred dollars to eight hundred fifty dollars on higher profitability and accelerated growth. While at thirty five percent five year compound annual growth rate. we remain below tessa. Guidance of fifty percent as trend growth desa currently trades on nine times revenue and sixty two times earnings before interest and tax a level disconnected with auto multiples but in our view more consistent with net growth lack of legacy issues and wider addressable markets including energy generation and storage and one. Quick little note here. Just because i do see these inflated allot tesla has guided for greater than fifty percent growth compounded annually for vehicle deliveries. That doesn't necessarily mean revenue would grow at fifty percent. Plus obviously it very well could but that's not what tesla has specified so to me. It's not super clear but it does look like in this case. Jefferies is comparing their revenue forecasts tesla's vehicle delivery guidance and tennessee that a lot so just wanted to point that out next year. We've got an update on giga texas. From joe tag mayer. He does drawn flyovers there and remember last week. We had talked about him here. He that tussle was going to be doing a test. Production run for the mentawai next week. Which would not be this week

Tesla Philippa Jeffries Tessa Jefferies Joe Tag Mayer Tennessee Texas
"mayer" Discussed on The Bible Binge

The Bible Binge

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on The Bible Binge

"John maher who just figured out that the world is bendable and he's out to just destroy it john's even been sober for a while and he's never really spoken about a specific program like alcoholics anonymous. Oh we don't even know if the higher power aspect of alcoholics anonymous has really meant anything to him or not john. Seven grammys actually has six and a half. Because fun fact one year he was up against alicia keys for best song and when he won he got up in front of the crowd and told them that he was really grateful but that he didn't feel like he deserved that. Alicia keys song was better than his and so he cut it in half and gave the top two alicia keys. And i think there's a lot to be said about the person we know s john maher versus the actual john maher versus who he claims to be in his songs. He talks about the duality or the trial. Is that a word of all these different people inside of him. All the time I really like what bob left sets. Says he says mayor has been creating a new paradigm of fame. Mayer take self-awareness to new postmodern heights. Like a football player who provides color commentary on his own career. He's so self aware to the point where he's starts becoming unaware of how self aware he has and listen. I understand that it could be potentially tricky to try to make the mental jump from someone who wants call jessica simpson sexual napalm and hunt out the faith adjacency but as a faith jason scholar. I feel like even. If john can't see the hand of god in his life i can and i was once really intense about this even if he doesn't know what he's missing as he sings and his songs something's missing i know what it is. It's god john listen to me john. And if he wasn't so into these themes of going home and searching and looking for light and wanting to be found that are such huge touch points that he seems to return to a songwriting. I'm not sure i'd be so adamant that the something missing is god because when you look at his lyrics as a whole as telling some sort of story about his brain and his life in his heart. It's hard to ignore that these are the things that really matter to him. John also lost his voice in a super old testament way I mentioned earlier that he had some tough times. In twenty ten he gave to really terrible interviews to playboy and rolling stone And then he was diagnosed with a granular on his vocal. Cords was unable to speak for months. And that is something. We're going to explore in the red thread board. But it's a really fascinating thing to look at comparing and contrasting john zachariah from luke in the new testament which will do in just a little bit. John is half jewish. He has said in the past that he really identifies with judaism. But we don't really know how or to what extent growing up. John's mom is a christian. His dad is jewish and he's always talked about when he mentioned sustain people. They say it doesn't count because you inherit your jewish culture from your mother's side Fun fact though the new light video which we will link in. The show seems to have a good early nineties bar mitzvah vibe. So it feels like maybe. He was pulling from experience there to john. Mary even have a bar mitzvah. I don't know. I don't know but we get this string of religious imagery in his songs but if he is religious or spiritual keeps it pretty close to his chest now. Do i think the guy who frequently jokes with pornhub on instagram is a secret christian. I do not. But i know like so many other people. John mayer is searching. Or at least he seems to indicate that search within his lyrics and i often find myself in a place where i want my own personal faith expectations to match the person who was bringing me into this place. The storch bear position when they've truly never indicated that that was important to them at all. But i do think that is what's magical about art and artists. They so often operate on a higher plane of understanding and think they can access thoughts and ideas that are beyond even their own understanding. John really reminds me of melilla book walking on water. I thought about john. When i read that book so many years ago. And it's such a great book for helping to suss out what is holy art. And what is unholy. Art and metal ingles says this in walking on water in a very real sense. Not one of us is qualified but it seems that god continually chooses the most unqualified to do his work to bear his glory. If we are qualified we tend to think that we have done the job ourselves. If we are forced to accept are evident lack of qualification. Then there's no danger that we will confuse god's work with our own or god's glory with our own and i think john has one of those divine talents one of those divine gifts that he can see things that aren't necessarily something that he himself would be able to access. I think a lot of artists have that gift if we agree that these gifts and talents can be defined than we can also understand that this same gifts and talents can be used to evoke the sacred. No matter the vessel and we'll talk about that a little bit more later. So yes that's all. Great all very scholarly faith adjacent things. But then i have my katy perry conspiracy theory and listen. This is what i used to think. When i was truly running a red thread board on john's quote unquote salvation situation. When i really just wanted katy. Perry to be the impetus of john's damascus road experience. So here's how that worked in my brain. Katy perry grew up in a very strict conservative christian home right a christian recording artists for a while and her parents are still prominent. She stated herself that. She drifted away from how she was raised. When asked about what she believed now she says. I do believe in something much bigger than me and i call that god for me. She said i know. God has his hand on me and i know sometimes i go through things and they're just too intense and i can't handle them and then he swoops in and he shows me that it's his grace that brings me through it now. Katie's relationship with her parents has mended but when she first hit the pop charts with songs that may or may not have been easily included on a youth group playlist. They were very open about their frustration. And disappointment asking people not to judge her but instead pray that she would return to the vape but anyway john maher katy perry start dating they record a song together they make a super non true love waits music video together and fun fact at least a fun fact withdrawn even though he and katie have been broken up for years and she has a baby with that other guy. She recently said that he was still her number. One favorite lila fun fact within fun fact i do not like the word lava and so i have to say it in a weird accent so now katie is with Like us what's his name orlando bloom and it doesn't appear that katy perry's mom and dad ever evangelist john but i sometimes still dream of a world. Where katy perry's has john mayer cell phone number. And he just randomly texts him like bible memes or like an encouraging word. This is completely unsubstantiated. And really just evidence that. I've thought way too hard about this. I want to be clear that this is a stupid theory. One developed by a brain that was still mostly shaped by g. as and youth group mission trips. But this is just me. Placing bona fida is on the table for you. I'm not just a normal. John mayer fan. I'm the john mayer fan. Who once believed katy. Perry's parents would walk him through the roman road now fun fact recently. Katie saying the old him as the deer at the ama's with hootie of hootie and the blowfish darius rucker and she dedicated the performance to her dad. So maybe all those.

John maher john mayer john maher Katie John katy perry Katy perry jessica simpson john zachariah katy John mayer Mary luke instagram katie first twenty ten bible pornhub jewish
"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Know it all right one last thing. We'll wrap it up with the salmon nets as you've watched these xfinity races again as you've seen all of this unfold. What's been your takeaways..

"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Who is getting ready to take over. The number eight obscenity series chevrolet for the team. And he's going to do that the day after he turns eighteen later this month. June twenty six and then. On june twenty-seventh hops pocono to make his affinity series debut and will run a majority of the second half of this season with the team. So we're going to catch up with sam to see what he's been doing in the meantime as he gets ready for this next chapter in his career and you're going to be able to tell right away that he is in very very excited about it. We talked about his preparation. We talked about how he got here. Some of his family background. His dad is a former open wheel. Racer so i thought that was really interesting and again. We're just gonna talk about how he's getting ready to take over. This car and watching josh berry has done in that machine through the first half of the season really how that changed expectations for sam and maybe made him a little possessive of the car. Because of course you've seen the headlines you've seen a lot of the social media chatter maybe heard some of it on sirius. Xm nascar radio. There's a lot of people that believe. Josh should stay in that car. Want him stay in their car. They want sponsors to step up. So we're gonna get sam's thoughts on what that has been like to hear people say that as he gets ready for his turn behind the wheel. Sam is returning to jr motor sports. He is a alumni of their late models program. He started racing in north carolina and legends. Cars he won a truck series race and twenty twenty running a partial schedule. And he also won the twenty twenty arkham and arts east series championship. He's been successful everywhere. He's gone very talented. Young driver and again. The extremity series is the next place for him to go and that is coming. So let's hear all about what it's like for sam to start realizing that this dream is nearly here. He's counting down the days and again. He's really excited to get behind the wheel. So here's sam. Mayer on the racing writers pot guest. That.

Josh Sam north carolina josh berry first half second half June twenty six sam Mayer twenty twenty arkham and arts later this month june twenty-seventh eighteen jr motor sports nascar radio twenty eight pocono sirius
"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"Who is getting ready to take over. The number eight obscenity series chevrolet for the team. And he's going to do that the day after he turns eighteen later this month. June twenty six and then. On june twenty-seventh hops pocono to make his affinity series debut and will run a majority of the second half of this season with the team. So we're going to catch up with sam to see what he's been doing in the meantime as he gets ready for this next chapter in his career and you're going to be able to tell right away that he is in very very excited about it. We talked about his preparation. We talked about how he got here. Some of his family background. His dad is a former open wheel. Racer so i thought that was really interesting and again. We're just gonna talk about how he's getting ready to take over. This car and watching josh berry has done in that machine through the first half of the season really how that changed expectations for sam and maybe made him a little possessive of the car. Because of course you've seen the headlines you've seen a lot of the social media chatter maybe heard some of it on sirius. Xm nascar radio. There's a lot of people that believe. Josh should stay in that car. Want him stay in their car. They want sponsors to step up. So we're gonna get sam's thoughts on what that has been like to hear people say that as he gets ready for his turn behind the wheel. Sam is returning to jr motor sports. He is a alumni of their late models program. He started racing in north carolina and legends. Cars he won a truck series race and twenty twenty running a partial schedule and he also won. The twenty twenty arkham menards east series championship. He's been successful everywhere. He's gone very talented. Young driver and again. The extremity series is the next place for him to go and that is coming. So let's hear all about what it's like for sam to start realizing that this dream is nearly here. He's counting down the days and again. He's really excited to get behind the wheel. So here's sam. Mayer on the racing writers pot guest. That.

Josh Sam north carolina josh berry first half second half June twenty six sam Mayer later this month june twenty-seventh east series jr motor sports eighteen nascar radio twenty twenty eight twenty pocono sirius
35 Republicans Buck Trump, Back Study of Jan. 6 Capitol Riot

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

35 Republicans Buck Trump, Back Study of Jan. 6 Capitol Riot

"Nearly three dozen Republicans bucked party leaders and former president trump in voting to create a bipartisan commission on the capital riot the GOP's John Katko negotiated the bill with Democrats and urge lawmakers from both sides to support it to put down their swords for once just for once just three Republicans spoke in favor of the bill including Peter Mayer who accuse fellow G. O. peers who criticize the attack of backing off but even more troubling there's been an active effort to whitewash and re write the shameful events of that day to avoid accountability but with Senate GOP chief Mitch McConnell saying he's against the bill it faces an uncertain path Democrats need ten Republican backers for it to pass Sager mag ani Washington

John Katko Peter Mayer G. O. GOP Republicans Mitch Mcconnell Senate Sager Mag Ani Washington
Click Funnels and Branding With Henry Kaminski

Accelerate Your Business Growth

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Click Funnels and Branding With Henry Kaminski

"My guest. Today is henry kamensky. Henry gotta start as a self taught graphic designer and eventual brand consultant defying the odds to build a multi million dollar business over twelve years. He's brought his particular expertise that building click funnels to a remarkably diverse range of business owners and professionals from musician. Jon bon jovi and fabio vivani to internet marketing expert russell brunson the latter of whom named henry the million dollar brand dr. Thanks so much for joining me today. Henry diane what an intro. Thank you so much for having me. you are welcome. Thanks so much. Purveying here so i wanna to start with. I have a question for you that branding and then you know i have a bunch of other questions for you but We will go from there. So we'll you explain to the listeners. How branding helps with sales conversion absolutely. So let's define branding the best way that i've learned it as a person expert in this space for over fourteen years. It's the gut feeling people get when they interact with you. Your business product or service. It's that old saying you know what they say about you. After you leave the room that is ranting at its best and i got this definition from mardi new mayer. He is a god in the branding. Space he's wrote books like the brand gap the brand flip And a few others. And when i came across that definition from him it really really resonated with me so when a lot of people think of branding they think of colors think of what it looks like and the the logo and website and all that stuff. Those are your brand assets but brand. Is that feeling that connection that experience that people receive when they come in contact with your business.

Henry Kamensky Henry Gotta Fabio Vivani Russell Brunson Henry Diane Jon Bon Jovi Mardi New Mayer Henry
John Mayer Nearing Deal to Host ‘Later’ Talk Show on Paramount Plus

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

John Mayer Nearing Deal to Host ‘Later’ Talk Show on Paramount Plus

"Like John Mayer could be heading to the small screen variety reports. The singer is nearing a deal with CBS for a talk show on Paramount Plus The show is based on the BBC show later with Jools Holland and will be called later with John Mayer. Sources say the show will feature performances and interviews. I wonder if his first interview will be with Jessica Simpson. I was gonna wonder about that, or Jennifer Aniston and they should have called it Wonderland with John Mayer. That would have been the best thing. Beautiful celebrity. Yes. Left wing. Yes, he This is this is true. He

John Mayer Paramount Plus The Show Jools Holland CBS BBC Jessica Simpson Jennifer Aniston
Interview With Mayor Aja Brown, Mayor of Compton

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Mayor Aja Brown, Mayor of Compton

"Today may are asia. Brown joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the mayor of the city of compton. California she made history back in two thousand thirteen when she became the youngest mayor ever elected in the city at the age of thirty one now mayer brown is almost done with her second term leading the city and is credited for lowering. The city's unemployment rate reducing crime and creating economic development in the area mayer brown. Thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure where we're thrilled to have you. So we're gonna champ and their first shane. Which is obviously your politics. You become a public figure but what is something that we don't know about you because we can't google it. I'm known to be really funny amongst my of ones. A my husband calls me the person that he knows we. This is like some high expectations now for this interview. Are you funny like up comedian. Funny i don't have this really sharp. One liners i like it and also did. I heard that you guys are high school sweethearts we are. We actually connected my senior year in high school so he actually thinks funny then. Because he's been with you for a long time so we are gonna go way back. We'd like to start in the beginning so talk to us about how you grew up. Our people surprise up with you that you went into politics. Our backwards. I think people bet i grew up with or that have known me the majority of my life. They knew i would do something in a leadership role. I never had an affinity for politics. I think that i came into the political. Realm was surprising for some people. But i had worked in city government for a decade and so it was kind of a natural projection to some perspectives. But as i was younger and growing up. I was raised by a single mom. I have a twin brother had a lot eleven. My home my mom. She worked really hard to take care of us. A we struggled a lot financially but growing up. I really didn't know. I was poor because i'm not make a big deal out of it and so as got to high school when i started learning about poverty figures and i'm like mom you actually do not earn a lot of money. I don't know how we were able to survive but i'm almost is such a strong leader and really imparted the power of vision for my brother. Nine we bought in and we just worked as a team my whole life so i had a really beautiful upbringing

Mayer Brown Compton Asia Shane Brown California Google
MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

Media Voices

02:03 min | 1 year ago

MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

"The main story which is focused on is the fact that Mal magazine has been funded by ohad rather been funded by dollarshaveclub since its launch in twenty fifteen butts on the twenty or god. When was it now. The announced that she was going to an end turn his sixth of much rights as was result. Tweet wasn't a tweet was was that twenty. Three staff has been left without jobs. So what does this mean. Does this anything about the wind branded content model or is this just a blip in terms of both malam magazine. And how we're gonna fill magazines. What is fundament. What's going here is fundamental to the brand to the brenda content model because the core and not from editor in chief. Just show mayer. He says let me put it this way. I don't think as aggregrate to have a single source of funding. Every every day of the company was praying sustainable. For me we part of the core dollarshaveclub business announce excite with a point. That's why you know. The print magazines that the matches company stopped all of these things. They're the male ceos whose funding will there. They're marketing channel effectively. And you know we've seen a particular last year we've seen so many marketing channels and platforms just kind of get excised from plans so to the point. That magazine was integral to dull shaped walls as a kind of you know obscure marketing channel. The i i didn't notice soon as it turns out. They didn't actually have the opportunity they weren't given the opportunity to fulfil they could have done it monetization cause remember thinking. Pt spoke to josh a couple months ago. And i remember listening to entering. Just thinking does a lot that they could be doing. Hasn't monetization head. The dollar shave dancing to be interested in pushing and that's great menendez's perspective and they got the chance to develop really restore voice without any financial pressure but the end of the let don't shape never gave the chance to really mayton self-sustainable

Mal Magazine Ohad Malam Magazine Mayer Josh Menendez
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
Tori Spelling wishes she slept with Ryan Seacrest in 2000

Daily Pop

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Tori Spelling wishes she slept with Ryan Seacrest in 2000

"Tori spelling. Says she regrets not sleeping with ryan seacrest when she had the chance okay. That's a headline coming this morning. Tori was playing version of. Never have i ever unease over. Served lisa vanderpump very naughty confession. Okay charlie next question. Which celebrity should you have set with that. You didn't ryan seacrest. Those when i started and like i i didn't know i was on. It was like oh whatever. I would have been dealing kardashian right

Ryan Seacrest Lisa Vanderpump Tori Charlie Kardashian
Jessica Simpson Reflects on Ex John Mayer

Daily Pop

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Jessica Simpson Reflects on Ex John Mayer

"Jessica simpson speaking at about how she really fell. When john mayer told the world she was crazy in bed. Jessica wrote that and her memoir and she says she was mortified when john called her sexual napalm but in this exclusive interview. I look that she has with tamron hall. Jessica explained why he does not own her anything. Should he follow a justin timberlake and do this public mac hall pa for some of the very public treatment. I definitely don't feel grime. public apology. you can't take it back. I feel like people end up finding their way to let you know we're sorry And i and. I think that i mean he might not be sorry. That's okay but like to talk about anybody sexually disrespectful. But i mean that's on him. I wouldn't mind if somebody left their review from you know what i mean like. It could be on the other hand like what happened with halle berry. Somebody said that she was bad in bed and she hear trying to find these accusations. Implicated in watergate.

Tamron Hall Jessica Jessica Simpson John Mayer Justin Timberlake John Halle Berry
"mayer" Discussed on KERWIN FROST TALKS!

KERWIN FROST TALKS!

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on KERWIN FROST TALKS!

"John mayer street where museum wow hosted by cornell university right but we would go to japan and this was before the internet really i mean internet was around but before the network of of everything was locked in. And you'd walk around with a shirt when you came home. That said a bathing ape busy works eight. Babe shall never kill ape. What is that and it would just be great and fun. And it made sense that hip hop would have picked up on it. And i just thought it was great and flawed imitation of hip hop image of which then became. Its own thing. Which which you know you get teriyaki. Boyz yes hilarious. You know and you get these shirts that are plays on things that we americans never really thought about like an american express card. Yeah right in the very first g. Shock that i thought was out of control was the bape g shop. The pink one. No it was a black one in each letter of a shock was different colic super playful so for me i mean caused it like the laminate for the two thousand maybe like eight tours ensuring the laminates for two thousand seven so me. This was back when there wasn't this giant neural network of street. Wear no. i didn't even get around. You went to union on like sullivan. Yeah yeah and and this is when their stock was in the floors tracked were yeah now so shady rate and you went to lebron and they love undefeated and there was a union and there was a couple of other places and and if you ever saw someone else wearing it you just start talking because there because it's such a small community line. Yeah no those now so and if there was everyone is like having fun on the line. Lavine misfits that a world cup for misfits. And i think at first there were followed. Like why is this..

John mayer cornell university japan sullivan lebron Lavine
"mayer" Discussed on KERWIN FROST TALKS!

KERWIN FROST TALKS!

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on KERWIN FROST TALKS!

"I don't know how to play the piano. Really great and i sat there. I think i had my jacket on. Because i was ready to leave but i sat there and i just kept running these chords and just kept going and going going figured it out and all i had that night was and i took it home and then i came back the next night and i started right olympics and i was the only time i was like bawling how i was bollywood radio and others one of the time i was on. And and that's on the same record and that was a song called Never on the day you leave that forget it. I can't make it through. But the audi writing and the microphone be open and the engineer who worked for years. Just wait for me to write. And you'd hear this. That's i when. I hit a line. Be writing yeah. Yeah like just naturally and thing about that song is that that is the only saw i think of as not being me singing. Yeah everything else. I'm like okay. I'm me right right. And i sound like this so i gotta sound but this one where it was almost like the way thoughts might sound Were they hit your vocal cords. But it was so good because he felt the solo. I'd say parts of me. There's no there's no quality to it other than these are the words and these are the notes. I mean there is a bit of like a little bit of like a torch singing thing but you know it's like plan it's key the distance to moons garda bomb. See there's no like oh people are listening. And i'm a famous guy very right. Just like netflix. Vulnerable ness just everything on the table. A big black box. And it's just you. And god dan that's that's the best songs that just you and the maker..

olympics audi netflix dan
"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

Pop Culture Junkie

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

"The tone is a lot darker grittier. Then the arrow verse shows which are a lot more campy. I think even like green arrow with tried to be dart at which you put it on the same level as arrow because like obviously flashes more kind of can't be and he was like always the the funny one compared to all of her queen always kind of moody in writing. But yeah i mean i. It's more similar to arrow than flash. But it really stands out like in a world of its own okay. A lot of the. It's funny a lot of the reviews. I saw the tweets i saw. This show is too good to be on the cw like the quality is too high. What are they doing and it really did. Give you the vibe a lot more. Like man of steel those early shots of man of steel on the farm and it was really good. It sucked me in right away so absolutely puppet for superman i can't wait to watch more. I did read that. It's going to be taking a hiatus for a little while and some other show is gonna come in but free talk shows do that all the time. Yeah so hard to keep up with. What's going on exactly south of bummer. But yeah you'll have time to check it out before super girl comes in and replaces in its time slot. So you'll you'll have time to catch up with that. So pop it. For superman and lois and a big fat drop it for young rock interesting you going to that. I don't know how you take someone like the rock who is arguably one of the most fascinating like figures in all of pop culture and you manage to make a show about him. That is so incredibly boring. No so is it a comedy. Is it a b. but it's not even funny and it's supposed to be like a family comedy right so brings in his whole family in it. It takes place like in his childhood and then in his adolescence and then in his adulthood and the casting is really well done. If i'm going to say something positive about the casting is really well done but my goodness had to force myself to stay awake. I mean i was like peeling is open. I wanted to change the channel several times. And the only reason i did and is because my daughter came in and goes is that the guy from the titan games until she wanted to watch it but yeah it was not good and i hate to say anything. Negative about my my boy. Dj dwayne the rock johnson. Mike by sicher genuinely like good dude. You just seems like a good person. And i want to touch his vice. I mean get him. And maybe it'll improve over time. Feel too bad for him. Because he's like the wealthiest person in. It'll all work out. I'm pretty sure uses. Bankrolling the whole production of the show himself. So it's fine. I'll still go drink his energy drink but not not going to be watching more of a young rock unfortunately.

Mike lois titan games one Dj dwayne the rock johnson super girl man of steel superman fascinating
"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

Pop Culture Junkie

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

"Speaking of the mcu natalie. Portman set picks from sore love in thunder. Actually not just natalie. Portman set picks there a lot of setbacks. And i almost don't want to look at anymore. I feel like i got some spoilers for Mean it's goofy stuff but it looks like they're bringing back. You know matt damon to be pretend. Low key. And i'm excited for the on. I'm really excited. I love. I think he did a great job on the last the war and i i'm ecstatic. That he's coming back And be my favorite movie in the entire. Mcu it's definitely top three so love and thunder is like half his good. I'll i'll be perfectly content. I'm very excited. You know i really did like ragnarok. But there were a few times where i had wished that there is a little more emotional gravity to some of that like conversations in situations and i was like it almost seemed like they were training it to. They were trying to get to funny. And i was like maybe they should be a little more like sad that their dad is i. You know what. I'm trying to say. But i really did enjoy it so funny that they did such a one eighty from the door franchise from a dark on time. I read that chris. Hemsworth didn't wanna come back and do thor again. Like another solo. Thor movie and he a couple of his stipulations like one was that he got to cut his hair short cut his hair and one was that that it could be funny that he could be funny yet and so in that thus ragnarok was born. So we'll see what happens with natalie. Portman back back in the franchise again. It's interesting 'cause like she didn't wanna be anymore either right and now she's going to be pretty much the lead of the film. How do you turn down. That marvel money come on now right so there has been sore or the dark world thor ragnarok and then yeah this'll be his fourth solo outing. I really liked the first one a lot. And it had like good mix of funny and serious and then the second one was not very memorable and the third one is amazing. So fingers darcy from wanda vision. Doesn't she make her first appearance in the movies. Yes she does. She is jane's assistant co something like that in. She's really funny in the movies too. So i was really happy that she came back from one division. So i'm guessing we'll see her again. Maybe in love and thunder who. I'm hoping so or at least in a multi verse madness. Yeah get cash. Means has said that she's not done with the character so good we'll see we'll see her again all right other other pop culture news. What else have you guys been. Following catching up with. The grammy's announced their performers. They did you know who it's going to be Yeah i have actually the list right in front of me. Let's see. I'll name some good people because some of these. I have absolutely no clue who they are We have cardi b. We doja cat might girl billie eilish. Miranda lambert dua lipa john mayer megan thee stallion and morris post-muldoon harry styles and taylor swift authors martha lot. There's definitely more. I have named lt. That's so many maybe some of them offer form together. 'cause doja in megan thee stallion both have best friend on the radio right now. That would be 'cause they're doing it all virtually I'm sure they'll find out but maybe they feel corentin. I dunno interesting. John mayer's interesting Like it's does he have a song or album coming out or something he must. He just joined tiktok. So maybe he's serve relevant please..

John mayer third one natalie matt damon megan thee stallion first one second one john mayer martha lot both Hemsworth jane taylor morris post-muldoon first appearance doja Miranda lambert dua lipa fourth solo outing top three ragnarok
"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

Pop Culture Junkie

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Junkie

"Just sit back when you need to stand up when you need to know. And sometimes i feel like i think people do this based off of not understanding and i think that also comes with fear and fear of losing something they love and i think that's the one thing love is the connection. Bovis is the emotion that connects all emotions. I feel when we do something where we feel some kind of weigh in motion. We're happy about it. We respond in a way where we feel sad or or hate something. I feel it sparked because to that end. There's something that we love and there was something that we're trying to protect and if we just understand that everybody's is trying to do that. Just trying to love and protect what they have. You give some time for people to speak listen. Share lives together. Like what else are we going to do. What do we do. We're all living on this planet together. We have no other option. Yeah well said alex. Am you get snaps for me. Right snaps absolutely dude. It's napster meghan. Markle and o'brien and harry. He's an you so supportive. And i loved all the means that were like you know megan's trying to be all jim your than harry comes out and he's just like dropping so bringing up name-dropping and people who are getting their do. We've got a mention ray fisher getting his his real. Turn as cyborg in the snyder. Cut coming out on march eighteenth. And it's right around the corner. Ray fisher tweeted out. That snyder's cyborg is meant to become the most powerful figure in the entire dc universe which is a real bold claim he said maybe maybe only second to dr manhattan and so so this idea of this cyborg that he is building up. He says he's turning a side character. Like cyborg in the most powerful being in the dc universe is no small feat. but thankfully zack. Snyder doesn't do small feats and that was his tweet today. So i i'm one of those people that honestly had very low expectations for the snyder. Because i was not a fan of weeden version of justice league and just the eu in general hasn't drawn me in the same with mcu can. But i've gotta say now. That ray fisher has hyped it up to that level. I at least i'm like okay. I'm ready to check this out. Let's see. Let's see what snyder can do you. Let's see if if cyborg really is as powerful as a as fisher claims. That's so interesting more powerful than superman. So we're expecting completely different movie now. Pretty much everything that that. They've said snyder that he isn't using a single frame shop. Just weeden yeah today. I l four hours long and apparently leaked over the weekend. If you clicked on tom jerry. The snyder cut popped up. It was lack for less than four hours. They got it fixed. So just a couple people on twitter for life you. I want to watch tom. And jerry superman and his black suit popped up. So there's this matter cuts four hours long and it was listed like just perfectly long enough to like most powerful cyborgs. Like i will find a way to break through to us. Tom and jerry to do it too. Well and jerry necessary come for your childhood. Garfield ex.

Markle harry o'brien Ray fisher march eighteenth meghan Tom today twitter megan jerry alex ray fisher Snyder less than four hours four hours jim dr manhattan zack justice league