35 Burst results for "Maya"

Why AJ Can't Like Maya Rudolph Anymore

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:53 min | Last month

Why AJ Can't Like Maya Rudolph Anymore

"The other day, I came across what seemed like a meaningless article. It was a former SNL player, Maya Rudolph, looking back on how David Letterman made her feel embarrassed and the key word here is humiliated because he mispronounced her name Maya instead of Maya. But now it is Maya and it's not Maya. Like the whole Demi Demi bullshit, this is back in 2009. Her first appearance on Letterman. I let this article. I'm like, what's wrong with this asshole? I always love her comedy. I think she was brilliant on her SNL years, but I said to myself, shit, now I can't like her. But I thought four or 5 days ago, this is too small a story. To bring up on this show, I'm always getting mad. I'm always telling people anger I am. Maybe I could just bypass this one, I just thought it would go away. But it didn't go away. Nothing just goes away today. And once some Internet slews picked it up, they began to let her have it. And mindfully so. But can you imagine, did you see this story when it first came out? She said, he said my name wrong. And I just sat there. I grew up my whole life in love with him, and now my heart is broken. I'm sitting here embarrassed and humiliated. I didn't know how to come up with something funny to say? My public persona muscle wasn't destroying yet. Public persona must I asshole. And by the way, David Letterman quickly apologized. And said her name the correct way. It was a brief moment in time.

Demi Demi Maya Maya Rudolph David Letterman SNL Letterman
Stacey Abrams: 107 Sheriffs Want to Take Black People Off the Street

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

Stacey Abrams: 107 Sheriffs Want to Take Black People Off the Street

"How much would you enjoy a Stacey Abrams defeat again? I got so angry, seeing what she said about law enforcement in her debate with governor Kemp the other day. I thought it was worth playing. This gives you an example of exactly how the would be want to be Democrat governor of Georgia, Stacey Abrams feels about law enforcement. Men and women in law enforcement know who is going to be with them who has had their back and will continue to have their back. And that is me. And that's why we have the endorsement of a 107 shares around this state. As I pointed out before, I'm not a member of the good old boys club. So no, I don't have a 107 sheriffs who want to be able to take black people off the streets who want to be able to go without accountability. A 107 sheriffs who want to be able to take black people off the streets. Can I play that one more time, please William? Can you play 14 one more time? You know, Maya Angelou, the late Maya Angelou said, when somebody tells you who they are, you believe them. When we talk about Democrats wanting to denigrate, defund and disparage the police, believe them, listen carefully to Stacey Abrams own words. Men and women in law enforcement know who is going to be with them who has had their back and will continue to have their back. And that is me. And that's why we have the endorsement of a 107 sheriffs around this state. As I pointed out before, I'm not a member of the good old boys club. So no, I don't have a 107 sheriffs who want to be able to take black people off the streets who want to be able to go without accountability.

Stacey Abrams Governor Kemp Maya Angelou Georgia William
Maya Wiley: The Wedge Between White & Black People

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Maya Wiley: The Wedge Between White & Black People

"Let's listen to this again I'm not done with this Maya Wally civil rights activists In fact let's go to cut three mister She's at the congressional black caucus foundation voting rights form today cut three go We do have tell truth because there's a big lie I called the big old lie because it didn't just start with Donald Trump It actually started in 2010 before Shelby that said that basically people of color And let's be explicit Immigrants of color in particular Mexicans in particular were lining up the vote to steal our democracy So the wedge between was black for black people was those people you problem and for white people was those people are your problem And there was only one problem People who were starting to see that the changing demographics of the country Okay Maya do you know what's going on in the inner city The crime rate murder Women being raped children being murdered You know what's going on in the inner cities Rather than concocting that America is so horrific That white people are so horrific particularly if they they serve in state legislatures if they have some power and don't agree with you and the Democrat party then they must be racist Don't you think it would be worthwhile To try and help people who are truly under assault families who've lost loved ones

Maya Wally Congressional Black Caucus Fou Donald Trump Shelby America Democrat Party
Black Lives Matter Because It Pays Well

The Officer Tatum Show

01:16 min | 3 months ago

Black Lives Matter Because It Pays Well

"Can I be honest with y'all? The problem is black folks. Not all. 'cause there's a lot of genuine, smart, good, will to do a well intentioned black folks that live in this country. You will be mine. You will be idiotic if you didn't think that there were great black people that live in this country. But there is a remnant of degenerate black folks. That happened to get in positions of power, they happen to get leadership positions, they happen to be celebrities that people look up to and they are fraudulent as you know what. Out here taking, I think it's shallow Maya. I think that's how you say his name. Shallow Maya, I didn't know who named the key. I don't know if this supposed to be a Muslim or whatever name he's trying to have. I don't know. But you take the people's money, you claim that you care about black lives. And black people are not benefiting from half of this money. And they use the death of thugs for the most part. Name one and they raise money on they wouldn't have to look. I can go down the list. Name one that they raised money for that wouldn't have thug.

Judge tosses suit that tried to deem books obscene for kids

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Judge tosses suit that tried to deem books obscene for kids

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting a judge tosses a lawsuit that tried to deem two books obscene for kids A lawsuit seeking to declare two books as obscene for children was dismissed by a Virginia judge Tuesday before it could proceed to trial Tommy Altman of Virginia of each tattoo shop owner and one time Republican congressional candidate had sued in April seeking to restrict the distribution to minors of the book's gender queer a memoir by Maya Kobe and a court of mist and fury by Sarah J Maz Circuit court judge Pamela S baskerville struck down the lawsuit on jurisdictional grounds writing Virginia law does not give her specific authority to determine whether books are obscene for minors and also that restricting distribution of the books would authorize prior restraint of speech and violate the First Amendment Book challenges and bans have surged across the U.S. targeting in large part books that have focused on sexuality gender identity or race I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Tommy Altman Virginia Maya Kobe Sarah J Maz Circuit Court Pamela S Baskerville U.S.
Winning the Debate Against the Left

The Officer Tatum Show

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Winning the Debate Against the Left

"I want to hear from you. What should Republicans do? What issue is it of yours that you believe Republicans need to take up in order to win this election? What is it that you're seeing on the ground? What is it that you want to see Republicans address? I think this is extremely important. I was giving you an example of Texas 34 where Maya Flores ran away with it. Hopefully she'll do it again. That was a special election. So she's got to win that again. But then, just a couple of months later, the thrill was gone. The New York New York congressional district 19 that Republicans were expected to take not so much. And basically this was a guy that allowed the RNC to kind of run the race and it was the stereotypical hey, you know, we're going to make sure the economy is good and all of that good stuff and that sounds great, but you have to understand we are people are frustrated at what they're saying.

Maya Flores New York Texas RNC
The Tragic Saga of Alex Jones

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 4 months ago

The Tragic Saga of Alex Jones

"Jones back in many a couple of years ago. Spoke out about the sandy hook shooting. He said something quote, he said, no one died. The incident was staged. It was synthetic. It was manufactured. It was a giant hoax and completely fake with actors. He's totally wrong there. In fact, he's admitted he was wrong. Shouldn't have said it. It was not true. Somewhat despicable, quite honestly, and he shouldn't have said it. Okay, so he said that and in reaction to it, the sandy hook parents then started to allegedly to the court documents started to get harassed because of that. Series of lawsuits then were filed against Alex Jones saying that because of him their lives were totally ruined. This trial has been going on and on and on. Now remember, with Alex Jones, you're dealing with someone that specializes in bombast and bravado, shouldn't have said it. It was a mistake. He's admitted he was wrong, multiple times, but that will not satisfy the media, and that will not sought satisfy the nonstop pressure campaign against Alex Jones. So according to the judge and the Alex Jones case, anything you read in the press is hearsay and even reciting what you read as a means to convey how you made it feel is also hearsay. So let's play cut 22. How did you feel about that? Well, when I read the newspaper, there was a 20 $8 million ad buy. Don't say what you read. Just how many have you filmed? Things that you have read are also here today. Okay. Because you didn't save them. Somebody else centered right on writing is speech. Do not tell the jury anything that came from someone else that you've read or heard don't have to disregard that sentence. Go ahead. So that is the judge, her name is Maya Guerra gamble. This is the type of judge that Alex Jones was given. 23 up on stage. Hashtag stay at home. It could save lives with a blue hair bonnet on. Love is love with the transgender thing, and also don't stay at the top, vote for every Democrat. That's the type of judge Alex Jones got. Conflict of interest, you better believe it.

Alex Jones Jones Maya Guerra Gamble
Black Student Rejected by U of Houston SGA Because of Her Faith

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Black Student Rejected by U of Houston SGA Because of Her Faith

"We've got a story up on our website Todd stern's dot com to bring to your attention. You need to understand what's happening on your college and university campuses. In America. There's something very dangerous afoot. Now, many public universities public schools have a student government association and it's just like, just like your local or state or federal government. You have senators or representatives, you have a student Supreme Court, so you have, it's basically a student version of what we do in real life in politics. But here's the problem. It really is a microcosm of the problems we're facing in big government. Because a lot of these kids are coming up with very dangerous ideas on their college and university campuses, and they're implementing these policies in the school itself. And that's where we start with Maya little. She is a black student at the university of Houston. She is a Christian. And she was hoping to become the first black woman elected to the student Supreme Court at the university of Houston. So she goes before her peers, her classmates, and she's giving her speech and she's explaining why she deserves to be named to the Supreme Court at the university of Houston. And she quotes a Bible verse during her remarks. And it triggered the student politicians almost immediately. And they decided to go into a closed door session and they voted and they rejected her because of her religious beliefs, and they said that they had to be very sensitive about appointing Christians to positions within the government in the aftermath of roe V wade.

Todd Stern University Of Houston Supreme Court America Maya Roe V Wade
Mayra Flores Sends Clear Message to Jill Biden

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:10 min | 5 months ago

Mayra Flores Sends Clear Message to Jill Biden

"Calls Hispanic voters. Tacos. And Maya Flores is not having it. She says no. You're not going to condescendingly come in as a white woke liberal and tell us how to live our life. Pretty fire here. I got to say Meyer Flores is passing all the early tests. Play cut 86. Do you accept her apology from this past week? Yeah, right. Then I'll see you as Americans. They see us as tacos. That's exactly how they see us. And we're proud Americans and they only are doing this to get our vote and they think that by giving us tacos and playing Latin music, that that's all it's going to take for us to vote for them in November. It's going to take a lot more than that. We want gas, rent and groceries to come down. We want more money in our pockets. And they're only making our lives more measurable. You say something that you would accept in terms of the topology. We take our apology, but we know that the reason why she's apologizing is because of all the backlash that's she's receiving truly doesn't mean it. It's pretty fire. She doesn't mean it. That's exactly right. Look,

Maya Flores Meyer Flores
1945: Could Israel Destroy Iran’s Nuclear Facilities in a Strike?

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 6 months ago

1945: Could Israel Destroy Iran’s Nuclear Facilities in a Strike?

"I'm looking here At a piece by 1945 dot com Military site And I'm thinking well we're not going to destroy We're not going to be able to destroy these sites or this site because Biden won't do it Millie won't do it Austin won't do it So could Israel do it on its own Maya Carlin in this publication over the years Israeli military officials have hinted At the countries of and by the way you put noids in the media and the different parties I would think you would support this right Right Over the years it's really military officials have hinted at the countries ability to strike Iran's nuclear facilities if necessary The Jewish state has led successful operations in the past Striking nuclear facilities in Iraq in 1981 and searing 2007 While Iraq and Syria closely positioned to Israel Iran is 1000 miles away The distance between Israel and Iran remains the most challenging obstacle for this type of operation But Israel's arsenal of long-range fighters And its potentially nuclear capability intermediate range ballistic missile Would lead to an effective operation In February the Israeli government estimated that the Islamic Republic of Iran was merely four to 6 months away from achieving a nuclear breakout

Maya Carlin Israel Islamic Republic Of Iran Millie Biden Austin Iraq Syria Israeli Government
"maya" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:06 min | 6 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"This is a science podcast for June 3rd, 2022. I'm Sarah krusty. Each week we talk about the most interesting news and research from science and the sister journals. First up, what did the historic Maya know about the stars? Producer mega Cantwell and contributing correspondent Josh sokol. This guess what archeological ruins and ancient texts reveal about Maya astronomy, and why it's so crucial to collaborate with living indigenous knowledge holders. After that, we hear from researcher Mike Kearney about a special kind of grasshopper. One that reproduces asexually. They're all clones, no males needed. He talked to me about how rare this kind of reproduction is. And why according to his study, sometimes not shuffling your genes from generation to generation, pays off. I'm Meghan Cantwell and joining me is Josh sokol, a contributing correspondent at science. He's here to discuss his story this week, which delves into the restoration of the historic Maya's star gazing knowledge. This field has been traditionally studied through archeology and the decipherment of ancient texts, but many hope that collaborating with living indigenous Maya will illuminate the field even more. Thanks so much for joining me, Josh. Thanks for having me. When did western scholars get interested in exploring the astronomical knowledge of the historic Maya? Over a century ago, by European scholar in Germany, got really interested in one of the very few surviving via manuscripts. And was able to decipher that there was a table that was doing very detailed tracking of the planet of Venus. And this was at a time in which Europeans couldn't read Maya hieroglyphs. And potentially no living people could in the world because of colonization. Ever since then, there has been this investigation in archeology and in my hieroglyphics to try to understand what it was that they were doing. What was the role that this astronomical knowledge played in a larger worldview and in a larger whole system? Some of these knowledge systems are still in use today and you actually got to go see them in action. How did that help inform your story? I was super fortunate to get to report on scene both with a group of gatekeepers in Guatemala and then some of the Yucatan. So much of this knowledge is specific to place that you're standing from a particular perspective, you're looking at things in nature that are visible at a certain time, and it was just very powerful to see people living today participating in very long-standing traditions who feel that connection to place and to time. One of the ways that this knowledge system pervaded daily life was through calendars and some of them are still in use today. How exactly did the way that the historic Maya kept track of time relate to astronomy? It seems like a big past and present focus of Maya coulter has been tracking time and tracking cycles of time and thinking about when those cycles interact with each other and when they converge. So you have this 260 day sacred calendar, which is used for ritual life. The historic Maya and some present day people also looked at a lot of celestial cycles. So we have records of very detailed quantitative tracking of the position of Venus in the sky that was being done maybe the 8th 9th and tenth centuries. There's a really sophisticated tracking of the phase of the moon and prediction of the cliffs is. It seems to scholars who are working with present day Maya people that there was a lot of interest on keeping track of where you were in these various cycles. And finding days that seem cosmically spiritually and scientifically significant to plan out public life and personal life. And in your story, you, of course, don't just touch on the calendars you touch on, a variety of different threads that show how deeply intertwined astronomy is in my culture. One of the things you touched on was about city structures and pyramids and how the Maya ruins also show this connection. Could you talk about that? There's been this field that's existed for a long time, but was certainly popularized and exploded in the 1980s called archeo astronomy, which was all about looking for architectural clues in these ancient cities that showed that the builders were very interested in particular celestial phenomena. These surveys using LIDAR are really important because they allow people to measure many different myocytes together and look at the orientation of the site. It takes it from this case by case on the ground speculation to a statistical study of I can get dozens of these together over a big area and I can make it more sophisticated argument that there was a cosmological worldview that drove the planners of these buildings to make them all this way. Are there similarities between different cities and how they were laid out and does that kind of point to similar rituals and relationships there? There's a particular structure in Maya architecture and this is called an E group and it's this central Plaza in a city that has this long horizontal platform on the east and then has a pyramid over on the west. And the assumption of archaeo astronomers for a long time has been that this structure is a way to get people looking over at the rising sun. That if you stand on the pyramid in the west, you look east towards the sun coming up and a particular date you see the sun rise over the opposite platform. And that might be a way to mark a planting or a harvest festival for agriculture. And it might be also a way to organize religious festivals and public life. There's this kind of macro level view of the structure of cities, but you also mentioned in your story that there's inscriptions that finer details too that you can see within these ruins. What is that kind of unveiled about their relationship with astronomy? My history is really long. In the early parts of it, most of the records that seem to be astronomical are these indirect clues from building layouts and things like that. But as you get to this period that scholar called the classic period of Maya history, you have impressive stone architecture and sculpture and artwork and you have rival city states that are fighting. In that period, there are a ton of inscriptions about, let's say, dynastic history, the ruler and their family. Those inscriptions commonly also feature astronomical information, especially the specific phase of the moon at the time, or a connection to past cosmological events. I was really astounded by how accurately the historic Maya could track some of these astronomical cycles such as the lunar month. Yeah, it's pretty cool. The lunar month, which is the space between a full moon and a new moon is not an even number of days, but they want it to be able to predict in advance what phase of the moon you would be at on a particular day. And they figured that out. They figured basically out to very high precision. Every month, how much does it get off given that the lunar month isn't exactly 29 days. They were super advanced and they must have done it over decades or centuries worth of observation and record keeping. How long did it take for western science to kind of have this sort of grasp on astronomy? At the time that these Maya scholars were keeping these records, they were world leading in precision. Even later, the sort of precision that they achieved was tracking the orbit of Venus was also world leading. But Europeans did not respect that or appreciate that until relatively recently. Right, not only did they not appreciate the knowledge, but colonizers actually destroyed written books known as codices that the historic Maya wrote that detailed all of this rich astronomical knowledge is there any sense as to how much of.

Josh sokol Sarah krusty mega Cantwell Mike Kearney Meghan Cantwell Maya coulter Maya Yucatan Josh Guatemala Germany
In Two Terms, Tom Cotton Has Upended Our Foreign Policy

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 6 months ago

In Two Terms, Tom Cotton Has Upended Our Foreign Policy

"Cotton was once the youngest member of the Senate Barely two months into his tenure he upended global foreign policy with a letter to Iran's leaders informing them any nuclear agreement would then president Barack Maya's bonito Obama could later be voided by the next commander in chief Wow That's unbelievable He served two combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan And he beat Mark Pryor Remember that jerk I mean remember that guy Democrat Arkansas by 17 points in 2014 His favorite food is birthday cake You know what mine is too Minus two Cotton said he's committed to continuing to provide Ukraine with the money from Congress even if Republicans take back the Senate majority Good for you I agree Questions about Biden's Ukraine policies which have been praised by some Republicans elicit lengthly diatribe about the president He's been terrible in Ukraine The Ukrainian war is a massive failure of deterrence It's primarily Joe Biden who failed to lead the western response in the lead up to Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine That's all factually accurate

Barack Maya Bonito Obama Cotton Senate Mark Pryor Ukraine Iran Afghanistan Iraq Arkansas Biden Congress Joe Biden Vladimir Putin
"maya" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:45 min | 7 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Today, we're talking about aunties, and I don't just mean the anti who's your actual relation, not your mom's sister or your dad's sister. If you were brought up in a black erosion household, you'll know exactly who I'm on about, basically any woman older than you is referred to as an anti out of respect. There is nowhere in this world. Geographically, that I'm not without an auntie, right? There's always someone who feels like I am someone who feels like I feel loved by and taking care of. I was brought up in a single parent household that was just my mom and her army of aunties. That's a clip of Tully Sean I spoke to her along with angel said a little bit earlier and you'll be hearing that in the show. But these aunties are also a community network who love nothing more than a bit of gossip and judgment, so today we're lifting the lid on anti culture, shaming them before they can shame us. I want to hear your stories about anti today. How have your community of anti's impacted your life? In my book I actually give them a name the illuminant anti your business is their business. And there is great comedy in aunties and there can be great strength in community. But they can also have a very negative impact or a suffocating impact if you like on the lives of both men and women, so I want to hear your stories of your aunties today. You can text woman's hour on 8 four 8 four four. You can email us via our website or you can contact us via social media. It's at BBC woman's hour. Also on the show, we hear another story from our life after divorce series, and this time we look at the stigma attached to being divorced, if you'd like to comment on that, please get in touch 8 four 8 four four. We've been running that series for a while. And a brand new police crime drama is about to hit our screens this time with an Asian female lead, can you believe it? Maya, the writer behind the groundbreaking DIA, will be joining me to tell me all about it. And I might even ask her about playing bindra in line of duty. I might, I might just, of course, message me throughout the show, we'd love to hear your comments about everything we discuss in the next hour. The text number once again, 8 four 8 four four. But first, a woman who was raped when she was on holiday in turkey and went to the British consulate for help, was told.

Tully Sean angel bindra BBC Maya British consulate turkey
Josh Mandel: Why I Joined the Marine Corps

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 8 months ago

Josh Mandel: Why I Joined the Marine Corps

"You served in the military Tell ohioans and the rest of America a little bit about that Sure did a couple of tours in the Marine Corps in Anbar province Iraq did my small part I was inspired into the Marine Corps by my grandparents One of my grandfathers was a Holocaust survivor liberated by American troops Maya other grandfather served in the United States Army air corps and I grew up in a family that was fiercely patriotic and one that believed we have a duty to serve this country and a duty to serve a cause greater than our own personal self interest and that's why I joined the Marine Corps And how old were you when you joined the Marine Corps Just out of college and I actually joined as an enlisted marine in a most college guys going as officers but I wanted to serve in enlisted ranks went through parris island and as I mentioned did my two tours in Anbar province the first tour our mission was to stop the flow of foreign weapons and foreign fighters across the Syrian border We were the first marine battalion out of the Syrian border and then our second tour was in a town called haditha which is also in onboard province and mission of our unit was to do security operations there in the Edith a triad area

Marine Corps United States Army Air Corps Anbar Iraq America Parris Island Haditha
GOP Candidate Mayra Flores on Flipping the Rio Grande Valley to Red

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:41 min | 8 months ago

GOP Candidate Mayra Flores on Flipping the Rio Grande Valley to Red

"Guys, I'm really delighted to welcome to the podcast Myra Flores. She is a U.S. citizen born in Mexico. She came legally to the United States at the age of 6. She became a naturalized U.S. citizen. She's a respiratory care practitioner who works caring for the elderly and the disabled and has been on the front lines helping people to fight against COVID. She's lived in the Rio Grande valley. This is the south part of Texas right near the border since 2004. She's now running for Congress in South Texas district 34. And Myra welcome to the podcast, really looking forward to this, you're in a district that's of a lot of interest to Debbie and me, W in fact grew up in the Rio Grande valley in harland and Texas. And I'm gonna sort of deploy her in the second segment to talk to you a little bit about things you might have in common and about your story. So I want to focus in on a few kind of key issues that you're running on and I maybe I can begin by asking you about this kind of sea change that seems to be underway in which Hispanics, Latinos, latinas are realizing that they're kind of traditional allegiance to the Democratic Party is now kind of out of sync. The Democratic Party today doesn't stand for what you can maybe call Hispanic values. So can you begin by saying a word about that? Absolutely. Well, I wanted to start by saying I grew up here in South Texas. I actually graduated from high school in 2004 in San Bernardo. But I've grew up here in this area and I've always said the Hispanic community is very conservative. Our values are pro God, pro life, pro family, all about hard work. Our values align with the Republican Party, but we have been lied to. We have been told that the Republican Party is the party of the rich, that it's the party that only white people support. And that's the idea I grew up thinking. And I still remember asking my father, who should I vote for and he told me Barack Obama. He said you should vote for him and I did not question him why I should vote or not vote for him. I voted for him because that's what I was told to do so. But a family member of mine came up to me and said, Maya, do you know exactly what you're voting for? And I said, to be honest with you, I don't. So when she explained to me the platforms, I told her, I'm a Republican. And you know, that's when I realized the lack of information. So I actually started educating my family. I started telling them what the platforms were. By the way, my dad hated

Myra Flores Rio Grande Valley Covid United States South Texas Democratic Party Texas Myra Harland Mexico Debbie Republican Party San Bernardo Congress Barack Obama Maya
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

05:24 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I feel like we've been talking this whole time about your identity and how it has changed and shifted. I'm interested in for you personally what has shifted from doing this work and maybe this is the time to talk about this episode you did that was about you because when I heard it, it's devastating. But I was also so impressed that you had decided to do that publicly because it didn't seem totally in character. To me. No, that's totally true. The decision to do that felt like evidence of a shift. Yeah. I think that's completely right. I mean, I always thought, you know, I'm the interviewer and I bring guests on and they share their stories. That was always my mental model going into the show. And you're in control of how much you're going to put out there of yourself and you're just helping people along. Absolutely. And I tend to be of open about certain things, but also deeply private about other things and certainly this whole fertility surrogacy miscarriage space was not something I was going on the road talking about. But here's what happens. So I already mentioned that we had a pregnancy loss with our surrogate in February of 2020. And then I'm making the show in 2021. And in late summer, we go through another embryo transfer with our surrogate Haley. And this time she's pregnant with identical twin girls. So our embryo split. It was so exciting. And I'm in the middle of production for season two of a slight change of plans. And all of a sudden, hilly, miscarries again, on exactly the same day of development for the baby. And I mean, this time it just like. I'm still speechless, 'cause I just remember what that moment felt like. Wait, really? Again, the same exact thing. How is this happening? We just saw the healthy babies on an ultrasound, and there's a miscarriage again. We later learned that Haley likely had an autoimmune response to our embryos. So it's just, it was just a bad fit. We were a perfect human fit. And just not a good biological fit, which is something that is such a bizarre thing to happen. I remember thinking in that moment, I feel like I need to make something good, come of this because it otherwise just only feels bad. And I feel like I also need some outlet to process what's going on in my mind. And so I called my producer the day after this happened and I said, I think I want to share this on the show. Would you be willing to interview me? Which is so foreign to me, max, I never, ever thought that I would want to do this. But I also kind of realized and I was pushing myself thinking, you know, this is something you ask of your guests all the time, like extreme vulnerability and honesty and transparency and a willingness to kind of quote go there. And you haven't been willing to do this. About the stuff you're going through in your own life. And I already was starting to feel so connected to my listeners at this point. I mean, in many ways, it's an ode to my listeners that I had the confidence to do this because they had already started creating the supportive bubble around me where I get emails from listeners every single day from all over the world. Talking about the show and loving the show and loving hearing what I had to say, which was also amazing to hear because I was always focusing on the guests and I just thought of myself as kind of like flying the wall who occasionally asked questions, but I was noticing that listeners were really responding to that. And so they gave me the confidence that my story was worth sharing. And so I remember telling my producer, we have to record this tomorrow morning, otherwise I'm going to change my mind. And I also don't want too much time to pass because I don't want to have created a narrative around. And this is what the human instinct we all have in our psychology is to create narratives around what happens to us. And I was like, I don't want there to have been too much processing. I really want to process what I'm going through out loud. You did not have it figured out. I really didn't. And I still don't, for what it's worth, but maybe I haven't more figured out than I did then. So it was the rawest I've ever been. And we put it out into the world, the episode's called Maya's slight change of plans, which is so again unexpected. And it's funny that I say we put it out into the world because I think that, again, was my mental model. You put things into the world. What I didn't anticipate is what I would receive. In response. And I feel completely overwhelmed by what listeners of this show gave me in return. It makes me emotional. Podcasting becomes a conversation. Between you and your listeners and I didn't expect that going into all of this. But it is absolutely the most beautiful thing that's happened to me as a result of this show. And as that opened you up in other aspects of your life, does it translate to your personal life? Yeah, I'm more hopeful and positive about human beings. Because I see the love and generosity of spirit from people who are consuming the show all the time. And I also hear about their lives and it makes me feel connected to people in a time when it's especially hard to connect with people. And does that make you better at your job?.

Haley max Maya
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:50 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"That a key part of my story is, you know, you see the numerator, you see the successes, but you don't see the denominator. You don't see all the times that I was totally despondent because I was told I would never be able to make a team or all the times I felt hopeless and like there was no chance ahead. So I think I just want to start by saying that. You have to try enough times at something to make things happen. And that's kind of always been my philosophy. And do you have endurance for that? Are you okay hearing no? Yeah, so I think I'm comfortable being told no or getting those rejections because from the time I was a little kid playing the violin, I received so much critical feedback. You're not going to survive in that world if you don't develop somewhat thick skin. Because it's a perfectionist sport, right? I mean, you're playing a passage that to any lay person would be like, that's great. And then it's being picked apart, not just by your teachers and everyone, but by yourself. I mean, I was always my harshest critic. And so I think maybe some of the resilience came from those early formative years where I was just used to being extremely criticized and extremely critical of myself. And I don't know where the right balance is, but that was just my life. And so that's what that's what I've kind of used to. And I've used it to kind of grow and be better. So how does that translate to starting a podcast? How do you go from The White House and that level of impact to being like, I'm going to talk to people with some microphones? Well, one way that that kind of thing can happen is when you don't control the results of the 2016 election. And so the woman you were hoping to work for for 8 years doesn't get elected. That's one possible way that you shift gears in life. But when it came to the podcast, I mean, I love people. That's actually been the through line through all of these seemingly disparate career choices, which is at their heart. It's always been about human connection and forging human connection. Certainly through music, you can make people feel things they've never felt before, and that's intoxicating. And then in my role as a cognitive scientist, I studied the human condition, I studied how it is that we even connect with one another. And at The White House, you know, when you're on the ground in Flint, Michigan, the wonky policy stuff feels super far away, and it's really just about connecting with human beings who are in states of distress. And so I do feel like I've always been motivated by a love and curiosity and empathy for humans. That's kind of like the thing that makes me tick. And so the podcast, in many ways, I never dreamt of being a podcaster, but when 2020 hit, and I was feeling overwhelmed by, first of all, just what was happening in the world. I mean, I think that kind of took us all by storm and no one knew how to respond in this collective moment of grief and loss and shock. And then I was going through loss in my personal life. So one of the challenges that I faced is my husband and I have to work with a surrogate in order to have a baby. And after years of trying to find our surrogate, we found her. We found Haley and Arkansas and she's amazing and I had gone through all the fertility treatments and she was pregnant with our baby girl and we were so over the moon and so thrilled that this was finally finally happening for us. You know, it's one process in life where you just don't have control. You know, no amount of like Maya hustle translates in this space. It's just, it's not like other spaces that I've been in. And so we were so thrilled and then Haley had a miscarriage and we lost our baby. And we were devastated. I was devastated. I was so intimidated by this moment. As someone who had endured so much change, this change felt different to me, and I felt like I didn't have the tools in my toolbox to figure it out. And we were also all quarantined. I wasn't even able to spend physical time with the very few people in my life who knew about this at the time. And so I guess I did the thing that I tend to do in these moments, which is I kind of got to action. Which is I think something that's kind of characteristic of my personality, which is I am a very proactive person. You know, I don't like kind of marinating in the negativity. I'm always trying to find a way out. It's probably just a survival mechanism. But I thought to myself, okay, you're feeling really scared by all the change, but you know that change is not new to humans. Like you know that we've done this rodeo, this change rodeo many times before. And that wall, the current moment feels daunting, our human ability to navigate change is not unprecedented. It's not new. And maybe if you can find people who have navigated extraordinary change and come out the other side,.

White House Haley Flint Michigan Arkansas
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:58 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Could not believe, again, the kindness of a stranger. It's like he doesn't know who I am. He's responding to my cold email within a matter of minutes and is telling me he's happy to facilitate a connection to an entire political sphere that I've had no interactions with my entire life. And when I email the Obama advisers, hilariously, this time I put cast in the subject line, recommendation from Cass sunstein. You just ladder it up. I love it. The ladder it up. So I email the deputy science adviser and he tells me, again, fortuitous that it just so happens he's in California this week because he lives in California and he loved to have me interview with him. Two days later and I need to get a business suit and I also have to prepare max for an interview with a White House official. And I have no idea what I'm doing. So my solution to that problem was to call everybody smart that I know in this world. And mine, their brains for wisdom. I was like, so hypothetically speaking, if you had an interview in two days with a White House official, what policy interventions would you want to do at the intersection of behavioral science? And so I just start curating all these ideas. And also, I mean, it was a really fun exercise because I feel like I'd been waxing poetic about the virtues of the behavioral science for a bit at this point, but I never thought any of those dreams could come true. And so it was a really fun thought experiment. And so I show up at Tom Khalil's house. That's his name. And I don't know what to expect of this government bureaucrat either. And so I'm very, very nervous coming in the door. And I enter and I just remember it was not what I was expecting. He was super nice and not at all intimidating. And what precedes is just this wonderful, rich conversation. It felt really like a conversation versus an interview about what it could be like if the government created this new position that I was proposing to them of a behavioral scientist. And so my job was just to pitch in. It was like I want you guys to create this position and I want you to hire me into the position once you created it. And I remember that there was this there was this moment that was really special for me where I was talking about the First Lady's let's move initiative. And I was saying how some of the language on the website could be improved because it wasn't reflecting the best science from behavioral science. And Tom's response was, oh, I know, you know, Michelle. Michelle. And her chief of staff. And we can make that happen. That was incredible. Yeah. That moment where I realized, wow, all this stuff that's in my brain and in all the books. Can now be translated in real life to improve people's lives. And so we conclude the conversation and I've ever at the end. It was like an awkward first date. He was like, so I'd love to keep in touch. And I was like, let's unpack that. What kind of keep in touch are we talking about here? Yeah, what are we talking about? We're talking about like a dope call me, I'll call you situation, or is it like I'd love to hire you? So I literally I think in the moment I did push him and I was like, what is that mean exactly? Are you blowing me off here? Exactly. And he says, well, there's a couple things that need to happen. One, Obama needs to win his reelection in a few weeks. So this was fall of 2012. And he said, I also have to convince all the leadership at The White House to create this new position, right? And I also need to make sure that there's a desk available for you. And this is where all my west wing dreams just kind of start eating because I realize that The White House is actually like a very resource constrained environment in which practical considerations are like, is there a desk available? It's like a real thing. And so all those things ended up happening. But I did, I did do a very bold thing, which is I terminated my lease in California and I signed a one year lease in D.C. and sold everything other than my bike before having a formal job offer from The White House. That is a bold move. I was kind of like, I'm showing up. We're gonna make this happen. You just showed up knocked on the door of The White House. Yeah, and I was like, let me in. But I think that really did show a commitment to everyone that it was really great if we could just get this over the finish line. And it happened. Yeah, and we can fast forward a little bit. I mean, you created a department of behavioral science, worked in The White House for four years, did all kinds of incredible work, and to me, I mean, there's so many parallels between that and the experience that you had with the violin. And then, Maya, and this is where the story goes from incredible to for me slightly annoying. You decide to start a fucking podcast. And then it's apple's best podcast of the year. How do you do that? I think it's important to pull the curtain back a little bit, which is the number of times that I've been told no and rejected in my career is countless. I mean, I was trying to build this team in government, and I was knocking on every conceivable door that I could, begging my government agency, colleagues, to work with me, because I wasn't given a mandate and I had no budget to build this team..

White House Tom Khalil Cass sunstein California Michelle Obama Tom department of behavioral scien D.C. Maya apple
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

05:52 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I define myself as a violinist for so long, even before I was Maya, I feel like I was a violinist. And so when it's taken away from you, you're kind of like, what the hell? Like, what do I do? What is my purpose in meeting and value in this world? You know, I was sad, but then I was also discouraged because I didn't know if I could find something again that filled me with the same kind of passion and love. And I recognize that it was such a gift I was given to love something so much as a kid. You know, I was given that gift, and then when it was taken away, I was just heartbroken, is the easiest way of putting it. I have never been through something like that, but I can imagine how devastating that moment is and how confusing it is in terms of identity and trying to figure out who you are. And I feel like there's all these stories out in the world of people having experiences like this, like I think about athletes blowing out their knee and their own careers. By the way, I like to think that I made violin and extreme sport, you know. Of having this career ending injury. So I just want a little bit of street Cred. The rare catastrophic violin injury. But the thing that seems different here is that you figured something else out and then ran as hard as fucking possible at that. So what is like the next life of Maya? Yeah, so there's a psychological term that I've since been acquainted with that I didn't know at the time called identity foreclosure. And it refers to the idea that we can lock ourselves into a self identity early in adolescence and sometimes that mentality can persist into adulthood and I fell prey to identity foreclosure. And I think it really helped me back. I didn't see my identity as malleable as dynamic as something that could change. And at the time, if I had been cultivating that kind of spirit, I would have navigated the moment better. But long story short, I was in my parents basement the summer before college started. Counterfactual world, I was supposed to be in China, touring with my violin classmates, so equally cool summer situation. And I stumbled upon my sister's course book. It was Steven pinker's book called the language instinct. And it basically articulated the marvelous ways in which our mind works. And how sophisticated the machinery is behind the scenes, that's giving rise to our ability to comprehend and produce language. And I literally never once before thought about my language abilities, just something that kind of happened, right? And I remember feeling in awe. Of this organ that we all possess. It was like this is awesome and fascinating and so complicated. And I was nerding out. I was like, this is a really cool thing that I just never thought about before. And so I got my hands on every book I could that summer on cognitive science, which is so foreign. I mean, I was going in to college thinking, okay, maybe I could pull off being a history major. I don't have any specializations that my brain really lit up when it came to studying cog sci. And so I still remember, so this is another kind of julliard entrance moment, basically, I knew that the cognitive science program was a competitive one. So it was an admissions only program. In my impostor syndrome, by the way, at this point, is through the roof, because I'm thinking the only reason I got into Yale in the first place is because I had these violent credentials. And I don't have them anymore. So I don't even know why I'm here. And I heard during a pre orientation program that this professor Laurie Santos was running a monkey lab, a non human primate cognition lab. And it was like the coolest thing because if you join this lab, you got to run novel experiments and ask all these interesting research questions and study cognition through this lens. And hang out with monkeys all day. And hang out with monkeys, which, by the way, later proved terrifying, so I'm not really sure what I was thinking. But I show up to the class on day one. It's the day where we just learn about it, and then there's the admissions process after that. And the room is overflowing max. There's like 50 people for whatever 5 spots. And it's overflowing with upperclassmen. I'm the lowly freshman. I'm thinking, oh crap. There's no shot I have at this. But thankfully for me, there is an application form. And I'm like, I'm going to crush this application form. Larry Santos is never going to see a better application for him than this. And by the way, no one's taking the application for a seriously except for 17 year old Maya. Viewing it like an elevator Julie. Yeah, exactly. And I was like, Laurie, I will take the 6 30 a.m. Saturday morning shifts in New Haven. I was selling my soul on this application. I was like, you can have any unborn children. You can have all the things that I ever succeed at. Everything. And she took me in. I was the only freshman that she took into the class that year. And I thought it was my booleans. She later told me that I was the only one who was willing to take the Saturday morning shifts. So, you know, too bad, it wasn't actually what I wrote in the application process. But that course really changed my life because not only did I have, did I get to enter this life experience of what it could be like to be a scientist? I now had an inbuilt mentor in Laurie Santos, who was able to kind of coach me through undergrad and get me jazzed about studying the mind and getting to ask just fascinating research questions, which is something I never thought I'd be able to do. Cover story, a new podcast by New York magazine is back for part two. So far in our first season, we've investigated the underground world of psychedelic healing. Now, we're going above ground. I kicked the door down to be in the MDA clinical trial. We're going to the world.

Laurie Santos Maya Steven pinker Larry Santos China Laurie New Haven Julie New York magazine
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

07:04 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Hey, max. It's great to be here. Oh, it's so great to have you. I feel like we're overdue. I know. I mean, I'm such a fan of long form, so I'm fangirling a bit. Mutual fanning out, 'cause I'm very, very excited to have you. Maya, I believe that you are unique among our 482 guests. And that I don't have the qualifications to be on the show. Is that what you mean? I'm not a journalist. I'm not a writer. I think this might have been a mistake. No, I think that you potentially have lived more lives than anyone that we have had on the show. That is always not the life that would again qualify me to be on the show. It's not lost on me, max. But thank you to all the listeners who are sticking around. I promise it'll be a fun conversation. Yeah, we'll do our best. But when people ask me about you, which they do fairly often, my answer is that Maya has lived like multiple entire lives that the rest of us would be very comfortable. It's just like any one of and yet somehow you have had these totally totally disparate journeys and I understand that this is a slightly challenging way to ask this. But is there a way that you could just do like the condensed Maya story for people who don't know about these multiple lives? Yes. I'll try to do the fast story. Yeah. Give me the fast version. So as a kid, first of all, you'd ask me, will you be a cognitive scientist one day? I'd be like, no, because I don't even know what that is. I was a violinist first and foremost. So when I was 6 years old, my mom brought down my grandmother's violin from the attic that she'd brought with her all the way from India when she immigrated to this country in the 70s. So my grandmother had played Indian classical music. And my mom had just meant to show me the instrument, but I took to it so quickly. I looked at it and I was fascinated by it and I asked my mom very quickly for a pint sized version of my own. So she bought me a quarter size instrument and I was a little kid with big dreams very quickly. And so I ended up auditioning for The Juilliard School of music in New York when I was 9 and was very fortunately accepted. And when I was a teenager, it's like Perlman asked me to be his private violin student. And so that was a big deal for these days, I feel like people are like, who's Perlman? Because we all grew up with Brittany, but probably the big deal in classical music circles. I feel like the long form podcast audience is in the Perlman's a big deal camp. Yeah, I was just going to say, I think this is the right audience for recognizing pearlman. Wait, just so people are understanding this. Your mom showed you a violin when you were 6 years old, you intuitively and immediately became obsessed with the thing. Will your way into julliard? And then Perlman is like, you're going to be my person. Kind of. I mean, we literally willed our way into Juilliard into the physical building. So it might be worth sharing this story, which is I was obsessed with the violin and my mom notes that while she had to convince me to do lots of things, practicing the violin was just not one of them, which was always kind of stunning to her. And so at a certain point, she realized that she was at the limits of her connections in the musical world, namely she had none. I mean, my dad's a physics Professor of my mom was a physics major. They're both scientists at heart. They don't have any connections into this space. And so she realized, you know, I'm not really sure how to connect my kid with the opportunities she needs in order to pursue her dreams. And so one day we were walking by Juilliard in New York and I had my violin with me. And she said, why don't we just walk into the building? I was like, what do you mean, just walk in? She's like, what's the worst thing that can happen? And I'm like security guards. That's one thing. You know, this is back in the day when you could still slide in to large establishments. So we did. We go into the elevator and my mom strikes up a conversation with a student and her mom, and says, hey, my daughter plays the violin. Would you mind introducing us to your teacher when your lesson's over today? And, you know, I'm so embarrassed. I'm like in the corner of the elevator, trying to make myself as small as possible. And they said yes, I mean, it's incredible how kind strangers are. When you ask them for a favor. And so they introduced me to who would become my future teacher. I auditioned for him on the spot. He accepted me into a summer boot camp, essentially the summer music program. And skilled me up to the point where I even had a shot at getting into Juilliard. And I'm not being falsely humble. Like we asked him later about this and he confirmed to my mother that when he first met me, he thought I had no shot. Of getting into Juilliard, but he liked my personality. And so he wanted to give me a chance. And then, you know, I just worked really hard over the summer, and then was able to pass the audition. And so I was a very valuable lesson to me from an early age that sometimes life doesn't give you the silver platter and you just kind of have to create opportunities where they don't exist. Yeah, I feel like that's a theme that's going to come up again in life to of Maya and life three to 5. It's all about cold emails. But tell me about what happened next. So proman takes you in and you are on a path to be a concert violinist. That's going to be your life. Yeah, a 100%. I mean, again, I definitely had all the impostor feelings for the longest time because when you're in such elite competitive circles, you're just not sure you have what it takes and then as I was saying when Perlman took me on, I felt, okay, let me go for this. And I even convinced my Indian parents that a conservatory was maybe in the cards for me. They had always been more of the, hey, we love the liberal arts education, very stable. Maybe don't do this music thing full time, but even they were sold after the Perlman vote. And so I just went full steam ahead. I was totally in. And then at a moment that changed my life forever, where I was practicing violin early in the morning at pearl and summer camp. I overstretched my finger on a single note. And I heard a popping sound and I had torn tendons in my hand and resisted reality for a very long time until doctors finally told me I could never play the violin again. And so that was, it was a total shock to the system. Yeah, that must have been just wild. Your whole plan gone in a moment and then sort of sitting in a couple of moments later. Yeah, you know, I think it's interesting max because when I look back at it, I realize that I expected to grieve the loss of the instrument, but I didn't expect to grieve the loss of me. It was only in that moment when I lost the instrument that I realized how tethered my identity was to it. And so when it was gone, and it was no longer a thing I could do, I really felt like I didn't know who I was anymore..

Perlman Maya Juilliard School of music pearlman New York max Brittany India Juilliard
"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

02:05 min | 8 months ago

"maya" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I'm doing great. Max Aaron will be back next week. We always miss him what he's gone. It's been so long since I intro with Aaron. I miss him desperately. Well, you'll see him again. You'll see him again, but for this week, who have you got for us? This week I talked to Maya shankar, and Maya is the host of a podcast that's called a slight change of plans. It launched last year and every episode, Maya talks to someone oftentimes very well known people, sometimes people you have not heard of before, but all of them have gone through a significant change. Something transformative in their lives and the show is about how you navigate those moments, how you come out on the other side. And Maya is like the perfect person to host it because she has had a bunch of really distinct lives, particularly professionally she was well, I don't want to spoil it because we talk about it at some length. But she has reached the Pinnacle or almost the Pinnacle of multiple professions and that includes podcasting, she launched the show last year, it was named best of the year by Apple, which is for me at least a little annoying. She just starts doing this and all of a sudden it's the best of the year, but it's deserved the show is great. And it was really fun to talk to her. We talked about interviewing and moving into podcasting and also about like whether or not she thinks of herself as a journalist or a scientist or an entertainer is a really compelling conversation she is a one of a kind person. Absolute one of one. I love it when you interview an interviewer max. I feel like I learned a lot from the max interviews and interviewer type shows. You know that I want to do that whole show. I wanted to do like a spin off where I just interviewed interviewers. And then I realized, like, that doesn't need to be a spin off. I could just do it on the show. We'd be annoyed if you did that as a spinoff. You know, who's not annoying? The people at vox, who we make this show with. Thanks so much to them for their partnership. And now here's max with Maya shankar. Hi,.

Maya Max Aaron Maya shankar Aaron Apple
$30 Trillion in Debt Is a Real Cause for Concern, Says Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

Mark Levin

01:03 min | 10 months ago

$30 Trillion in Debt Is a Real Cause for Concern, Says Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

"$30 trillion debt is a jaw dropping number that is a real cause for concerns that Maya McGinnis president of the committee for a responsible federal budget A nonpartisan group that advocates for bouncing the budget Tells The Wall Street Journal that it is the result of both borrowing for really important crises most auto we have a pandemic but also trillions and trillions of borrowing for no reason of in politicians have stopped being willing to pay the bills Does anybody think this is even a problem anymore Does anybody even think this is even an issue And then you factor in inflation into all of this too And then the spending that keeps going on in Washington and then ask yourself something too When does it end exactly They're talking about now another possibly 5.3 trillion in emergency pandemic spending down the road Might have to do another big massive spending bill to get the economy moving again to deal with inflation You can not solve inflation with government spending Only a moron who doesn't understand basic economics would think that the answer to inflation is government

Maya Mcginnis Committee For A Responsible Fe The Wall Street Journal Washington
 US Mint begins shipping quarters honoring Maya Angelou

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

US Mint begins shipping quarters honoring Maya Angelou

"Friends friends can can get get your your hands hands on on a a Maya Maya Angelou Angelou quarter quarter pers pers will will be be the the first first in in a a series series of of queens queens in in the the American American women women quarters quarters program program the the U. U. S. S. mint mint has has already already begun begun shipping shipping the the twenty twenty five five cent cent pieces pieces around around the the country country and and there there is is definitely definitely no no discounting discounting Angelou's Angelou's cred cred the the author author poet poet and and civil civil rights rights activist activist rose rose to to fame fame with with her her and and book book I I know know why why the the caged caged bird bird sings sings in in nineteen nineteen sixty sixty nine nine she she received received the the presidential presidential medal medal of of freedom freedom in in twenty twenty ten ten four four years years before before her her death death at at age age eighty eighty six six other other women women featured featured in in the the quarter quarter series series include include the the first first woman woman astronaut astronaut Sally Sally ride ride and and Anna Anna may may Wong Wong the the first first Chinese Chinese American American film film star star in in Hollywood Hollywood I'm I'm Oscar Oscar wells wells Gabriel Gabriel the the popular popular American American poet poet is is getting getting a a special special tribute tribute and and it's it's more more than than just just some some two two bit bit honor honor soon soon

American American Women Women U. U. S. S. Mint Mint Rose Rose Sally Sally Anna Anna Wong Wong Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Hollywood
Coronavirus dampens Christmas joy in biblical Bethlehem

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus dampens Christmas joy in biblical Bethlehem

"Bethlehem Bethlehem is is marking marking its its second second straight straight Christmas Christmas Eve Eve under under the the shadow shadow of of the the corona corona virus virus small small crowds crowds angry angry gloomy gloomy weather weather dampened dampened celebrations celebrations in in the the traditional traditional birthplace birthplace of of Jesus Jesus a a ban ban on on nearly nearly all all incoming incoming air air traffic traffic by by Israel Israel the the main main entry entry point point for for foreign foreign visitors visitors heading heading to to the the occupied occupied west west bank bank skip skip international international tourists tourists away away again again this this year year the the band band is is meant meant to to slow slow the the spread spread of of the the Omicron Omicron variant variant of of covert covert nineteen nineteen still still local local authorities authorities are are counting counting on on the the holy holy land land small small Christian Christian community community to to lift lift spirits spirits last last was was much much harder harder to to move move the the Maya Maya is is the the Palestinian Palestinian tourism tourism minister minister many many Palestinians Palestinians from from different different governorates governorates out out coming coming in in to to replace replace him him to to celebrate celebrate Christmas Christmas this this year year several several hundred hundred people people did did gather gather is is bands bands marched marched through through manger manger square square midnight midnight mass mass at at the the church church of of the the nativity nativity which which houses houses the the grotto grotto where where Christians Christians believe believe Jesus Jesus was was born born I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Bethlehem Bethlehem West West Bank Jesus Jesus Israel Maya Maya Manger Manger Square Square Church Church Of Of Ben Ben Thomas Thomas
"maya" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Hey, before we dive into today's show, my new book spark is out. It's a book about being seen, reclaiming agency and control reimagining the way that you work and the way your work makes you feel. It's a book that will show you how to live and work with more meaning and purpose and joy. So pick up a copy at your favorite bookseller or just use the links in the show notes onto our show. So imagine this. You're so drawn to something as a kid. It consumes most of your waking hours. It rapidly becomes your identity, and it's even the thing that you believe that you'll devote your entire life to. And then in the blink of an eye, it's all taken away. Well, that's what happened to Maya shankar, who fell in love with the violin as a small child, she studied it with so much love and passion and devotion was even being mentored by the legendary itself Perlman and was sure it would be her profession for life. Until an injury took it all away in the blink of an eye. How that moment affected her, and how she'd eventually discovered an entirely new yet equally fulfilling devotion just a few years later in the field of human behavior and cognitive science is a big part of today's conversation, along with a deep dive into how our brains work and how we change our minds, which is especially important now. So Maya is currently the senior director of behavioral economics at Google and is also the creator host and executive producer of a slight change of plans, which is a podcast with pushkin industries. My previously served as a senior adviser in the Obama White House, where she founded and served as chair of The White House's behavioral science team, which was this team of scientists charged with improving public policy using research insights about human behavior. She's been profiled everywhere from The New Yorker and has been featured in New York Times, scientific American Forbes and NPR is all things considered freakonomics hidden brain and more, and we dive into it.

Maya shankar Perlman pushkin industries Maya Google White House Obama The New Yorker New York Times Forbes NPR
'Jeopardy!' Hosts Mayim Bialik, Ken Jennings Will Finish 2021 Season

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

'Jeopardy!' Hosts Mayim Bialik, Ken Jennings Will Finish 2021 Season

"Another jeopardy question has been answered sort of the latest decision on any of the new full time jeopardy host is literally a split decision Sony pictures television says Maya Bialik and Ken Jennings will turn to the duties for the rest of the year here's how it will work the Alec who's been named interim hosts will host for shows that air through November fifth after that Jennings of the article share hosting duties to the end of the calendar year depending on their schedules it's unclear what is to happen after that November eighth will mark the one year mark since the show's beloved host Alex Trebek died of cancer I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Maya Bialik Ken Jennings Sony Jennings Alex Trebek Mark Oscar Wells Gabriel Cancer
Judge Shields Texas Clinics From Anti-Abortion Group's Suits

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Judge Shields Texas Clinics From Anti-Abortion Group's Suits

"A state judge in Texas has provided temporary shield for abortion clinics facing the prospect of lawsuits if they perform the procedure in a very narrow ruling state district judge Maya Gera gamble granted planned parenthood's request for a temporary restraining order against the anti abortion group Texas right to life its legislative director and one hundred individuals the ruling doesn't stop the new strict anti abortion law that bars the procedure if a fetal heartbeat is present but it does shield the clinics for now until the hearing September thirteenth Texas right to life's as they are certain an impartial court will throw out planned parenthood's lawsuit the U. S. Supreme Court has allowed the Texas law to remain in effect I'm Jackie Quinn

Maya Gera Gamble Texas U. S. Supreme Court Jackie Quinn
"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Things i find myself most inspired by is when people choose to expand the amount of space they hold for new information and new experiences both in the world and in in themselves that makes me feel really giddy and said my favorite thing to ask. Everyone and i wonder if that might be. Your answer is what in your life at this moment. Feels like a work in progress. Yeah it's related to answer for sure. I think the works progress for me. Is you know as a scientist. It's so seductive to feel like there could be a one-size-fits-all answer for people. And i think in making this podcast. I'm realizing how tailor-made advice needs to be when it comes to the topic of change in how we navigate changed in our lives because the way that we interact with. The change can be so idiosyncratic and so one thing i've had to be satisfied with is if i just lead every conversation and listeners. Leave every conversation thinking new thoughts about even one idea within the change domain. That's a success. There's not you're not gonna get the how to guide on change from this podcast and that's kind of the point which is every personal. Take something different from any given person's story you know you might hear that. The hillary clinton you think one thing i might hear the hillary clinton something completely different and i think that's part of the magic of what needs to be human. Which is we take in all this information and ultimate we do need to figure out how to tailor it to ourselves given our best understanding of who we are. Yeah i love the the ability to always add change. be flexible. That that to me feels like the kind of behavior. We all need to really lean into. So i i appreciate that answer very much. I think you so much for joining me today. Of course there was such a pleasure to chat. Thank you for your time..

hillary clinton
"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"The puzzle. I love that was was that understanding. What led you to work with people to judge on his debate. Prep team. i'm so curious. How did you get that call. Do you think that was made that call. I liked the reason. I'm the queen of the cold email. Cold this it's very ads. So i should also mention that when i was young kids. I mentioned how i auditioned for. Juilliard is just give you a quick back story how that happened because it's very relevant to the pro-choice you since so. My parents had no exposure to the classical music world. my dad's theoretical physicist helps immigrants get green cards to study in this country so when i developed a huge love of the violin They didn't know what to do like they had no exposure to western classical music. So my mom knew that my dreams are really big. She knew that i was fired. Two audition for juilliard but we have no connections with that world so day. We are in new york. It's mother daughter trip. You're walking by the juilliard building. And my mom goes. Why don't you just go. It and see what happens is like quitting. Just go. that's crazy. She's let's just go in and see what happens. You've got your violin with you. Maybe we can find something out of this experience. So we walk into the juilliard building unannounced uninvited. My mom's strikes up a conversation with a woman in the elevator and her daughter and says hey. When you guys with your lesson with the teacher would you might of. Maya just played for that teacher just a few minutes. Would you be willing to just make an introduction. And they said yes and it was a lesson to me that some. Hasn't you just ask you'll get a yes in return and so they made the intro. I auditioned for this teacher. He took me out as the summer student and it is only because of that summer. Bootcamp that experience. That i even had a chance of getting into juilliard in the fall so she talked me in this case it wasn't even it wasn't a cold calls like a cold walk into the.

new york Maya
"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"It's so nice to have you on the show today. And before i ask you one million questions about your fascinating work actually always liked to go backwards. Because i sit across from you today. You know fascinated by your career and wanting to talk about behavioral science and and how the brain works. And i wonder how you got to be an expert on the brain. We're fascinated by science as a kid was was eight or nine year. Old really into what makes people tick or where you want. Wanna hold other path. I was on a for salts. Great to be here safiya. And it's so lovely to meet you a fan of your show. So yeah. I mean if you had asked nine year old maya evaluate whether she was actually going to become a scientist to been like. There's no way that's not even possible When i was a kid i true. Passion was playing the violin. So when i was six years old my moment to her attic and brought down my grandmother's violin that she brought with her all the way from india and she tells me that when she opened up the case. My eyes just lit up like i. It was an instant connection that i felt with the instrument and things really picked up for me when i was nine. Because i auditioned for the juilliard school of music and new york and was very fortunately accepted and that began weekly trips from connecticut to new york every saturday for about ten hours of classes and then when i was a teenager things picked up even more when it's up. Perlman asked me to be his private violent student and he was my role model and in my mind. The violinist of our time. And as you can imagine. I felt very intimidated in the juilliard climate. Right it's very easy to feel imposter syndrome. Then and like you don't really have. It takes but when perlman gave me his vote of confidence i felt like. Oh maybe i. Maybe i do have what it takes. I could actually go pro. And so i really double down on my desire to of professional at that point and every decision i made from that point on was was in pursuit of wanting to become a concert violinist but then when i was fifteen i had a sudden hand injury that derailed all of my ambitions to become a violinist and doctors basically told me that i could never play the violin again so that attack that changed my life in a pretty significant way and i imagine especially when you're so dedicated to something as a young person. I.

safiya juilliard school of music maya new york Perlman india connecticut perlman
"maya" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Find. Maya's slight change of plans podcasts. Wherever you get your podcasts are some ziglar show sponsors then. I'm going to give you a clip of dr maya shankar talking with adam grant about science based tactics to actually change people's mind from again. Her new podcast cold a slight change of plans so people generally assume that they're less biased than others right. This is my favorite bias. It's been. I'm not biased by everybody else's vice i am objective i see things with perfect neutrality. That's adam grant. He's a psychologist an author of the book. Think again and he's talking here about a surprising feature of our own psychology that prevents us from changing our minds. Even when we should. And i think that the higher intelligence the more likely you are to fall victim to that biased. They're smarter. You are the more feedback you've gotten throughout your life that you're right and that gives you an illusion of objectivity. I wanted to talk with adam. Because he's an expert on the science of changing people's minds a topic. We've been diving into on this season of a slight change of plans. We all have that friend that family member that we disagree with on something and it can feel daunting to engage with them on the topic. So daunting that oftentimes just give up in this episode. We're trying to change that. Adamant i discuss science-based tactics that you can use to approach these conversations differently and hopefully with more success shankar and this is a slight change of plans was great to me. You outta. i've been hearing about you for years. I'm so excited that you're you're able to join us for this. I'm just eager to pick your brain today. My brain is sitting here waiting to be picked. Awesome okay we don't like changing our minds right. it's uncomfortable it can create a lot of cognitive dissonance..

adam grant dr maya shankar ziglar Maya adam shankar
"maya" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"And here's nobody else did. Gourmet this neat. When you want. I got you come home. Bring them with you. They may be important in maya. Have you heard that hers was medicine.

maya
"maya" Discussed on EDMlivesets & Podcasts

EDMlivesets & Podcasts

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"maya" Discussed on EDMlivesets & Podcasts

"Now give it up for matias maya.

matias maya
"maya" Discussed on A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"maya" Discussed on A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

"I get as how. I started my podcast and why anchor fm Did extensive research and anchor is is great for newbies like myself it. They provide good support and it is easy to use the cost. You can't beat it just starting you can start for free and this is another reason. I shows anger. Fm all the work. You do there many times in today's world that if you're not super famous a super-rich that people tend to look at you as someone unworthy. Perhaps you're not super rich super famous and let us face it in today's world certain jobs. Just don't even pay a living wage. This brings me to something. I had read somewhere. That job is what you make of it. And i said sure then came this two encounters one office supply store my daughter and i had gone there to make a large amount of copies and the clerk was so good about expanding all the options. We had in order to make it work for us. I thank him for his kindness and he seemed generally surprise after all. He is probably like this all the time just part of his job but is it a few days later. I went on a saturday morning to my local supermarket which i dread going there Because the lines are now longer than ever since covert we in line and waited and a young woman does seem too good for her job proceeded to tell us we should go to the next Cashier and it turned out that she was closed. We turned around and said to her. You sent us to a cashier that as close and then she just Send us to another cashier That had like another person waiting already. They're violating the protocol for covid since we were really next to the person in if not we would have to wait where everybody was going by And then another worker proceeded to come over and say to her. I guess they just don't want to wait nosy. I said Nobody funny she was somehow a few minutes earlier when she was telling the too good for this job. They just don't want to wait the takeaway from this was that i always believed honor. The work you do thinking that you are too good or too good looking or makes some side comments to another worker In the service to everyone there are many people who are good. Workers need to work and need a job. Work is just that work for sure are jobs where there are situations. No one should have to tolerate by. But i'm not talking about those situations. I'm talking about every day. Probably underpaid jobs the jobs we conham people do the postman. The people who clean our streets the sales clerks babysitters you name it. A some point some of us have had jobs we hate it where on the pay impossibly underappreciated but you know that you know what you honor the work you do by respecting yourself and the people you service till next time remember life is for the living. Live it and stay well to next time..

saturday morning few days later today one office supply two encounters anchor a minutes
"maya" Discussed on A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"maya" Discussed on A Writer's Journey By Maya Rodriguez

"I get as how. I started my podcast and why anchor fm Did extensive research and anchor is is great for newbies like myself it. They provide good support and it is easy to use the cost. You can't beat it just starting you can start for free and this is another reason. I shows anger. fm. Take time to look up. It used to be they're looking at. This guy was something people did with awe amazement form of inspiration about all the beautiful things. This guy had Especially at night but then came the incident. The busy lives to cell phones and who needed to look up at the sky when you could just go online and get a whole view of the whole sky but then came. Kobe is just got me thinking about all the things you forget to appreciate. There are times that i get of the sky from my bedroom window and every so often. I see the moon and all the different faces. It goes through from a quarter moon to a full moon. Sometimes the moon is much bigger Embroider and other times you can barely see it but you know it's there somehow. This kind of contemplation got lost. We all remember to look up at the sky when there is a of some kind of a special moon or some other event. That is not likely to happen for another two hundred years or more then it becomes this media event not the quiet of just observing the beautiful sky above us. Looking up is the time for quiet contemplation. Just enjoying the view. It time to just let your mind wander a time of quiet peace while for now. Remember that life is for the living. Live it to next time stay well..

Kobe