26 Burst results for "Max Planck Institute"

Chimpanzees Show Altruism While Gathering Around the Juice Fountain

60-Second Science

04:53 min | 6 months ago

Chimpanzees Show Altruism While Gathering Around the Juice Fountain

"Have you ever done something for someone else. Knowing that your actions would solely benefit them and not you. Maybe you opened a door or donate blood. Volunteered in hospitals e. r. during the pandemic this is called a pro social behavior caregiving group coordination conflict resolution. Sharing humans engage in these types of behaviors. All the time we've learned but it's a large part of the reason we succeeded as a species but a major question remains in science. A we the only species who do this one of our closest relatives chimpanzees have long been studied for signs of this their genetic. Similarities could help us tease out. The evolutionary trajectory of the desire to selflessly. Help others sir. For research has provided mixed results on the question studies of these animals in the wild and captivity seem to come to different conclusions. Some studies show the chimps cooperatively hunt share food and console each other but one highly cited study. Come to a very different conclusion. He said chimpanzees are indifferent to the welfare of others. The study use what's called a pro social choice. Test controlled lab experiment which in pansies in enclosures were given two options. Push a button to give fruit to themselves. Who push the button to give food to themselves and apartment chimp. If they chose the latter it was seen as a pro social behavior in that study chimps showed no special preferences for feeding themselves and a friend overfeeding just themselves into new research and a remote juice fountain in started but in a concrete fountain into the chimpanzees outdoor enclosures. The fountain was then hooked up to a large container of juice placed outside of the enclosure when an individual pushes the button. It releases juice from the fountain however since the button and fountain are approximately five meters apart. The individual pushing cannot directly drink from the fountain and if any other chimpanzees are at the fountain when the button is pushed they and not the pusher will be able to drink the juice that sarah detroit at the max planck institute for evolutionary anthropology leipzig compared to previous controlled lab based experiments. The setup for this was very naturalistic and detroit says chimpanzees were able to interact with a fountain in this social groups. In this context they discovered a willingness to act in the interest of others with chimpanzees prepared to activate the fountain without benefiting themselves.

Sarah Detroit Max Planck Institute For Evolu Detroit
That Mouse in Your House: It's Smarter, Thanks to You

60-Second Science

01:51 min | 6 months ago

That Mouse in Your House: It's Smarter, Thanks to You

"You've ever hosted a mouse as a house guest you know they can be incredibly clever finding your food and that makes sense. They had to become better in traits like problem solving because we became better at hiding food from then on your guitar with the max planck institute in germany. She says that battle of the minds has made mice craftier over time longer. Demise was humans better. They are at problem. Solving there are more than a dozen subspecies of house mice worldwide and each began cohabitating with humans at different times in our evolutionary history. Take for example. We're marcus domestic. As it began raiding human pantries around twelve thousand years ago. Whiskas musculus our relationship with them began some eight thousand years ago and musculus castanos that one is a relative newcomer which began cohabitating only three to five thousand years ago and that spread in evolutionary life histories among the three groups gave guenter team and opportunity. They gathered one hundred fifty mice with constituents from all three groups and tested them with seven. Different food puzzles. Each puzzle was baited with a mealworm which the mice could only get by pushing or pulling live for example or extracting a ball of paper from a tube or my favorite opening the window of a lego house and they founded the longer amounts variety had lived with humans. The more likely it was to solve these puzzles. Basically what we are left at with trying to explain these results we see is that the mice really developed higher or enhance cognitive abilities. While living with humans the results appear in the proceedings of the royal society b and as the human footprint on the globe expands. Guenter says. it's more important than ever to understand how we influence animal minds to learn. Why some creatures like house mice adapt while others simply die out.

Max Planck Institute Whiskas Musculus Guenter Marcus Germany Royal Society
The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

60-Second Science

02:01 min | 10 months ago

The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

"Like modern humans than neanderthals roamed widely throughout europe. We know this because they left behind. Extensive evidence usually bones or tools but their cousins. The denisovans our more mysterious until recently they were conclusively linked only to a single cave in southern siberia called denisova cave which lies between kazakhstan and mongolia in that cave. Scientists had found a finger bone three teeth and piece of skull which tip them off to the existence of a whole new lineage of ancient human now scientists have uncovered more of the range for the denisovans says de endo mossy lonnie of the max planck institute in germany. His team turned up evidence. The ancient humans occupied a high mountain cave on the tibetan plateau. Called by shia cave belongs to monks and -mongst things that it's a very holy place in fact among found a piece of jawbone there in nineteen eighty which has been tenuously linked to the denisovans salani and his team have now unearthed more conclusive evidence by sifting through cave sediments and sequencing the genetic evidence. The denisovans left behind. Buddy decay of people chests. Gabbing down the side like bleeding. There are coping ping could left their dna. The dna appears in layers suggesting the denisovans inhabited the cave as far back as one hundred thousand years ago as well as at sixty thousand years ago and perhaps even as recently as forty five thousand years ago meaning. The denisovans might overlapped in this region with modern humans. The results appear in the journal. Science mossy lonnie says. This method could enable more denise in detective work to this like so many caves when we have evidence of human activity but we don't have opening remain so if he can exploit to sediment can actually start to track down in segment. The denisova dini denise evans live on today in the genomes of some modern day humans from the south pacific further. Genetic work like this might give scientists more clues where early homo sapiens. I met and mixed with the elusive denisovans.

Max Planck Institute Siberia Kazakhstan Mongolia Tibetan Plateau Europe Germany Lonnie Denise Evans Denise South Pacific
Divide and Conquer Could Be Good COVID-19 Strategy

60-Second Science

02:32 min | 10 months ago

Divide and Conquer Could Be Good COVID-19 Strategy

"Health experts shake their heads at the chaotic political divisions and inconsistent policies that have undermined attempts to control the spread of covid. Nineteen through much of the world but a new study by mathematicians in germany and the uk has applied the tools of chaos theory to show that divisions of a constructive kind could actually bring the pandemic under control much more effectively. The research was done at the university of oxford girding in university. And the max planck institute for dynamics and self organization. The group built a mathematical model of corona virus transmission that accounts for the inherently random ways that the number of infections fluctuates over time they noticed the case counts within small populations. Sometimes drop all the way to zero. As long as people are wearing masks social distancing and taking the other standard precautions though spontaneous extinctions of the disease made them wonder if the small towns or counties did more to isolate themselves from neighboring communities would that sometimes extinguished covid nineteen enough that they could lift restrictions and resume more of normal life for longer periods until the disease popped up again a rigorous mathematical analysis showed that indeed. This kind of divide and conquer strategy can work at least in theory. They published that result in the journal. Chaos then in a follow on study published in a reprint which has yet to be peer reviewed. The group ran simulations using county level data from germany england. Italy new york state and florida for each place. They compared to scenarios in the first leaders impose statewide or nationwide restrictions like those that western european countries have just put back into effect in the second scenario restrictions on movement kick in whenever infection rates rise above a threshold but the restrictions are applied county by county or even neighborhood by neighborhood within large cities. So that the population is effectively. Subdivided into groups no bigger than two hundred thousand people for example under this alternative strategy a big outbreak could force the upper west side of manhattan to restrict non essential movements for several weeks but in other neighborhoods on the island. Schools offices and restaurants could remain open so long as case count stayed low the researchers found that even when they allowed for modest intermingling among communities this approach of local control could cut by about eight percent the number of days that most people would have to spend living under tough restrictions. Their models predict that these benefits of local control might take a few months to become obvious but they also suggest that a subdivision strategy could save many many lives over the long

Max Planck Institute For Dynam University Of Oxford Germany UK New York State Italy England Florida Manhattan
Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

60-Second Science

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

"The risk factors for covid nineteen are many old age obesity, heart conditions. But early genetics studies have identified another trait that some people who developed severe cove nineteen seem to share a cluster of genetic variations on their third chromosome and that DNA sequence likely derives from neanderthals says Hugo, Siegburg of the Max Planck Institute it is quite striking that S-. This veterans has lingered until house years fifty thousand years ago is. The approximate time humans and neanderthals interbred, and over the Millennia, those neanderthal variants have become more common in some homo sapiens populations than others for example, about sixteen percent of people of European descent carry at least one copy of the neanderthal stretch half of South Asians do and nearly two thirds of Bangladesh's, and that's kind of fascinating is so high that points towards that it must must've been beneficial in the post. I mean it's much higher than we expect. Undone. It's totally expunged in east as shown in China. Some something has happened driving the frequency often certain placing removing a token, the other places they details are in the journal, nature. See Bergen is colleague right that perhaps the NEANDERTHAL DNA happens to boost the risk of developing severe covid nineteen and they point to the fact that in the UK people of Bangladeshi descent have twice the risk of dying of cove nineteen than the general population. But as Epidemiologists Neil of the University of Nottingham pointed out in an email people of African descent in the UK are also being hurt more by the virus. Despite, having hardly any neanderthal genes instead, it's social factors like crowded multi, generational households or working frontline jobs that are more likely to be driving the trend seen in the UK that's according to Andrew Heyward Director of the Institute of Epidemiology in Healthcare at University College London, and as both epidemiologist pointed out, it's worth remembering that you can only develop severe covid nineteen if you're exposed to the virus in the first place.

UK Max Planck Institute Andrew Heyward University Of Nottingham Hugo Bergen China Institute Of Epidemiology University College London Director Bangladesh
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
Indigenous Amazonians Managed Valuable Plant Life

60-Second Science

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Indigenous Amazonians Managed Valuable Plant Life

"Barred. If you watch nature documentaries it's easy to come away. With the impression that lush tropical forests have been largely undisturbed until modern times tropical forests of soda long been considered to be these pristine wildernesses that humans haven't really touched until recent industrial foolish started to invade them and challenge them with twenty th century capitalism archaeological scientists. Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of human history however in the last two decades archaeological data shown that actually human societies occupied modified these environments of many Millennia. Roberts says some of the trees alive in tropical forests are up two thousand years old and they're sort of like time capsules storing record of past human activity in their tree rings chemistry and DNA so we wanted to see how different existing methods might come together to explore. Tree populations tree groves tree ages by looking at the largest witnesses of the changes in human activity in the tropics. The trees themselves for example indigenous peoples of the Amazon basin cultivated Brazil nuts for thousands of years. Roberts colleague Victor Kitano Andrade analyzed tree rings to determine the age and growth rates of Brazil nut trees near the city of Manaus. He found that many trees were established in the late. Sixteen hundreds but there was a steep drop off in new trees around the middle of the eighteenth century as colonial communities came into analysis about the city. They drove indigenous. People out often killing them they found is that actually that growth slowed after this period without these traditional management strategies. Brazil Nut Trees. That were still standing name announced. Today we're actually affected by these pre and post colonial changes in human settlement activity. Another example is how communities selected for genetic traits in a variety of tropical trees such as the cocoa tree used of course to make chocolate of more detailed full gene. I'm alison this. Plant has shown that humans may have even selected genes. That reduced bitterness improved. Its resistance to disease for their own economic benefit. The study is in the Journal. Trends and plant. Science Roberts's recognizing tropical trees is time capsules of cultural heritage. Gets US yet? Another reason to protect them. Not just because of their ecological benefits which is hugely significant but also the information. They store about human

Patrick Roberts Victor Kitano Andrade Max Planck Institute Brazil Manaus Amazon
Musical Note Perception Can Depend on Culture

60-Second Science

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Musical Note Perception Can Depend on Culture

"Music music but what shapes our perception of music to candidates are the limits of the human brain and the exposure. We've already had to music during our lives. If we only test participants with expense with best music than we'd really can't know whether the speeches come from the experience or from the biological constraints psychologists noory Jacoby of the max-planck-institute for empirical aesthetics during the past few years he and his colleagues have visited a remote area of Bolivia took investigate this question so we traveled there by taking canoe ride or it can Cessna plane or a couple of hours track to communities. Don't have running water orange. The CIMINI are an indigenous people who live in the Amazon Basin we specifically recruited participant from the believe in Amazon because this this participant had relatively little exposure to music for example octaves are a staple of western music but Jimani musical instruments don't feature them as an acoustical go phenomenon. An octave is defined as the interval in which the vibrational frequency of the bottom note is half that of the top note. They're considered the same note inactive apart for example Middle C. N. Nine High C. for the study she money participants pence were asked to listen to simple melodies and sing them back to the researchers. This exercise revealed that the money don't perceive tones that are knocked of apart as the same note on the other hand participants from the US did recognize octaves other musically trained Westerners were better at it than those with no musical training ansel Hansel what is exciting years highlights the importance of experience and exposure on the mind the researchers in the journal current biology in an earlier study Jacoby Bubis colleague Josh Mcdermott and his team from mit found that the chimney don't find an unpleasant to hear notes sight-seeing f sharp played together but there are distant Combo. That's particularly grading too many western years. Despite the evidence that experience influences pitch perception biology college is also a factor. Jacoby says the new study also revealed the both Westerners and the Toumani have trouble distinguishing between really high notes above four thousand thousand Hertz even though human hearing goes all the way up to twenty thousand Hertz and that may be because no matter where we're from we hit the limits of our brains before we reached the limits of our ears. Thanks for

Noory Jacoby Jacoby Bubis Amazon Basin Amazon Ansel Hansel Cessna Bolivia United States MIT Josh Mcdermott Four Thousand Thousand Hertz Twenty Thousand Hertz
"max planck institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Primate research. Now, fascinating, this inevitably has a sort of an introduction, and background in sort of human jokes about pushing mothers, IGA a range of good marriage for this sons to eligible women bonobos do it. The Novo chimps, a study has found that the mothers of bonobo chimps is so concerned about this sons sex life in procreation that they drag them over to potential partners and make sure that they copulate with the right ones. Good solid, evolutionary reasons for this, of course as tennis. More from the Max Planck institute in Leipzig is multi Suwa back, if you spend time with CD's females, who tried to intervene in the males mating, and tried to fend automative off from computations that have been on even within cells. And it just turns out, these are basically mothers of meals, so they actively involved in made competition. And they also held their sons to. Tight and teen hirings into community, that's kind of unusual, because you would expect with new usually, I mean, the model is, is males more aggressive than females the males would do this for themselves. And that's the kind of the plastic pecking order, that you see in most animals, Albano, bows, different, therefore. Yes. The Nick difference in Barnabus females actually pay for very high status within society, so often the highest-ranking individual in the group is a female, and I think you to these additional leverage that females have we see all of a sudden these nominations and that's interesting. So that means it's the female who is concerned with the passing on one presumes of her own genetic material, there is a genetic evolution redrafts of this. What you're suggesting yes because due to her behaviour, but she basically can do she can increase the number of her grandchildren. No through their sons, and why wouldn't other species do this because they are male lead not female lead. I think that is one part of it. But then, again, most other any moves it's normally who leave the Natal group while the females remained now for chimpanzees inborn to male always remain basically, at home, and you find there for adult may still have their moms around so they stay with the mum. And they have more sex and more partners. So stay with the mom and the mom helps them as about to a certain degree to kind of increase their children. They got how do they do that? Do they do they drag them to an available female? They don't literally dragged into a valuable females. No. But I mean, if other mayors, try to interfere with the songs, mating of these males and because the center of bone of society's kind of female individual in the shadow of the moms, males can really excess in central positions within grew which allows them as well to interact more without a visas, including the interesting ones, that's fascinating. So they have a habit. Do they have charging couples having sex if they don't want that couple to copulating, they will charge him push them, off, and pull them apart? You know, maybe sometimes even kind of, you know, try to pulling me by holding their, their feet snow in pulling him off from the female. I think that's funny gets.

Max Planck institute Leipzig Albano tennis Barnabus Nick
Colossal X-ray "chimneys" discovered at center of the Milky Way

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:52 min | 2 years ago

Colossal X-ray "chimneys" discovered at center of the Milky Way

"Have discovered two colossal chimneys family material from the vicinity the Milky Way supermassive black hole into two huge. Cosmic bubbles the giant bubbles discovered? Back in twenty ten by necessary. Fermi gamma Ray space telescope, one bubble stretches above the plane of the Milky Way galaxy disk and the other below it looking side on they shape akin to a giant colossal Alagoas spans. Some fifty thousand light is with about half the diameter of the entire galaxy. You can think of these gamma-ray bubbles sort of John burps of material from the central regions of Amway way where it central black hole. Nonessential Terry's a star resides. Now, the European Space Agency's X men using space telescope has discovered. Two channels surveyed x Ray material streaming outwards from secretary say star and finally linking the meat surroundings of the black hole in the bubbles together. The study's lead author Gabriela Ponti from the Max Planck institute says strong of known that outflows and winds of material and energy emanating from the galaxy crucial in sculpting, an altering the galaxy shape of time these k- plays in how galaxies and other structures full men evolve throughout the cosmos, and our Milky Way. Galaxy gives us tournaments a knee by Lebar tree to explore this phenomenon. Dato letting them probe how material flows added to space from the black hole. The authors used data gathered by union between twenty sixteen in two thousand eighteen to form the most extensive x Ray Meh and made of the galaxy's core. The map showed these long channels of superheated gas, h extending for hundreds of light is streaming above and below the plane of the Milky Way, a strongest thing that these actors will sort of exhaust pipes which energy and massive being transported from galaxy is hot out to the base of the bubbles replenishing them with new material the finding clarifies how the active. Occurring in the core of the galaxy both prison in past is connected to the existence of the largest structures around it. The flow could be a remnant of the galaxies passed from a period when I was more prevalent and powerful or it may prove that even cuisine galaxies like those hosting relatively quiet supermassive black holes with moderate levels of staff or mation, like the Milky Way, for example can still bust eugenic outflows material Mogae despite its categorization as questioned in the cosmic scale of galactic activity. Previous day different makes him a mutant has revealed that the milky ways call is still quite multiples and chaotic dying stars explode. Violently throwing them till outer space binary stars will around one another and secretaries a star amongst the black hole containing the equivalent of four point three million times, the mass of son, which he's lying there in wait for incoming material to devour late up Bill checkout radiation in genetic paddock was as does show.

European Space Agency Fermi Milky Way Space Astronomy Astrophysics Podcast Spacetime
"max planck institute" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'll be there from one until six I want to give people plenty of time to come in and shoot me. Now. Our CoCo is non GMO. Okay. It's non GMO. It's never been sprayed. It's never been a radiated. There's no life off on. That dangerous anti-deflation spray. Now, it's also fair trade the people Encana who work in the agriculture get some of the money from this. I mean, that's how we do things would are green, tea and all these different products. We make sure it's fair trade. Now, you don't want just to the person of all the the form to make the money. You want to people to share? And. It's not converted into chocolate. This is an important point. Columbia University NYU. Tufts University yell university. They all came out and said, listen when you convert and Harvard Harvard to they've all come out and shed when you convert cocoa and chocolate, you lose a lot of benefit caused many of the important ingredients for brain don't survive, the processing when you add the deduction when you touched a cocoa when you Roche the coffee cocoa beans, I'm sorry, not coffee when you Roche the cocoa beans when you add the Alkali to Dutch it when you add the milk fat. And when you had to sugar it takes away a lot. Activity. That's good for bring polyphenyls recall flab and thrills. There are other plants flab in three holes. But it's the particular mix in here the particular blend at a show dynamic that the brain. So here's what Harvard Medical School proved and university of reading and a Max Planck institute and Brigham and women's hospital stroke division. Here's what they approved. As we grow older circulation to the brain decreases. The brain is a super high energy Oregon needs a lot of nutrition it needs a lot of calories. It needs a lot of oxygen and blood. So there's all these arteries perfusion in the middle of the brain the central. Cerebral arteries, and there's a lot of arteries in the back of the brain, the posterior cerebral arteries, and as you age their walls, thicken and stiffen. So it's harder for the heart to pump blood into the brain. The brain receives less blood Harvard actually, put a figure on Harvard when they looked when a canvassed a lot of older people they found that circulation to the brain competing prequel typically declines by ten to fourteen percent. Now, you can make that worse. You can complicate that. If you have prediabetes or diabetes to circulation to the brain is even going to be worse than that. Or if you're smoker or a few very obese would high cholesterol or high blood pressure, or if you abuse alcohol all these things or if you smoke marijuana all these things complicate circulation to the brain on a worship. Is just the opposite. The stroke division, Brigham and women's hospital and Harvard Medical School. When people cocoa. They showed that a restored circulation to the brain like eleven twelve percent. Almost perfectly offsetting the decline of circulation to the aging brain almost perfect. When they did this perfuse to brain and supplied more oxygen, and nutrition and blood, and vitamins and amino acids, and minerals and all the things to bring needs to function calories. We're getting there. Just like a young bring. Show this improved connectivity within the brain. She as you grow older and circulation declines, the brain isn't getting nourished and the orange involved with your memory to shrink like your muscles. If you don't exercise, your muscles, shrink. Well. Brain wishy, flesh, blood brain organ struck to shrink and when they drink they pull apart and their connect titties broken their neural networks, Dan nerve tissue breakdown in connected, yet is still some connection. But it's not like a thirty five year old. When you take the cocoa, your reestablishing almost perfect youthful circulation. This is proven by active research institutions like Harvard and Yale. And the organs start to grow back to a healthy shies again day regenerate. I want to do that. They're coming close to each other. And there signaling to each other with all these neurotransmitters, and they struck to reestablish connectivity. Neural networks and what happens they start to function? Again, they fire together day wire together, they function your memory improve your memory improves this has been proven again. And again, and again by all these academic research institutions the best one I think was a study from Columbia University and Columbia University uptown Manhattan near the Taliban to tune. Studies de aging brain, but also studies Alzheimer's disease. That's primary. Focus. And they worked with NYU because NYU has dislike great neuro imaging center. So they work together to researchers to scientists doctors at Columbia worked with the doctors and scientists at NYU, I mean, a very profound study. They took older people fifty sixty s. But these people they had a little bit of memory loss. But just what you would see moral nothing pathological. It wasn't. Alzheimer's? It was just like normal decline in memory that you Chee like like you talk to an older person. I'm older. But I don't have this issue yet. Will it happen? I hope not I'm trying not to have it happen. A lot of people. I know I'll share them. Remember when we went to such a place to go. No, I don't remember going there. Or I'll say what was that restaurant? You went to list, we can go. I don't remember the name over Rosalind children Huntington. No. These little things they're getting things they're fine. You can play tennis with them. He could take a walk with them. You can have a drink with them. Netflix show at the Taliban institute. They enrolled a bunch of people. They were older they had the normal level. She memory loss and Alzheimer's takes place in a part of brain called the cortex. This was a different part where normal memory loss takes place. The den take Girish and the hippocampus. When they gave them CoCo. They show that the health. They were doing the neuro imaging at NYU because they had like really advanced or imaging. They sure that these deep brain parts were prospering. They were they were evolving back into what they used to beat. It will become more youthful and more active and more energetic. They short right in in in in in the brain imaging functional Emory show. He's a very expensive equipment. Not every place has them. Plus, you need to know the technique, you need to be an expert reading. And at the top institute when they were giving him the tash there were performed tests, and they actually came out with a statement. They were interviewed in the news, a shed let me see if I could find him I already through the folder on the floor. Next to my Dutch what they said was. You're in. The course of three months study. People.

NYU Harvard Medical School Alzheimer Harvard Harvard CoCo Columbia University NYU Brigham Harvard Encana Tufts University Roche Max Planck institute Columbia University Alzheimer's disease Taliban Oregon Netflix
"max planck institute" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Cap. Did you know that crows are smart? Of course, I been listening to you on this. I'm tony. How smart crows? And we have Kalian on here while back. We sure did expert. Yes, I have on vacation didn't crow sit in for me actually part of the show. That's. I just have the latest line latest headline in the series of crows are smart stories. This is of course, the New Caledonian crow the superstar of crow intelligence. This is a study from the university of Auckland University of Cambridge Bertha von Suttner university and the Max Planck institute for the science of human history. Interesting addition there at the end, they found that New Caledonian crows can infer the weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind. So we know by looking at things how heavy or light. They are by the way, they responded breezy conditions. The study they offer or the the example up here is that if you have a napkin and a fork on the table at an outdoor cafe the napkin will fly away the fork will not you might even take that fork and put it on top of the napkin two-way hit down. But we have not studied any other creature being able to figure this out just by looking. Yet. This might just be a case of not to looking. I haven't heard a lot of a lot of studies looking at this specifically, but regardless this is a study where they actually they didn't use lab birds. They went out into the wild and grab twelve birds from the wild brought them back into the lab, and they were taught to use a weight of an object to receive a food reward. So half of them were taught that they needed the lighter object to get their food reward. And half of them are taught they needed the heavier want to get their food or ward, then they took those same objects that they learned about they strung them a few inches off the ground one by one pointed fan at them. They got to see how they blew around. And so even though they might look the same by watching which ones moved in which ones didn't the ones that blew around easily in theory were where lighter the heavy ones remains stationary. Then they brought the birds into the test area and the birds got to pick whichever one they wanted without having touched them first. So they pick something and it was over. They didn't get to pick them each up and decide. And they were seventy three percent accurate. So definitely more than just random in Tuesday. The objects that would get the reward. So if they were taught that they needed the light object. They went for the one that was moved around by the wind if they were taught they need the heavy objects pick the one that didn't move from the wind. So this is a very interesting bit of kind of inference that they're able to figure out just by watching natural conditions. Also, they they tried to do something that they might actually see the wild wind is a very natural thing they grabbed these weld birds. So they're not used to solving puzzles, these their lab crows that are Larry have you done. The latest New York Times crossword..

university of Auckland Univers New Caledonian New York Times Max Planck institute Kalian Cap. Larry seventy three percent
"max planck institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

15:52 min | 2 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Welcome to coast AM. Good morning, gentlemen. Jay interesting program. I have a and then I wanna tune into have to do the internet and New York. Tonight to listen, I Andrew. I want you to travel fide, the origin of the name niece, Denisa wtn's and also the spelling, and Secondly, I'd like to know. I believe if I'm correct? That Neanderthal only show up in a small percentage in the European and Asian population. If you could give some understanding of that where they fit in how and when as to the at and how it fits into your overall, view and lafley. Even Quayle has also been dealing with the giants. I'd like to know if you're familiar with his work. I have a book with the cover is just unbelievable in terms of an example of wanted to giant, and whether you've looked at his work, and how you look at it. Whether it is or whether he has that particular piece, how would you analyze his work in in conjunction with yours? And if you have my questions, and and do I'll turn on the internet, and I listened to your responses. Thank you my. All right. Andrew questions. Firstly? I I'll be honest. A lotta aware is taken Carl's work sense. Interesting. I'll look into it. I'm you send me a link or the house. But are there are a number of books, obviously on the the giants of America particularly associated with the John skeleton? I mean, my colleague Greg literalist work on my colleagues to know men, Kim fiero rough Hamilton very solid pay some really sterling work to recalled literally thousands of accounts of the discount for all of John's skeletons in nights of American context. Great books out there. This time. Coming onto the Denisovans quite specific. Like I mean, th and he's obviously tight can from the Chi Chi. That's actually comes from hermit who occupied that. Crave in the eighteenth century code Dennis Denise and from that the type nine then he saga. And they correct pronunciation. And obviously there are two ways pronouncing it the certain you've come into popular tradition. The original and the correct way of pronouncing Denisovans as I thought just say Denise opens Denisovans, this was what was decided by the the the the the the geneticists at the Max Planck institutes all physical anthropology at Leipzig in Germany when I realized the uniqueness of the. Yeah. The Jeanine this particular. Yeah, I found in cave. So they couldn't Denisovans bicycling some of my colleagues. Call him Dennis fans. There's nothing wrong with it's like tomato tomato is near the end of the day. So that's fine. I to the relationship off the Dan I now. There's no discipline in European the only Europeans have anything all they finish PayPal. And that's because of that background in I shop to six to seven percent of Finnish comes across from Knowlton Aisha via the top of the euro mountains, which divide Europe from is shop many different populations from central Aisha going into eastern. I share in China, for instance, Japan Vietnam, Cambodia places like this have up to five to six percent, Dan. I. Quite a lot that definitely shows us that the the hybrid descendants of the dissidents mostly moved in the east. In other words, we're coming out of Africa. Then count the events say into bread with them. Their descendants continued the journey a squirts. So that's that. But as far as the Leander. How yes most people that came out of Africa. I would say people that came out of Africa from his earliest two hundred thousand years ago thrown until about thirty thousand years ago. Gained neanderthal. Dan, I is still within us to die. That's up to percents far as Africa itself. Concerned. This is where the Denisovans began as this other much earlier type of human nine is homo Harto pajamas. When they're buying a found in Africa. I saw anything up to seven seven and a half eight toe. They would seem to have been the precursors altered Denisovans. In fact, there's even a possibility that the Denisovans are high my heart open Jancis when we I know about them they will. So in Europe, by the way, we I know about them from jaw that was found at Heidelberg in Germany in nineteen ninety seven or ninety nine right place, cold mala. And this jaw is absolutely massive massive they match very well. The soy's off the taste alternate Denisovans found in the car. Of this type. So, you know, everything tends to suggest that the Knicks were a massive soy. And if you want to an impression of how they looked. Cop. The great Khali. He's an Indian wrestler. He's seven feet toe in hot Phil masi fly. I got a very low five very low jaw. I've been having a him. I if I wanted to cite. Lockout point to save inside. Hey, looks very similar to what they would. Like what about is? There any connection between the Denisovans, and perhaps the elongated skulls in Peru. Probably not directly because the guy did scouts. Don't come from the Neanderthals. The Neanderthals had extremely long skulls. In fact, long that often the natural foaming Nanto Scouse were mistakenly so to pay off officially fold the race mother had along county. Scholars is the they had a much larger syrup lem, which is a part of the Brian rocks. The back just above the the the spinal Colt initiate an area that is associated with dreams, and visions and experiences, which we would more associate with more artistic creative ideas to die. And they this elongated skull would seem to have been inherited by the earliest, Neanderthal hybrids. But it cokes. Obviously. There were also talk this event. Avante hybrids, in fact, only last year, it was announced that I first generation Neanderthal Denisovans hybrid the bones equate shipping found in the Dennis of life. So, you know, there's this incredible admixture all of these early archaic humans. I'm way coming into the mix. So they, you know, you create the Neanderthal Denisovans human mixes. So this is creating. Oh, people different sizes with different shapes heads, and whatever. And four of them have their own unique characteristics and features, and I believe the most of the lung headed nitric comes from Neanderthal ancestry, not from Denisovans, but a coast some Denisovans hybrids would have also had Neanderthal ancestry as well. So as I also would have had locates as well. East of the Rockies. Joe is in Long Island. Good morning, Joe. Welcome to coast. Yeah. Hi, andrew. I'm speculating but say upset the island say a Hawaii if they had remnants of these people from way back when how could they have possibly gotten there could they have domesticated birds and travelled on birds giant birds and with the watchman dispersed as individuals where they could abandon say, I'm one of these islands rather than together as a group. Well, it's a very interesting thing. And this is an area that I'll be covering with Greg in the new book coming out in September. Because there is a lot of evidence of Denisovans DNA in South America. And this seems to be connected ways ancestry of Melanesian and Australian origin. And you have to side south. How did they get into South America? And the they're all absolutely hard and fast out. But it does look very lightly. But Denisovans hybrids in south east Aisha island southeast Asia places like Indonesia. And some kind of maritime expeditions went on between there. Probably the north coast of Australia round to south to New Zealand and then down using the currents in the different wins. That would take them all the way down to Antarctica. And then a cross up into South America. Right. The tip of South America. Allowing them to go up, even though the west coast to South America, all the east coast where they would have been able to enter the interior South America trade the different navigate navigable rivers. This could be the explanation. Why we find quite high levels of both of strategy and a melon Melanesian, Dan, I in South America as well. As Dan I walked, Greg and myself will be showing in the notebook is that was extreme high. Coccia in South America, certainly by four thousand years ago. But the DNR I suggest that the Denisovans my in South America by about folk fifty thousand years ago, what this means is in addition to all the incredible high culture that we know that by had they were also ancient Mariners as well. Thanks for the call. Joe? Let's say hi to Tom in the wildcard line. He's in Serie toes, California. Tom good morning. Hey, Reggie like Steven Wright. Thanks to right. Got one for you. Real quick. I love Stephen. I kill for a Nobel peace prize. That's my favorite, Stephen. I was at a hotel and the pool was on the twentieth floor. I tried to try to frame the bottom, but it was two hundred feet deep. Anyway. Okay. I wanna ask you. How is it that why deandre fog get overtime by you know, what caused all that. And second of all based on the maritime thing. I've read that the back in those days encased in ice and the the distances in in water, we're not as as distinct, you know, not as long it made it easier for them to travel around and also the additions involved in any of this as well, that's one, you know, if you can answer these two of their three questions responsible. Thank you, Tom and thanks for Steven right? Joe? I mean, the maritime want to do with with the ice. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, they the eyesight she's coast huge amounts of ice to build up in the oceans in particular, the the Atlantic, and this would have might navigation between Europe and North America, easy but possible and this again is something that Greg on. Gonna look in the book. Comes out because what we say is that there was a huge flowering of civilization going on in Siberia and Neo timeout since around fourteen fifty thousand years ago when there is an ancestor this first encounter they that. They didn't they Denisovans, but you know, within about ten thousand years the puritanism. In other words, stocks with one hundred percents, Dan, I of of you know, there I'm. Type of of of humans disappear an old it's left is the the hyper descendants. So in other words, somehow dissipates what happened to them? Well, we might ask the same question of coast to the Nando toes right disappear around the same time. But it's actually probably about thirty thousand years ago, the Neanderthals disappear in Europe and in western and in central Asia. So what happened to them? Well, nobody really Knox. It might be to do with the changing environment tools. Yeah. The I h this seems to be unlikely because both Ethan events and the the Neanderthals had been around for hundreds of thousands of give so many different eyesight chase. And I think the most likely explanation is just got something to do with off. You know name does I get the feeling that the meetings between ourselves? And both the Nisa vans and the nanny house probably did not go. Well, I mean, you know, what happened when when Europeans first encountered the peoples of the Americas. I didn't go well either. And I think that there are traditions. You know, you can sign from different periods of history where new different toy posts of culture encounters one that's been existing for an extremely long period of time, those encounters to start with never got well, and I think that the same might be said between now and ancestors encountering tennis events and Nanto talks for the first time, and the fed parts of the question about the.

Denisovans South America Dan I Europe Greg Africa Joe giants Dennis Denise Andrew Stephen Germany Tom New York Americas Denisa wtn Jay Quayle Knowlton Aisha
"max planck institute" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"In from New York my ad good morning. Welcome to coast to coast AM. Good morning, gentlemen. Very very interesting program. I have a reporter. And then I wanna tune in to have to do the internet and New York tonight to listen, I Andrew. I want you to travel by the origin of the name, Denise Denisa, vans, and also the spelling, and Secondly, I'd like to know I believe if I'm correct that Neanderthal only show up in a small percentage in the European and Asian population. If you could give some undestanding of that where they fit in how and when as to the at and how it fits into your overall view. And lastly shaven Quayle has also been dealing with the giants. I'd like to know if you're familiar with his work. I have a book with the cover is. It's just unbelievable in terms of an example. I wanted a James and whether you've looked at. His work. And how you look at it. Whether it died, or whether he has that particular piece, how would you analyze his work in in conjunction with yours? And if you have my questions and Andrew out turn on the internet, and I listened to your responses. All right, Andrew questions. Firstly? I I'll be honest. A lotta aware of Stephen Carl's work sense. Interesting. I'll look into it. Obviously, you sent me a link call that they towels, but are there are a number of books, obviously on the the giants of America, particularly associated with John skeleton, something my colleague, Greg literalist out a lot of work on my colleagues to know men Kim fair rough Hamilton, you know, very solid people does some really sterling work to recalled literally thousands of accounts of the discount for all John skeletons in nights of American context. Great books out there. This time. But coming onto to the quite specific like I mean, he's obviously tight can from the that's the Denisova car that actually comes from I- hermit who occupy that cave in the eighteenth century code Dennis Dennis and from that the type good nine Dennissova and the correct pronunciation, and obviously there are two wiser pronouncing it the certain you've come into popular tradition, but the original and the correct way of pronouncing Denisovans east. I thought just say Denise opens the Nissen's. This was what was decided by the the the the the the geneticists at the Max Planck institutes all physical anthropology at Leipzig in Germany when night. I realized the uniqueness of the the genome of this particular. Yeah. Bite found in KYW. So they couldn't Denisovans bicycling. But see some of my colleagues your call him. Dennis fans is I think wrong with it's like tomato tomato is. Now the end of the day, that's fine. As to the relationship off the DNA. Now there is no discipline in European the Europeans have anything all the finish PayPal. And that's because of their background in I shop to six to seven percent of Finnish comes across from and Aisha via the top of the euro mountains, which defied Europe from Isha many different populations from central Aisha. Going into eastern, I share in China, for instance, Japan Vietnam, compiled places like this have up to five to six percents Denisovans deny that definitely shows us the the the hybrid descendants of the mostly moved in the east in other words as coming out of Africa man, count this events whilst into bread with them. They continued the journey escorts. So that's fine. But a far as the meander. Oh, yes. Most people that came out Africa. I would say people that came out of Africa from two hundred thousand years ago through until about thirty thousand years ago. Gained neanderthal. DNA that is still within us to die. That's up to to percents as far as Africa itself. Son. This is where the events began as this other much earlier type of human nine is home, my heart open Jancis when they're buying a found in Africa. Anything up to seven seven and a half fake toe. They would seem to have been the precursors off Denisovans. In fact, there is even a possibility that the Denisovans are high my heart open. When we I know about them they were also in Europe, by the way, we I know about them from jaw that was found at Heidelberg in Germany in nineteen ninety nine seven months. All right. Place called mala. And this joy is absolutely massive the tasting it, a massive, and they match very well, the soy's off.

Denisovans Africa giants New York Dennis Dennis Denise Denisa Europe Germany James reporter Nissen Andrew Quayle Stephen Carl Aisha Leipzig John skeleton Heidelberg KYW
"max planck institute" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"But what cells do is they affectively pump charged atoms ions across the membrane and they charge up. They give an electrical charge to the membrane and bacteria have that charge across the surface of the cell, and it seems you need jeans to control that kind of strong charge and what we. Have with the mighty conjure. It's not just that we internalized all the energy production in cells. We also internalize the genes required to control it, and it was that really that led to the step change. And so one of the things that we do know about the carrots, the complex life is stemmed in this eventing talking about is that our genes absolutely colossal and hugely variable compared to the bacteria. So there's potentially so much more information that begins at this point. So what is it about that incident that gave us a sort of template from which we could build all of this new information in effect what you have is a population of cells inside cells. When I say a singularity, I've never been. There was a single cell. There was always a population of cells and they had other cells living inside them. What happens with these cells living inside is that they tend to lose DNA and become simpler. And that happens pretty much all the time. And there's no requirement that I'm aware of the says, well, if you losing genes from these, you can accumulate genes in the nucleus, but there's no net energy cost. You've simply got the same number of genes. Overall. It's just you've changed that distribution. You have fewer and fewer in the Mitek on just keeping the ones you need for energy and you get more and more in the nucleus. So you have this genomic as symmetry where we have two genomes. We don't have a single human genome. We have two genomes, the mighty comes. You'll genome on the nuclear genome and without the might accountability. And I'm, you could not have this massive swollen expanded nuclear. Gina. Now, Beth as an Eva legionary biologist, I want I want you to sort of take us through the idea of the tree of life because this this event that Nick is describing, don't describe it from beginning to end, but there seems to me that there's some something that we don't think about very clearly and evenly string biology, which is that they're all these events where where branches collide and they clash and it's not a branching tree. I think when we as humans, we have this amazing proclivity to want to categorize things to put them in boxes. And when I began to try to write down how we can describe this evolutionary tree, it was very clear that every single thing had to belong in a particular box, their species box and that species branched off and they shared a common ancestor and closely related species might be in the same Genesis. And the closely related genera- might be in the same family at cetera. And we have this idea this conception of this branching bifurcating tree that goes on and on forever. But one thing that we've been discovering more and more recently with genomes and the power of complete genome sequences to tell us about evolution history is that things once they separate in less, they have evolved, the capacity not to be able to inter breed if they happen to overlap again in space and they can mate, they do and jeans. Don't always move in this evolution. Airily bifurcating pathway, but instead can come back and move in between species. So Nick was describing a major transition, but there was another one that long after so billion years, which is introduction of chloroplast sins appliance. But then there are all these other sort of moments through our religion history, where they all sort of events where major transitions happen as a result of mutations. Sure. I returning a little bit to thinking about this admixture and what mutations might have evolved that then get passed back between species. Some of the work that's come out of the Max Planck institute in Leipzig has revealed now that we have complete Neanderthal genomes, that there was an admixture event between our ancestors and our ancestors who were in the undertows who would actually diverged from anatomically modern humans, hundreds of thousands of years prior population level..

Nick Max Planck institute Mitek Leipzig Gina Beth billion years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Yeah. Say this story gays back a couple of years. The work was led by researches at the Max Planck institute for evily SRI anthropology. And back in two thousand sixteen, they had this Bain fragment, and they had already done some radiocarbon dating on it, and they found that it belonged to a hominem. Who lived more than fifty thousand years ago on their analysis. Then of the specimens might Conrail DNA shade that it was my to Conrail DNA from Indiana toll. So Martikan DNA than is inherited from your mother. So I guess this show, then this ancient hominids mum was in the NFL Benicia against researchers have taken this a bit further. Exactly. So at that time they knew only half the picture. They didn't know the identity of the father of the person to whom this Bain fragment belonged. And that's what they've done now, and that's where the bombshell has dropped. So in the latest study, they have been able to sequence toll g name and they have compatib- it to the DNA of three of the hominids and not is to Neanderthal to Denisa van and to a modern day person from Africa on what are they found say. They found that around forty percent of the DNA fragments from the specimen match Neanderthal DNA and another forty percent match the Denise van and they all say, secrets to sex crime. Museums, and they determined that the frogman came from a female on the thickness of the bones suggest that she was about thirteen years old and the research is have now nicknamed hut. Denny, right. So equal amounts of DNA from each parent Benicia. What other researchers say about this weather research is a really, really excited Kelly Harris. He's a population geneticist at the university of Washington says that these results convincingly demonstrate that the specimen is indeed a fuss generation hybrid and others agree. They say, this is a really click out case in this is headed straight for the textbooks. So we've come quite a long way then since since that first paper in two thousand sixteen, but it seems like they're probably still some questions that need to be onset. Absolutely. In this case, it raises questions around how Neanderthals and Denise Evans interacted, for example, they make frequently and if they did make frequently, why did they remain is genetically distinct populations for several hundred thousand years? And there are questions about geography as well as I understand it, then he is recording a history. To be about nine hundred thousand years old now, but where she was found in this in this cave in Russia seems super important as well. Say, there are questions about how often yonder souls. Denisa vans actually overlapped because our encounters mice have been quite rare research to suggest, but Neanderthals might have traveled from western Europe where they thought to live to Siberia where Denisovans with what live Ovalles's faster and on the basis of the variation in this specimens g name the team deduce that Denny's Neander tool mother was more closely related to Neanderthal specimen that was found thousands of his away in Croatia then to another that was found less than a meter away in the same cave in Russia. Well, let's move on then to our second story, and I couldn't be more different to be honest with you last week on the show, Adam was speaking about using satellites to to measure kind of differences in temperature in the oceans and on measuring these things, or satellites is super important, but there is maybe one whole research is trying to fill..

Kelly Harris Benicia Denny Max Planck institute Denisa van Denise Evans Denise van Russia Bain Indiana NFL Africa Europe Croatia Adam university of Washington Denisovans forty percent nine hundred thousand years hundred thousand years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Talking Machines

"This week's guest on talking machines is professor but hutch will cough from the max planck institute and we asked him the first question we ask all of our guests how did you get where you are coincidences perfectly into a lot of nice people helped me along the way m was so i'm not from an academic family my own my most of my answers where we're gonna be the hands and so i was a bit of an outlier i was already academically inclined early on but so i liked mathematics physics and this kind of stuff and especially astronomy i went to the becoming autonoma i decided to study physics mathematics for that and then somehow i got a little sidetracked during studying fascinated by theoretical physics quantum mechanics dabbled area bits and then at some point i i got this chance to spend an internship loves wow and look what they had there in i i came across the work of flooding up nick who would later become my phd adviser and found that fascinating because he was he was really studying how to find structure in the world from with irregular point of so i was thinking this is the way i can continue to do mathematics but studying fascinating problem that's still on the conceptual level and so not just taking felt like in quantum mechanics many small people have thought about from already for fifty or eighty years in tra like who am i to to make sears confusion there so so i thought i'll go for something where there's still more conceptual work open so anyway i ended up applying for this this internship i didn't get it i they someone gave me advice how to structure myopic ation and which which i tried to do but then he said i was also i wasn't studied mathematics physics i was registered feels fee and he said well bitterly that i didn't do that because i wasn't anyway i had a new girlfriend i wasn't sure what i want to go to america anyway at that point so i ended up leaving it in and then i didn't hear for a long time at some points i could see my directly from leading up nick and he said i like that you study math and philosophy we're just going to be an internship but in his first email addicted again years later in the fifty media ready wrote will come here you will study my new book that i'm currently writing and then we will decide in the topic of these so out even before meeting me but in a way so that's what what happens i went there i spent some time there started working with him was very exciting time and that's how i got into machine learning wow fantastic and where did you go from there so i defended my face at some academia industrial lab you can't get a phd from them but at some point i met another researcher from germany at a conference close miller and he asked me well you you want to do a phd or you will you defend said well i haven't actually worry about that yes he said well why didn't you come to belene my my boss can give you a phd ending them outcome by sort of i went to defended him billion afterwards i stayed there for another one or two years and that was a fun time then i went to microsoft research in in england cambridge that was very interesting was a different world because i was more of a basin machine learning lab and that i hadn't got to know before because my training was more statistical learning theory and then support to machines these kind of things after that i went went to start up in new york in biotech for another one or two years and then i joined the society and start my own lab in into begin which which is essentially very close to where i grew up in the space in between i spent some maybe one year and totally in australia but but compose shorter spells so i traveled around quite a bit but ended up in the same place again and tell me about what you guys are looking at your lab these days what are the questions that are really exciting so i traditionally have worked a lot in in colonels but somehow it feel like feed was getting more technical sexual things where maybe not as exciting as they that used to be not anymore and i i.

professor hutch max planck institute two years eighty years one year
"max planck institute" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Spicer's what does that mean for says he planning then and for the for the authorities in cities iranian aggression dargis that basically governments need to provide what she called smart species for poor communities and the local migrants you know who may have moved from the country into these urban communities she says that the problem is at city plan is aunt they favoring ornamental introduce species that the rich community is garnering joy and she says this is a problem because when city space somewhere like banglore so scarce what they need is multifunctional trees and plants so trees that children can play on that provide a foodsource that she says that urban planets need to think about this because public space needs to serve both segments the population it needs to serve both the rich and the poor and in this sense we need these multifunctional trees and plants our country thank you will you were there for now now it had a glimpse at the future of robotic surgery this week and while i've seen is a tiny piece of plastic was always of a all grub that can bend twist and flex its way for your body it's a robot made of material with magnetic properties meaning that a surgeon could steer it accurately through the body by varying and electromagnetic fields produced in some electrical coils the many robot as they call it could deliver drugs to specific places in the body and perhaps target cheetah's it's all going on in the lab for now but the research has reckoned that the boats could make it to a hospital near you within about ten years if all goes well the research is at the max planck institute for intelligent systems have just described at latest work in the journal nature one of the team is metin city he's director of the physical intelligence department this is a very tiny solve robots which use our on four me mitchell long and one we mature widened point balmy mature thick it looks like an elastic sheets and it has inside embedded magnetic microparticles then we can apply amenity fuel from outside and then the rub.

Spicer max planck institute intelligent systems director mitchell ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years
"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"max planck institute" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Jio law and the a good paul appalled began get bigger cup holders thirty two answers just doesn't mean the same thing anymore oh sorry here oh well who was awarded oh if tho so so many from you know how you were asking about these other humanlike species the denisovans in the knee anatole look i will i just got the latest issue of the journal science advances and look at the cover oh article about dennis open baby we'd seen that those are worth a lot of money mindy this article by a group of mealy anthropologists including vivian pslon from the max planck institute in germany describes how they just tested be lidl team eat tiny bb tooth that was found in a cave in a part of russia known as siberia and talking about losing the to the olah what what did they find out from the tat well let's see here flip through woke curious it seems like this little baby tooth belonged to a dennissova and if my memory is correct denisovans were another human life species but they were not homo sapiens like us and they were also not neanderthals either right which were another humanlike species that once lived mostly in your rights and the cool thing about dinners opens is that scientists only really confirmed or prove their existence in the past ten years look if there were denisovans living in russia and the advert recalls living in europe in homo sapiens walking the rule the middle east and spreading out all around the world then them power homo sapiens ancestors must have met some dennis opens in the inner talls along the way can we need to be they even had the families together which explains why most homo sapiens on earth today have a little bit of neanderthal or a little bit of dennis oben dna inside their bodies.

paul anatole vivian pslon max planck institute russia siberia europe germany lidl dennis oben ten years