35 Burst results for "Mattie"

Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

Short Wave

12:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

"As a teen Sabrina strings loved getting to hang out with her grandma even when her grandma was obsessing over one of her soap operas I remember one time. She called me into the living room and she's like Sabrina look at Victoria. McCoy's kept on young and the restless. Victoria is killing herself to him. Why are white women dying to be thin? Fast forward to one three adult Sabrina was working at an HIV medication adherence clinic in San, Francisco, where she witnessed real life, examples of women sacrificing their health to be thin nights, spoken to a couple of women both HIV positive who refused to take their HIV medications for fear of gaining weight, and that blew my mind, and immediately took me back to conversations I've been having with my grandma like gosh onto something so important you know when she was talking about it, she saw it as largely a white phenomenon, but the women I interviewed that day. We're both color. Why were these women dying to be thin and did race have anything to do with? Him. Sabrina went on to become a sociologist at the University of California Irvine and wrote a whole book investigating these questions. If you're like me, you might have assumed that. There was some moment in between Marilyn Monroe. TWIGGY EH in which. Suddenly we'll. We suddenly became fat-phobic in those three years, but Sabrina started digging looking at nineteenth century magazines like Harper's bazaar in what she found was troubling articles warning American women well middle class and upper class white women. They needed to watch what they eat, and they were unapologetic, and stating that this was the proper form for. Jackson Protestant women, and so it was important that women eight as little as necessary in order to show their Christian nature and also their racial superiority. Today on the show we go all the way back to the transatlantic slave trade to understand the racial origins of fat phobia, and how black people are still dealing with the consequences today? I mattie Safai and this is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. So Sabrina. Let's let's get into what you discovered about the history of fat phobia a little bit you. You did a ton of research and you started the story several centuries back in Europe definitely in the ethos that like Renaissance Women. you know we're full figured. And that was absolutely a thing that was valued, and then there was a big shift explain what was going on back then so it turns out that the growth of the slave trade, especially by the eighteenth century led to new articulations of what types of appearance we could expect of people by different races, and also what types of behaviors. Such that by the middle of Eighteenth Century, a lot of French philosophers in particular were arguing that you know what when we're in the colonies, we're noticing that Africans are sensuous. They love sex and they love food, and for this reason they tend to be too fat. Europeans have rational self control. This is what makes us the premier race of the world, so in terms of body. Body size, we should be slender, and we should watch what we eat so okay Sabrina. Are you telling me that? When the slave trade started and European saw that African women were essentially curvy much like European women at the time at that point, they decided that being fat being thicker wasn't ideal anymore, and they built a system of oppression around this idea of needing to be. Thinned to prove racial superiority is at eight am I close. It's not quite as intentional as that. Effectively what they determined was that. You know we want it to be able to have a mechanism for ensuring that we could recognize who was slave, and it was free right, and it was easy in the beginning of the was simply skin color. What did you might imagine? After two hundred years of living in close proximity skin color really no longer works has a mechanism right, because now we have all of these people who are We would consider them today to be by racial, and so what they did was they decided to articulate new aspects of racial identity and so eating and body size became of the characteristics that were being used to suggest that these are people who do not deserve freedom. The trans, Atlantic slave trade eventually ended, but argues that we are still absolutely living with these racist attitudes about body size today. And in her book, she also traces how these anti-fat attitudes worked their way into modern medicine for somewhat arbitrarily, reasons for example take BMI or body mass index. That equation actually wasn't intended to be used to measure individual fatness. Though of course doctors did and still do today, can you? Can you explain the problem with using am I as a measure for obesity especially when it comes to black women, who I know have been told that they have the highest rates of obesity according to that measurement to be am I. Yes, so am. I is a measure of the ratio of a person's weight to their height. And what this does not account for is bone density. Muscular already any other type of genetic influences in your way or cultural environmental influences in your weight, and so, what ended up happening? As many people pointed out is that you might have to people with the same BMI, but vastly different life experiences embody compositions outside of the simple reality of their weight to height ratio, right, and the problem of applying this to them in particular, is that African American populations as studies have shown for literal decades since at least the eighties tends to be healthier at heavier weights than white populations. And so that already is an indication that cross racially. This is not a very useful tool, not to mention the fact that even within race there are going to be vastly different experiences, of an individual body between like their weight and their health profile so surreal this message from the medical establishment that excess weight is the biggest you know reason for black women's health problems or a very central of it. Why do you see it as so damaging? For Black Women, ultimately, the main advice that people are given when they so called obese is to lose weight, and there are so many problems with this. We have been telling people to lose weight for decades. What ends up happening is that they either don't lose the weight or they sometimes do lose the weight, and then frequently gain it back so first off. It could be more harmful to tell people to lose weight in the long run, and then in addition to that there are the psychological effects of telling people that their bodies are wrong. Right at their bodies are inherently unhealthy This type of fat stigma also leads to health outcomes right right right, so let's talk about this. In the context of covid nineteen I'm thinking about the recent New York Times op Ed you wrote about how cove nineteen is disproportionately impacting. Impacting people of Color specifically black people, and how you took issue with obesity, gaining traction as a leading explanation for that disparity, so talked me a little bit about that. This piece was actually motivated by something that I felt was very troubling, which was I had been seeing so many report, suggesting that the disparities in Colbert outcomes between white populations and black populations. They would say things like well. You know there's already the pre existing factor of obesity, and somehow that was one of the first things that come up and I thought there is very little evidence that disparities in quote unquote obesity are what's contributing to these negative outcomes, but there's plenty of evidence to suggest that Kobe. Fatalities or maybe even serious complications with Kobe nineteen are being influenced by people's environments. Are they essential workers? Do they have access to enough soap and water hand sanitizer, and so of course might imagine that the ability to socially distance to shelter in place to have access to healthy foods under Corinthian, all of this is very much being structured by a person's social location and black people tend to live in communities without access. Access to a lot of different healthy and life giving resources. Yeah, in in Sabrina, I'll tell you that as a person that reads a lot of the literature on Kovin prisoner biologists I am seeing a lot of papers coming out that are associating with the obesity without with health outcomes of COVID, but those links tend to be correlated right, but even if we were to find out that there's absolutely a causal link. Link between covert and obesity which I think you're arguing. There isn't one especially right now. At least the rates of obesity and white and black populations aren't actually that different right like it wouldn't necessarily be the thing that made it. So can you tell me a little bit about those rates versus the actual percentage of disparities? We're seeing so according to the CDC, the Obesity Twain. African, American and white populations are. Are Forty two point, two percent for white populations and forty nine point, seven percents for black populations are about that and so we're looking at effectively a seven percentage point disparity between white and black populations in terms of rates of obesity, however, when we're looking at serious complications with covert nineteen. What we're seeing is that black people are dying at rates of two point four to seven times that of white populations. How that's seven percentage point differential is leading to two point four to seven times the disparity in serious complications. Death. No one's really being able to explain that. This is the problem with the kind of cords of studies, which is that they lead people to believe that somehow. Is One of the drivers when in fact it could simply be a confounding in these studies, but we're so used to studying obesity and treating these correlations as if they are evidence of causal link that people are frequently not being very critical when they're seeing studies that show these relationships. Sabrina, you've obviously spent years by now working to understand this issue and to educate folks about it I'm wondering you know like why why this. Why have you specifically taken this on one of the reasons? Why continue to do it? Is I've seen what a difference? It's made to people's lives. I mean I've had so many people reach out and tell me that they felt for the longest time like something was wrong, but no one was talking about it or that I have spoken to their personal experience. I couldn't have imagined when I started doing this work. That could have possibly had the impact that it's had you know I'm standing on the shoulders of giants people who have been feminist scholars medical scholars journalists who've been doing this work at least since the nineteen seventies, but we're at a moment right now where there's a critical mass of people who are aware that the discourse surrounding fatness that we've long accepted really is baseless, and we think about a new way of allowing people to have a positive relationship to their bodies, and to cultivate health within themselves and their communities that does not rely on that stigma. Okay Sabrina I appreciate you. Thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing your life and your work with us. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Sabrina strings. Her book is called fearing the black body the racial origins

Sabrina Obesity Black Women Victoria Mccoy Europe Marilyn Monroe Obesity Twain University Of California Irvin Francisco New York Times Mattie Safai Kobe NPR SAN Harper Kovin CDC
Why Do Flying Snakes Wiggle In The Air?

Short Wave

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Do Flying Snakes Wiggle In The Air?

"Madison Safai with NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce. Hey, now. Hey, Mattie, so now you have. Both weird and amazing for us today which I feel like is Kinda right in your wheelhouse. Aright well I hope my repertoire is a little more expansive than either but I'll take weird and amazing Yeah, so you know how snakes kind of undulate or slither when there are moving around serpentine baby, let's go I like it, so this undulating is how they get around like on the ground or in trees. And in fact it turns out snakes that fly even do it when they're sailing in the air snakes on a plane. No, please sorry I just had to get one of it out. And now we can focus so okay. Okay? All right I'll give you I'll give you one. Yes, but we're not. We're not talking that kind of thing we're talking about. You. Know flying snakes like that live in south and Southeast Asia. You're aware of these snakes right? Yes, I am very aware, but I don't know necessarily that our listeners are so. Yes, there are real snakes that hand fly which I feel like for some people is the stuff of nightmares, but to me. It's just amazing now. I definitely have heard people say like. Do we really need to talk about flying snakes range. Twenty. Seven things gotten bad enough like can't. This is just like yeah, if you're not a snake person, this is a problem, but in the real world these snakes exists not to torment us, but to just live their lives. They cruise along the tree branches. You know up hunting things up in the trees, and sometimes to get down to the ground or another tree, these snakes actually launched themselves into the air, and they kind of glide down at an angle. The snake looks like swimming in the air. And when it's swimming. It's undulating. So that's Jake so high and he's a researcher at Virginia Tech and he's been studying these snakes for nearly twenty five years and one of the things he's been wondering about is like why snakes do these movements in the air. Why do they undulate and you know he thought? Maybe they're just doing it out of having. You know because like snakes when they propel themselves on the ground up a tree or in water. They do wiggle like this right, so it's not to think that when the snake jumps into. into the air, the snake goes. Hey, snake I under late. That's what I should be doing I'm just GonNa undulate snakes got undulate. Now. You know that's what they do. Yeah, they're in the air and they're out. What do I do? What do I do you know snake I snake. It seems plausible on the other hand. It's possible that these motions actually might have purpose like. Maybe they're doing something to help the snake. Why through the air

Researcher Nell Greenfieldboyce Mattie Southeast Asia Madison Safai NPR Virginia Tech
Judgmental or Making a Judgement? What's the Difference?

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Judgmental or Making a Judgement? What's the Difference?

"Hey Good Morning peeps Lynn Mattie here yet again and from peachtree city. What's with that? Yeah I still live here. On my morning walk with the Dogs I was contemplating judgment and I thought well I'm GonNa talk about that today on the podcast because it is so poignant. For this time in our history, but of course it also is such a big part of our day to day lives. So I want to talk about what is judgment. And how does it differ from being judgmental? If you look up the word judgment in the dictionary, there are generally two meanings which help us sort out issues. One has to do with making judgments so yeah. At a basic semantic level making judgments is being judgmental, but the other meaning of judgmental has to do with being overly critical in an unhelpful way, and it is this separate meaning that allows us to get to the heart of the issue that most of us have with judgment. And that is when it becomes an obstacle. When were unaware of our judgmental tendencies? We become angry, hateful, defensive, anxious and isolated, and as you can imagine these traits not only alienate us from others, but also from our very soulful South's and this is tricky business because. Judgmental ISM is not all bad when our inner judge is balanced, we are able to make clear decisions and avoid potentially dangerous and very situations. Being critical also helps us be creative and innovative and Yup insightful about other people's problems, and how they reflect on our lives when we're judgmental, and we behave in a manner that is critical, condemning and condescending, we are judgmental and critically nitpicking in finding fault with another person group an idea situation. That is when we start to filter our lives through these distorted patterns of thought those cognitive distortions that I talk about black and white thinking we mind, read what another person is saying and condemn them for it. At the same time we judge because of this mind, reading or the black and white thinking that they're bad or they're. Stupid unworthy and yet while this is happening, this judgmental ISM extends to ourselves, and we become self hating increasing our low self worth increasing depression and anxiety, and all that comes with that like substances so essentially in the psychological realm. They're such a big difference between making judgments emitting. Mental making judgments comes from. A balanced a neutral mind while judgmental ISM comes from the imbalanced and reactive mind that is seeking to protect us from being hurt by others. It's our defense mechanism. In case you need a little help. To see or hear if you're judgmental in the more harmful way, here are some signs to look out for you believe. Everyone or a significant amount of people are out to get you. You expect other people to be consistent all the time meaning in their behaviors in how they treat you excetera. You struggle to see on a person's flaws. That falls into that black and white thinking pattern. YOU EASILY SKIP to conclusions mind reading to conclusions you struggle to tolerate ambiguity and uncertainty Waza like what we're in the midst of. Your intolerant of people who are not like U. yeah, this is a Biggie for many of us. You generally are pessimistic about life. You tend to believe people are either all good or all bad. That's a good person. That's bad person. You struggle to find the inherent beauty in another person.

Lynn Mattie Peachtree City
"mattie" Discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"mattie" Discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

"This anymore. Calm down talked me. What did to Mattie? Thinking about. I can't sleep when I sleep. I dream about don't do that to yourself. Is Your ID the caused it? Not you'd. I'm the reason she's gone. If people at school, but I did it to. Those idiots thing I know that you're a good person broken. That's what matters. Now I'm not. moral. The police thing I did it to the police. Don't have any evidence to convict you, so don't let.

Mattie
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 3 weeks ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
BlackLine and LOOMIA

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | Last month

BlackLine and LOOMIA

"You, for the kind introduction and I was so excited to speak with theresa and Fatty Day, because evolve have big. Businesses and I find that sells is something that can be really hard to hire for and really hard to learn. A lot of my background is on the product side so. We can make prototypes. We can get things out there. We can handle inbound, but when it comes to having a really strong smell strategy including hiring a sales voice. Something! That's been been tricky over time, so I wanted to have this conversation to get as much advice as possible about how you went about finding your sales hires what you looked for any challenges you had along the way. I love it awesome. This is my favorite kind of conversation so many ideas Matt. Let me ask you a question, so maybe can you describe it in like a minute so that we can maybe give you also some specific advice in your case, so how many? How many customers you have today, what is the enterprise sales cycle? Look like how long did it take? What's the average customer take? Do you have any sales reps like? Can you paint a little bit of the picture? Because maybe then we could actually give you some specific like actionable things out of this. So our team is very small and we're four people and we just brought on. To people went to help kind of conscious and sales. I'm in another person to help execute in sales, but there's not somebody who's full. We wanted to kind of test and see. What we liked to get a handle of this situation, we have about six customers or so are we generally sell to large businesses, and especially, because the product that we make is very hardware focused. It was really around the beginning of last year we were able to get to market in a meaningful way when we were able to have samples were like this. Versus like imagine what you could get. Rich is a really different process to last year. We say on a few fortune one thousand companies. This year we're hoping to bring out a few more, but as he mentioned as. Her and I do most of the sales calls, and at some point for these really high attached cells processes. It really doesn't scalp very well, so I think that in the past we felt a little burnt by certain sales hires, and so we're trying to think okay. How do we re strategize everything about this differently? In order to be able to hire better, and because I think for the company to grab, we definitely have to have to have someone. Well. Let's turn to our expert Therese, Tucker. What's your advice to Mattie? Mattie I like you don't come from a sales background. And I definitely made plenty of mistakes in the early days and I have to tell you that the first really capable sales leader that I hired made the difference between the company succeeding and failing okay, but before I found him I definitely went through a number of. Different attempts at trying to find the right people, and it's difficult, because people that are in sales can talk a good game right just about all of them, and that may or may not translate in terms of. Performance now with that you have to think about the kind of sales culture that you want I did not want a sales culture like some of the other software companies that I've worked at you know there are certain software companies that have reputations for people, basically just brawlers. They grabbed the prospect, and they throw them on the ground and stomp on them until they get a deal I've had a few of those okay again. That's not something that necessarily comes through in an interview, because everybody's on their best behavior in an interview, so you're GONNA WANNA. Look for proven success. You're going to want to look for culture alignment in terms of the culture that you're setting for your company. For your early sales. People I would suggest that you do options. A really good salesperson can work anywhere I mean they really, can't they? They've got all the options in the world right I mean in. Actual you know they can go anywhere. And so why would they come to a small company that may or may not succeed in a new market. So, what is the carrot to get somebody WHO's really good? And, typically that would be stock options that gives them tremendous upside.

Mattie Rich Matt Theresa Therese Tucker
How to Correct Misinformation, According to Science.

Short Wave

01:55 min | 2 months ago

How to Correct Misinformation, According to Science.

"Maddie Safai here today with your way. Shah a reporter from invisibility. Npr's sister pod about human behavior Heo way. Hey mattie what do you got okay so you know how wanted the big problems right now? Seems to be like all the misinformation flying around some public health officials are calling an info dimmer journalists find themselves debunking wild claim of false tweets. Right and it's like especially tricky right now because there's so much we don't know yet yet. Which makes it easier for misinformation to flourish. Unfortunately and I've been thinking about one particular drama and all this like what do you do when it's somebody you love. Who's spreading the misinformation? Right Right which is why I was so excited to come across this guy. In London named Kush not cut and his misinformation problem. It starts back in March in the form of a WHATSAPP message from his dad. Who Lives back in Kenya? Natural Remedy for coronavirus like boiling lemons and orange and black pepper. For some reason. It was just really odd and cush. He just ignores the message. Brushes it off but a few days later. His Dad sends another message about a false coronavirus remedy. In this time Kush decides to say something on the phone when they're catching up like this is nonsense at nyu saying this crap. Okay fine. I'll stop. That was easy. Well not so fast because a few days later the very same cycle happens again. Can you just stop forty me this crap? You'd be like Yep I just thought you'd find it interesting over and over. Rinse and repeat dot. There's no source. I us any three. This know he's come on Dodd. Seriously okay cool.

Kush Maddie Safai Shah Mattie Reporter Kenya NYU London Dodd
Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

Short Wave

01:34 min | 2 months ago

Science Movie Club: 'Contact'

"Summer. I just re watched contact last night and I feel like it held up. You know I feel like I was still really happy. With what is your. What are your thoughts? I was very pleased. Yeah and I feel like I need to watch it more. Regularly summer ash knows a thing or two about making contact if you will with space. She's a real life radio astronomer. Who Works at the. Va a telescope facility. In New Mexico. Be L. A. Stands for very large array basically a group of radio antennas working together to Observe Space. And it just happens to be where lots of the movie takes place so it is very large. That does not align the telescope itself is made up of twenty seven separate dishes there each roughly one hundred feet tall and eighty feet in diameter weigh two hundred thirty tonnes and they all act as one. So they're all pointing at the same thing and they are just a super powerful instrument could call it the most scientifically productive ground based telescope in the world. So it's pretty awesome as where your it's pretty frequent. Contact isn't just about the search for extraterrestrial life. It also touches on stuff like academic culture and scientific funding all stuff worth digging into so stick around. I'm Mattie Safai. And this is shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR.

Mattie Safai VA NPR New Mexico L. A.
Boundaries For Healing From Childhood Emotional Neglect.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

10:24 min | 3 months ago

Boundaries For Healing From Childhood Emotional Neglect.

"Hi Everybody Blend Mattie from Peach Tree City Georgia where Yeah Georges. Opening back up and I am really grateful to say that. I don't feel compelled yet to open up my in person. Private practice office most of my clients. Barring one or two are perfectly comfortable staying with the video sessions. And that's why I'm grateful. Many of the business owners in our community are continuing to operate at very reduced ours or no ours person. The restaurants are still doing this. Really innovative kind of business model for many of them either being local grocery outlets or curbside pickup which has been working for them throughout this entire difficult period and they are continuing that very few businesses are opening for. I in restaurant or in house kinds of things mainly because we're just not ready yet as community however I do understand that some people are making the choice to go wide open and You know although it's scary for many of us to watch who am I to say that that's not right for them? It's just not right for me. I wanted to share that little bit of what's happening in my personal life. My community with a coveted nineteen the era of cove in nineteen. All right let's get started with today's topic and jump right into some healthier coping skills for you today. The title of today's episode covers two of my most favorite topics to talk about because inevitably most of us have trouble with these two things and they are boundaries and healing from childhood emotional neglect first. Let's start with what the heck is childhood emotional neglect or C. N. Oftentimes we associate childhood trauma with physical abuse. Which of course leaves external scars as emotional scars or emotional abuse which also invokes lots of internal traumatic response intends to stay us for long long periods of time until we heal it however many of us also have issues with things. We can't really pinpoint emotional. Wounds that tend to pop up in things like triggering words and other emotional disturbances in these hard to identify and equally difficult to overcome issues are sometimes misdescribed as emotional neglect in. This is not the same as child abuse because it's mostly unintentional from our caregivers. There are definitely parents out there who might intentionally ignore our emotions as children's but many others feel to notice or respond in a healthy way to our emotional needs as children. Your parents could have tried their best and loved you very very much but they still may have neglected your emotional needs. And that's what we're GonNa talk about today especially how that neglect tends to tie into a lack of healthy boundaries as we mature and work our way through this thing called life childhood emotional neglect can best be seen by professionals like myself when we ask about the generational habits of how your family has come to raise children so often parents who say come from a poor upbringing tried to give their children what they didn't have and we focus on these external things and you can hear this in the stories that your family tells about how they grew up versus how they wanted you to grow up trying to correct those mistakes that they saw their parents making what we are finding collectively as a society as we become more aware of the importance of not only knowing your feelings but then learning how to cope with them is that many generations have simply forgotten that this is an important coping mechanism. That feelings are good no matter what they are you know the negative feelings quote unquote or the more positive feelings are all important components in US humans and when we are not allowed to have feelings or talk about feelings or when that becomes a habit from generation to generation that is passed on that. We just don't do that. We don't talk about feelings. We'd get over them. Which if we know that one of my favorite phrases then essentially what we're passing on is emotional neglect from one generation to another how we deal with. Our feelings is important and when we are taught that feelings are not that important. What we teach our children is that emotions are not valid. They're black and white. They're either too little or too much. We give much more importance to the getting over of the feeling and this is evidenced by phrases like this. You don't really feel that way do you? It's not that bad. It's really not worth getting upset about you know. Don't cry over Spilt Milk. Kind of thing and the The one I used to hear all the time. Stop being so dramatic a when our parents don't notice or value or respond to our emotions or they questioner emotions when we do express them. They are unintentionally sending this message. That your feelings don't matter or there's something wrong with you and then most of us barry our feelings. We transform an unacceptable emotion like anger into an acceptable one. Like internal anxiety. And just in case you need like a list to see if you qualify. Here are nine signs that you may have suffered from childhood emotional neglect. You're afraid of relying on others. And you reject offers of help support or care and then you have a hard time asking for help. You have a hard time identifying near strengths and your weaknesses your likes and your dislikes and your life goals you are harder on yourself than you would be on a stranger and you lack that self compassion and understanding you tend to blame yourself almost excessively and you direct that anger inward feeling guilt or shame around your needs and your feelings. You tend to feel numb empty. Cut off from your emotions or you feel unable to manage or express them or you reach for substances or behaviours that. Allow you to feel numb and detached from your emotions. You are easily overwhelmed and tend to give up quickly or procrastinate you have low self esteem in what self-esteem means is how you think about yourself. How you talk to yourself you have an extra sensitivity to rejection. Oh you feel that rejection deeply. You believe you are at your core deeply flawed and that there is something about you. That's wrong even if you can't specifically name it do any of these sound familiar to you when I work with clients who have evidence of these characteristics much of our work. Tends I to revolve around identifying and accepting that this happened in their lives? And it's not necessarily something that rises to the level of severe traumatic abuse. But it can help us make sense of why we have trouble in our adult relationships and it inevitably it comes down to communication and boundaries when we are not taught that our emotions are valid or to be explored and doubt with and worked through these moments of childhood emotional neglect what happens essentially as it prevents us from developing healthy boundaries and ways of communicating openly about our needs which by the way is what about is how to explain to another person what you need. What's okay with you and what's not okay with you. Let me explain that a little further when your parents ignore your feelings they inadvertently t chew that your feelings do not matter but since your feelings are the most deeply personal biological expression of who you are deep down when this happens to us we learn that. We don't matter that you don't matter when your emotions are ignored when you're caregivers who you are learning life from ignore the basic source of information about what you feel what you want and what you need.

Peach Tree City Georgia Private Practice United States Georges Barry
Animal Slander! Debunking 'Birdbrained' And 'Eat Like A Bird'

Short Wave

08:07 min | 3 months ago

Animal Slander! Debunking 'Birdbrained' And 'Eat Like A Bird'

"All right first up bird brained again. People say this when they're implying somebody needs to get it together or they're scattered. Yeah clearly not a compliment right so for more on this you talked to Corinna newsom. Hello Hi Emily. Yeah Hey how are you? I'm good how are you good? Good my name's emily. Corinne is a Grad student at Georgia Southern University studying birds and before that she was zookeeper she's got a deep well of experience to draw upon for today's episode. What's your relationship with that phrase bird brained? I usually get a little bit offended when I hear the word bird brained as a person who spent a lot of time training birds For the purpose of education and showing off natural behaviors. I've gotten a chance to look very closely. At how birds think and understanding the way that they think and being very impressed with their cognition and so when I hear people use bird brained as an insult. I am. Dan Personally insulted. You gotta stand by Your burs. Starting off strong. I mean you gotta set the tone. Okay trusted expert. Witness Carina newsom approaching the bench. Hit us with that sweet sweet evidence. Carina SAYS BIRDS ARE OVERALL PRETTY SMART. Cognition depends on the species of course but birds in the Corbett family like crows and Ravens are wicked smart. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. They can memorize faces. They were Super Cool. Experiments on that in some crows can make tools which is usually associated with primates. Correct and you know what other birds are. Smart Parrots. They are incredibly social animals. They are also very skilled at mimicry. At recognizing even memorizing patterns At picking up on behavioral cues from humans. Corinna says that parents are tough pets precisely because they're so smart you have to give them mental stimulation and if you don't they're going to occupy themselves which oftentimes may end up looking like biting your furniture tearing apart your shoes wreaking havoc on your home here. It's need constant mental stimulation or else. It's just havoc and all of this has to do with connections inside their brains. Do I smell little data? Kwon Oh you. Do you better believe you do so a couple of years ago. This study came out that looked at brains across different types of birds songbirds parrots various birds of prey and the study looked closely at this part of the brain called the medial spira form nucleus which helps connect the Sara Bellum to the Tel and south one. Zero Bhalla is at the back of the brain deals with muscle movements balance. That kind of stuff. Do you know what that is yet? Yeah I know stuff kwong. Okay fine well do you know at the Telegraph. Alana's I yes. Go read do go right ahead. What is it okay. All right Gimme second. There's a lot of stuff in the brain Yeah it's this really intricate set up structures in the brain that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions. Yeah you clearly. Google that With I can't you're breaking up on going through a tunnel. Ma'am you're in a closet? You can't be gone through the same time all right anyway. Moving on the key here. Is that the bridge connecting these two parts. The medial spire form. Nucleus and birds is a mark of strong cognitive abilities and parrots have an unusually large medial spiral form nucleus for their size so the birds have small low noggins but really advanced Lil Naga. Oh yeah good point. That was my follow up question to this research. Carino was talking about two and so despite the fact that birds have like very very small brains Usually like the size of a walnut forest and even larger Brain Bird. Those brains are the most effective at packing neurons compared to any other brains including Mammalian brains. So you hear that birds punching above their weight when it comes to neural density honestly. I'm not surprised. So some birds have about as many neurons in therefore brain than like a primate so because their brain has some complex folding and the the neurons are closer physically closer together inside of the brain. They can have a large number of neurons accomplishing a lot of the same goals that animals with bigger brains and their but fewer neurons have. Okay Kwong the verdict on bird brained. Oh you know what it is Mattie. Do I even need to say it slander? Getting so good that you taught me how could Lord okay? Okay my turn so I looked into the phrase eat like a bird. Oh yeah very curious about this. People will say that it suggests. Someone doesn't eat very much that they're like peckish right. Which you know the official. Npr shortly position is that just. Don't comment on how much or how little somebody eats you know what I mean. Generally speaking yeah mine. You're on food business. Yes so okay. Let us start our examination of eat like a bird by considering the simple hummingbird. Do you know how they eat. Deer Kwan no no I do not dear Mattie but I fear but I fear you are about to tell me in excruciating detail first of all let me start off by saying you're welcome second introduce you to Alejandro Trico. He is an assistant professor of biology at the University of Washington on curator of birds at the Burke Museum of the University of Washington. But before that when he was a graduate student at the University of Connecticut he was part of one of my favorite bird. Eating related experiments ever so humming. Birds have really long tongues that dart out to get nectar and for a long time scientists. Thought that the tongue worked like a tiny tiny little tube so small the nectar. Kinda just shoots up the tongue on its own by what's called capillary action Ali in his boss Margaret Ruby. The did not by this capillary action. Theory Oh We were discussing. How the equations and the predictions from those capillaries don really made sense in terms of what the actual the hummingbirds in nature look like. But here's the thing on one does not simply eyeball a hummingbird tongue. These little are as thin as a fishing line and they dart in and out of the beak at like fifteen to twenty times per second. Whoa so to solve these problems. What we devise were tiny transparent flowers with flat sides so we could film through it and see the action happening on. We needed high speed video because it's happening so fast so we were filming between a thousand and two thousand frames per second just to see how long would interact with the nectar. So cool all right so. They made little glass flowers so they could film through them. That's that's pretty genius. Yeah and what they saw kwong. It changed the Hummingbird game. What we saw is that the Humbert on when he touches the nectar. I the portion that is inside the liquid on falls on it has little fringes on those tubes on those open up. Oh so it definitely isn't just a static little tube no not even close as the tongue is shooting out of the beak. It's compressed by the beak but when the tip of tongue hits the nectar it splits into two like a little snake tongue and those tips. They have these little flaps that hoping an those flaps fill up with nectar. That is so amazing.

Corinna Newsom Carina Newsom Kwong Mattie Georgia Southern University Corinne Sara Bellum Google DAN Corbett Alana Humbert Kwon Carino Ravens University Of Washington NPR Graduate Student Deer Kwan Assistant Professor Of Biology
On Earth Day, What You Can Do For The Environment

Short Wave

02:20 min | 3 months ago

On Earth Day, What You Can Do For The Environment

"Madison shortwave reporter. Emily Kwong Hey Mattie. Hey you so kwong. It's a listener question episode that we have perfectly timed because tomorrow is Earth Day the fiftieth anniversary of Earth Day. And yes and you know. What Earth is shortwave replenish? We love you. We love your tectonic plates. Your Ocean absolutely. You're many fungi and insects. Kwong favourite insect on three one To Walking Lady Bug but as we all know our home planet is getting warmer We've had evidence of climate change since nineteen sixty when Charles Keeling measured carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere and detected in annual rise and climate. Change has of course progressed significantly in the past few decades bringing costly changes to our oceans and forests soil and air so this leads us to our listener question right right like this one from Janet Grou- in Heidelberg Germany one topic which is very much in the news. These days and very much on my mind is climate change. It's something which is causing many people a great deal of anxiety because they feel helpless in the face of it. So what can individuals do to slow global warming? Thanks for the question Janet and you know we like to over promise over deliver on short yes so I took this question straight to the top to folks who have thought about this more than most. Hello my name's Tom. Rivett CARNAC and I'm Christina Vienna's Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett. Carnac were lead negotiators for the United Nations during the two thousand fifteen Paris agreement. Dang Quang those. They're like big time climate folks. It's true only the best for our listeners. And this landmark document. The Paris agreements really crafted the language. That we now use to talk about. Climate Change Action. Here's Cristiana. We knew that this would be a once in a lifetime. Opportunity to how one hundred ninety five countries come around and agree. This is our one chance and we have to set out the in dire thing the way that science

Rivett Carnac Emily Kwong Janet Grou Tom Rivett Charles Keeling Reporter Paris Madison Cristiana Mattie Christiana Figueres Heidelberg Germany United Nations Christina Vienna
Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

Short Wave

06:46 min | 3 months ago

Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

"All Right Emily Kuang Wave Reporter. Animal Lover Unabashed Animal Lover. It's true you and I both know that bats are amazing. That is not up for dispute on shortwave. They're important for pollinating flowers dispersing seeds. They catch bugs the same ones that bite us and eat up some of our crops but bats also harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases. That's right the rabies virus the Marburg virus the Hendra and Nipah viruses. The Abullah virus outbreak in West Africa was traced to a bat colony. All these viruses find what's called a natural reservoir in bats meaning the viruses live in that host without harming it. Do We know why that is? It's a very interesting question so I used to say a million dollar question now as as a billion dollar question Lynn Fouling says it might have to do with the fact that bats are the only mammal that's adapted for flight because during flight. The body temperature goes to up to all the way to forty two degrees. That's super high. Forty two degrees Celsius is almost one hundred eight degrees Fahrenheit and their heartbeat goes up to a thousand beats per minute. They're burning a ton of energy flying several hours a day and this creates toxic free radicals that damage their cells but Linda's research has shown that bats have also evolved this ability to repair and minimize that cellular damage. Kind of counterstrike and those same defensive. Abilities may help them not only tolerate flight but also to fight infectious diseases in a way that the human body simply cannot so the essentially. Have this like super effective? Immune response rights so while our immune systems can get overwhelmed from fending off these viruses. He thinks bats don't our hypothesis is best has evolved. A different method is to get the balanced right for defense and Torrance and that famous virus to live peacefully with Bass and they're able to safely house these viruses in their bodies and not get sick from them. Got It so. Let's talk about why scientists think this particular corona virus could have come from bats. Well they got a big clue from the start so in early. January Chinese scientists were able to quickly sequence the viruses entire genome and then they published it online from that scientists begin to study the virus in-depth and around this time researchers at Wuhan Institute of Raji in China compared its genome to a library of known viruses right and found a ninety six percent match with Corona virus samples taken from Horseshoe Bats in Union. Yes the same kinds of bats that were natural reservoirs for the original SARS virus that broke out in two thousand three and this led them to believe that this new corona virus likely came from bats to right and from a genetic standpoint ninety six percent match. Sounds like a lot but that four percent can make a big difference exactly that that four percent difference is actually a pretty wide distance in evolutionary timing. It could be even decades. This is Robert Gary Ablett at Tulane University. And while that one paper says there's a ninety six percent match with bats that extra four percent to him suggests some other viral material may have gotten mixed in from another animal and that other animal could have even transmitted the virus to humans right. This is called an intermediate host or an in-between host correct. But when it comes to this corona virus scientists aren't sure if there was an intermediate host between bats and humans and if so they're not sure what the intermediate host could be. There are theories Robert and fellow. Researchers have hypothesized. This virus could be a blend of viruses from two different animals bats and something else. An early scientific studies suggest it could be this animal called Penguin this scaly ant eater vulnerable to illegal wildlife trade and virus penguins or some other animal. That has a similar receptor binding domain. So to buyers getting together recombining to make up a new Sars KOGI team but the important point to all this is that virus hunters haven't come to a definitive conclusion about the chain of transmission from animals to humans about the involvement of penguins and baths or any other host animal. Not on the level of proof. They need right like the genetic level. Yes we don't know definitively which animal or animals this came from. It will take time to figure out but we do know. This came from animals a bunch of scientists in mid-february publish this big letter in the Journal. Lancet saying evidence overwhelmingly points to wildlife as the origin for this corona virus. And Roberts stands by that too. I can tell you that this is a product of nature. It's not a virus. That has arisen in a laboratory by any scientists purposely manipulating something that that was then released onto a cup like that. That just didn't happen. Because if you look at the actual genome which Robert has done the evidence. Isn't there okay so you said earlier. While speaking to the researcher in Singapore that it took a decade to find out the actual origin of the virus that causes SARS the original SARS. Do we know how long it could take to figure out where this new corona virus came from. Oh Mattie I wished I had an answer for you. We don't it all depends on funding and resources. Doesn't it all gone and time like I keep saying? Throughout this whole episode investment in virus hunting right expanding the zoonotic studies to figure out the transmission chain between animals and people. Because if we know that we are armed with information that can help us. Prevent future outbreaks. Peter doc he's the President of the US based nonprofit ego health alliance and he says that even if bats are the likely origin they are not to blame. It's no but's it's uh it's it's and what we do to Bass that drives this. Pandemic risks like wildlife trade and Food and agriculture practices or are close proximity to animals in densely populated areas one of the poster things about funding that. We're actually behind. These pandemics is that gives those the power to do something about it. We don't need to get rid about. We don't need to do anything with that. We've just got to leave them alone. Let me get on doing the good. They do flipping around at night

Robert Gary Ablett Researcher Marburg Emily Kuang Sars Hendra Reporter Lynn Fouling Wuhan Institute Of Raji West Africa Linda Torrance Lancet Kogi Union Mattie Tulane University Singapore United States
How Does That Feel?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:24 min | 4 months ago

How Does That Feel?

"Privilege and the honor to meet for the First Time. A remarkable little boy that. I wanted to make for the moment. I heard his story his name is Mattie Stepanov and I hear he's an extraordinary person. He's only eleven years old. I've spoken to him on the phone several times but today's the first time we're actually meeting in person. Here's Maddie story. I want people to know Ma knife philosophy to remember to play after every storm. Maddie's Depan it is an extraordinary eleven-year-old living through difficult storm. He was born with a rare form of muscular dystrophy. He feel it in your muscles. You feel muscle pain DMC around. I need my wheelchair I I need. Oxygen Maddie's mom ginny also. Has the disease did not discover until after she had had four children. Katie died when she was two years old stevie died at six months of age and Jamie died when he was four years old. Manny has miraculously just turned eleven which nobody would have ever guessed possible from a very young age. Mattie was special even while tethered to oxygen he earned a junior black belt in martial arts and now he home schools at the eleventh grade level but his real gift is the poetry he writes. I have a song deep in my heart. I right to express my thoughts my feelings. I want people to think a few poems are fine but most of them are so that we can understand how we need to listen to our hearts songs and spread page with each other. You hear the word heart songs a lot in his poetry heart song is your inner beauty. It's the song in your heart. That wants you to help. Make yourself better per sin and to help other people do the same. Mattie is a very unique spirit A lot of people would say he's an old soul spiritual and he's hopeful for something bigger than himself. When I grow up I not only want to be a pacemaker. I'll be other have stuff. Dan Malls at treat like my children for a boy so full of life. He came very close to dying this year. Mattie spent about five months and the Intensive Care Unit at Children's National Medical Center in DC came so custody debt. I saw in comedy great me into Heaven with his health failing and time running out mattis. Three lifelong wishes had not yet been granted. I had three wishes and they are one town. My Book published. I can spread the message. Be World to talk peace with my hero. Jimmy Carter and meet with a win. Free BODY GOT. I wish to books of poetry published in the last four months and with a phone call. Second wish came true. They picked up the phone and handed it to me. Was Jimmy Carter. It was so I couldn't believe it. Mattie was very sick clinging to life but he wanted to return to the comforts of home the day before he came home from the hospital. Mattie night parade very very hard and Matty's prayer was that he was coming home to live and all the bleeding it stopped. I call it a miracle. I really think I'm here for fish because in my life I've had so many close calls to dying even if it takes me one year or one thousand I have to. I was meant to do. Shares the Dow. So here you made in your thank you your everything I imagine you. This is your first time flying coming to yes. It was. What was that like for you? It was amazing from me. I mean even especially when we had to go through this huge cloud we would I saw cloud coming and I figured they would. Just go around it all of a sudden. I'm surrounded by white stuff. Fell like algebra fluffy more. Mellow fluffy marshmallow. That's that's my mom. However she was a little anxious right a little. Play it simply. That's putting it simply. How are you how is your health? How are you doing? I'm doing a lot better healthwise I'm doing very well. Excitement wise a lot of grownups. They tried to get you to let go of the three wishes but you held onto them. Yes because because they were things that will last forever going to Disney. Well and in a week having shopping spree day but being able to talk to Jimmy Carter being able to have my books. Publish- being able to talk to you here today nests forever. He's four so you've been writing poetry since you were. How old about three. Yeah I would go to my mom on the WHO would be typing on the computer. Either School were playing solitaire and I would say mommy. Can you write something down for me please? And to assure I would tell these poems and she would type them down for me and then when I learned to write and all so known that I was making poetry. What you were doing yes I would. I was shows expressing my feelings. I just saying what I felt like. I needed to stay home. I learned to write so I wrote end dictated and now most of the time. I just go to my computer type book some poems and so you started calling it heart songs because what was the song in my heart it was the CICCIO. My heart hurt. Song doesn't have to be a song in your heart even talking about Lavin peers. It can just be your suit can be your F- feeling some people might even call it a conscience even though that's not really what it is. It's your message what you feel you need to do. And everybody has it. Everyone no matter what it is it. It's still sings the same beautiful to peace and love but people now are fighting over. How are harp songs are different? But I don't need to be the same. A heart tongue zone need to be the same because everybody has different woods. Yes and that's the beauty. We are almost sake of gifts and each was has our inner beauty. No matter how we look I mean you're very beautiful for no but it's our interview. I read your first book the Now the Second Book Journey through hearts come out and I have my own favourite poems. I ask you. Where did these were these come from? Just they are my feelings life experience. I mean like I said when I was little outside Mommy. Can you type this up for me? Your your life experiences Mr Levin Euro dealings. Don't you think you're wise beyond your years? Don't you yes thank you. Yes

Mattie Stepanov Jimmy Carter First Time Maddie MA DOW Ginny Manny Dan Malls Mr Levin Katie Disney Stevie Jamie National Medical Center Intensive Care Unit Matty Lavin
No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

Short Wave

09:07 min | 4 months ago

No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Madison Here with NPR science reporter paying long. Hey Ping Hey Mattie. How's life working at home for you? Hang Well Gladiolas Mattie good to hear your voice It's it's all right. You know I am Trying to work right next reconstructions and right now you might be able to hear a little bit of that noise in the background. I I do have a little pillow. Fort here to help so from my closet to your pillow for today. We're GONNA talk about an idea that's been in the air a lot lately that the krona virus is basically no worse than the flu. Thirty six thousand deaths a year. People Die Thirty six from the flu. But we've never closed down the country for the flu so you say to yourself. What is this all about? That was the president on Tuesday of this week. And so the estimated death toll last flu season in the US was about thirty. Four thousand people in experts say it can range from around twelve thousand deaths year to sixty one thousand deaths a year. By contrast the Krona virus has killed one thousand one hundred and twenty four people in the US. That's as of Thursday when we're taping this according to a Johns Hopkins Count but there is a problem with comparing the two diseases in this way especially at this point in time. Yeah it's tree. Mattie and one of the reasons is that our healthcare system is set up to deal with the flu every year. But what? It's not set up for is to deal with the current events on top of the flu. And so yeah like on purely rod numbers. More people have died from flu this year. But there is a lot of science and data that we've learned in the past three months and it suggests that the corona virus is not only a more dangerous disease. It's one that could hurt more people if it spreads unchecked. So this episode. We'll talk about that. Science and data how the Krona virus differs from the flu and why it could emphasis on could be even more dangerous to public health. Okay paying like we all do with these current virus updates. We need to be clear that the information in this episode is based on what we know right now as of March twenty six and most of what we're talking about today are estimates based on information. That's still evolving. Yeah so let's start with some symptoms flu versus Corona Virus. So this is one of the things that makes containing this illness so tricky. The most frequent symptoms of corona virus are fever dry cough fatigue and shortness of breath and those show up in both corona virus. The flu and people can also get diarrhea. But that's pretty rare and it's also something that can happened with flu and that's all information from the World Health Organization and of course it's very possible that there are symptoms out there that we haven't identified yet so for example. There's been some talk about people with Corona virus. Losing their sense of taste But that hasn't really been proven. Yeah right and of course. A huge concern is people who can pass this fires onto someone else without even knowing that they have it. Yes so let's talk about that. Let's talk about transmission so basically how flu and Crow virus passed from one person to another so flu and current a virus or both ought to be spread mainly through close contact with other people who have it so you can kiss them or they can coffin you and the droplets that come out of their noses and mouths can get into your nose and your mouth and make you sick. So that's why CD's recommending keeping a physical distance of about six feet away from other people right now right right but there is one big difference. And that's the flu can be transmitted through what we call. Airborne transmission people can offer sneeze in a room and then other people can come in and breathe in like super tiny particles of virus and get sick and obviously that type of transmission can be really hard to protect against exactly and while public health officials have said they don't think that's what's going on with occur virus community so far they are still trying to figure that out. Okay Ping so. Let's talk about how many people one person can in fact figuring that out is part of figuring how contagious diseases. There's some numbers that have been reported on the lot even seeing them in the news. But we're going to put some of that. Sweet sweet shortwave nuance in there for you. Yes shortwave where caveats are very welcome. Always okay so matty. If you look at the data from China it looks like each person. Infected WITH CORONA VIRUS. Seems to give it to two or two and a half other people on average and that is higher than the flu so person with flu only spreads it to about one point. Three other people and again that's on average. Yeah and we have to be really careful with those numbers how many people one person will infect is this average based on an equation and for Corona virus a lot of the factors that go into that equation. Like how long? Somebody's contagious. How much virus it takes to get. People sick are still unknown so that to two point five number is a rough number and it is extremely likely that that number will change for better or for worse right yeah and this one was calculated again looking at populations in China not the US and things like weather. People ride crowded subway to get around or whether cheek kissing is a common greeting. You know things like how people behave. And how many people come in contact with that can change that number. And that's why social distancing is so key right now all that being said today Dr Anthony Voucher one of the top public health officials in this country told Steph curry and NBA Point Guard. Because that's the world we live in now is much more transmissible than the flu in part of that has to do with one of the most important and honestly scary things about the corona virus that people can be contagious before they have symptoms so before they themselves. No they're sick. This also happens with the flu. But it's only for about a day right. That's what we were just mentioning that. He and with Corona virus seems like people can walk around for longer not knowing that they're sick and potentially getting other people sick so we still don't know a lot about this yet but one study looking at a bunch of provinces in China found that about thirteen percent of their cases were likely caused by people spreading the corona virus to others before they started coughing or having a fever or getting achey. Yeah and what's really wild about it and I've only seen this in this one study. Is that some of the people who got infected had symptoms before the person that infected them so it would be like if I was contagious. And I didn't know and I came to work and infected you and you had symptoms before I ever done and if you think about it. Mattie from a public health perspective so hard to deal with it's part of the reason why some people are really advocating for testing a lot of people who may have been exposed to corona. And not just the symptomatic ones. So let's talk about when you do get sick enough to go to the hospital. There's some evidence based on data from China that patients wind up in the hospital with Corona Virus. Than when it comes to the flu right it looks like about twenty percent of patients with cove in nineteen. Get seriously ill enough to be sent to the hospital. And that's about ten times the rate for flu. Here's Parker Hudson and epidemiologist at University of Texas at Austin Del Medical School where it's particularly concerning are the number of people who are progressing to need hospital level care and then eventually critical care and who are dying especially the extremes of age and we also have some data from China from Wuhan about how long people with the krona virus need to stay in the hospital. Once they wind up there. Yeah so based on information from Han in January the average hospital stay is eleven days for Corona Virus. And that's compared with five or six days for an average flu case. And when you have a patient using a hospital bed for that length of time. That's the bad that can't go to a flu. Patient or someone with a heart condition or someone in a car accident suggest because this is a new disease for our healthcare system. It doesn't mean that all the other reasons people end up in the hospital usually just magically go. Yeah and not only that based on the stories we've been hearing from Er Doctors Hospital. Nurses caring for Corona virus. Species takes a lot of work yet. It's true so an expert at the world. Health Organization says that taking care of intensive really unwell corona virus patients. It can take two to three medical staff at one time all in protective gear for hours and hours and that is super social work. And don't even get me started on the amount of disposable gloves masks and gowns that takes because we've all been hearing about that shortage and it's a whole separate

FLU China Mattie United States NPR Corona Er Doctors Hospital Madison Dry Cough World Health Organization Reporter Diarrhea President Trump Health Organization NBA HAN
Doctors Have Injected DNA-Editing CRISPR Into a Live Person's Eye

Short Wave

01:13 min | 4 months ago

Doctors Have Injected DNA-Editing CRISPR Into a Live Person's Eye

"Tell me why Chris so awesome. It's really cool because crisper. Is this really powerful? Gene editing technique that allows doctors to make really precise changes in our genetic code. And so it's got incredible potential for treating lots of diseases right. It is actually not an exaggeration to say that crisper could revolutionize medicine in future in today. You have brought us another crisper milestone yet. Mattie get this for the first time scientists have used crisper to try to editor Jean while the DNA is still inside the body which is wild because until now offer crisper treatments for things like cancer or sickle cell disease. Doctors had to remove the cells. They wanted to change. The patient's bodies edit them in the lab and then put them back in right for this time. Hopefully the editing will take place inside the I of a patient who is almost completely blind due to a genetic disease. Called Lieber Congenital Amoroso's the experimental treatment was done by doctors at the Casey Institute in Portland. Oregon. The hope is that the crisper will edit or fix the mutated gene that causes the disease and potentially restore the patients

Mattie Casey Institute Chris Lieber Amoroso Portland Oregon Cancer Jean Editor
Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

Short Wave

08:50 min | 5 months ago

Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

"TALKING FRESHWATER MUSSELS. And the fact that they're dying off. Where should we start so I actually want to take you to South West Virginia right near the border with Tennessee? Mattie put on your waiters done okay because we're about to get into the waters of the clinch river so the clinch river flows at the feet of the southern Appalachian Mountains. The water is cold very clear and that is good news because freshwater mussels live on the bottom of rivers. They're kind of like sorta like the less edible version of their saltwater cousin they don't get the same love but they bury themselves in the sediment and among the rocks on the bottoms of rivers and I went out to find some of these muscles with Jordan Richard a biologist with the US fish and wildlife service who is obsessed with freshwater mussels and it did not take him long waiting out into the water for him to find what he did not want to see how long this is a matter of like. How long does it take until we see something that died very recently won? Shell was just laying there even say it's not buried. That's its footing Jordan. There he'd reached into the water and pulled out that muscle a pheasant shell. That's the species but should be buried in food. Not that's dead and this show is about the size of his palm. It's this beautiful. Golden Brown color But the Muslim side is usually a smooth. Pink is turning Greyish Brown and frayed around Sedgwick's Basically it's rotting in place. I saw that one took a few steps out and by the time I stopped right there at like five expecting not a good way which I'm pretty I'm pretty used to like coming out of your thing and I'm GonNa see just getting completely like bombed with the muscles but it's obsolete lousy you out there finding like dead muscle after dead muscle. Yeah I mean they were everywhere and you heard Jordan say but this is really not what he was expecting. It was not the time of year that they typically see a bunch of mortality You know he was just being nice and taking a reporter but biologists have been going at different sections of the clinch river since it was first noted in two thousand sixteen and in just one section of that river the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that the number of pheasant shell muscles that have died is in the hundreds of thousands knee. It sounded like I don't know just hearing his voice on the tape that he was super upset. Yeah I mean he was on the verge of tears when we were talking and then he tried to apologize about later. Which I didn't think was obviously not necessary but it was upset because he's so frustrated by what's happening they don't know what's causing this and there's this kind of feeling of helplessness. This guy is so passionate about freshwater ego systems. It's his entire life. I mean he actually said that he had three fish tanks house one by his bed one by the foot of his bed and one in the living room so yeah very understanding wife. Okay but let's talk a little bit more about why people are trying so hard to save these muscles. They play a really important role in freshwater ecosystems. Right totally so. They don't often get the attention they deserve. Here's someone who knows that all too well. People don't tend to get quite as excited about things that lack burns. Unfortunately that was emily blevins. She's a conservation biologist with Versi Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Which you know besides having a really cool name is a nonprofit that focuses on some of the world's more under loved Chrisny. I'LL SAY AT ONCE. I'LL SAY THOUSAND TIMES INVERTEBRATES. Don't get enough credit. I know I mean I think as vertebrates are a little biased but these muscles do deserve a ton of credit. There are filter feeders so that means that they filter water through them. While they're down they're just chilling on River Bottoms. There's research that shown they can remove pharmaceuticals from the water and pesticides and flame retardants and they remove E. coli from the water. They're like our little water filters exactly so a few of the biologists. I talked to really did say you can think of them. As nature's equivalent to a BRITTA filter cleaning up the water that we drink implant but they all sorts of cool stuff like reducing the size and impacts of dead zones. Those big nasty you know fishing life killing phenomena to keep occurring in the Gulf. They do that by filtering out. Sediment and agricultural runoff They sequester carbon phosphorus heavy metals in their shells. They reduce fecal bacteria from water. And you know like what's not to love about Madonna got it thank God. A single freshwater. Mussel can filter more than fifteen gallons of water in a day and besides that they provide habitat to tons of other species. One biologist described them as like the fresh water equivalent to a coral reef. So these muscles are clearly out here doing a lot of work. We don't have any idea what's causing these die-offs so no I mean we have some hunches but you know Jordan. The biologists set it could be a million different things that is causing this There's a bunch of folks working on this from around. The country. University was constant is doing a lot of work and they've recently identified a virus and bacteria that they say are statistically associated with the dial keywords being you know statistically associated so not enough to say hey dingaling we found it but they're highly suspicious of a pathogenic cause and that is where their research is focused right now. What about the stuff like we? Humans are doing on climate. Change for example. Does that seem to be a contributor at all? Well I mean there's no doubt. The climate change is stressing river ecosystems as it is just about every system everywhere but it does not seem to be the driver of what's going on here as far as scientists can tell But I think it's important to note that there are other human components it sort of brought us to this place as I mentioned freshwater mussels or already on the brink and that is because of human activity fun fact before the Aplastic Freshwater Mussels were actually collected in cultivated by the millions to satisfy a commercial demand for buttons. Their shells were pearly white inside right. Thanks for Buttons Fresh Harman's But even more damaging was just you know the general destruction that was brought along by Human Development. So there was pollution from coal mining in the southern Appalachia Rivers dammed for power streams diverted for agriculture wetlands pay for housing and all of those things have brought freshwater mussels to the point where a mysterious die off can happen and it becomes so crucial to find out why fast because there's so little wiggle room left in the system all right eight. Your bumming me out. What's the plan? So there is a contingency plan all right and there always needs to be a contingency plan But like most contingency plans. It's one that nobody wants to use in this case it's a hatchery or nursery more or less for freshwater mussels one of our living screams So pheasant shells in here. That's the one that really dial so basically this place is like a last line of defense for some of these species they're going to breed them in captivity so at least they're not totally gone from planet earth. Exactly so tim and the other. Biologists are reproducing muscles. Here keeping them safe until they're mature enough to be brought back into the wild they're basically stock and when the recent die off started on the clinch river. They brought a bunch of muscles here from part of the river that wasn't affected And those muscles could not just be used as stock but they could also use a baseline a healthy sample to us as they search for the die-offs 'cause Worst case scenario they have to take some of those muscles and try to repopulate parts of the Clinch River. Where the muscles of Dino are going to stand idly by watching the way we're GonNa do the best we can to help them produce progeny. So of the species isn't going for Jordan Richard. The biologist remitted beginning also is helping with this effort and he says it you know he knows. That muscles aren't as photogenic as a rhinoceros or polar bears but freshwater mussels are crucial to the health of other species. So if they go. We're going to have a lot of problems is not sexy to care about the foundation of Your House and you could renovate your kitchen but he says if that foundation is crumbling and you ignore it by the time you notice a problem because you fall through the floor. It's too late to do anything about it. And then everything else including your fancy. New Kitchen is going to fall through to

Clinch River Jordan Richard Us Fish And Wildlife Service Tennessee River Bottoms Shell South West Virginia Appalachian Mountains Mattie Versi Society For Invertebrate Gulf Britta Reporter Emily Blevins Appalachia Rivers Dino Human Development
Tips To Prepare For The Coronavirus

Short Wave

04:00 min | 5 months ago

Tips To Prepare For The Coronavirus

"Are we got some really great questions from listeners? And I want to start with this one from Mattie Park in Ventura California okay. I'm just wondering how many people who get the corona virus actually die. How dangerous is it? Really? How much more likely is it to lead to death than the regular flu? You know. I'm afraid we might be whipping up some hysteria about this disease. Well I would say that. The good news is that so far. Most of the illnesses have been mild in China. Eighty percent of the cases have been classified as mild. This needs symptoms such as you know a dry cough may be a low grade fever something similar to a cold or perhaps the flu now. The death rate is estimated to be about two percent and this is really important to point out. It means that ninety eight percent of people who get this. Don't die from the virus right. Mattie asks how this compares to flu well the answer is that flu has a mortality rate of about point one percent or about one thousand. But here's something to keep in mind. Also that I think is really important. This two percent estimate is really provisional. It could be off. I mean early in an outbreak the sickest people are identified and there may be people with more mild cases have not been accounted for so that could throw off the calculation and it's possible that the death rate is even lower mean here in the. Us There are only a small number of cases but so far there have been no deaths and the people who do die in China tend to be older. The average age is in the seventies and the thought really is the people who are already in poor health due to medical conditions or habits such as smoking. The day are most vulnerable are their symptoms. That people should be on the lookout for and how are people who are sick actually treated sure well? Early symptoms include fever dry cough. Some people experience fatigue headaches less frequently. There's diarrhea the treatment is typically what healthcare professionals would call supportive care and that really just means giving medicines to keep a fever down making sure the person stays hydrated so plenty of fluids now shortness of breath can develop and that would be assigned. You need medical attention in a clinical setting. They can use a breathing machine to assist with breathing now. There was something that a bunch of people wrote in saying that they were confused about and that was something that Nancy Messina of the. Cdc said yesterday Yes we are asking the American public to work with us to prepare it in the expectation that this could be bad okay. One listener heard that in wrote to us. What does that mean exactly? It's completely unhelpful. Bottom line is what do we do in a practical sense? I completely get that. I think big picture here. There is no cause for panic right now but now is the time to prepare as we just heard the. Cdc says it's a longer question if if it's now when now we won't see outbreaks everywhere all at once in this country it could be cluster in a small town or maybe in the middle of an urban area. We don't know but think about this the way you think about preparing for snow storm or a Hurricane. It may not come. It may not happen but if it does you'd be smart to prepare. You may want to have some extra food in your cupboards have basic medications such as Aspirin Ibuprofen on hand. I spoke to Rebecca cats. She's director of the Center for Global Health Science and security at Georgetown University in this situation. If you have widespread virus in your community you may not want to go to a public drugstore. You may want to figure out ways you can distance yourself from other people. You also may want to think about what you do if your kids schools are closed. What is your daycare backup? Plan talk to your employers about working from home. Think through the details of that. It's really just about good

FLU Dry Cough Director CDC China Mattie Park Fever Ventura California Mattie Hurricane Nancy Messina Rebecca Aspirin Georgetown University Ibuprofen Center For Global Health Scien
Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

Short Wave

10:37 min | 5 months ago

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

"So it's May of Twenty fifteen. And a researcher named Chichaou. Shing is at his home near Philadelphia. She is a physicist at Temple University who studies SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SPECIAL MATERIALS. That can sometimes lead electricity flow through them with no resistance. There's a ton of applications for it and all of a sudden there's a knock door very very loud and urgency rental open the learns Esau arm agents outside and pointing their guns to my wife and daughters into an Tokyo in Hong Cups and I had absolutely no idea why okay. So why was he arrested? Like what was going on what the. Us government accused him of sharing a special piece of equipment with researchers in China. But here's the thing he did. Do it prosecutors. Were confused because well it turns out. Superconducting technology is just really complicated. But what about the idea that he was helping? The Chinese developed superconducting technology. Just in general. Well Dr she says sure. He works with scientists in China all the time and sometimes he spent summers over there doing research with them. But as you know Mattie one of the basic pillars of fundamental research is openness nothing. He shared was classified or restricted in any way. Qadam ICK espionage. It's a contradiction me. Everything we are doing is fundamental research. There's nothing to steal can. Just sit there and read your paper and sure enough about six months after this whole thing starts. The charges are dropped against doctor she. The government admits he's done absolutely nothing. Wrong I mean honestly it sounds like he just had collaborators which is like a major thing in science unless there was some weird money. Thing being exchanged or going on this is what scientists do. Yeah I mean. They're technologies that are restricted for example stuff to do with rockets that could be used in missile development say. The government has very strict rules about sharing that kind of information but generally scientists open collaborations. Happened all over the world. The thing is China is getting a lot more scrutiny. These days so fast forward to twenty eighteen attorney general. Jeff sessions is really concerned about the theft of scientific knowledge and intellectual property by the Chinese so the Justice Department launches what it calls its China initiative the goal is to crack down on the transfer of US knowledge to China and in the academic community the focus. False really quickly. I'm one program in particular. It's called the thousand Talents Plan. So our understanding is that originally. The purpose of the thousand talents program was to reverse the brain drain. That's Michael Lower. He's deputy director of extramural research at the National Institutes of health. And he's the main guy at NIH dealing with thousand talents. When he says brain-drain an example of that is like scientists. Go abroad to study and then end up staying in whatever country instead of coming back home. Exactly the Chinese government wanted to bring back outstanding scientists to China so as to develop their science and technology and the way the Chinese government does is by offering money so researchers set up labs in China and they spend at least part of their year over there Doing their work in exchange for grants and expenses paid and the program grew pretty quickly to include non-chinese scientists as well right and I think there are these kinds of programs in other countries to yeah. It's not uncommon. Canada had something called the one hundred fifty research chairs. I mean. That's kind of the less ambitious Canadian equivalent. Chevy Sega but with lower says is the thousand talents program has gone too far in the real problem from his perspective is that in a number of cases researchers are not telling their home universities or the. Us government for that matter about Chinese funding and not disclosing that Chinese funding. That's what's actually against the law. Exactly the types of behaviors that we are seeing are not subtle or minor violations What we're seeing is really quite egregious and that brings us back to Charles Lieber. The Harvard Chemist We were talking about earlier. Who is arrested back in January the complaint alleges Doctor Lieber signed a contract with the Chinese University in Wuhan and was paid to fifty thousand dollars per month plus up to one hundred and fifty eight thousand dollars in living expenses and awarded more than one point five million dollars to set up a research lab at the Chinese school and work there on researching nanotechnology that is a lot of money. Jeff that is like ten post docs full of money. At least I love that. Your brain calculates prices in post is seen but the bottom line is. It is a lot of money in the criminal complaint. Alleges not only did he get all this money. Lieber lied about being part of the program to Harvard to the NIH in the Department of Defense. Which together we're also giving him many millions of dollars in research money. I should say Lieber attorneys declined to comment about this case. They didn't WanNa speak to me but Mike clower from the NIH says there's a larger pattern here other scientists have done the same and it's a real problem. Collaboration does not involve offshore offshore bank accounts. collaboration does involve undisclosed cash payments. It does not involve undisclosed employment agreements or undisclosed contracts. It does not involve double dipping. Where a person is being paid salary to work in China and to work in the United States at the same time several scientists and other institutions have been fired over this he says the NIH is currently investigating around one hundred eighty other scientists. He thinks this is a systemic problem. So if these cases involve lying failing to disclose information which we do know is against the law. Why are scientists doing this? It's a really interesting question and I don't have a great answer as I said. Liebers attorneys have declined to speak to me In other cases other scientists who've been fired don't talk to the press generally now lower says. In some cases the thousand talents contracts scientists sign actually come with a nondisclosure agreements. So they're actually told by the Chinese not to say anything which is illegal but there's also more going on I mean it may be then some cases they fear if they disclose money from the Chinese. They are going to get more scrutiny on their work and then something else to consider is the possibility of just plain old greed the criminal complaint against Charles Lieber alleges and I should say alleged here that he was receiving cash payments from the Chinese. That some of this money was just coming straight up cash. Okay so the sounds problematic for sure but is it espionage. Maybe I have like an outdated old timey spy version of espionage but it doesn't necessarily feel like that to me no I mean. It isn't really espionage. I think it's really important to say that. Lieber isn't technically being accused of espionage. The government this is about the money and I think it's very telling the US government's going after the money rather than transfers of technology like you remember that superconducting case earlier. It's really hard to tell of. Someone's doing something illegal when they're collaborating scientifically and that's also got some people wondering whether these sorts of cases really deserve criminal treatment so frank who is somebody I spoke to. He's a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law and he tracks these espionage cases and says arresting people for issues around what they disclosed for their grants. It just feels heavy handed to him zone. The past if there was a problem somebody would talk to you. Maybe you would face disciplined from your employer but you wouldn't face being fired and going to prison and having your name dragged through the mud as a spy in fact the same day. Lieber was arrested the Justice Department announced the arrest of two Chinese nationals. They say had lied on visa. Applications and illegally transferred biological samples. These aren't exactly the same kind of case. But you know it's the same general flavor. It sounds like a lot of people who have been accused are Chinese nationals or ethnically Chinese. Does we think that racism plays a role in this well would midst. There are some real espionage cases that involve Chinese people and they have been convicted. But they're sort of larger tone around all this. It sounds very familiar to him. No matter how assimilated. You are no matter how much you think yourself. I'm an American just like any other American winner of Chinese background. There's that risk always that people will look at you and suspect you're actually communist agent now. I should say. Us officials categorically denied. This has anything to do with race. I interviewed Andrew Leveling the federal prosecutor. Who ARRESTED LIEBER? And he said this if it was the French governments that was attempting to steal. Us technology in a massive decadelong campaign. We'd look for French people. But it's not it's the Chinese government and he actually points to the Lieber case as an example of how they're willing to prosecute anyone they think is broken the law by lying but even if the government doesn't think it's racial profiling it's definitely having an effect on the Chinese research. Community your remember. Chichaou shing the researcher who was falsely accused that we talked about well. I asked him. Does he still work with colleagues? In China. The short answer is yes but the more Ah Longer answer. Is that to my research. Now is much much smaller than used to be. And that's because he doesn't want to apply for federal grants anymore. He's afraid he'll do something wrong so every time I do all this conflict of interest floor alright to all these Grant applications and check boxes and also I I I I shake I I. I'm scared that if anything I didn't do exactly accurately I could be in

Charles Lieber United States China Researcher Chinese Government Chichaou Shing NIH Esau Justice Department Philadelphia Chinese University Superconductivity Special Mate Chinese School Physicist Hong Cups Canada Temple University Tokyo Mattie
Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

Short Wave

10:44 min | 6 months ago

Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

"So we are right in the middle of cold and flu season and Alison as our consumer health aficionado. Let's start with talking about how to reduce the likelihood of getting a cold. Okay there's our shortwave favorite which washing your hands and you know mattie not everybody who gets exposed to cold actually get sick when they've done these studies where they take a rhinovirus and they stick it up people's noses and they see who gets sick and who doesn't they find that people who've slept less than six hours are about twice as likely to get sick when exposed to this cold virus as compared to people who've slept more so sleep is really important High stress has been shown to increase the likelihood and a lack of exercise has also been shown to make you more susceptible. I feel like you just targeted me with the high stress. I am not here to wag my finger at you or anyone else because at a certain point look we all get a cold. Typically adults in the. Us get about two to three colds a year. And when you do get a cold there is something you can do to put yourself out of so much misery. One method people swear by is zinc. That's right it's a mineral found in trace amounts in a lot of the foods that we eat our bodies need zinc to function optimally. In fact it's considered an essential mineral and boosting the amount of zinc. You get during a cold by sucking on zinc. Lozenges is actually shown a bunch of studies to help shorten the length of the common cold but only in certain situations and there are a lot of caveats so today on the show zinc an essential mineral and a cold remedy. We'll talk about when it works and when it doesn't Okay Alison we're talking about zinc and whether or not it helps shorten the length of a cold and there's a story behind that question that starts in the nineteen sixties. Yup that's right that is when a young physician named a Nanda persad studied a group of young Egyptian men who were completely deficient in zinc. Now these young men suffered from stunting. They hadn't grown to a normal height or developed normally in other ways and this is because they had very limited diets. They ate a lot of bread. That was hind phosphate. And that can actually block the absorption of zinc. Now skip ahead. Prasada is now ninety. One years old. He is still an active researcher at Wayne State University in Detroit and. He told me that when he gave these young men zinc. Something really remarkable happened. The grew at the rate of five to six inches in height the first two years so it was. What is a molecule remarkable? Change that occurred after supplementation. When you first documented this what was your you must have been ecstatic. Y- well actually the first patient re gives zinc and his other two couldn't believe it because I thought that the growth phenomena will be shut off after the age of eighteen and nothing will happen to anybody but that was not the case. So does that mean that. We all need to grow right well. We all do need zinc for optimal health. It doesn't work like a growth hormone and here in wealthier nations. It's completely possible to get enough zinc in your regular diet. But back in the nineteen sixties. The role of zinc was not at all understood. I mean people thought persad was crazy for just suggesting that zinc deficiency can do this but he ignored all those people who are skeptics. He just kept pressing on. He became really just kind of obsessed with getting to the bottom of how zinc work in the body. And so after he documented the growth in these young men. He threw himself into further studies. He really laid the groundwork by showing that zinc influences immunity he theorized that zinc works as an anti inflammatory agent and then over the course of a couple of decades persad and other scientists have shown that up to three hundred enzymes requires zinc for their activation or stability of their structure. Right like enzymes that you would even be familiar with like alcohol. Dehydrogenation rolls right up the Tong Yung. But importantly breaks down all that beer and wine. You drink the alcohol right right exactly but keep in mind. It took decades to show this. I mean lots of scientists completely questioned persad findings but eventually in nineteen seventy four. The National Academy of Sciences declared zinc an essential mineral for human health and they established recommended daily intake level. What is that Level Alison? Because now I'm a little worried about my zinc levels. Prepare well public. Health officials say that adult men need about eleven milligrams of zinc per day. Women about eight milligrams so let me help you figure this out. If you ate a three ounce beef chuck rose you'd get about seven milligrams so red meat can be quite high. That's close to a day's amount. A Half Cup of beings will get you about three milligrams. Pumpkin seeds a single ounce provides two point two milligrams so that's a good source and then there are lots of cereal grains that are fortified with zinc. Right that's why I eat a bowl of cereal every night. Eleven PM for my zinc. That's right you are clearly not zinc division. Here's a fun fact. Wasters have more zinc per serving than any other food. They contain seventy four milligrams per three serving. That feels like too much now overall. We shouldn't laugh. I mean overall here in North America overt zinc deficiency is pretty uncommon. But let me get back to the story of Dr Prasada and his discovery is now these zinc guidelines were first put into effect in nineteen seventy four and once. That happened. Persad began to wonder since he knew that zinc had an effect on immunity. Weather's zinc supplements might help to shorten the duration and symptoms of a common cold. And I should say that he kinda came at this from what he had realized back in Egypt. He's seeing that. A lot of these deficient men died early from infections. So his guests was that yes zinc lo and behold probably did play this role and immunity. Now it's known for instance that the body requires zinc to develop an activate t lymphocytes those. They're like protect you viruses and tae exactly that come out to protect you. They're the type of white blood cell. That is a key part of the immune system so this was all kind of in the back of his mind. He wanted to test out. Whether these zinc supplements might help shorten the cold so he collaborated with a scientist fellow. Scientists named Tom Fitzgerald at the University of Michigan. I talked to Fitzgerald and he told me what when Persad I gave him this theory. He was pretty skeptical. Got Admit when I first heard this I I actually told us a research assistant i. I think he's losing it. I was he so skeptical other than just being a scientist right. Exactly you know. I guess he was skeptical. That something as basic as a mineral would be powerful enough on its own to alter immune function which is a good level of skepticism. But he did agree to do the study. They recruited a whole bunch of people in Detroit. Who had colds? They gave them zinc lozenges made by a pharmacist. It was a double blind placebo controlled trials that means that neither the participants nor the researchers knew who was getting the real thing and who was getting the Placebo. And here's what they found long behold when I did in Dallas it indeed did shorten common cold symptoms by about two or three days and I gotTa Admit. I was stunned by that result. Two or three days isn't nothing now not at all when you think about. How many lost work and schooldays there are just because of cold symptoms that significant absolutely and then several other studies have confirmed these findings. I talked to another scientist. His name is Harry. Pamela of the University of Helsinki in Finland he published a sort of Meta analysis that reviewed a bunch of the studies and says bottom line here is low doses of zinc lozenges. Don't work you gotTa take about eighty to ninety milligrams a day of zinc at the onset of a cold that has been shown to help shorten it and he says he now uses zinc when he the cold coming on himself though. I'm also encouraging my patients to try zinc but Usually I am encouraging only if the common cold has been lost in for a day or something like that so he saying only within the first day that's right because if you don't catch it at the beginning you can't really halt the progression. It doesn't work okay so if you're taking zinc at the beginning of a cold it has to be within the first twenty four hours. That's what the studies have shown. Okay but here is another caveat and it's a pretty big one if you go to the drugstore right now and you find a zinc product. A lot of what you'll find are these multi ingredient products with a whole bunch of other ingredients. You've probably never heard of before. Be Aware that a lot of ingredients can undercut the effectiveness for instance. Some of them contain citric acid which actually binds with the zinc and makes it completely ineffective. So you're basically saying you've got to take it early. You've got to take at least eighty to ninety milligrams and avoid stuff with citric acid. That's right and as the consumer health reporter here I want to be able to say. Go out and buy this product. Unfortunately I can't do that because the lozenges used in the clinical trial. Those are not commercially available. And here's the deal. A LOTTA TIMES MANUFACTURERS CHANGE THEIR INGREDIENTS. They changed dosing. It's hard to make a solid recommendation about a product. Just basically have to do your homework. You gotta be aware that you need certain dose and that you don't want all these other ingredients think it's more what you can feel assured of is that there's science behind the idea that yes zinc can help shorten a cold. Would you be comfortable saying? Hey go out there and eat a couple of years. You know if you're seafood lover absolutely go. Enjoy some wasters. I can't tell you whether or not they're an aphrodisiac but I can tell you. They've got plenty of zinc

Zinc Deficiency Colds Scientist Alison Nanda Persad Detroit Dr Prasada FLU Mattie Growth Hormone National Academy Of Sciences Tong Yung Tom Fitzgerald North America University Of Helsinki Researcher Egypt University Of Michigan
"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

02:23 min | 9 months ago

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

12:27 min | 9 months ago

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"We're back at the races I just I just saw traumatises tweet trumpeting. His his visit he. He says that I've bumped him twice. I think only really once I think just one other time was was. There was some question whether whether the timing was gonNA work but either way it's one of the most anticipated separated conversations after Breeders Cup the Paul Matisse Postmortem and getting into all the vets that work the vets. That didn't didn't what we were right about. What was unexpected? Go morning on the that. You're finally want let me out beyond California and you hang around with those movie stars and you've had the great gambler philosopher only the battler says. You've you've changed if I'd really changed I would've I would've stayed out there because I do love. I do love being out there and this this series of races Paul it always. It's always dissipated disappinted. And some of the best typically some of the best betting opportunities of the year but one observation. The came up. The last couple of days is is that the money was pretty smart about a lot of a lot of horses and that included Bella Fina and without parole role. I mean not necessarily winners but horses that that were bet and ended up running well first before we talk specific races. What was your overall impressions Russians? Well that's one of the overall impressions I had was that even though we've heard that the The horses didn't handle the the tracking and whatever the the you know the force of the highest figures fared pretty well and you know for the most part form held up pretty good. You know a couple of horses you mentioned there. We live in a different world. You know with Workout reports and and such. I would add spun. The run probably a little bit to that category too. You know the You know we have better information. I mean a horse like Without Parole The the Chad Brown horse you know all every these workout people were on top of the fact that he was working working with bricks and mortar you know and add holdings beating them actually beating them and you know and you can watch it to you know we have. XP TV TV which is a an incredible service. I know we probably are a little jaded and take it for granted nowadays but you know this stuff was is unheard of not even that long ago so so you gotta expect a little bit changes where the money is going to be. The money is going to be better. You know we're doing on an everyday basis. The money's better that's a great point that's a great point and I I would also include the understanding that is certain horses says aren't working at as well as might have been anticipated and people. I see people that are dismissive of the workout information. And they say well everyb- everybody's working good. Everybody is working well L. enough summer working significantly better or noticeably just a little less and that might be enough differential when you're building tickets other. You know the other thing where we we. Don't get to see the horses as much you know work out with you and I've talked about this before. Workouts are more important now. Because was it used to be you. You saw the horse run two weeks ago so he didn't care about how he trained. You know. I mean if you watch the Seattle flu win the you know the the Marlboro you don't worry about how he's training into the Jockey Club. It was only twelve days ago. You know fourteen days ago You know it's different now. I mean a lot of these sorts of hadn't run since some of them hadn't runs in Saratoga or Delamarre so you have to You know you're you're look it. You're you're looking at a completely different horse in some cases so you need you need that kind of information you know and you trust especially especially that the the crackers. A- ah they'll probably on some you know on this on a daily basis the clocking information we get should be better but when it comes to the good horses did you know you. You can't fault it. I mean it's incredible my favorite part of for the invariably. Is You know it was with the young horses purses and on an everyday basis on the first years and then when you combine for you know for me to try to sniff out a price thing about Saratoga season for for instance in del Mar it helps to see an obscure horse. That may come from less high profile L. connections that's working well and then when I see that combines with positive sibling Information is that you know that were precocious and and one early. That's for me. That's a the go-to and that's where I find that. It really helpful on a day in day out basis. I I gotTA bring up before. We talk about the series of of races. A Friday and Saturday that comprise the Fourteen Cup events. There was a horse each day. Paul Friday and Saturday that if you played the early pick five and the early pick for that absolutely absolutely would have made your Breeders Cup. That was Mo- fours of course on Saturday Berry Irwin Barrier Berry Abrahams and Doc Peter Miller. That was eight thousand nine hundred ninety one and then there was the Bondi horse on Friday. That Rick Hammersley gave everybody and I and I left off the ticket tap back at fourteen to one and so if you sniff out those two horses either day you were off to a big star. Well I didn't I didn't Tap back got me pretty good on Friday at the race that I did that. I missed and and and I don't know if you if you you probably know on Friday and Thursday night early Friday morning most togas power was out so Friday was the oh no I was out of. You Know I. I had to leave my house because I didn't. I couldn't see the races on Friday so I I didn't didn't get power back until Friday night but So Friday was a little bit of a tough thing. I never would have been able to add. Probably somebody texted me and said Tapa back one. If they it came back from the future is still probably wouldn't. I probably wouldn't got the message even though I really can't complain about that when he was he was a hardcore door savvy he you know he he definitely ran Iran much better. I guess the one thing you could say that race is that that it was it. was there for the taking it. Wasn't it wasn't a great face. It was a very weak. We grace and it was a hard race to figure. I just I never I never would have come up with him on the on Saturday. I actually think the horse that the other race that's going to be important on. The undercard is the flagstaff rate. And I you know I singled him pick five and me too I I use bury a little bit With most whereas even though that wasn't a great result for me but Later on I didn't have I needed home in her in the In the last leg but Flagstaff is GonNa be interesting race. We probably won't get to it later on so you know. The the time that race was was I wanted to mention that the the time of that race was basically the same as Kofi and for whatever reason some of the places that I've seen have already projected that figure down but I I think that's a huge mistake and I would really take notice of the two three year olds. Who wrote ran behind flagstaff? Coming forward They they they definitely improved without many people noticing. Though I think Bob Baffert already had made a comment about roads how happy was with them roadster. We're in the Mandela horse. Extra hope ultrasounds ran really well and are going to be a factor probably next year especially in the early part of next year in California. That's a that's a terrific side bar and you would think that given the distance they'll both be pointing for the Malibu. Yeah I would I would thinks thanks over. The the great thing about bolt sources can definitely go along. Yeah so if they if they go a different direction I may not be great for us if they all end up in the same in the same race. You know but we'll see how things play out there. They're definitely to definitely keep your eyes on point well taken and flagstaff lack staff buy out by every measure on figs. I mean it was a was a single in a stand out and it was weird though that in the early wagering Who was roadster that? That was an early favourite in a strong early favourite before very slowly and steadily flagstaff. Came down to even money and roadster off just a tick under under three to to like you started off with somebody in somebody in those camps must have thought that they that they both have improved. You know that's a general rules about this time of year that I start. I always give Three year old the second look you know and Not just for not not just for stake races but this race is I think in general handicapping when it gets this time of year. Lots of lots of three year olds make big jumps forward. And you know I'd I would I'd that some of my better handicapping at the end of the year I think going forward people should be looking at you. Know is there is a tip off that the sources has gone before no it you know and those to be coming but you know. I think it's a good lesson. You know for racing. We're hearing that extra hope Already will point. For long races Eric Lawson weighing in and I appreciate that would make sense for Samantha. SEGEL's in fact Samantha. The made that race go. I saw her earlier in the week. And we were talking about I said hey you're running this weekend. And she said well extra hopes going to go in the Damascus. Yes and I think they kind of hustle doesn't and we made the race go so that was There's I'd be faded about how he how he ran. I'm sure they are to to keep you ran real well. Well actually. I know it's I know it's turf but I'm just looking down. I forgot what kind of a number Mo four zero came back with. What a ninety six I think he just he just went forward as well? You know again another. I think he was free as well. I guess you could have predicted that it was a you know. It's a lot of red boarding to do that but You know we needed to go forward to win but He kind of figured to get the the trip that he did. So and the three year old forces If you've read any my tweet issue there. They've been hungry bunch you know now so you know looking for an outsider in that race probably made sense but That was a that was a tough race but one that'll work like that could certainly went. Well well I can tell you that. What one thing? I was so happy for Berry Berry Abrahams. who was such a special moment and of course Rosario part of that story but I had sniffed out succeed in surpass? Who I ki- I you find? I like that at eight to ten to one and you think you got something and then I was is like Oh yeah not gonNA catch. He's not gonNA catch him today. Quote Unquote so that got the under since we since we're very very very Very trained for my brother Myself For since for.

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Empowered to be themselves. Get ready for a lot of last. Unfiltered, by and wine. Get ready to shake things up. Here's caitlyn. Welcome to off the vine on your host Kaitlyn bristowe in the studio today. You may remember her as the Somali did I say, right. Nailed it kiss from great therapy. Episode. Mattie selectmen who is now retired from wine. I'm retired for my my first one career now, I'm just a regular old snobby drinker. Which is why I'm serving you the crappy read today and her friend, Brooke Tom, attach nowadays, you got it. It was good. I panicked. I was. Pitch. And together. They started knows it Nashville see paranoid about high. Because I think it's like I don't want to insult somebody. So I'm always so paranoid about high pronounce it just because I want to make it right anyways. Nashville Nashville Nashville Nashville Nashville, a lifestyle brand and apparel company that gives back to orphans widows and traffic women in middle Tennessee such an amazing organization that you guys have created. Thank you. Good for you. And thank you so much for coming on the podcast today for just doing what you do. And I just wanted to start by maybe you guys giving us a little background on just who you are. Absolutely. I were psyched, I'm psyched to be back. And you're always welcome back. All right. We'll just have to start a new company and another new company. They just keep me on my toes. Retirement interesting for me. Well, all it. Brooke speaking on it first and kind of tell you a little bit about her. This was her brainchild. And then I piggybacked on with her after my after salt and vine finished, which we're all still crying about with the good news is the bottle shop. That's there is going to reopen. The sweet wonderful man who was my GM for so long got the new folks to sublease space. So we can. And what's Nashville? Oh, amazing. Okay. Good near the wind chop up. Well, yeah. Plug it all day sister plug it all day. I'm like go on if you want to. Okay. So I guess this started kind of I was at this crossroads in my life, where I had been a hairstylist, and I ended up realizing that thing I love the most about that was that people get super vulnerable when they sit in your hair, they really think about it. What you tell your hair stylist and Arab bartender. You you are and there's in hairstylist and your therapist. And you know, sometimes you're dislike I can't believe that opened up about that. And I got so excited to go and just listen to these women and just all of their problems. But the bad thing about that is I'd never let them pay me at the end going. We come home and check secure actually losing money doing now. So if you want to be a counselor, go, get your ph. So so I got introduced to a marketing company from hairstyling, and I ended up about six years in I've been leading a team at twenty thousand women how yes our full it has world's part time. It really landed in my lap from one of my clients. And so I love that. And it really is filling. But I've realized what I love even more than the products. I'm marketing is the stories all of these women and just the relationships and the connections. So basically the biggest part of my existence. I feel like is we actually adopted a little girl. Yes. And going through the adoption process. Just wrecked me and just an unexplainable way. And I just can't ever live my life with my eyes closed ever again to it. And so I just started feeling so unfulfilled and like I was just not stepping into my true calling. So I just started thinking what is something that every single day? If I woke up, no matter what mood I'm in. I would want to do and it has to do with women and advocating for adoption. And so the war that kept on being laid on my heart was she like what?.

Nashville Brooke Tom Kaitlyn bristowe Mattie GM Tennessee six years
"mattie" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Popcast

"Let me see you don't ever come on podcast mattie poppy is from iowa she is how do we she is may be lilith fair monk hey don't say that she is a quirky singer songwriter in the vein of regina spector that is extremely generous thank you and i hope for geeta specter is listening to hear you drag her name through the mud by likening her to mattie poppy mattie poppy i do know that throughout the season this is the one who i've struggled with quite a bit i did not understand the character of her voice the outline the tone of it i just didn't there's no texture to it incredibly neutral i disagree i like to hear more you know i thought her voice was soothing but not to the point of being dull i felt that it felt effortless like i enjoyed watching her saying because it never looked like a struggle on her face i like to personal style i thought not hard okay john are thought she i thought she was consistent in her messaging between her guitar playing her voice and her and her outfits yeah but sound like chicken mcnugget it's the same whether you get it in fargo north dakota or austin texas columbia south carolina was consisted i wouldn't say she was a chicken nugget we really going there today scribe you're like a mass murder i knew when she opened her mouth that she was going to hit notes without me having to be like us she could hit this no and it always it sounded very sweet i just i don't know what really there is to hate about it i didn't it was actually worse than hate because hate implies like some kind of incredibly strong negative reaction but i found i always like mentally zoned out during our reform ince's i just there was no there's no kind of rasp or edge or kind of tough mr voice it's just extremely clean i mean i think we're saying it was clean yeah saying the same thing but we're reacting to that same thing differently okay i'm looking for a calmness and consistency in my lifetime.

iowa regina spector geeta specter john fargo north dakota south carolina murder ince mattie poppy
"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

"To save us from this if born from father he wouldn't have this follow to save out some sun but his bottom zip ni fide significant by the pan of a god that i'm going to give you my son and my son is going to be true the spirit of a holy spirit and this law and tool the spirit of the holy ghost that you may across the bird to believe on this guys may be saved and this was the purpose of the god that he in vigorous hit last fall nations at the medicine should be a one mattie should be followed in with the son the holy spirit and that was the plan of jesus that will declare our family father that that satin should be bombed the help of jesus christ and this holy spirit is our had jesus christ going back to his father when he was turning do once again turning to god and this was data them fat but of jesus christ jesus christ has done back to his father but he didn't allow us to beat the men in loneliness don't want us to be feeding loneliness he don't want to be that the are alone because god won his presence and for his presence jesus said i'm going to my father but i'm going to my help will going to be have you on in the in the in the invite you have this problem in your life when we go into the book of x that is was.

mattie
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"But i'll let you know we do let me get something together awesome and then your instagram i on vine in yours is yes so at salt and vine nashville all spelled out in mine is as we laughed about early regrettably still mattie miti underscore bug for my college nickname yeah but yeah maybe need to make that a little more professional and a little less am messenger call you mattie bug for the rest of our friends it's fitting it's fun right okay less serious people call me being everybody in my home my hometown vancouver where i live for twelve years everybody there calls me being like that was over being that being in bug being bar next podcasts are you go oh oh yeah yeah good even on like the work schedule is like being monday funny i'm actually grown up now my name's caitlin bean works yeah thank you so much this is fun it's been a tree on monday and hopefully suddenly we learned a little know we definitely did and people are going to be really happy to know that the most inexpensive delicious that's it i'll write your session is now ending i hope that therapy was helpful yeah it was kind of therapy right there thanks for listening to off the vine grape therapy tune in to hear new minnie's odes every thursday and checkout new full length episodes every tuesday exclusively on podcast one dot com the podcast one app and subscribe on apple podcasts.

vancouver caitlin bean nashville mattie apple twelve years
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"You know it's presenting older mine i it is it's being funny and it is sort of mocking serious wine snob people because that's who he is in the movie yes but i think it brings a lot of good light to to the california wine industry yeah but it's an entertaining it's actually a very very good like film movies good yeah i've heard talking about it but it's definitely worth a watch i'm trying to google right now i always end my podcast with a joke and i'm like i wanna find a good wind joke i should be all i wish i'm jokes really i'm usually really good but wind jokes this is split my secrets right now i'm not a good joke teller i just google people are still laughing it doesn't matter okay i have one what is the woman's idea of a balanced diet grapes guess great gas a glass of wine in each hand oh yes you know what's fun about being sober nothing right exactly right these stupid what's what's an a women's idea of a romantic night this is the worst job i've ever heard netflix and chill wine it's sad how many my nights are like well yeah that's my every dairy accurate yeah it's not even funny that's not sound okay so where can people on your instagram for salt vine right yes.

california google netflix
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"I think this is very helpful even for me rachel stegman says what do you have to do to become very tucker high berbie tucker wants to be assembly it would just let them let them he can hang yeah tucker god i can't imagine this guy on winding i strong what is the process like to become a hover you say it so you got to get it right getting some malia some soli oh i thought you said it so differently the other time somalia somalia now okay now what's the process like so there's it's a tricky thing because there are certifications for it just like you would get certified to go through as a real estate broker in writing like that it doesn't mean that you can't be a wine professional or runaway program or anything but it's really just an accreditation i did it because like i said i'm a self admitted nerd and i wanted to learn as much as i could but it's a group called the court of master somali as in it's it's an international program and in school of study so there's no physical you don't go to university you just sign up and you prepare for an exam date and then you take those exams and their four levels of them and you go as far as you want to push yourself how much do you have to drink to do they do you spit it out you spit it otherwise failing then there's only you know there's there's anywhere from two to six wines that you're tasting on an exam and so it's a tasting portion always there's a written exam that's like fifty to one hundred questions and then.

berbie tucker somalia rachel stegman
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"The reason i'm here i love to talk about this number one hundred one with you and i'm not at my office but i love to talk about wine and it is ever evolving and so those lists are always changing someone we'll be excited to help you and it will they will not be like oh this idiot knows nothing right they'll be excited to share something yeah because in a way it's part of why i fell in love with it and why it rings true to my heart having grown up in an amusing family is like the wine is art yeah it really it's like they're all different and some whoever made this is trying to show you something that the the guy down the road from him didn't wanna show yeah so it's cool to find the difference anyway so i've poured you both winds together okay my number one rule of tasting wine is if you have one glass you're probably drinking two glasses you can really taste and learn so it's comparative so while people are scared of sweetness and white wine there is kind of two fundamental camps i try to tell people figure out what camp you live in red and then you can explore all all the different varieties or styles that kind of fall within either a fruity category again not sweet but ferdi right or a more savory earthy category so i'm trying to remember which one it's always keep the winds in order that's the hard part so your first wine here on your left this is from the island of canada or excuse me the island of sardinia which is of course right off the coast of italy so when we look at island winds whether it be sardenia portugal any of the iberian ones from portugal or spain you're gonna get a lot of ripeness so he think about its mediterranean.

canada italy portugal spain
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Exactly delete the baby names and i'm pretty sure i have wine notes in my phone somewhere to actually i was looking through my notes the other day and it's that should be a segment on my podcast right just embarrassing though my iphone like a like i have one that's just says funny and it's just like things to conversation that was funny like i love that you're prepared though and you're garnishing this brilliant thoughts yeah because if i write it down then i remember it and then if i don't the next i'm like why didn't i write that down again remember it scares me how much are how terrible my short term memory is it definitely is starting to decrease i'm sorry thirty i'm like wine nothing what has happened i used to be so intelligent see i actually feel like i'm getting smarter with age but memories going right yeah yeah that makes sense yeah anyways i love this one super cool and that's one of my biggest sort of campaigns and my whole staff will tell you this proudly many come in you know i think i love red wine i had the most beautiful light super chilled last night on the porch with a burger early grain but my sort of going campaign resulting vine and it was wine professional is to get people to not fear wine like there is this assumption that it's either a butter bomb chardonnay or it's sweet and the truth is most white wines are dry and they are more versatile with food yeah then anything and so i just there's there's a lot more complexity in them than people kinda just lump it into this one category xay yeah but i would definitely encourage people to explore them and like i said check that that alcohol percentage if it's above twelve it's dry yeah hands down question would have never known that yeah yeah eleven could be one way or the other but if it's twelve or above.

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"No i i studied abroad in college i went to school at the university of tennessee and i studied a summer in greece in kind of traveling around through italy afterward and just kind of a whole summer inundated in that like all that old european environment and in a weird way at just obviously i was young and i liked the drinking part which we all do but i've always loved school and i'm just an admitted brainiac nerd like i just love to learn anything which is why i love podcast so excited to be on this and hopefully y'all learn something oh i will today but anyway i just fell in love there and then moved to austin texas after school okay and just to live somewhere else young fun food city so i just got to give bartending for a little cash and it happened to be restaurant with a heavy wine program and so i just started helping the somali there i said hey look i'll help you he was preparing for an exam at that point and i said hey i'll help you study you're put wine away or whatever if i can do the tastings with you and i started learning and yeah and just kind of never stopped yet 'cause i feel like sometimes if you enjoy something and then you learn more and more about it you start to appreciate it more and more like that's how i've been headline even though i'm like not on your level by any means but just it was like i don't drink it just to like feel drunk i actually like enjoy it i enjoy it was certain food up solutely i find that it's like having a glass of wine and cooking oh my god it's like my favorite thing in the world it's like the most fundamental partnership yes exact i don't understand how people like john doesn't actually should have sean in here learning about the wines he can appreciate it because my goal in life is to get sean to appreciate because he drank it with me on the show just to get in my good books right and i was like man yeah well super smart but then i'm like wait you don't drink one like he really doesn't it's like wow you really love me but like also you've pulled the blindfold over my advertising i don't know how to deal with this.

greece italy texas sean university of tennessee austin
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"The following program is brought to you by your friends at podcast one don't forget to download our new podcast one out every so often there's a reason to go to the movies book club has four beautiful diane keep jane fonda candice bergen and berry steve urge i am not gonna let us become those people who stop living before they stop living let me introduce you for christian no tricks are calling book club hilarious certainly sounds like a four star delight the must see comedy of the summer happy reading ladies book club directed by bill holder in theaters tomorrow rated pg thirteen maybe inappropriate for children under thirteen podcast one percents off the vine grave therapy take them brits jokes didn't answer your questions drink to your concession and here you have to say about anything bachelor let's shake it up the more here's caitlyn welcome to grape therapy your session is now starting this is very exciting for me we now do sit somalia well it depends i've been called a somalian i've been called a someone gay somebody a is actually the correct way to say it but just short again somali oh okay we've got mattie selectmen here former former former formerly known yeah that's right yeah okay i was questioning with health yes as jackson yes so selectmen i had to try and get that one down right that's right that's tricky that's harder that really but i thought it would be so perfect to you know eleven am why monday morning everyone hates mondays.

diane candice bergen somalia jackson mattie
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"So interested in mattie at first too other she tried they tried really hard to go all in on mattie and she wouldn't give them like a poor choice and they from preseason i'm sorry terrible question but like where's she been i she's nowhere to be found that was a total fraud that was like parr har levels of fraud nece with her going in the house okay which which on those shaded jp he owns that shit guy was like totally blowing smoke up their ass that i was like some young republican conservative who's gonna fight in the house he's of course of course i really wasn't gonna do that but like this batty that's in house right now bears no resemblance the mattie on the outside i think mattie is is the person that she represented herself to be i see mattie as like somebody an introvert who who would like watches watches the show and in in real life she's like a more shy person maybe or maybe just like how she isn't big brother but like i think she is that snarky person i think if she comes online she comes on twitter she'll probably be great on twitter she'll probably be great in podcasts but just like in person in the game she just doesn't have the social i don't want i don't even wanna say social skills because i'm sure she has them but like again there's just like a wall there that just it's not the swagger like bill says in the chat mattie needs to be reunited with her soul which is in the tomb agree that if you like that sometimes there's a little bit of something missing it sounds like dog dogging her but you know what i dog dog matty i'm not taking on her like i mean we've said this before they often feels like a job interview when she's trying to make bonds with people or if she trained to talk to an h o h who might think about nominating her it never feels.

mattie fraud twitter bill
"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Team there was this was called the birth of jesus christ to place is mother mattie was than guild to georgia but before they were manage she phone out that she was going to have a baby by highlight the message and the god has forced to the holy jesus cries being seen victory v was to be treadmill before he met to jaws and cheerful to be lane this baby before she met joseph son that wall to be conceived by mother mattie from the chun going to scene like me and you born and don't have seen gone to believe in jesus the only hall both then jesus born with shave from this born from father he wouldn't have this power to shave from but significant the debt going give your going to be born tool the holy spirit and spirit and the spirit of the holy ghost that across to believe on jesus christ maybe shaved and this was the purpose of the guard invigorating let the dacians should be a one should be following with sun with the holy spirit and that was the plan for jesus bedwell declare that the shoot be born helpful for jesus christ this have zeppelin jesus christ going back to his father when he was turning do once again turning to god this emblem of jesus christ jesus christ has done back to his father but he didn't allow us to be remaining loneliness don't want us to be don't want to be seen.

mattie georgia joseph
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"And with kayla working for her with jani working for her this is really starting to look bad for maron meanwhile mattie in paris are talking and matty's kind of kind of a little too hyped up here she's like i'm gonna blow stuff up i don't care i don't care what it takes they've woken sleeping giant and peres well i don't know if you need to though don't worry about it because first of all you don't know this but there is a backdoor plan potentially in play this isn't from erica but a lot of people want this and it's definitely a possibility that veronica may be back doored so any chance you get you throw veronica right under that bus but i don't think you need to blow anything up if there goes up you're good you don't have to do anything else and matt he's like okay calm down a little bit it's exactly what mattie needed yeah exactly this is a situation where it's not plans e yet girl sit down like let's just play com okay you know things are starting to shift the critical mass is happening to sort of rally around keeping you save doesn't mean that you should go and like you said star blowing stuff up so i think it was good the perez there was able to sort of temper all of matty's excitement and a little bit of sanity yes so so now allie again elian liver talking about probably keeping mattie alley has a conversation with mattie and this is a very important conversation for mattie because alley still doesn't feel that she can fully trust mattie and if she's gonna end up saving her she's going to have to feel a bond with matt he's going to have to come out of her shell and finally start making actual moves and saying actual things to people and luckily she does a little bit here she's especially armed with the information that alli wants to target for annika matty starts talking all sorts of nonsense about veronica she's the worst i i'm pretty sure she'd cast that hanky vote.

kayla jani maron paris erica veronica perez mattie alley matt alli annika matty peres allie elian hanky
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Okay oh my god this conversation was fantastic because mattie was so robotic but like accurately assessing the situation so she i mean she's running through okay i am logically assessing what is happening in real time to me right now but not thinking at all about how erica then is perceiving this and how is taking is taking in this information mattie is is oh my gosh there was one moment where erica was sort of trying to cover make clear that he was like about to cry i'm not gonna cry i've been crying i was just sitting at my computer yelling cry like this you need to appeal to the emotional side of erica this is not what's going to try to save you oh my goodness disaster yes caleb on facebook says they woke asleep and giants yeah maybe i think free said mattie was sleeping giants i think i think it would definitely she has the possibility of something like that but i think that just sort of oh my gosh i don't even know i don't even know i mean there was one point where after the conversation was over was like i feel like this changes nothing so i mean clearly all of the talk that matty did really just did nothing i mean did nothing to help her game it was a lot of veiled threats like really sucks that you're doing this and drawing the line not that i'm gonna like draw line but it does point us in a direction not that i'm going to be pointed in a direction but it does do something that is really unfortunate and i think you're going to regret it.

mattie erica caleb facebook matty