5 Burst results for "Max Krummel"

"max krummel" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

09:26 min | 1 year ago

"max krummel" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Throw and again this is a guy that shoots threes he's three of four from three point land these numbers are really really impressive by this young man while the second free throw John powers at a wake forest a few years there was the nineteenth pick if it landed the two thousand and seventeen now there to use a timeout with three thirty nine remaining the hawks leading one twenty six to one eleven get the dagger put back it feels like right now it's time to make it possibly have a chance for young takes a bad John no where in this price is a little bit it's haven't be able if they vantage of those plays by Trae young where he feels the ill advised shots they got a little something going and that's why when we go to the hawks called the quick time out within three we'll make candid Candice Bergen while they live six three three BTC Michael said many more purchase go to Ticketmaster three thirty nine to go to forty one twenty six of one eleven and land the reefs what we typically do is that's about the only hard they work this is a team for this is not disappointment in those of all the reserves right now she knows the game down the next day with a white flag here in Atlanta where the game tomorrow night in Miami she owes a he's inside the walls of the room to paint sitting still come back and they gave me no maids several of the backward to free himself get into the food court for a young man with the to the surface now works right across the board led interest three forty six percent eighteen eighteen to thirty seven the worst in the league groups of three on the left that won't go we've got a buddy Andre Hutson the two fifty to go in the fourth one twenty nine and it's one eleven your nose into the shooting motion when he felt the contact up top the family gets into three free throws it up for Trae young the nets modesty by thirteen in the first quarter that lead was trimmed in the military ten point lead in the second only to be down six at the half was young makes a free throw going into the Orlando game that's really seven three point very good even in the losses they will over time and it's Rhonda was a one point your time to feel you feel really good about this group of that first half hour of Orlando they're they're dominating and then everything they have been able to get it back since they let the foot off the gas to their windows games with the exception of maybe one stretch there the the third quarter Washington when they arrested eighteen point deficit to take the lead role of corporate couldn't hold on in that game and then this one got out to a big lead thirteen point lead in the first and let off the gas still the third free throw talking about it as a follow as given by Trae young to come out of the game a good will come in for yogi finishes with twenty two points and fourteen assists we set up a defensive mentality the stock you know you think too he said we can shoot eighteen of thirty seven from three you think trail would one off is only one of six from three incident of the right to prove someone off the line drives instead crosscourt to chosen chosen working across the lane got stripped by right after the foul came right in he's been impressive has any video camera this is really what the party both ends of the floor he looks incredibly comfortable it's got great size again he was kind of quiet even it's do well saw the potential and they were right about this guy he does it try to base line gets to the rim missed a lay out rebounded by Atlanta Orlando it's a good way Graham ready she can hold her hi screen working right in the corner trivial inflammatory that's no good which side rebound looses to stuff like this Sexton this Canberra two to three in the right corner it's good for TLC with two minutes to go in the forty one thirty two one fourteen Atlanta leads the next class since this is overall energy could impact helped his team get out of the funk hunters not his game but I'm just saying in general but I want to get a longer look at here good win not only folder roles in twenty point lead for Atlanta in the mid thirty eight to go in the game Max Krummel crossover down the lane with a floral plants from doctor for the refill good the Andrea how to read that they play the controls of the fourth quarter steps in with three minutes really programming nineteen of thirty nine from behind the arc actually losing my propensity it's in working life as the classic gold everybody got found sixty three is like this isn't this isn't the thousand eighteen warriors but I don't even want to do it you're not even in the mood right now the spirit is in full I'm with the process the thirty three year lately but he makes the first the left hander makes the second free throw six eleven at a Georgia he got a nice looking stroke there Hey I got a chance to interesting player not necessarily just the five eight deception by paints in the lawn for thirty two eight celeb five simply last night and for the Long Island nets me down today and getting into the game with under a minute to go one thirty seven one eighteen Atlanta it takes it right down the lane for the crucial Saul Goodman goes Ole miss backdoor feed the rendition reverse reddit reddit he's got twenty six when it was still light see also three will go thirty seconds to go in the game this is turning into a blow out here in the fourth quarter we look to dribble out with too few the six five twelve seconds remaining again again the scores of one forty one to one eighteen and lasted just putting on offense display an inmate said no defensive resistance against it wasn't all three on there was a balance attack in a the way with twenty six in turn this one into right away one forty one eighteen the hawks beat the nets eight game winning streak over the hawks comes to an end and the nets lose on a Friday night for the first time this season come back right after this on the fair sixty six harming the fact love to put their hearts into categories like hatchback or SUV these names black and motion we should call the pilot something like family defender after all it comes standard.

"max krummel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"max krummel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's here and now, and it wasn't long ago that advanced skin cancer was a death sentence with survival rates of less than a year. But in the nineteen nineties scientists began working on something, no one thought possible harnessing the body's own immune system to fight cancer. Leslie mcclurg for member station K Q E D met up with a young woman beating the odds. Thanks to these advances in science. In the unit at a UCSF medical center in San Francisco, a nurse wraps. A blood pressure costs tightly around Ashley Walton's, thin pale arm. She looks pretty young for thirty four years. Temperature. The nurse leads her. And her mother down a hall to meet Ashley's oncologist for a quarterly check in. Ashley warmly embraces. Dr Adeel doubt, so hard. You know good Mary now. For many years, Ashley, doubted marriage was inner future when she was twenty six she found a more on the back of her hip, and it started Morphing into this. Ugly, dark bleeding thing. That just I knew something was wrong doctors surgically removed it then a couple of years later, a tiny lump popped up and Ashley's abdomen and over the next few weeks. It started growing and growing until it was about the size of a walnut. A biopsy revealed. She had stage four melanoma in total shock. She scoured the internet and found the average survival rate was six to nine months. I saw that. And. I freaked out on colleges told her to ignore the numbers. Doctor Dowd told me if there's any time have melanoma right now is a pretty good time to have it. Because there's a lot of stuff opening up to you. The major excitement in our field is on using immune checkpoint blockers idea here is that if you have diesels turn off by what's known as the PD one one checkpoint. Okay. Let me try to simplify this. Normally when the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now..

Ashley Walton cancer skin cancer Doctor Dowd UCSF Leslie mcclurg San Francisco Dr Adeel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Robin young gastritis Jeremy Hobson Mary max krummel NPR BBC World Service Claudio
New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

Here & Now

05:29 min | 2 years ago

New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

"When the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

Ashley Walton Cancer Max Krummel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Claudio Gastritis Robin Young Jeremy Hobson Uc Berkeley NPR Bbc World Service Graduate Student Mclaren Dr Dowd WVU Feld Medical Officer Forty Percent
"max krummel" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"max krummel" Discussed on Here & Now

"It wasn't long ago that advanced skin cancer was a death sentence with survival rates of less than a year. But in the nineteen ninety scientists began working on something, no one thought possible harnessing the body's own immune system to fight cancer. Lessee mcclurg for member station. K Q E D met up with a young woman beating the odds. Thanks to these advances in science. In the college unit at a UCSF medical center in San Francisco, a nurse wraps a blood pressure cuff tightly around Ashley Walton's, thin pale arm. She looks pretty young for thirty four years. Temperature right under the nurse leads her. Enter mother down a hall to meet Ashley's on colleges for quarterly check in. Hello. Ashley warmly embraces. Dr deal doubt. Good Mary now. For many years, Ashley doubted marriage with inner future when she was twenty six she found a mole on the back of her hip, and it started Morphing into this gli dark bleeding thing that just I knew something was wrong doctors surgically removed it then a couple of years later, a tiny lump popped up Ashley's abdomen and over the next few weeks. It started growing and growing until it was about the size of a walnut. A biopsy revealed. She had stage four melanoma in total shock. She scoured the internet and found the average survival rate was six to nine months. I saw that. And. Freaked out but are on colleges told her to nor the numbers. Dr Dowd told me if there's any time to have melanoma right now as a pretty good time to have it because there's a lot of stuff opening up to you. The major excitement our field is on you know, using immune checkpoint blockers idea here is that if you have diesels turn off by what's known as the PD one pedia one checkpoint. Let me try to simplify this. Normally when the body sees toxic material immune cells, kill it. But cancer cells are released sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening. You'll basically preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer kind of has this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under and then you of take off that Claudio biting that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug adminis-. Gratien approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you exceleron them or you can break them. And then there was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the very first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed and krummel's lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was hair wing when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy, the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her to Moore's worship, then after six months new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. Unfortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months. Technically in remission. Intermission..

Ashley Walton skin cancer max krummel UCSF Dr Dowd San Francisco gastritis Mary Gratien Claudio UC Berkeley graduate student Moore thirty four years ninety minute nine months six months ten months
"max krummel" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"max krummel" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The other scientists who've been working on therapies and cancer, because this is one thing that I think you know, the Nobel prize does a great job at at acknowledging great work and focusing, you know the public's broader attention on things that are happening in science and medicine in particular. But. Hope you don't mind me saying, but I presume you're not the only person who's had a big impact in this field. No, I'm the way that science and there I work in works. As we, we have students and postdoctoral fellows, and you know, we direct their efforts and as a team, you know, approach things and I, it would be I'd have to give you a long list people that contributed to this, but you know. They mothers work was done to foundation for the stuff was done in the mid nineties, actually massive graduate students in my lab at the university of California, Berkeley at the time, and I have to give them a lot of credit most notably, guiding max krummel, who was the guy that did the cool experiments that showed that seeks for it was the breaks on the immune system. Britain Yuli. I, I mean to that point, there's a lot of their many people out there working on this. There's a labs across the United States and around the world where what do you think is the best thing that the public could do to further support enhance, you know, advance this research. So I think it's incredibly important that the public understand the value of participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials, research working with physician researchers who are trying to advance these new news therapies. All the wonderful discoveries in the laboratory don't don't mean much to human beings unless we can have patience, you know, partner with us to really test them and study them. So that's one way where people can make a tremendous difference in the world in hopefully for themselves. But also even if not for the world and future cancer patients, you know. And then finally, a lot of research is supported by by the by the government and continued public support for the type of research that has led to these breakthroughs that comes out of our public funding is really, really something we'd like to see our our citizens continued to advocate for well, Monica, Burton Yolly president of the American society for Clinical Oncology and chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks magnates been great. And Jim Allison, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize winner in physiology or medicine on a award that he shares with soup Honjo of Kyoto University. Jim Allison is also chair of the department of immunology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Mr. Ellison. Thank you so much for joining us today and congratulations on the Nobel prize and all your research. Thank you so very. Much. Thank you. Thank you so much the chance to do this and by the way folks, if you've been wondering why I've been calling Jamal's and Mistrals Dr Ellison he is Jim Elson PHD but our journalistic standards here at NPR say, MD's get called doctors, PHD's get PHD's, I guess. So that's the quick explanation there, but go to our website on point, radio dot org. If you've got thoughts about cancer treatments today and immuno therapies as well, I'm gonna trucker body. This is on point.

Nobel prize Jim Allison Mr. Ellison MD Anderson Cancer Center Clinical Oncology and chief hospital cancer center postdoctoral United States Berkeley university of California MD NPR Britain Kyoto University max krummel partner Jamal Brigham Monica