35 Burst results for "May Ninth"

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

Court Junkie

02:13 min | just now

9 Minutes and 29 Seconds: The Derek Chauvin Trial

"Thirty pm on may twenty fifth two thousand twani at the intersection of east thirty eighth street and chicago avenue in minneapolis. Minnesota was the aftermath of something. Horrific that had just occurred there. Donald williams was calling nine one one of the emergency designing killing In front of chicago He is pretty noisy. Guy wasn't the rest. Yeah neck the whole time. I'll do ninety man win. Went by breathing was arrested. Nothing you've already made green light these stupid. If not responsible when the ambulance you're area cattle. Donald was talking fast. He would later say he called nine one one because he didn't know what else to do about what he had just witnessed. He told the dispatcher that he saw a police officer quote pretty much. Just kill this guy. Who wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee and this dude's neck the whole time. He said officer nine eighty-seven referring to the officer's badge number he had seen. He said the man hadn't been resisting that he was already in handcuffs when the officer knelt on him pinning him down on the ground then. The man stopped breathing and was non responsive when the ambulance came he said. Would you like to speak with us sergeant. That would go. What a wasn't the rest for. Let me get you over to the best thing for thing. Don't be his own off. Duty firefighter day. Your washing it. As well jacob go the one person he told the dispatcher he had been standing there watching with a woman who was an off duty firefighter. That woman told the officer to check the man for a pulse. He said but the officer refused

Donald Williams Chicago Minneapolis Minnesota Donald Trump GUY Jacob
Bryant, Posey lead Giants to 8-5 win over fading Friars

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 hrs ago

Bryant, Posey lead Giants to 8-5 win over fading Friars

"Buster Posey had four hits and scored three runs leading the San Francisco Giants to an eighty six win over the San Diego Padres San Francisco jumped out to an early lead in the first inning on Kris Bryant's bases clearing double off Padres starter Vince Velasquez the giants would go on to add two runs in the sixth and three more in the seventh inning building an eight to one lead then held off the Padres comeback attempt to secure their ninety ninth win of the season the giants catcher feels they played well all year as a team I don't think you get to this point this season and have won as many games we have without you know collectively played really well Fernando to teach junior went two for five hitting his National League leading fortieth home run of the season for the Padres with the win the giants increase their National League west lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers to two games Philip gone San Diego

Padres Kris Bryant Vince Velasquez Buster Posey Giants San Francisco Giants San Francisco National League Fernando Los Angeles Dodgers Philip San Diego
Schwarber, Sale help Boston win 7th in a row, 12-5 over Mets

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 9 hrs ago

Schwarber, Sale help Boston win 7th in a row, 12-5 over Mets

"Carol shorter club a pair of home runs and had four RBIs to help the red Sox blow out the Mets twelve to five Schwarber had a solo shot in the first inning and smacked a three run Homer in the second to raise his season total to thirty one Chris sale tossed five innings of two run ball with eight strikeouts for the red Sox who remained two games ahead of the Yankees atop the AL wild card race Alonso had a solo shot for his team leading thirty fifth Homer for the Mets as New York fell nine and a half games out in the NL wild card hunt I'm guessing Coolbaugh

Carol Shorter Club Schwarber Red Sox Mets Homer Al Wild Chris Alonso Yankees New York Coolbaugh
Harper's throw to plate saves Phillies' 4-3 win over O's

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 10 hrs ago

Harper's throw to plate saves Phillies' 4-3 win over O's

"Bryce Harper throughout the tying run at the plate in the eighth inning to keep the Phillies ahead in a four three decision over the Orioles the game was tied to two in the seventh before Jean Segura hit a sacrifice fly and JT Realmuto added an RBI single Andrew McCutchen hit a two run Homer for the Phils Zack Wheeler got a no decision after striking out nine while limiting the Orioles to a run and four hits over six innings Wheeler leads the NL with two hundred forty Kay's Jose Alvarado improved to seven and one and Ian Kennedy walked to one the night before closing out the win I'm Dave Ferrie

Jean Segura Bryce Harper Jt Realmuto Orioles Zack Wheeler Phillies Andrew Mccutchen Homer Jose Alvarado Wheeler NL KAY Ian Kennedy Dave Ferrie
Kiermaier hit, apparent retribution, as Rays clinch playoffs

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 10 hrs ago

Kiermaier hit, apparent retribution, as Rays clinch playoffs

"Austin meadows hit a three run Homer during a six run third that propelled the race to a seven one win over the blue jays meadows blast occurred long before teammate Kevin care Meyer was hit by a pitch of perceived retaliation on Monday cure Meyer picked up a scouting report that fell off the wrist band of blue jays catcher Alejandro Kirk during a play at the plate here Meyer refused to give it back manager Charlie mon Toyo says he understood why the rates are not buyers thought it was a purpose pitch I understand what it looks like just why don't get excited you know because I understand what you're doing things about when the wires are thinking about because data team was out for two days yeah I D. D. as in Taylor walls drove in two runs apiece is the rays improved to an NL best ninety four and fifty nine I'm Dave very

Austin Meadows Kevin Care Meyer Alejandro Kirk Meyer Charlie Mon Toyo Homer Jays Taylor Walls Rays Dave
Author Joel Rosenberg Describes His Latest Book 'Enemies and Allies'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | 16 hrs ago

Author Joel Rosenberg Describes His Latest Book 'Enemies and Allies'

"Rosenberg. Welcome to the program. Thanks bob it's great to be with you. Oh eric trish. I even heard of you. I've heard of you in fact i've had you on the program many times. You have so many new york times. Bestsellers that i. I laugh because to somebody who i don't know. I think i have five officially but i thought you have written so many books and your books do so well and you now have another book so before we get into current events. 'cause i wanna talk about the middle east. Sure i'm tell us about the new book. Because it's i know it's it's the new book. Well what's interesting about this book. Enemies and allies is. It's the first book. It's the only book that really takes you inside the middle east twenty years after the horrific events of nine eleven to to assess. Where are we today right. Who our enemies today. Because they've changed and who our allies today. They've also changed but what makes us book. Distinctive is not just that. I'm sort of analyzing it from my own vantage point. But i'm taking the readers inside the palaces and the presidential compounds in every major american ally in the middle east. You're sitting with prime minister. Benjamin netanyahu you're sitting with israeli president ruby. Rivlin you're sitting with. Israel's defense minster by you're also sitting as i take you with me into riyadh saudi arabia and you're meeting mohammed bin salman most consequential and i think the most controversial leader in the arab world and presidency in egypt and king of jordan and the leaders of the united arab emirates and bahrain. This there is no book. Might this that has allowed you to sit there and listen to these leaders. What are they think are the worst threats facing not only the united states but them how do they how are they changing their societies because there are massive changes. So that's what makes us book interesting and for me fascinating to live it over the last few

Eric Trish Middle East Rosenberg Rivlin New York Times BOB Mohammed Bin Salman Benjamin Netanyahu Riyadh Saudi Arabia Israel United Arab Emirates Bahrain Egypt Jordan United States
South Carolina's Confederate monument protection law upheld

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 16 hrs ago

South Carolina's Confederate monument protection law upheld

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting south Carolina's Confederate monument protection law has been upheld the South Carolina Supreme Court has upheld the legality of the state law that prevents moving a Confederate monument or changing the historical name of the street or building without the legislature's approval but the justices struck down a requirement that two thirds of the General Assembly must approve a move or name change the ruling keeps the state's heritage act in place heritage act was passed in two thousand as part of a compromise to remove the Confederate flag from atop the South Carolina statehouse dome the rebel flag was moved to a poll on the capitol lawn but it was removed in twenty fifteen after nine black church members were killed in a racist shooting at Emanuel A. M. E. church in Charleston hi Mike Rossio

Mike Ross South Carolina Supreme Court South Carolina Legislature General Assembly Capitol Lawn Emanuel A. M. E. Church Charleston Mike Rossio
Bush to headline fundraiser for Cheney after Trump backs foe

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 16 hrs ago

Bush to headline fundraiser for Cheney after Trump backs foe

"Former president George W. bush is coming out of political retirement to support Republican congresswoman Liz Cheney's reelection bid an insider familiar with the campaign's plans says former president George W. bush will be the featured guest at a Dallas fundraiser next month for Liz Cheney the Wyoming lawmaker whose father served as bush's vice president former president trump has been attacking Cheney who voted to impeach him over the January sixth insurrection at the capitol earlier this month bush noted there wasn't that much difference between the nine eleven attackers and the rioters who stormed the capitol building maligned for seems at work in our common life that turns every disagreement into an argument and every argument into a clash of cultures bush's support for Liz Cheney counters trump's efforts to end her political career Jackie Quinn Washington

Liz Cheney George W. Bush President George W. Bush Bush Donald Trump Wyoming Dallas Cheney Jackie Quinn Washington
Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 23 hrs ago

Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

"Hey folks As you know this is the eric metaxas show and as you also know whenever you read one of those websites that always says terms of service. Have you seen that. And i just thought to myself. It's so annoying because it could mean anything. Nobody reads it. And i thought what a great title that would be for a book. But i don't have time to write a whole book. So i thought maybe somebody else would and they did. His name is craig stand fill and the title of the book is terms of service. Craig welcome the program. Thank you eric. Okay this is a great title terms of service. Ominous is this a dystopia novel. It is an extremely dystopia. Novel portrays a future that we might be creating where you've got these huge big tech companies that run everything in your life and of course they're watching everything you do. Add the the final turn of the screw is they've got these a is that are constantly watching over your shoulders and monitoring everything you do and that lets them exert an incredible level of control over your life. Okay this i gotta tell you you've got your phd in artificial intelligence in one thousand nine hundred eighty three before. I think there was artificial intelligence practically so you are at least an expert on this subject. Most of us of course no nothing about artificial intelligence. So why does it seem so scary to you and obviously you put it in the novel terms of service which i hope people get a copy of but what do you see that the rest of us wouldn't have a clue about well first of all there's nothing intrinsically evil about it's sort of at some level just another technology it can be used for good or ill but when you develop a new technology with as wide ranging implications ai. You really need to think about. What are the risks associated with that technology. And what could happen now. The important thing to understand about. Ai is in the context of social media and so forth is that it is a force multiplier as they say as an example facebook has only fifteen thousand content moderators. And they've got something like two billion people use their platform on a monthly basis and do the risk to take can't watch everybody they can all. They can watch almost nobody. So what they do. In order to enforce their rains upon you is they let their is most of the work.

Eric Metaxas Craig Eric Facebook
What's Happening at the US Border Is an Insane Crisis

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:08 min | 1 d ago

What's Happening at the US Border Is an Insane Crisis

"What is happening at our border is an insane crisis anybody with a modicum of common sense knows that you do not let people into the country unless you know who they are this is so basic. Anybody who doesn't get this is really foolish. And you can't even listen to them because this is really basic. You don't let people into the country unless you know they are whether they should be let into the country. There are people all around the world to come to this country. We can't simply let people in. We have a process that has been thrown in the garbage. We have total chaos. If our borders are not safe. We are not safe. And what do we need a tragedy. Do we need another nine eleven to happen before people say. Oh yeah you know you were right. We should've kept her eyes on that ball. What's going on. Ghanistan is a scandal. Yeah and we're is the pushback from the republicans. You got like a handful. Republicans pushing back. They should all be pushing back. I mean we. Have you know you mentioned democrat on one hand you could mention. You've got ted cruz. You've got josh. You've just got a handful of folks out there Devon nunez who are

Ghanistan Ted Cruz Josh Devon Nunez
"Late Night Lamonte" lifts Giants over Padres 6-5

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

"Late Night Lamonte" lifts Giants over Padres 6-5

"Lamont Wade juniors RBI single in the top of the ninth inning gave the San Francisco Giants a six to five win over the San Diego Padres San Francisco fell behind four to one as many Machado hit two home runs in his first two at bats off giants starter Kevin Gausman Gausman going just four innings allowing four runs on nine hits in a no decision the giants rallied back with two runs in the fifth and two in the sixth chasing pottery started Joe Musgrove who allowed five runs on eight hits in five and two thirds innings with the win the giants maintain a one game lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League west Phillip con San Diego

Lamont Wade Kevin Gausman Gausman Giants San Francisco Giants San Diego Padres Machado Joe Musgrove San Francisco Los Angeles Dodgers National League West Phillip San Diego
Pujols hit in 10th, Dodgers beat Rox, stay close in NL West

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 d ago

Pujols hit in 10th, Dodgers beat Rox, stay close in NL West

"The Dodgers continue their torrid stretch run this after they went ten innings to defeat Colorado five four because first place San Francisco beat San Diego LA remains a game behind the giants for Los Angeles the game winning run came across on a single by pinch hitter Albert pull hoes who stood on first base and happily waved to fans you know you're not gonna have long enough to enjoying it so it was a big game right there you know and and then I just when the temperature the tribe is a good be sure your washer which is still about a whole host is big base hit came off loser Julie's just seen but when went to Kenley Jansen the save to LA Spezia the Dodgers have won nine of their last ten Bruce Morton Denver

Dodgers Colorado Giants San Diego San Francisco Albert LA Los Angeles Kenley Jansen Julie La Spezia Bruce Morton Denver
The Need for a Courageous Revolution of Vaccine Whistleblowers Like Jodi O'Malley

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 1 d ago

The Need for a Courageous Revolution of Vaccine Whistleblowers Like Jodi O'Malley

"I want to ask you number one. Talk about the kind of resources. You're providing to jody to be able to support her. Because to give whistle blowers protection is something that congress should be doing. But they're not going to do that of course in this sense of many other senses and talk about how we need more people to stand up like this. We need a courageous revolution really. Charlie i mean you know. Some women are one great. Some achieve greatness and some have breed mistrust them. No one's ever done this before. I mean she's a federal employees. Were little hidden camera and eventually expose the emergency room. Doctor was saying and this is. This is not pretend. Fake people say video. I make claims making claims. She reported what people were saying. So i think a lot of people right there on the fence. Tens of thousands of messages from people who are in her situation and all parts of society. They're afraid of what might happen to them if they do this. Jodi what idea was illegal faith. She didn't know where shoes in the land she. Didn't you know one of the most hardcore to of peasley fell yesterday was i. I enjoy it. What you fray and she said. I put my faith in god not man and i thought it was very powerful and i think people do need to eat buffet and i think we're on the verge of something massive. You talk about revolution. I think they're pushing people so far to their limits and when people are pushed up against the wall like this. I think you're going to see a lot of america. I mean you can see people that are and they're willing to lose their job. I never saw for as long as i've known you for nine years. I've never seen people put so much. Faith and confidence in the truth is sacrificed career. Ender job for the public's right to know south

Jody Peasley Charlie Congress Jodi America Ender
Manoah helps Blue Jays top Rays 4-2, maintain wild-card spot

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Manoah helps Blue Jays top Rays 4-2, maintain wild-card spot

"I'll be no earned his seventh win in lower discreetly junior his twenty first home run of the season is to try to blue jays defeated the Tampa Bay rays forty two but now improve to three one this season against Tampa Bay by allowing two runs on five hits in six innings striking out seven but walking six I pride myself on never being in an easy push over or you know this get to this guy really helpful I'm constantly gonna fight I'm counseling it give my team a chance grill solo shot in the fifth off restarted Rasputin gives him twenty nine RBI in the month of September one shy of the franchise record set by Kelly Gruber in nineteen ninety the loss drops Tampa bay's leading the American League east to six games over Boston while the Bluejays staff half game ahead of New York for the final wild card Steve Kearney St Petersburg

Tampa Bay Rays Tampa Bay Jays Kelly Gruber Rasputin Bluejays American League Boston Steve Kearney New York St Petersburg
A Perpetual Pandemic Is Extremely Lucrative for the Pharmaceutical Industry

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

A Perpetual Pandemic Is Extremely Lucrative for the Pharmaceutical Industry

"Pharmaceutical industry and the pharmacists walgreens. Cvs they don't want you to be able to get access to ivermectin. No one really makes money with that. They don't want us to be able to follow the way of india that was able to turn the corner. A perpetual pandemic is extremely lucrative for people that want to go to nine booster shots. Twelve booster shots. Fifteen booster shots. Being a state of fear is very profitable for america's ruling class. fear creates power on. Certainty creates profit

Walgreens CVS India America
Toyota scraps V8 in Tundra redesign, adds hybrid powertrain

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Toyota scraps V8 in Tundra redesign, adds hybrid powertrain

"So it has made some bold moves in the redesign if it's full size truck in an effort to make stronger U. S. fuel economy requirements that will soon be imposed Toyota has unveiled its restyled Toyota tundra it's full size truck that's poised to hit dealerships later this year they ditch the V. eight engine for a three hundred eighty nine horsepower three point five liter twin turbo V. six there's also an optional gas electric hybrid system years Joe Moses with Toyota North America hundreds new core power train offers impressive horsepower and torque they not only improves on the outgoing VA in terms of performance but also it's more efficient the company has been struggling for market share in North America never really got much over about a hundred thousand sales a year compared to about nine hundred thousand answers here Sam Abell sumit is an automotive analyst with god house insights that massive grille on the front is going to be interesting to see how people buy into that I'm Jennifer king

Toyota Joe Moses Tundra North America Sam Abell Sumit VA Jennifer King
Biden aims to enlist allies in tackling climate, COVID, more

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

Biden aims to enlist allies in tackling climate, COVID, more

"President Biden hopes to use his address today to the United Nations General Assembly to make the case for American leadership on the world stage White House officials say Biden plans to put a heavy emphasis on the need for world leaders to work together on the culvert pandemic meet past obligations to address climate change had off emerging technology issues and firm up trade rules the president was expected to release new plans to assist the global vaccination effort and to talk about the U. S. plan to meet it's part of financial commitments that the U. S. and other developed nations made in two thousand nine to help poor nations adopt clean energy technology according to a senior administration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to preview Biden's remarks Julie Walker New York

President Biden United Nations General Assembl Biden White House U. Julie Walker New York
Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 2 d ago

Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

"We are governed by currently in this era of public health. Put that in quotes lockdowns and draconian drank draconian ism by a group of people that was largely unknown a couple of years ago but they have come to the forefront and have more power than any other people in the history of domestic american policy. One of those people is dr peter desk. Dr peter dasent is the villain behind the villain. Is the man behind foudy. Now many people ask the question. How is it that they spied on. Donald trump the same playbook that they used spy on donald trump. And go after lieutenant general. Michael flynn is precisely the same playbook that they use to launch this fraudulent campaign saying that the chinese corona virus came from the himalayas. It came from some bat soup. I'm reading from the daily mail dot com. It was revealed earlier last year. That peter desk a british scientists with longstanding links to the wuhan institute of variety had secretly orchestrated in landmark statement in the lancet in february two thousand twenty which attacked conspiracy theories suggesting the cove in one thousand nine does not have a natural origin. The now infamous letter signed by twenty-seven seven public health experts said they stood together to strongly condemn the theories that which they said quote do nothing but create fear rumours and prejudice. See that there. You have medical scientists telling us that it creates prejudice. They also lavished praise on chinese scientists. Who said they worked. Diligently and effectively to rapidly identified a pathogen behind this outbreak and share. Their results transparently the global health community. But now the lancet which is the top level of medical discourse and publication said near agreeing to publish an alternative commentary which discusses the possibility that laboratory research might have played a role in the emergence of the sars kobe to ouchi chinese corona virus. The scientists say quote. They need to evaluate all the hypotheses on a rational basis and away their likelihood based on facts evidence devoid speculation concerning potential and possible political impacts in february two thousand twenty. They even add that that statement in part of a silencing effect on the wider scientific debate. Yeah no kidding. Because peter dasent inserted themselves under orders from bouchier he is the pulp fiction equivalent of mr wolf.

Dr Peter Desk Dr Peter Dasent Foudy Donald Trump Peter Desk Wuhan Institute Of Variety Michael Flynn Peter Dasent Mr Wolf
"may ninth" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"may ninth" Discussed on WTOP

"Don't may ninth for profit can weather on the aids and when it breaks free blasted around the capital beltway no reported delays inner or outer loop Maryland or Virginia in Maryland ninety five in the Baltimore Washington parkway are running very well between the belt ways with no reported delays the overnight rain and the colder temperatures not taking as much of a toll as we'd feared they might but still proceeding with caution fifty between the bay bridge in the beltway doing fine to Bowie and Annapolis wind warning still in effect on the bay bridge extra caution high profile vehicles and motorcycles trying to get to and from the shore but everything else seems to be fine in the bay bridge the earlier disabled vehicle westbound on the bay bridge is gone on the Maryland on the Virginia side on three ninety five and I. ninety five as far south as Fredericksburg you're running in the clear with no reported delays in all your travel lanes available sixty six between Haymarket in the rosin tunnel eastbound the works on after Lee highway in Washington Boulevard heading toward glebe road should be single file left getting by but not much in the way of delay to market and then the westbound bridge work that they had been doing on the road Celbridge coming out of the district heading toward Rosalyn that was gone as fast as it got there and all your travel is westbound should be back up and running W. T. O. P. reporters are driven by fitz Gerald auto mall from test drives it home to free pick up service pick up and delivery see the customer appreciation program if it's Gerald mall at fit small dot com that's the fits way Ian Crawford WTOP traffic a blustery cold start early on this already with a freeze warning northwest of DC towards Ashbourne Germantown Damascus otherwise near forty in Washington a blustery colder Saturday.

Maryland Virginia Bowie Annapolis bay bridge Rosalyn Gerald mall Ashbourne Germantown Damascus Washington Baltimore Fredericksburg W. T. O. P. Ian Crawford
"may ninth" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"May ninth apply today more information can be found at metro state dot EDU metrosafe committed to support students now and always from the commission society of Minnesota weather center partly cloudy across the metro today with a stray afternoon shower possible highs will reach the low to mid sixties low temps tonight will fall to the low forties sunny tomorrow with highs in the mid sixties I'm meteorologist Ashley o'connor on Twin Cities do you stack able Levin thirty currently it's sixty five hired radio wants to help with a chance of one thousand dollars texted nationwide key word share two two hundred two hundred you'll get a confirmation text info standard data and message rates apply in this nationwide contest that's here two two hundred two hundred opposing immigration will help put unemployed Americans first applied for jobs has America reopens so important I spoke truth when I said he's a poor leader he never accepts responsibility he always assigns blame I think we have an opportunity to turn the the changing the climate the generator fundamentally green infrastructure one hundred ninety three yeah in order to order to shine the I'm glad you're with us our two eight hundred nine four one Sean you want to be a part of this extravaganza as we've now been doing for a few weeks now Dr oz doesn't sleep doesn't rest his calling in life is what it is.

Ashley o'connor Levin America Sean Dr oz Minnesota
"may ninth" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KTOK

"Coach stadium later tonight thriving as an impasse should be fascinating here's what's happening for large drug companies have reached a last minute two hundred and sixty million dollars legal settlement over their role in the U. S. opioid addiction epidemic of burning the first federal trial that was scheduled to start Monday morning in Cleveland lots of money but you know what if they had been convicted there would've been more several Walmart great value brand meat items have been recalled due to possible salmonella contamination more than sixty four hundred pounds of the food ready to eat pork sausage patties and Turkey sausage Patty products were recalled by Georges prepared food nothing to do with me located on Kerry ville Tennessee the items included the recall were produced on April nineteenth twenty seventh may seventh and may ninth check the package's higher air pollution in the United Kingdom is probably happens here too has triggered hundreds more heart attacks strokes and acute asthma attacks according to the latest research there something's happening around the planet Hong Kong streets descended into chaotic scenes following a pro democracy rally Sunday is the protesters again set up road blocks in torched businesses and police responded with tear gas and water cannons four dead were killed dozens injured in Bangladesh after security officials in southern Bangladesh opened fire to disperse hundreds of Muslims during a protest over an apparent social media post undermining his lambs profit Mohammed now these protests are broken out in several countries all across the planet with citizens on happy for different reasons summer pro testing over economic conditions others are protesting over tax heights elsewhere protester breaking out over controversial laws or prison sentences imposed by the government other countries involved chili they're having the problem the president there was declared a state of emergency in Santee Iago I just mentioned Hong Kong Lebanon security forces there have fired tear gas in chase down protesters in Beirut our Solana Spain those problems it's just seems to be growing all around the planet but why what is happening to the human psyche let's check in with residents psychiatrist Dr Peter Bergen Peter what's happening around the planet your exist so much fake news that is really hard to figure it out and even what gets selected you know you mentioned several I mean there are hundreds of hot spots around the world so even that's affected by by who gets picked but there are some issues going on what I might also say George this is one of the most peaceful here is the world has ever had it's not World War one World War two and Vietnam or North Korea and we've even managed to reduce a lot of the violence in the Middle East and stomp came in so I don't think it's the worst of times but they're a good like three issues that I think come up independence we want to be independent who wants to be independent Barcelona won fifty independent one of these about trump is he's addressing all of these in terms of America he's saying America needs to be free American needs to be in the and then another big issue is the resentment he's corrupt regimes everywhere almost everywhere and trump is saying kicked him out check out the people who've been you know fun on the on the left and the right from all the parties that you know been bilking us and then supporting have their own families their own kids their own cronies so I think that's and not the universal theme and then as these religious conflicts and trump is saying no we're not going to happen in this country no you know you're not going to just stare up you know violent religious hatred towards thinking the dominant religions so I think that we've seen a lot of stuff in the world is being reflected in in America and I think trump is doing a very interesting job echo Romeo a looking at this and it's also says you know why should he take all this hatred for saying all right you know we calm down things in the Middle East but it's not our fight between the Turks and the Kurds it's not that's a fight going on forever F. fights going on everywhere forever so America be glad we here because we have strong traditions we got the rule of law we got the constitution there are heavy attacks against all those going on and if they if they win if there is a radical progresses the country's dismantle the constitution and the rule of law and the presidency we are going to have these kind of breaks all of the US and it's happening though Peter it's happening we too much all around the country and after tight tight the campaign that sought to leading party struggled to break out over the pack the liberals under Justin Trudeau have held on just through seats in the Atlantic Canada Quebec Ontario to secure a minority government there sure Justin Trudeau rule true doll looks like he's back in business there wikileaks founder Julian assigns came up short in a bid to delay his extradition to the United States to face espionage charges a sergeant peered with his legal team at the Westminster magistrates court in London failed to convince the district judge that a delay in the already slow moving case was justified the European spacecraft that aims to take the closest ever pictures of the sun is built and ready for launch the solar orbiter Pro Bowl put itself inside the orbit the planet mercury the transients telescopes on the surface of our star let's check in now with doctor sky Stephen Kate so he can talk to us about what's happening Hey Steven what's going on in the skies George lots of information and here we go you know tonight ladies and gentleman George this is the peak of the a right handed meteor shower we've talked about it for so long and we'll have more about that when we end with the live sky portion but George I thought it important to talk about some facts.

"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's it's in the report and I support it as being in the room as being in the report thank you Sir even though the public the president publicly denied telling call me to drop the investigation you found open quote substantial evidence corroborating homies account over the president's is this correct correct the president fired call me on may ninth is that correct Sir I believe that's the aggregate that's page seventy seven volume two you found substantial evidence that the catalyst for the president's firing a call me was homies open quote on willingness to publicly state that the president was not personally under investigation I'm not a great deal more of the details of what happened if it's in the report and then supported because it's already been reviewed and appropriately appears in the report and that's page seventy five volume thank you in in fact the very next day the president told the Russian foreign minister opened quote I just fired the head of the FBI he was crazy a real nice job I face great pressure because of Russia that's take enough I'm not under investigation close quote is that correct that's what was written in ninety four yes time of the gentleman has expired thank you Sir gentleman from Virginia thank you Mister chairman Ben Klein Republican of Virginia questioning Robert Muller live on Capitol today so let's talk about something that you should be able to talk about the law itself the underlying instruction statute in your creative legal analysis of the statues inviting to take your earlier interpretation of eighteen USC fifteen twelve C. section fifteen twelve C. as an obstruction of justice statute created as part of auditing financial regulations for public companies and as you write on page one hundred sixty four volume two this provision was added as a floor amendment in the Senate and explained as closing a certain loophole with respect to document shredding and to read the statute whoever corruptly alters destroys mutilates or conceals a record document or other object or attempts to do so with the intent to impair the objects integrity or availability for use in a fit an official proceeding or otherwise obstructs influences or impedes any official proceeding or attempts to do so so we find of the stature in prison not one twenty years or both your analysis an application the statute proposes to give clause see to a much broader interpretation and commonly used first analysis proposes to read closely to an isolation reading it as a free standing on coppicing provision prohibiting any acts influencing of proceeding if done with an improper motive and second your analysis of the statute to apply this sweeping pro proposes to apply this sweeping prohibition unlawful acts taken by public officials exercising their discretionary powers if those acts influence a proceeding so Mister Moore and ask you in analyzing the obstruction used state that you recognize that the department justice in the courts have not definitively resolve these issues correct correct you agree that not everyone in the justice department agreed with your legal theory of the obstruction of justice stature right I'm not going to involving discussion on on that at this juncture in fact the Attorney General himself disagrees with your interpretation of the law correct leave that to the Attorney General to identify and you would agree to prosecutor sometimes incorrectly applied the law correct I would have to agree with that one and members of your legal team in fact have had convictions overturned because they were based on an incorrect legal theory correct I don't know to what you adversely wall well in time and one of trenches trying cases of not one everyone of those cases I only ask about one in particular when you top prosecutors into Weissman obtain a conviction I guess auditing firm Arthur Andersen lower court which was subsequently overturned in a unanimous Supreme Court decision it rejected the legal theory advanced by Weisman correct well hi again that delve into let me read from that maybe may I just remember I just finished yes answer to say that I'm not going to be get involved in discussion on that I will refer you to that citation that you gave me at the outset for that lengthy discussion on just what you're talking about and to the extent that I have seen anything to say about it it is well we've already put into the report on and I am reading from your report when discussing the section I'll read from the disk decision the Supreme Court unanimously reversing Mister Weisman when he said indeed is it it's striking how little culpability the instructions required for example the jury was told that even a petitioner honestly and sincerely believe this kind of was lawful the jury could connect instructions also diluted the meaning of corruptly such that covered innocent conduct hello my only to say that but I work for me move on and I have limited time your report takes long as possible reading of this provision in applying it to the president's official acts and I'm concerned about the implications of your theory for over criminalizing conduct by public officials and private citizens alike so to emphasize how broad your theory of liability is I want to ask you about a few examples on October eleventh twenty fifteen during the FBI investigation Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server president Obama said I don't think it posed a national security problem he later said I can tell you that this is not a situation which America's national security was in danger assuming for a moment that his comments did influence the investigation couldn't president Obama the charge on your interpretation with obstruction of justice well I again I refer you to the report but let me say with Andrew Weissmann is one of the more talented tourney so we haven't not have on board I won't take that over a period of time he is run a number of units I have very little time in August twenty fifteen a very senior DOJ official called FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe expressing concern the FBI agents were still openly pursuing the Clinton foundation pro DOJ official was apparently very pissed off quote unquote question this official asking are you telling me I need to shut down the valley predicated investigation to which the official replied of course not this seems to be a clear example of somebody within the executive branch attempting to influence in as the I'd this investigation so under your theory couldn't that person be charged with obstruction as long as a prosecutor could come up with a potentially correct corrupt motives I I refer you to our lengthy dissertation on exactly those issues and fears and the in the end of the road and report this remind argue that it says about the Supreme Court justice underlying gentlemen is expired not stretch our intent was our intent was to conclude this hearing in three hours given the break that would bring us to approximately eleven forty with director mothers indulgence we'll be asking our remaining democratic members to voluntarily limit their time below the five minutes so that we can complete our work is close to that time frame as possible they recognize the generally from Pennsylvania director Miller I want to ask you some questions about the president's statements regarding democratic system so the president refused to sit down with your investigators for an in person interview correct correct so the only answer is we have two questions for the president are contained in appendix C. to your report okay so looking at appendix C. on page five apology this.

president one twenty years five minutes three hours
"may ninth" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KCRW

"May ninth. Tickets start at just ten dollars KCRW dot com slash L. Ourse eli? Once again, it's Anthony Valez hanging with you for about another forty minutes. Let's get into this one Georgia Smith up with maverick sabre, titled slowdown KCRW. Saw. Instead you to say. You know, the some thing to say when the. The. And you found me, I don't know you. Then like some. Say about. See saw games just may. We could say we don't us to say. Well. I gotta sinful causing. Spud him. I'm good to go..

KCRW Georgia Smith L. Ourse eli Anthony Valez forty minutes ten dollars
"may ninth" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KGO 810

"Have to start with the major news of the day, which is that Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for Trump was sentenced today to an additional sentence that will put him in jail for up to about seven point five years. He was also charged with federal crimes in New York. Which means the president can't pardon him. If he's convicted of state crimes, what do you make of this? Well, I think judge Jackson did what most followers and observers of judge Jackson expected her to do she stayed focused on the conduct that was before her. She didn't really get distracted by trying to address what had happened in the Virginia courts the week before. And she delivered a sentence that is actually kind of right in the middle of the middle of the range that offenders of those sorts of white collar crimes typically receive. So I think her sentence was certainly reasonable based on the facts before and professional unreasonable result. The developments in New Yorker interesting. You know, it really kind of drives home the seriousness of a federal criminal investigation federal investigations those done by the FBI start in one place. They start when we have articulo facts that form the basis of a belief that a crime has been committed or a threat to national security exists. But once that investigation is often running and you're collecting evidence and information and talking to people you frequently become aware of all kinds of other activities that you might not have known about at the beginning. I think some of that invest solid investigative work is really coming back to haunt Mr. Manafort now in a new jurisdiction this one this time, of course, in New York. I mean, your book does a really good job of explaining that sort of investigative process of the FBI going all the way back to your first investigations is their point at which you decided in your career, man. I have to put this in a book March eighteen. Was that the day you were like FBI agents loved to tell stories we have these incredible experiences in the course of our work. And so you get a bunch of agents sit around the table with beverages unknown types. Yeah. We tell stories about the experiences. We've had I think a lot of people in the FBI think at some point God, I should write these things down or it would be a fun thing to do after. I retired. I didn't spend much time thinking about that. I didn't really have time to when I was still working certainly the experiences. I went through in the last few months in the way, I left the bureau I felt very strongly about a couple of things a couple of messages that I felt like the American people needed to hear not just about my situation. But about the FBI it self who we are what kind of people are drawn to this work. How we actually do the work. So the nuts and bolts of the authorities that we that we operate under and the sorts of techniques that we use in different investigations. And how that work is done in an independent way. It's not it's based on those legal authorities. It's not based on politics or preference, or we like this person. Don't like that person. It's based on the facts that we have before us and how those facts compare. The authorities that we operate under. So that was really the story. I felt like I needed to tell. So let's start with the beginning of the end. Really? I think we all know now, how director Komi found out. He was fired from a news report. How did you find out that he had been fired? So it was a Tuesday the Tuesday in may. It was the end of the day. And I had convened as I did every day that what we call a wrap-up meeting. So my leadership team would get together in my conference room. And we kinda talk about the events of the day progress on different issues that sort of thing. So I had done that on may ninth day director Comey had traveled to Los Angeles. I was the acting director for that day shortly after we began the meeting one of my staff came into the room and told me that the attorney general needed to speak to me. I assumed he was on the phone left. The room said what mine is the on. And they said, oh, no, no. He wants to see you in person. I thought that is a bad sign. That's not enough. Did not happen. Too often certainly not at five thirty in the afternoon. So I walked across the street, and I met with attorney general after a brief after waiting for him for a minute or two I walked into his office, which is extraordinary beautiful office. In the Robert F Kennedy department of Justice building in DC, which is right across the street from FBI headquarters, I walked into the attorney. General's office. He was there the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein was there and gentleman who worked for rod was also in the room. They're all three standing when I walked in and all wearing their coats, which investigative clue. Not a good sign for any hastily convened meeting. So I walked in the attorney general looked at me and said, I don't know if you've heard, but we've had to fire the director of the FBI, that's how I learned. And what happened after that? I said I have not heard that. But thank you for telling me. Yeah. Good to know. It was totally disorienting you it's one of those moments. I tried to describe it in the book where you are confronted with facts that you know, will inexorably shift your reality from that point forward. I had a million questions. I was surprised and shocked maybe I shouldn't have been. But I felt in the moment you go back on your on your training on your experience having been confronted with kind of shocking relevant. Revelations many times the past you, try not to react strongly in the moment. You try to be non judgmental. You just listened to the things that you're being told. And that's how I responded he said we need you to run the FBI for some period of time. He was very clear to point out that they would likely have they were considering bringing in an interim director to serve until a permanent director had been confirmed. So I knew that my time in the chair would be very I thought it could be very brief. And I told him that. I would I would do whatever is necessary to keep the organization moving forward. How long did you think you would serve as interim director acting director had no idea literally thought it could happen at any moment. Yeah. Joked in the book that my for that first week every night when I would come home. My daughter would say did you get fired today? Not today today. I really didn't know I knew that we had some work to do. I feel very strongly about trying to take some steps to ensure that the Russia investigation, which was the thing that had been consuming a lot of our attention for months was on very solid ground. So that depending on who came in behind me if they wanted to end the investigation or close it they would have to do. So in a way that established a transparent record of how and why that decision had been made. I like that. So you prepared your family by joking about whether or not you get fired every day, and you prepared the FBI for putting in place these investigations that would be hard to undo. That's right. That's right. We wanted to kind of make sure that whatever steps we thought needed to be taken. We wanted to take those now and do it in a documented and clear way. So that for time immemorial the world would know how we thought about this case, and what we thought should happen next in our professional opinion. Tell us about the first time you've. Met the president. So the first time I met the president was later that same night. I got back to my office was odd. They told me as I left the department not to tell anyone that the directors have been fired site thought. Okay. So they were supposed to find out about it on. I'm not sure. Or an Email, or that's in fact, how it happened. Of course. That's how everything happens. But as I left, they said don't say anything, I said, I I should probably send some sort of a message out to the workforce. And they said don't don't do that we want to check and see how the White House wants to handle it. And don't do anything. Don't tell anyone in to hear from us. So walked across the street with my security, the gentleman who was a me with security, and he was like so what's going on? Nothing. Yeah. It was it was very awkward, of course. By the time. I got back. It was already on the news. And everyone knew so we're we're kind of in crisis management mode at that point. And then I got the message that the president wanted to speak to me in the Oval Office travel down to the White House and saw him for the first time. I had not met him before. And what was that like? It was interesting. Strange troubling exciting all the things at the same time. What were you expecting him to say to you? I didn't know dot certainly not what he actually said. I thought it was probably just a. You know, kind of meet and greet sort of thing. Ten seconds. I'd be in and out and that would be it. I didn't really have high expectations for the encounter. It's the Oval Office. I'm a career government servant. I had never been in the Oval Office before. And so it's it's an experience that really has an impact on you. And it's it's an all inspiring place. You think a lot about the history that's taking place within those walls. And so those are the sorts of things I was thinking as I stepped inside president stood up from behind his desk came around and shook my hand and began talking nonstop. It's a it's an overwhelming experience trying to talk to the president face to face. It's he's he just goes. And you don't really have an opportunity. This is really ask you anything. I mean, he eventually gets around to that. But not right away. And he just kind of jumps from one topic to another. And he says things that are almost like he's just seeking your agreement with the things that he's saying much of which is completely false. The part about that story that I really liked as you become fascinated with staring at his desk. During which I just imagine you tuning out the president talking about his election and just staring at this historic desk. He you know, he sits behind it kind of on the edge of his chair. And he's a big, man. He means a cross has his hands kind of kind of coming at you. So you're very.

FBI president director attorney acting director Paul Manafort Virginia judge Jackson New York interim director Oval Office Trump chairman deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein Los Angeles Russia Robert F Kennedy department of Komi
"may ninth" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

10:24 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"We have to start with the major news of the day, which is that Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for Trump was sentenced today to an additional sentence that will put him in jail for up to about seven point five years. He was also charged with federal crimes in New York. Which means the president can't pardon him. If he's convicted of state crimes, what do you make of this? Well, I think judge Jackson did what most followers and observers of judge Jackson expected her to do she stayed focused on the conduct that was before her. She didn't really get distracted by trying to address what had happened in the Virginia courts the week before. And she delivered a sentence that is actually kind of right in the middle of the middle of the range that offenders of those sorts of white collar crimes typically receive. So I think her sentence was certainly reasonable based on the facts before and professional unreasonable result. The developments in New Yorker interesting. You know, it really kind of drives home the seriousness of a federal criminal investigation federal investigations those done by the F B I start in one place. They start when we have our facts that form the basis of a belief that a crime has been committed or a threat to national security exists. But once that investigation is often running and you're collecting evidence and information and talking to people you frequently become aware of all kinds of other activity that you might not have known about at the beginning. I think some of that invest solid investigative work is really coming back to haunt Mr. Manafort now in a new jurisdiction this one this time, of course, in New York. I mean, your book does a really good job of explaining that sort of investigative process of the FBI going all the way back to your first investigations is their point at which you decided in your career, man. I have to put this in a book March eighteen sorry. Sorry. What's the day? You were like FBI agents loved to tell stories we have these incredible experiences in the course of our work. And so when you get a bunch of agents sit around the table with beverages, unknown types. Yeah. We tell stories about the experiences. We've had I think a lot of people in the FBI think at some point God, I should write these things down or it would be a fun thing to do after I retire. I didn't spend much time thinking about that. I don't really have time to when I was still working certainly the experiences. I went through in the last few months and the way I left the bureau, I felt very strongly about a couple of things a couple of messages that I felt like the American people needed to hear not just about my situation. But about the FBI itself about who we are what kind of people are drawn to this work. How we actually do the work. So the nuts and bolts of the authorities that we that we operate under and the sorts of techniques that we use in different investigations. And how that work is done in an independent way. It's not it's based on those legal authorities. It's not based on politics or preference, or we like this person. Don't like that person. It's based on the facts that we have before us and how those facts compare. To the authorities that we operate under. So that was really the story. I felt like I needed to tell. So let's start with the beginning of the end. Really? I think we all know now, how director Komi found out. He was fired from a news report. How did you find out that he had been fired? So it was a Tuesday the Tuesday in may. It was the end of the day. And I had convened as I did every day that what we call a wrap up meeting. So my leadership team would get together in my conference room. And we kind of talk about the events of the day progress on different issues that sort of thing. So I had done that on may ninth the day director Komiya traveled to Los Angeles. I was the acting director for that day shortly after we began the meeting one of my staff came into the room and told me that the attorney general needed to speak to me. I assumed he was on the phone left. The room said what mine is on. And they said, oh, no, no. He wants to see you in person. I thought that is a bad sign. It's not enough. Did not happen often certainly not at five thirty in the afternoon. So I walked across the street, and I met with the attorney general after a brief after waiting for him for a minute or two I walked into his office, which is extraordinary beautiful office. And the Robert F Kennedy department of Justice building in DC, which is right across the street from FBI headquarters, I walked into the attorney. General's office. He was there the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein was there and gentleman who worked for rod was also in the room. They're all three standing when I walked in and all wearing their coats, which investigative clue. Not a good sign for any hastily convened meeting. So as I walked in the attorney general looked at me and said, I don't know if you've heard, but we've had to fire the director of the FBI, that's how I learned. And what happened after that? I said I have not heard that. But thank you for telling me. Yeah. Good to know. It was totally disorienting. You know, it's one of those moments. I tried to describe it in the book where you are confronted with facts that you know, will inexorably shift your reality from that point forward. I had a million questions. I was surprised and shocked of maybe I shouldn't have been. But I felt in the moment you go back on your on your training on your experience having been confronted with kind of shocking. Revelations many times the past you, try not to react strongly in the moment. You try to be non judgmental. You just listen to the things that you're being told. And that's how I responded he said we need you to run the FBI for some period of time. He was very clear to point out that they would likely have they were considering bringing in an interim director to serve until a permanent director had been confirmed. So I knew that my time in the chair would be very I thought it could be very brief. And I told him that. I would I would do whatever is necessary to keep the organization moving forward. How long did you think you would serve as interim director acting director had no idea literally thought it could happen at any moment. Joked in a book that my for that first week every night when I would come home. My daughter would say did you get fired today? Not today today. I really didn't know I knew that we had some work to do. I felt very strongly about trying to take some steps to ensure that the Russia investigation, which was the thing that had been consuming a lot of our attention for months was on very solid ground. So that depending on who came in behind me if they wanted to end the investigation or close it they would have to do. So in a way that established a transparent record of how and why that decision had been made. I like that. So you prepared your family by joking about whether or not you get fired day, and you prepared the FBI for putting in place these investigations that would be hard to undo. That's right. That's right. We wanted to kind of make sure that whatever steps we thought needed to be taken. We wanted to take those now and do it in a documented and clear way. So that for time immemorial the world would know how we thought about this case, and what we thought should happen next in our professional opinion. Tell us about the first time you. Met the president. So the first time I met the president was later that same night. I got back to my office is odd. They told me as I left the department not to tell anyone that the directors had been fired aside thought. Okay. So they were supposed to find out about it on. I'm not sure. Player or an Email, or that's in fact, how it happened. Of course. That's how everything happens. But as I left, they said don't say any, you know, I said, I I should probably send some sort of a message out to the workforce. And they said don't don't do that we want to check and see how the White House wants to handle it. And don't do anything. Don't tell anyone to hear from us. So walked across the street with my security, the gentleman who is a me with security, and he was like. So what's going on? Nothing. Back to work just saying. Yeah, it was it was very awkward, of course. By the time. I got back. It was already on the news and everyone knew so we were kind of in crisis management mode at that point. And then I got the message that the president wanted to speak to me in the Oval Office travel down to the White House and saw him for the first time. I had not met him before. And what was that like? It was interesting. Strange troubling exciting all the things at the same time. What were you expecting him to say to you? I didn't know dot certainly not what he actually said. I thought it was probably just you know, kind of meet and greet sort of thing. Ten seconds. I'd be in and out and that would be it. I didn't really have high expectations for the encounter. It's the Oval Office. I'm a career government servant. I had never been in the Oval Office before. And so it's it's an experience that really has an impact on you. And it's it's an all inspiring place. You'd think a lot about the history that's taking place within those walls. And so those are the sorts of things I was thinking as I stepped inside president stood up from behind his desk came around and shook my hand and began talking nonstop. It's a it's a it's an overwhelming experience trying to talk to the president face to face. It's he's he just goes. And you don't really have an opportunity. This is really ask you anything. I mean, he eventually gets around to that. But not right away. And he just kind of jumps from one topic to another. And he says things that are almost like he's just seeking your agreement with the things that he's saying much of which is completely false. The part about that story that I really liked as you become fascinated with staring at his desk. Just imagine you tuning out the president talking about his election and just staring at this historic desk. He you know, he sits behind it kind of on the edge of his chair. And he's a big, man. He means a cross and has his hands kind of kind of coming at you. So you're.

FBI president director attorney acting director Paul Manafort Virginia judge Jackson New York interim director Oval Office Trump chairman deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein Los Angeles Russia Robert F Kennedy department of Komi
"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have to start with the major news of the day. Which is that Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for Trump was sentenced today to an additional sentence that will put him in jail for up to about seven point five years. He was also charged with federal crimes in New York. Which means the president can't pardon him. If he's convicted of state crimes, what do you make of this? Well, I think judge Jackson did what most followers and observers of judge Jackson expected her to do she stayed focused on the conduct that was before her. She didn't really get distracted by trying to address what had happened in the Virginia courts the week before. And she delivered a sentence that is actually kind of right in the middle of the middle of the range that offenders of those sorts of white collar crimes typically receive. So I think her sentence was certainly reasonable based on the facts before. And professional unreasonable result the developments in New Yorker interesting. You it really kind of drives home the seriousness of a federal criminal investigation federal investigations those done by the FBI start in one place. They start when we have our facts that form the basis of a belief that a crime has been committed or a threat to national security exists. But once that investigation is often running and you're collecting evidence and information and talking to people you frequently become aware of all kinds of other activity that you might not have known about at the beginning. I think some of that invest solid investigative work is really coming back to haunt Mr. Manafort now in a new jurisdiction this one this time, of course, in New York. I mean, your book does a really good job of explaining that sort of investigative process of the FBI going all the way back to your first investigations is their point at which you decided in your career, man. I have to put this in a book your March eighteen. The day. You're like FBI agents loved to tell stories, right? We have these incredible experiences in the course of our work. And so when you get a bunch of agents sit around the table with beverages, unknown types. Yeah. We tell stories about the experiences. We've had I think a lot of people in the FBI think at some point God, I should write these things down or it would be a fun thing to do after I retire. I didn't spend much time thinking about that. And I'm really have time to when I was still working certainly the experiences. I went through in the last few months away. I left the bureau I felt very strongly about a couple of things a couple of messages that I felt like the American people needed to hear not just about my situation. But about the FBI itself about who we are what kind of people are drawn to this work. How we actually do the work. So the nuts and bolts of the authorities that we that we operate under and the sorts of techniques that we use in different investigations. And how that work is done in an independent way. It's not it's based on those legal authorities. It's not based on politics or preference, or we like this person. Or don't like that person. It's based on the facts that we have before us and how those facts compare. To the authorities that we operate under. So that was really the story. I felt like I needed to tell. So let's start with the beginning of the end. Really? I think we all know now, how director Komi found out. He was fired from a news report. How did you find out that he had been fired? So it was a Tuesday the Tuesday in may. It was the end of the day. And I had convened as I did every day that what we call a wrap up meeting. So my leadership team would get together in my conference room. And we kind of talk about events of the day progress on different issues that sort of thing. So I had done that on may ninth the day director Komiya traveled to Los Angeles. I was the acting director for that day shortly after we began the meeting one of my staff came into the room and told me that the attorney general needed to speak to me. I assumed he was on the phone left. The room said what mine is on. And they said, oh, no, no. He wants to see you in person thought that is a bad sign. It's not enough. Did not happen. Too often certainly not at five thirty in the afternoon. So I walked across the street, and I met with the attorney general after a brief after waiting for him for a minute or two I walked into his office, which is extraordinary beautiful office. In the Robert F Kennedy department of Justice building in DC, which is right across the street from FBI headquarters, I walked into the attorney. General's office. He was there the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein was there and gentleman who worked for rod was also in the room. They're all three standing when I walked in and all wearing their coats, which investigative clue. It's not a good sign for any hastily convened meeting. So as I walked in the attorney general looked at me and said, I don't know if you've heard, but we've had to fire the director of the FBI, that's how I learned. And what happened after that? I said I had not heard that. But thank you for telling me. Yeah. Good to know. It was totally disorienting. It's one of those moments. I tried to describe it in the book where you are confronted with facts that you know, will inexorably shift your reality from that point forward. I had a million questions. I was surprised and shocked and the maybe I shouldn't have been. But I felt in the moment you go back on your on your training on your experience having been confronted with shocking relevant. Revelations many times the past you, try not to react strongly in the moment. You try to be non judgmental. You just listen to the things that you're being told. And that's how I responded he said we need you to run the FBI for some period of time. He was very clear to point out that they would likely have they were considering bringing in an interim director to serve until a permanent director had been confirmed. So I knew that my time in the chair would be very I thought it could be very brief. And I told him that. I would I would do whatever is necessary to keep the organization moving forward. How long did you think you would serve as interim director acting director had no idea literally thought it could happen at any moment. Joked in the book that my for that first week every night when I would come home. My daughter would say did you get fired today? Not today today. I really didn't know I knew that we had some work to do. I felt very strongly about trying to take some steps to ensure that the Russia investigation, which was the thing that had been consuming a lot of our attention for months was on very solid ground. So that depending on who came in behind me if they wanted to end the investigation or close it they would have to do. So in a way that established a transparent record of how and why that decision had been made I liked that. So you prepared your family by joking about whether or not you get fired every day, and you prepared the FBI for putting in place these investigations that would be hard to undo. That's right. That's right. We wanted to kind of make sure that whatever steps we thought needed to be taken. We wanted to take those now and do it in a documented and clear way. So that for time immemorial the world would know how we thought about this case, and what we thought should happen next in our professional opinion. Tell us about the first time. I met the president. So the first time I met the president was later that same night. I got back to my office was odd. They told me as I left the department not to tell anyone that the director had been fired site thought. Okay. So they were supposed to find out about it on. I'm not sure. Or an Email, or that's in fact, how it happened. Of course. That's how everything happens. But as I left they said don't say any I said, I should probably send some sort of message out to the workforce. And they said don't don't do that we want to check and see how the White House wants to handle it. And don't do anything. Don't tell anyone in to hear from us. So I walked across the street with my security, the gentleman who is a me with security, and he was like. So what's going on? Nothing. Just saying. Yeah, it was it was very awkward, of course. By the time. I got back. It was already on the news. And everyone knew so we we're kind of in crisis management mode at that point. And then I got the message that the president wanted to speak to me in the Oval Office travel down to the White House and saw him for the first time. I had not met him before. And what was that like? It was interesting. Strange troubling exciting all those things at the same time. What were you expecting him to say to you? I didn't know certainly not what he actually said. I thought it was probably just, you know. Kind of meet and greet sort of thing. Ten seconds. I'd be in and out. And that would be it. I I didn't really have high expectations for the encounter. It's the Oval Office. I'm a career government servant. I had never been in the Oval Office before. And so it's it's an experience that really has an impact on you. And it's it's an all inspiring place. You'd think a lot about the history that's taken place within those walls. And so those are the sorts of things I was thinking as I stepped inside president stood up from behind his desk and came around and shook my hand and began talking nonstop. It's a it's an overwhelming experience trying to talk to the president face to face. It's he's he just goes. And you don't really have an opportunity. This is really ask you anything. I mean, he eventually gets around to that. But not right away. And he just kind of jumps from one topic to another. And he says things that are almost like he's just seeking your agreement with the things that he's saying much of which is completely false. So the part about that story that I really liked as you become fascinated with staring at his desk. Which? Imagine you tuning out the president talking about his election and just staring at this historic desk. He he sits behind it kind of on the edge of his chair. And he's a big man, he leans across and has his hands kind of kind of coming at you. So you're not really any way to look away. Then you realize the desk is incredible. It is the resolute desk. So it's a desk that was there was a British ship. That was recovered by the Americans and returned to the Brits. And then they took the timbers from the ship and created this beautifully hand carved desk, and has all this incredible detail on it, and you know, the history of it. You know, you've seen all the pictures of presidents sitting behind it. So I've become totally distracted by the desk. And I'm just like I want to touch it. So at some point I think like pay attention stop looking at the desk..

FBI president director interim director acting director Paul Manafort Virginia judge Jackson New York attorney Oval Office Trump chairman deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein Los Angeles Russia Robert F Kennedy department of Komi
"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have to start with the major news of the day. Which is that Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for Trump was sentenced today to an additional sentence that will put him in jail for up to about seven point five years. He was also charged with federal crimes in New York. Which means the president can't pardon him. If he's convicted of state crimes, what do you make of this? Well, I think judge Jackson did what most followers and observers of judge Jackson expected her to do she stayed focused on the conduct that was before her. She didn't really get distracted by trying to address what had happened in the Virginia courts the week before. And she delivered a sentence that is actually kind of right in the middle of the middle of the range that offenders of those sorts of white collar crimes typically receive. So I think her sentence was certainly reasonable based on the facts before and professional unreasonable result the developments in New Yorker interesting. You know, it really kind. Drives home the seriousness of a federal criminal investigation. Federal investigations those done by the FBI start in one place. They start when we have our facts that form the basis of a belief that a crime has been committed or a threat to national security exists. But once that investigation is often running and you're collecting evidence and information and talking to people you frequently become aware of all kinds of other activities that you might not have known about at the beginning. I think some of that invest solid investigative work is really coming back to haunt Mr. Manafort now in a new jurisdiction this one this time, of course, in New York. I mean, your book does a really good job of explaining that sort of investigative process at the FBI going all the way back to your first investigations is their point at which you decided in your career, man. I have to put this in a book Marci team. The day. You were like FBI agents loved to tell stories, right? We have these incredible experiences in the course of our work. And so you get a bunch of agents sit around the table with beverages unknown types. Yeah. We tell stories about the experiences. We've had I think a lot of people in the FBI think at some point God, I should write these things down or it would be a fun thing to do after I retire. I didn't spend much time thinking about that. I didn't really have time to when I was still working certainly the experiences. I went through in the last few months in the way, I left the bureau I felt very strongly about a couple of things a couple of messages that I felt like the American people needed to hear not just about my situation. But about the FBI itself who we are what kind of people are drawn to this work. How we actually do the work. So the nuts and bolts of the authorities that we that we operate under and the sorts of techniques that we use in different investigations. And how that work is done in an independent way. It's not it's based on those legal authorities. It's not based on politics or preference, or we like this person. Or don't like that person. It's based on the facts that we have before us and how those facts compare. To the authorities that we operate under. So that was really the story. I felt like I needed to tell. So let's start with the beginning of the end. Really? I think we all know now, how director Comey found out. He was fired from a news report. How did you find out that he had been fired? So it was a Tuesday the Tuesday in may. It was the end of the day. And I had convened as I did every day that what we call a wrap-up meeting. So my leadership team would get together in my conference room. And we kinda talk about events of the day progress on different issues that sort of thing. So I had done that on may ninth. The day director Comey traveled to Los Angeles. I was the acting director for that day shortly after we began the meeting one of my staff came into the room and told me that the attorney general needed to speak to me. I assumed he was on the phone. I left the room said, what mine is gone, and they said, oh, no, no. He wants to see you in person. I thought that is a bad sign. It's not enough. Did not happen. Too often certainly not at five thirty in the afternoon. So I walked across the street, and I met with the attorney general after a brief after waiting for him for a minute or two I walked into his office, which is extraordinary beautiful office. In the Robert F Kennedy department of Justice building in DC, which is right across the street from FBI headquarters I've walked into the. General's office. He was there the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein was there and gentleman who worked for rod was also in the room. They're all three standing when I walked in and all wearing their coats, which vestige of clue. It's not a good sign for any hastily convened meeting. So as I walked in the attorney general looked at me and said, I don't know if you've heard, but we've had to fire the director of the FBI, that's how I learned. And what happened after that? I said I had not heard that. But thank you for telling me. Yeah. Good to know. It was totally disorienting. You know, it's one of those moments. I try to describe it in the book where you are confronted with facts that you know, will inexorably shift your reality from that point forward. I had a million questions. I was surprised and shocked and the maybe I shouldn't have been. But I felt in the moment you go back on your on your training on your experience having been confronted with kind of shocking relevant. Revelations many times the past you, try not to react strongly in the moment. You try to be non judgmental just listened to the things that you're being told. And that's how I responded he said we need you to run the FBI for some period of time. He was very clear to point out that they would likely have they were considering bringing in an interim director to serve until a permanent director had been confirmed. So I knew that my time in the chair would be very I thought it could be very brief. And I told him that. I would I would do whatever is necessary to keep the organization moving forward. How long did you think you would serve as interim director acting director had no idea literally thought it could happen at any moment. Joked in the book that my for that first week every night when I would come home. My daughter would say did you get fired today? Not today today. I really didn't know I knew that we had some work to do. I felt very strongly about trying to take some steps to ensure that the Russia investigation, which was the thing that had been consuming a lot of our attention for months was on very solid ground. So that depending on who came in behind me if they wanted to end the investigation or close it they would have to do. So in a way that established a transparent record of how and why that decision had been made. I like that. So you prepared your family by joking about whether or not you get fired every day, and you prepared the FBI for putting in place these investigations that would be hard to undo. That's right. That's right. We wanted to kind of make sure that whatever steps we thought needed to be taken. We wanted to take those now and do it in a documented and clear way. So that for time immemorial the world would know how we thought about this case, and what we thought should happen next, and our professional opinion. Tell us about the first time you. Met the president. So the first time I met the president was later that same night. I got back to my office was I they told me as I left the department not to tell anyone that the director had been fired site thought. Okay. So they were supposed to find out about it on. I'm not sure or an Email or that's fact, how it happened. Of course. That's how everything happens. But as I left, they said don't say anything, I said, I I should probably send some sort of message out to the workforce. And they said don't don't do that. We want to check and see how the White House wants to handle it don't do anything. Don't tell anyone in to hear from us. So walked across the street with my security, the gentleman who is a me with security, and he was like. So what's going on? Nothing. Back to work just saying. Yeah, it was it was very awkward, of course. By the time. I got back. It was already on the news. And everyone knew so we're we're kind of in crisis management mode at that point. And then I got the message that the president wanted to speak to me in the Oval Office travel down to the White House and saw him for the first time. I had not met him before. And what was that like? It was interesting. It was. Strange troubling exciting all those things at the same time. What were you expecting him to say to you? I didn't know dot certainly not what he actually said. I thought it was probably just know. Kind of meet and greet sorta thing ten seconds. I'd be in and out and that would be it. I didn't really have high expectations for the encounter the Oval Office. I'm a career government servant. I had never been in the Oval Office before. And so it's it's an experience that really has an impact on you. And it's it's an all inspiring place. You'd think a lot about the history that's taking place within those walls. And so those are the sorts of things I was thinking as I stepped inside president stood up from behind his desk in came around. And shook my hand and began talking nonstop. It's a it's a it's an overwhelming experience trying to talk to the president face to face. It's he's he just goes. And you don't really have an opportunity. This really ask you anything. I mean, he eventually gets around to that. But not right away. And he just kind of jumps from one topic to another. And he says things that are almost like he's just seeking your agreement with the things that he's saying much of which is completely false. So the part about that story that I really liked as you become fascinated with staring at his desk. Which just imagine you tuning out the president talking about his election and just staring at this historic desk. He he sits behind it kind of on the edge of his chair. And he's a big man, he leans across and has his hands kind of kind of coming at you. So you're very not really any way to look away. Then you realize the desk is incredible. It is the resolute desk. So it's a desk that was there was a British ship. That was recovered by the Americans and returned to the Brits. And then they took the timbers from the ship and created this beautiful like hand-carved desk, and has all this incredible detail on it, and you know, the history of it. You know, you've seen all the pictures of presidents sitting behind it. So I become totally distracted by the desk..

FBI president director acting director attorney Paul Manafort Comey Virginia judge Jackson New York interim director Oval Office Trump chairman Marci rod Rosenstein deputy attorney general Robert F Kennedy department of Los Angeles
"may ninth" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

"Depending on your aunt hey kelly really wanna go there with your within arm's reach my even wanna go toe to toe with okay fine so the first one is the venture may nine p a credit to revel in the breath of flavors and aromas it could be coaxed from hops really interesting that they said this blend of hops in this beer provide rich flavors of berries tropical fruits citrus pine without lingering bitterness the yeast i mean the the hops selection on this i thought was kind of cool it's got columbus cascade chinook there's your onion eldorado and was a one of my favorite loves support the tree yes and then they're using british how she st of some sort yeah which i thought was cool and this is okay this is one of those a percents however i don't feel like it tastes like eight percent me either and that's why enjoyed it and actually as it's warmed up i'm enjoying it even more becoming more citrus and and more balanced and you know maybe it was just the coldness in the can and i'm one of those girls that like i'll take a couple of sips when i you know taking out of the fridge and then always a little bit yes i don't drink it all quite at once caperton's one of those girls to but now i'm i mean this is really opened up and i really enjoyed this even more okay so i'm sorry you suckers didn't talk about it before girlfriends i mean it's a busy beer it really is there's a lot of ingredients there lot of hops i really liked the mouth feel on it too it's yeah it is it's it's kinda deceiving but i thought that was really beautiful the other one that i wanted to talk about is the burnside brown from the same people foundation so again we had some naysayers i won't say who they were in the beginning.

kelly caperton columbus cascade eight percent
"may ninth" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Today but he's done that and we should acknowledge that and at the same time has managed to build relationships with israel and is even making inroads with some of the the sunni leaders in the region he's playing a very complicated role where he wants to be the mediator between a lot of these different actors and we're pretty absent right now i gotta say the we the united states i hope we get more engaged there's a sizable israeli russian population russian derived russia heritage population in israel by my book yes they are and may ninth is now a holiday in israel yeah incredible isn't it it really is a remarkable time let's let's i want to talk further about the united states and russia in in two thousand nine secretary of state hillary clinton presented russian foreign minister said gay level of with an actual physical reset button to symbolize a new era of diplomacy between the united st states and russia i wanted to present you with a little gift which represents what president obama vicepresident biden and i have been saying and that is leave want to reset our relationship has so we will do it together thank you very much where the seeds already sown before we go to a break four things not going well or was that still in oh nine a time of high optimism we'll just listening to that i was out i was at that meeting of course and listening to them chuckle and be so friendly greatness daljit moment because i was at a lot of other meetings between clinton love roth that did not have that kind of chumminess to it.

united states israel russia hillary clinton biden roth president obama
"may ninth" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"Hey everybody welcome to the pc perspective podcast this is episode number four ninety nine hugh being recorded on may ninth twenty eight teen allen montana i'm jeremy hellstrom nashville emotionally scarred and that's an emotionally scarred ken over there oh i think i'm deaf in this year now what was it expected like redfaced like does it he's been building this up for for years and years dragon ball z the top of his head he's now super say josh oh wow hey everybody welcome to the podcast we might as well just yeah just okay so let's start going through all the home of things so hey there's mailing us thing that didn't work this week that hopefully we'll have that fixed binding a cellular emergency system oh they have one of those we've been tested just piggyback on our so well all right well dot com slash describes how you get there give us your name email address that part will still work right like getting the name if somebody right now seems like it okay so it might work diff does weird things than try to don't get an email before the next podcast yet probably doesn't work well we'll know you know what we're trying to fix it it's it's had a good run i mean it's been working for waltz no need knocking on wood it's broken now that's not gonna keep it working okay okay all right patriarch dot com slash pc payers where you can chip in and help us keep the lights on and stuff and pay kin and appreciates it.

hugh allen montana nashville jeremy hellstrom ken josh
"may ninth" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Right certainly so and and it just shows you gotta wear how commoditised the phone market of the smartphone market is and if you look at your payer this headline with all the consternation about apple's earnings before they came out and still some of the lingering wonders about exactly how much you know we should expect from the top end of this martin market this is not a luxury good anymore a you are going to see this continue to be commoditised yeah and i think you'll see jami continuing to play both ends of the market both the mid range and and the the high end let me tell you a little bit about the nineteen ninetysix congressional review act to it gives the united states congress the power to reverse any federal regulation by passing a joint resolution of disapproval within sixty days of the rules enactment so let's say i don't know the fcc passes something they have sixty days congress can overrule it on may ninth senator ed markey will introduce a joint resolution to roll back the fcc's order that removed the twenty fifteen open internet guidelines the cra congressional review act procedures are a bit arcane but simplifying them down they allow vote to pass with a simple majority sidestepping going through committees and avoiding filibusters right now fortynine senate democrats and republican senator susan collins are on board they think they might be able to get republican senators john kennedy or dean heller to flip.

apple jami united states fcc dean heller congress senator ed markey senator susan collins john kennedy sixty days
"may ninth" Discussed on Pop Shop

Pop Shop

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on Pop Shop

"On good golly the carpet the grammy carpet is an interesting one just because it's a very long day yeah we actually starts on the carpet around i wanna think like it's about two pm eastern that's true because the usually had to be there i knew the inla so i guess that would be two or three the carpet as effectively like a five hour long carpet and if you are watching us on sunday you'll be joining us about no two thirds of the way through the carpet or highway carpet when things really start to pick up in the reason why it's so long as because they had a um a separate awards ceremony before the grammy awards where they actually give out the bulk of the awards 'cause there's something like eighty something categories and only maybe seven of them are given out on the air him in a threehour show the rest of them are given out earlier in the day and so the carpet is there for all those folks that are coming earlier so what am i looking forward that a long preeminent i'm looking forward to possibly speaking to say bruno mars on the carpet that would be a may nine yes it would be great if i could talk to paint yes it will be wonderful to such lady gaga but i also know that none of these things will probably how that but on the show uh i'm just looking forward to surprises in especially concerning this is the sixtieth annual show i out if i would suspect is going to be a bridging the gap between icons and legends uh who have been with us for decades and the newcomers the yes i would hope and i hope there some sort of new reflection of the past um but also look towards the future i feel like that's the grammys the burden butter is the app is recognizing the people that that came first though i think it on the sixty the annual show they will definitely do that yeah but speaking of the future let's get to our interview with grammy nominee colead yeah you know the army singersongwriter from his three bill word hot one hundred top twenty hits location and young woman broke from his 2017 debut album american teen plus.

grammy bruno five hour threehour
"may ninth" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"To the most important issue being investigated by federal agency right isn't that just what happens the devices just didn't sank a new version of what's happ probably just updated it happens by the way by the way none of that explains why the text aren't still on the devices themselves so there are alleging the messages didn't up to the cloud or the federal collateral or whatever okay why aren't the message is still on the devices to the fbi sell the phones on fiver for fifty bucks a pop or something like that the department wants to bring to your attention that the fbi system of selling old bureau devices on craigslist to help pay for the pixel to failed to preserve text messages from mr strug in his page got it by the way by the way during the time of the supposed glitch a few important things happen this just a glitch when all the text one away just a few things happened in that period a mellon mr struck me it might have been text each other about these things out of the publication of the totally unproven antitrump fusion gps dossier funded by hillary clinton and the dnc that may have been used as pretext to kick off the whole investigation of trump in russia that happened uh you know democrats possibly bankrolling a government which hunt of their political opponents on january 20th also in that time frame trump was sworn into office on january 24th struck interviewed former trump adviser michael flynn on march ii jeff sessions recused himself from any investigations involving the campaign and russia on march fourth trump predicted correctly it turns out that barack obama use the government to spy on his campaign on may ninth trump fire james calling me at the encouragement of virtually every politician in the us on both sides of the aisle and on may 17th deputy attorney general rod rosenstein appointed robert muller special counsel to investigate trump the fbi only loss text messages from those months fox news.

jeff sessions robert muller deputy attorney general barack obama michael flynn happ special counsel rod rosenstein us federal agency trump russia dnc hillary clinton mr strug text messages craigslist fbi
"may ninth" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

Pop Culture Palate

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

"Uh doesn't say but it's may nine hundred and fifteen thousand dollars are uh yeah i mean it's just it it i like what you're saying but that's just not how it works well here's hoping yeah make his star wars the new star were movie is in the top ten movies of all time already ryan though i mean and mostly cats um now these horror movies is another thing i think we're gonna see a lot more because their cheap to make yeah and they make money while bloom houses killing it lately so a i think everybody's going to start looking at that model of a movie production and see that that is very profitable and people are not dart uh copycat and you're going to see a lot of copycats off of that in also i feel that a lot of the movies that we're going to be looking at this are as those lowerbudget movies are gonna end up being released by streaming service is more than anything area air with only limited engagement so it will be eligible for a awards nia um but one more story before we move into our main topic for the night uh cosmo's ordered a season too uh it's gonna be on fox and net geo uh or season to a science series reboot produced by seth mcfarlane this was tweeted out by neil degrasse tyson's himself the other day i'm really excited about this because i loved the two thousand fourteen revival of cosmo's i dunno if you guys ever watched it but uh i think this is what the world needs right now because.

seth mcfarlane neil degrasse tyson ryan bloom fifteen thousand dollars
"may ninth" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"may ninth" Discussed on KFC Radio

"Mugabe all baird's get the full cow dude four a ticket through the year the air ticketed this summer taking take away through take it day by day going to do a day by day may nine at seventeen schemic why are you use including the elegant every time he and fiber baylosis do coq let's at all in that way to end a fight thakur therapy as a teenager via serb breaking it up and they're like okay seltz oh that's good anyways unisa group don't forget if i can get another dumber era anyways feel like this oh guest do mushrooms find out how you were will they go that's what i saw a couple of really comes together on a roll out of a jet you wanna drill down or eat suicide we were actually just talking to date because i like i was one with fellow at the weekend with some friends and a took inedible i don't really do edible and stuff like that and other duty just lasted so long as i just want to stop being high mushrooms go forever too right a year he'll for like putting how much e like four or five hour as long as you man you jump in drinks fucking and orange juice fucking ripped the pain off the wall all about it clearly hardly mosia will they could go the whole time whatever gives him down a minute maid if you start fruit nuts to intensify the high if you are that the actually serve the purpose yes sir citrus anything citrus wool uh will make the civil side been fucking.

baird Mugabe unisa drill down five hour