36 Burst results for "Mattie"

Fresh update on "mattie" discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

00:30 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mattie" discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Black flats in the points with jeans and as happens in the course of my glamorous life i got them super mattie while taking the trash out of his moments when you feel like this is one thing too many i have had since coming on and then i remembered that these beautiful. She's our rossi's toss them into the washing machine. And i'll be fresh and clean as a new pair of shoes. That's why i have four pairs of rockies as well as a rossi's bucket bag. They just work in my life comfortable and practical and stylishly designed and of course they're good for the planet. I love being able to talk to my daughters about how rossi's repurposes plastic water bottles.

Rossi One Thing Four Pairs Of Rockies
Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

Short Wave

09:28 min | 2 hrs ago

Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

"Okay paying we are talking vaccine equity in the pandemic and just a quick note. We are focusing a just here in the united states for this episode. So let's start with some top line numbers three covid. Nineteen vaccines have been authorized for emergency. Use in the us one very recently. How many people have actually been vaccinated so far well. Since vaccine distribution started in mid december around fifty million people have gotten at least one dose of a covid nineteen vaccine that includes about twenty five million people who got into doses means they've been fully vaccinated with either the pfizer or madonna vaccines. And that's some real progress over the past few months. Still just around eight percent of the total. Us population has been fully vaccinated. So there's still a long way to go. yeah i mean. Do we have any demographics on who the people who got the vaccine are like. Do we have any data on race or ethnicity well. Last week i spent some time at a cdc conference which was online and a bunch of public officials talked about it including dr marcela nunez smith who we heard from earlier. People of color are getting vaccinated rates below their representation in the general population. We know these challenges reflect longstanding deeply rooted systemic rallies. But here's the thing. The data that she's talking about is still pretty limited. You know so far race. Nothing to see. Data have only been collected for about half of the shots given out. Wow only half the thought i mean. There's a little bit frustrating. That's that's not enough data. Yeah it's it's really not and the biden administration pointed this out themselves and they acknowledged that it's pretty abysmal. Doctor rachelle will lansky. She's head of the centers for disease control and prevention and she says the problem is coming from a couple of different directions. Individuals may choose not to report. It may not be required of or requested by providers and some providers as well as jurisdictions have restrictions on data sharing so some of these data gaps are due to the fact that we have inconsistent systems around data gathering. Which you know is something that has been in quite a bit with this pandemic. Yeah that's certainly part of it and there's reasons why people might not want to share their personal information about race ethnicity especially people of color you know. The federal government has a long history of exploiting and under serving minority communities and that extends to this day but now there are government officials saying that. It's up to them to try and convince people that it's important to give their information. Here's neurath shaw. Health official in the state of maine in public health. What gets measured gets managed and if we measure the right things then we will manage the right issues if we measure the wrong things. Then the did that we collect. That may not bear resemblance to current present. Elf challenges is actually what we will end up managing. Yeah so early. On in fact vaccine distribution the only metric that was available was the number of doses sent out in the number of doses administered which basically measured speed and so if the biden harris administration wants to achieve both and equity with axiom distribution. They're going to have to get more comprehensive data on race ethnicity to get a handle on the problem. Yeah i mean. I want to talk about what the biden administration is doing specifically to address this issue of a vaccine but first let's talk about some of the ways. The general rollout has put. Vulnerable communities added disadvantage. Because that's definitely happening. Yeah and to be honest. It's been hard for everyone including health reporters to keep up with the changes that are happening. Daily and weekly with axiom distribution. I mean every single state has its own rules about who qualifies and had a sign up. Obviously that confusion is compounded. If the information isn't coming to you in the language you speak or you don't have access to computers and email and even for people who may have read up on how to book an appointment. It's taken them hours to actually research in book one. So if you don't have time to figure that out and if you don't have access to transportation or time off work to get an appointment and was places you probably haven't been able to get vaccinated yet. Yeah i mean and that's when you know for sure that you want the vaccine. Exactly dr christian rumors. He's a physician and executive that family health centers of san diego. He points out that people also have questions that are very specific to their own circumstances and we want those answered before they feel like they can make an informed decision to actually get vaccinated. Here he is speaking to. My colleague yuki noguchi residency is not just one thing. And in many cases. They're very unique to their own situation. Like i just got treated for cancer. Or i'm on a certain medication or i've had an allergy in the past and those are questions that'll be answered most likely from talking one on one with a medical professional or some other trusted person. Which again if you're part of an underserved community is hard to access. If you don't have the time to seek out those answers it'll be much easier if the vaccines and the resources were coming directly to you right right okay. So ping what has the biden administration specifically announced or done to address vaccine equity so at that. Cdc conference. dr marcellina smith acknowledged that this is a huge issue. And it's not gonna be easily solved. Must attend the underlying social structures arborist as we look ahead to building resilience into our recovery. What we do believe now. Is that the way we get american vaccinating and the emphasis he placed reaching the hardest hit communities attached just as important as being the goals the number of people that's needed so their strategy to get to those goals basically amounts to increasing a couple of different things number one the number of vaccines available number two the number of people giving vaccines and number three. The number of places people can get vaccinated and specific to equity. They've launched a few fema supported mass vaccination sites. These are huge operations set up in stadiums and parking lots that are aiming to give at six thousand shots a day and they're putting some of these in places that score high on something called the social vulnerability right which is a cdc measurement of how vulnerable community is based on social factors like poverty for example. They've also started sending vaccines directly community health centers which serve around thirty million people over. All many whom are rural belong to minority groups or are low income and the centers can also offer outreach in different languages and support for signing up. I mean are they also leaning on non-medical sites to i mean like i know working with community leaders and partners be especially effective. Yeah well they're also talking about sending out that nation trucks to job sites and setting up clinics and local churches and high school gyms and ymca's those non-medical sites that you were talking about and these community clinics might not be serving thousands of people a day but they will make the vaccine available and convenient for people in those communities to get gosh so the vibe administration is really trying to take a both and approach. They're supporting mass vaccination sites to get a lot of people vaccinated quickly and they're also realizing that some people will take more time and more effort to reach so they're also trying to figure out ways to gather better data and target underserved areas. Okay so you know. Most of what we've been talking about today paying as the government is handling this which i would argue is the most important facet but i mean. Is there a sense of individual responsibility here. I know there are a bunch of stories out there about people line jumping or like going into communities outside their own to vaccines how we have all heard the stories and it's hard to say how much it's happening but it does make people feel like the system isn't working you know and what bioethicists have said to me is. That cheating happens for sure but it's probably not happening enough to undermine the system overall i mean. Is that all kind of a short term problem. I mean there's a huge demand right at this point and not enough supply but the hope is that you know in the coming weeks or months the situation will change as vaccine manufacturing and distribution ramp up even further right. Yeah and that's been the hope all along. I mean for weeks now. We've been hearing about a flood of vaccines that will be coming online in the near future. That will make it less. Cut throat to vaccine appointment and we're not there yet but there are some promising signs. The government has now ordered a total of six hundred million doses of pfizer in modern of vaccines to be delivered by the end of july. Which is enough to cover three hundred million people and that's more than all the adults in the us right right. Plus we've got the newly authorized. John jay vaccine which will eventually make a difference right and getting all these shots in urgent right now because we're kind of in a race between vaccinations and variants. Which means that. The more people protect right now. The fewer people will catch the virus and the fewer chances the virus will have to keep mutating in ways that might make it avai the vaccines and the treatments. We've developed so that's why it's still super super important to keep the other measures that prevent the virus from spreading double masking staying physically distant. You know we're all excited about vaccines but health. Experts are saying right now that in the middle of the vaccination campaign is not the time to let up our guard okay pingpong we appreciate you as always thank you for coming on the show things so much. Mattie appreciate you to

Biden Administration Centers For Disease Control An Dr Marcela Nunez Smith Rachelle Will Lansky Neurath Shaw Biden Harris Administration United States Dr Christian Yuki Noguchi Pfizer Dr Marcellina Smith Madonna ELF Federal Government Maine Confusion Allergy CDC San Diego
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | Last week

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

Short Wave

03:30 min | 2 weeks ago

When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

"So emily why did you want to focus this story on. Columbia am the philippines. So remember that report i mentioned earlier. Yeah the one from global witness yes. So they're an ngo tracking threats against grassroots environmental actus subsistence farmers opposing mining tribal leaders condemning logging. Journalists lawyers organizers the un calls these folks environmental defenders and most of the murders that global witness documented took place in just two countries columbia and the philippines and in columbia indigenous communities are especially targeted. including the. Why you me known. His and nicole's piece this is on halacha or ortiz. A member of the y. You in northern colombia. In luck waheeda heater. We spoke over a secure video chat. She told me we raise our voice in defence of the territory and that the land is so much more than territories little walmart. It's wolman cup or mother. Earth where the why you pass on their culture to the next generation on halacha remembers being a little girl. When mining operations appeared dedicating the only stream the community had turning it into a better london. They have lan local on her community. Not only lost a source of water but a community meeting place where women would gather and do laundry and talk. Gauloise will come through and she became an activist because she doesn't want other communities to go through what she did. Okay so tell me a little bit about the activists work that unhealthy code does in columbia. So she is the secretary general of where side they mujeres y you mounting protests against mega mining projects in la guajira particularly. This project called l. said horn and what else to hone. That is the largest coal mine in latin america and it's right in her backyard. This is illegal operation owned by multinationals digging up coal that's exported to other countries but the practice of open pit mining. Mattie has proven really disruptive to the people who live there and harmful for the environment right. I know open pit. Mining can mess up local water resources absolutely and can create pollution that is physically harmful to communities that live nearby el cerro hone overall is really polarizing. Its construction has provided jobs and wealth to some in colombia for decades but it's also displaced indigenous and afro colombian communities forcing them from their lands without real resettlement consequently they are exposed to violence largely at the hands of paramilitary groups and criminal organizations groups that harass and target defenders like on helicopter who out against human rights abuses and environmental issues like those caused by the mine and this is on top of the violence. Colombians have already faced right. I mean. I know that colombia's kind of coming out of decades of conflict a conflict. Some say is an over because of armed groups still active in the region. And how does the government there respond to these attacks. Yeah that's a good question. I mean they often dismiss them as localized crimes and perpetrators are

Columbia Philippines Colombia La Guajira Emily Ortiz UN Nicole Walmart El Cerro Mattie Latin America London
How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

Short Wave

03:33 min | Last month

How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

"Okay thomas we are talking about apple's today. Why don't you tell our listeners. Even got started down this weird little apple path so a few weeks ago i saw video of a dude eating apple from the bottom. And you know. I it up to the pitch me and at the time all i wanted to find out from the team was whom amongst us was with me in eating the entire. It was just way to start to get the conversation going. Yeah i remember. And i was horrified to find out so many members of our team eat the whole apple. We were pretty divided down the middle. Yeah that's right and the discussion led to the possible dangers of eating the apple seeds. Some of us had heard they might be toxic. Some of us hadn't so here we are chatting away about them apples and the science behind whether or not you can eat the core why we are here. Today is pretty cool. Yeah totally and i found a food. Scientists to help explain it all could also My name is islami outs. For last shoddy. I am senior lecturer in the department of food. Science outsider jackets ally investment technology. Islamia is a few scientists beast in nigeria and she told me on the one hand apples. Are these magical fruits. That are really nutritious. And good for you apple's Poplar fruits us are reaching nutrients such as anti oxidants minera house vitamese dietary fiber is an auditor nutrients but their seats are different than their flesh. Yeah exactly what i'd always heard. Is that apple. Seeds have like some amount of cyanide in them you know like generally not something that is good for humans i mean yes and no i asked islam yacht to explain it and it's a little more complicated seeds that is in the center of harpool copy above causing poisoning because the seed contains it compounds. That is called. I mean. I lean mick. Dolan is a compound that's found and lots of natural plants and things that humans eat such as apples but also peaches apricots and almonds. They're is a similar compound and cassava he staple in nigeria and on its own mattie in seeds a midland is usually harmless to people no concerns there but what is potentially concerning is when digestive enzymes in our bodies come in contact with the michelin and when they combine the enzyme breaks away the sugars in the dylan and leaves cyanide which could potentially lead to cyanide poisoning. What do you mean. Potentially thomas say more. Well the conditions have to be just right mattie for this to be more of a concern for starters the midland in apple seeds is encased by pretty tough outer layer in order to expose them make the land to our digestive enzymes have to chew those seeds really really. Well okay i get it and even whole eating monsters like you. Thomas are generally crushing those seeds down to a fine pace with your teeth right exactly. Mattie as much as i love that tidal more importantly though there's not enough apple seeds in one or two apples to really show in effect on our bodies the amount of cyanide that does get formed if at all our livers are pretty good at filtering out those hawks

Apple Department Of Food Islamia Minera House Nigeria Thomas Dolan Mick Mattie
How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

Short Wave

05:33 min | 2 months ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

"Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show we talk with ed young about some of the ways cope with nineteen could change science forever. I'm mattie safai in this is short way from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash back online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more warding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ibm a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm telcos. Rollout innovations with watson. Ai without losing speed. The world going hybrid with ibm visit ibm dot com slash breed cloud. Okay so today. We're talking about how the pandemic changed scientific research. Let's let's start with one of the core foundations of science publishing data. Something that in my experience doesn't traditionally happen very quickly. Yeah so traditionally The process of publishing is often very slow. It takes a lot of time for scientists to write up the results for that results to then pass through gone through. The peer review process can take many months. Is ill suited to a crisis. That is as fast moving as the covy pandemic has been but for many years now. Biomedical researchers have pushed for innovations that will speed up the process of science so they have started increasingly using pre-printed servers where they can upload early drafts of the papers so that their peers can discuss and build upon those results even before it goes through the peer review. Gauntlets and it really took off in the middle of the pandemic p- reprints were a major part of how science was disseminated over the course of this year and i think for both good and they meant that as intended. The pace of science was much quicker but in an environment where the entire world was hungry for more information about this new disease. A lot of very bad reprints were also circulated very quickly gained international attention and led to the spreading of misleading information. That hindered the controller cove. Nineteen rather

Ed Young Jennifer Dowden Ebola IBM Mattie Safai Polio Bank Of America Twenty Twenty Bank Of America Atlantic Jennifer NPR Watson
Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall: Can You  Reveal An Animal's Inner World At All?

Short Wave

07:31 min | 2 months ago

Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall: Can You Reveal An Animal's Inner World At All?

"Okay nelson gordon. Gallup came up with this mark test. And i assume he actually you know like tested some animals. The one that made the splash was chimpanzees. So he put this big mirror just outside their cage and at first the chimpanzees acted in the way that a lot of other species do like the mirror. Image was another animal a stranger. You know that you might attack After a couple of days though that changed the chimpanzees started using the mirror to look at parts of their bodies that they couldn't normally see like opening their mouth and looking at the keys. They looked at their bottoms and their genitals. I mean of course they did know of course they did then gallup with the chimps under anesthesia and marked their ears and their foreheads. With a red dye the animals woke up. They saw themselves in the mirror and what they did was to reach out and touch and examine the marks on their faces only be seen in near so they realized the marks were on their own faces by looking in the mirror. Okay so that's chimps are close relatives. What about like monkeys. So he told me that monkeys could be exposed to mirrors for literally years and would never spontaneously use the mirror to do any kind of self examination like that but if quietly snuck into their room and you know in a mirror was there and the monkeys saw the person in the mirror. They turn around to confront them. They could use the image of of us me and my students in the mirror to bonaventure our behavior and respond appropriately. Okay so just like my creepy low dog. That is just like your. I mean. I don't know if your dog responds appropriately. Yeah i told them about your dog and he totally thinks your dog could be using mirrors to spy on you. I mean it sounds like her no honestly but in in terms of using a mirror like people do to look at yourself. How many species can actually do that. Well if you ask him he thinks it's just humans chimps entering. That's his view okay. So you're saying if you ask him that makes me feel like there are other views out there. Yes so if you ask diana at hunter college she'll tell you that dolphins and elephants can recognize themselves. And you know it is hard to test dolphins. I mean think about it. They just don't have hand right. You can't really like poke your own face with the flipper. Yeah yeah so. She had to come up with variations of the mark test. Like in one experiment. They used a marker to kind of draw on a dolphins body in different places But they didn't do it secretly so these dolphins could actually feel the marks being made the idea was. Would they race to the mirror afterwards and orient immediately to the place where they've been marked as if they had something in mind on their way to the mirror they were going to use it as a tool to look at the mark and we. That's exactly what we found. Wow okay that's that's pretty cool. What about What about elephants. They have trunks right so it feels like you do this kind of mark test. Maybe we'll she and some colleagues did study elephants at the bronx zoo and so again. Not so easy. They had to get this big jumbo eight by eight foot unbreakable mirror and she says the elephants seem to look at themselves and they did all kinds of unusual things like they'd rhythmically move their trunk or you know one of them would use a trunk to pull an era forward in front of the mirror like it was looking at it One of them touched this white x shaped mark that they put on her head. You know she used her own trunk and sort of investigated but two of the others didn't do that with the marta. So you know recess. She's tested other elephants since then and she does think they get it you know. She thinks they just recognize that what they see in the mirror is them okay. So so back to the original mark test developer. Gallup doesn't buy that. Dolphins and elephants no themselves in a mirror. He just doesn't think it's been conclusively shown. I mean there's been claims over the years about weird behavior with mirrors in all kinds of species. Birds fish aunts manta rays. And you know he says there's always this problem of if you have an animal doing strange stuff in front of a mirror and they do odd stuff right. There's this danger of seeing whatever it is you want to see. You know what their behavior actually means can be hard to figure out. Well i mean for that matter now what does it mean if an animal unequivocally passes gallup's mark tests like does that mean that they're actually self aware gallup thinks that the tests means they're self-aware. He basically thinks that self awareness is like being able to make yourself the object of your own attention and he says that you know if you're looking at yourself in mirror and recognizing yourself in the mirror. You're kind of like literally doing that. And that this says something about the animals internal world and its ability to understand other animals mental states But you know that's kind of romantic idea in a way you know that that that just as muir recognition says something really profound animals internal world. And so you know daniel pov- anneli doesn't really buy it. So he's a researcher and he told me when he first read about gallup's mark test for mirror self recognition in highschool. It made him wanna spend his whole life studying chimpanzees. You know. I bought into the story of mirrors and sulfur ignition hook line and sinker because it is a compelling story. Yeah i mean like wow there are creatures out there just like him just like people and all it took was a mirror to uncover this magic secret about that more whatever exactly but i gather from his tone. No longer feels that way. No no i mean. He's a researcher with the university of louisiana at lafayette and he spent years studying champs and mirrors and self recognition all this stuff and he says you know just think about when you go to a mirror say in the morning when you wake up you drag yourself there. You're looking at your image and like maybe you're all but drag with sleep in your eyes and you start having all of these thoughts. You're just like geez. I look older and you think about time and time is passing and then you start thinking about who you once were and your future and what other people think and on and on but is that which required do i have to think about any of that in order to brush my teeth in front of the mirror. He says you do not need all of these higher order concepts of self and self awareness to use a mirror in a practical way to just understand that like your physical motions are connected to the mirror in some way. Yes we saying like when a chimp interacts with its own mirror image. We can't know what it's thinking about. We have no clue and finally pointed out to me with training. In how mirrors work rhesus monkeys can actually learn to recognize themselves in mirrors and. Pass the mark test you know. So what does it mean if an animal with training can do this. He said he doesn't think dolphins been shown to do it yet but he says oh it could probably be taught to do it sure. What about my dog. Now what do you think. I don't know i mean maybe i mean. Some people have suggested their dogs. You know. the visual system isn't as important and like self awareness or self recognition might be more like smell related. Yeah yeah that makes sense so we need some kind of like olfactory mirror. Scientists have been working on that mattie. No okay no well thank you for this tour through the muir amazed that is research on animals and mirrors. I will think of you the next time. I see my dog gazing at my reflection. Which i imagine it's going to be in like five minutes. Enjoy

Nelson Gordon Gallup Dolphins Hunter College Anesthesia Bronx Zoo Daniel Pov Anneli Diana Muir University Of Louisiana Lafayette Mattie
The Science Behind The Historic mRNA Vaccine

Short Wave

05:05 min | 2 months ago

The Science Behind The Historic mRNA Vaccine

"Absolutely so most vaccines use a weakened version of a virus or just little pieces of it but that requires time to grow up a bunch of virus to process it in order to make the vaccine but for this vaccine in the amarna vaccine. There's no virus in it. Wait we'll wait. You're saying there's no actual virus in the vaccine at all. Because i didn't really realize that nope so you have this. Mr vaccine that all you need really was the genetic sequence the template for what marinate you're going to make you didn't need to girl or virus you didn't need to expose your workers at lab to it and so it just you just skipped a few steps in that way that is amazing mattie here it's also a little confusing like what does he mean the marinate template so emma vaccines take advantage of a process. That already happens in our body like every minute of every day our body is making this thing called 'em a and it's like an instruction manual that tells our body how to make proteins. And so if you make a little piece of mr and lab and feed it to ourselves. Ourselves will naturally read that little piece of code that instruction and use it to make a protein. Whatever you want. And in this case it's a coronavirus protein so it's like we're hacking ourselves bright and instead of putting a bunch of proteins from the virus into the shot we give the cells in our body instructions to make that coronavirus protein themselves. Exactly that little routine by itself cannot give us cove it but it is enough to trigger an immune response so that the body learns to fight it. So let's say at a doctor's office about to get this vaccine Get it and how does my immune system actually respond to it. Okay so let's walk through it so these any vaccines are an injection in the arm after the injection your muscle cells. Kind of swallow up the rene bring it into the cell now. This summer rene doesn't get into the nucleus of the cell where your dna hangs out. I can't so there's no worries about the vaccine like messing with your dna at all okay. Instead that mini hangs out in the site of plaza of cells where it gets turned into protein. I remember drawing the seidel plaza in class leslie. I think it's an underrated part of the cell. Okay so after. Our body uses marinate to make protein. The cell put some of that protein on its surface like outside of the cell which allows other cells in your body to see it. And that's the goal right. The point of the vaccine is for your body to recognize pieces of the coronavirus without actually having to get the corona virus. Yeah and at this point the vaccine kind of acts like all other vaccines throughout the whole process at different times our immune system cells recognizing react to that self made corona virus protein. I mean there's a whole subset of cells where they're entire job is to tattle on invaders like they pick up foreign proteins that are in your body like this corona virus protein. And kind of like. We've it around to other cells like ooh guys. I found this protein. It's not supposed to be here. And honestly i think it you get in trouble. I'm sure the scientific term for these is not tattle cells. No but it should be. Because they're actually called antigen presenting cells. Tattle cells is definitely memorable. I'm gonna remember that. Thank you thank you. So these tattle cells can activate other cells including this diverse group of cells called tells so some of them get activated and become very murdering. Those are literally called killer. T. cells they go around sniffing out cells infected by the virus and kill them. Some of these t help raise the alarm. They bring other cells into the area. I call him a super tattle t cells there helping with the tattling and then some of those same cells help other cells make antibodies. And so later after you've gotten vaccine if you're exposed to the real corona virus those. Antibodies can recognize that protein. Grab onto it and keep the virus from getting into ourselves and antibodies are. What protect us in the long term. We want those those a huge part of it. You have this. Initial wave of antibodies and t cells right after vaccination or infection. But your body also creates this kind of memory bank to once. The threat is over once. There's no more presenting of the antigen the cells will revert into a dormant stage. That they'll still be around still be circulating still growing and dividing until the protein gets presented again and then they'll activate again almost immediately and that memory is why some vaccines work for years and years after you get them now. We don't know if this vaccine will lead to long term immunity. But that's what everybody's

Seidel Plaza Mattie Emma Rene Leslie
The Next Generation

In The Gate

04:42 min | 2 months ago

The Next Generation

"Recently. The washington post published an article about how young adults twenty-somethings called generation z. Are creating a real shift in how viewers connect with sports. And how many connect with sports if you think of the traditional ways of consuming sports you root for a team you watch and attend their games. You might be completely disconnecting from generation z. As an example the post cites. Espn's internal data that says that the percentage of twelve to seventeen year old stick and ball fans who call themselves. Avid fans has dropped from forty two percent ten years ago to thirty four percent today. What if i was to tell you that young people care more about what an athlete binge watches on net flicks. Then what he or she thinks about the next opponent or that viewers might not care about the athletes next opponent at all only that the athlete is a culturally significant. Figure if that sounds ridiculous to you then you might not understand this new generation of consumers. But if you're a decision maker stewarding the future of this sport you'd better learn to understand these jen's ears and give them what they want or you won't have a sport left to oversee now. The washington post article talked about gen z as relates to stick and ball sports. But we're going to do is spend this time talking about how horse racing relates to generation z. And what leaders in this sport can slash should do in order to reach them to do that. We have invited guests from a number of different viewpoints. I we have a racing executive looking to market his product. He is gregory. Vincent who is the vice president of marketing at gulfstream park. Next we have to young people with us. One became so hooked on this sport that he's now going through the race track industry program at the university of arizona. He is michael sand duly and full disclosure. His father matt has been a longtime espn event producer. Our third guest is madison. Bregman the founder and ceo of girls spelled with a z. At the end she consults with clients trying to reach young people. Young girls in particular. According to her linked in page she's worked with a number of clients including the nfl and she's the perfect person for this discussion because she can self reflect if you will on trends involving generation z. So welcome to all three of you. Let's start with mattie when it comes to sports in general how would you describe the differences between what appeals to gen z irs versus older generations. What degen's ears care about. Yeah i think the big thing is that where older generations would sit down and watch an entire football baseball basketball games. This generation is so much more driven by watching clips or highlights. The way that we're consuming it with that. Being said is different too because we're not watching it on tv watching it on mobile devices on different platforms like twitch and and snapchat instagram. And really the way that we're interacting with teams and players as different as well where older generations once again. We're fans of specific teams because you grew up in that city or whatever have some kind of connection to it and this generation more fan of individual players can so for example. If i'm a huge fan of baker mayfield. I may not necessarily love the cleveland browns. But i liked baker and would wear a skirt near water. Whoever it may be michael san duly. You've heard what she just said about your generation. This is your generation. How does that jibe with your thinking as you were being attracted to horse racing. Well horse racing is the number one sport in my heart. But i but i'm a fan of all sports so i completely agree with matt in the sense that our generation likes players rather than teams a lot of my friends like lebron or curry and so on in horse racing. You can kind of do that. You pick your hero for the year for lack of our term. Unfortunately nowadays everybody gets sent to orderly and this year you've built a brand of this year you could arguably make the case for to the law in tis. The law garnered a lot of fan interest because he came from a grassroots fail. I think it was the saratoga. Select that nolan in toga. Bottom out of and he grew into this the big story line. And that's what everybody likes. Everybody likes a big story. That's what attracts fans.

The Washington Post Bregman Degen Gulfstream Park Espn JEN University Of Arizona Gregory Vincent Baker Mayfield Matt Mattie Michael San Madison NFL Michael Basketball
Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

Short Wave

09:03 min | 3 months ago

Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

"Dan let's start with a little bt crops one. oh one all right. Walk us through how they work. So these genetically modified plants got their superpowers from a bacteria. Let's let julie describe it a little bit for bt in particular They express genes that. Come from a type of bacterium It's really a very common. Bacteria that's found in soils it's called bacillus thuringiensis as the scientific name now. This kind of bacteria is actually poisonous and the larval stage of some major insect pests like corn route worm. Cotton bollworm Which farmers worry about a lot. So what the scientists did was they took some of the genes from bacteria and inserted them into these corn and cotton plants which then made the plants poisonous to the insects just like the bacteria were so now. The plants can actually protect themselves by killing off past that. Try to eat them. Exactly which is a big deal for farmers. Here is david current. He's an entomologist at texas am university. He gives farmers advice on the best way to handle their insect problems. A lot of them are cotton farmers and for them. The effect was dramatic. U we'd have cases before the introduction of bt where You know farmers were having to treat you know it could be ten times. You know for these pests. The ring ten times in a season they could yeah some areas and one bt was introduced. Well our our insecticide sprays just plummeted. And you know in there were guys who wouldn't have to treat it all and that's a big deal for not just the farmers but for the environment right. Dan like those pesticides. Don't just kill the insects year. For right yeah absolutely. Regular insecticides can kill off a whole range of species and mess up the whole ecosystem. Bt crops produced specific proteins that only kill particular insects so those crops are basically harmless to pollinators like bees and beneficial insects. That prey on past help. Keep them under control. It's not toxic to people or birds and for farmers like jonathan evans and north carolina. It meant he didn't have to work so hard is always better for the plant to protect itself. Then i have to go out and try to to spray for the worms. Did it really change farming. Have -solutely i mean you can tend a lot more acres. Were the whole equipment. Got it so jonathan. The farmer loves these crops. Julie who likes insects is happy. When did things start to go sour. Dan well i guess for jonathan it was you know one day in two thousand sixteen when he went out to cotton field and saul some cotton bollworm happily chowing down on his cotton plants and he knew what that meant. Those insects had evolved. He was looking at a new strain of bollworm that the bt protein wouldn't kill and this has been happening more and more often the country right david kerns that insect specialist at texas a and m. says some farmers are pretty disappointed and angry. There's words i can't use but they wanted to know what the heck they're doing paying for a technology and they're still having a spray. Okay dan so let's talk about. Why some of those insects have become resistant to bt crops. Yeah let's get into the science mattie evolution and here we go okay so there's a part of this. It's really simple. You have a gazillion different individual. Let's say cotton bollworm out there. There's genetic variation among them and just by chance. You may very well have a few that have some genetic mutation that makes them a little less vulnerable to the fbi t. Now they're rare normally right no problem share except if you plant these bt crops everywhere you kill off all the other insects and you have. What biologists call selection pressure right those rare individuals. That aren't killed by the gmo will be the only ones that survive and they will find each other and you know what happens next. Mattie they do that birds and the bees and the bugs thing they do they they they mate and offspring and suddenly you have a lot of insects with that. Same genetic trait a new strain of resistant. Insects emerged its evolution. Right in front of your eyes. That is what has happened over and over now. It's complicated because the biotech companies actually deployed a whole series of slightly different bt jeans and we've seen insects evolve resistance. I two one gene and then the next one sometimes it took maybe five years other times. It took a lot longer fifteen even twenty years. And it's patchy in some places the bt crops are still working and other places they aren't okay but the end. This idea of selection pressure has been around for a long time right so clearly. Scientists saw this coming. Oh absolutely did. In fact i was around. I was reporting on this back when there. Were these arguments going on back when the crops were new and university. Scientists were predicting that this would happen. If the genes were overused. They were pushing this idea of refuge to keep it from happening. They said farmers should be required to plant some of their land with non bt crops Just so all those pests. You know those with and without the resistance. Gene could thrive there elway. So in that way the rare insects with genetic resistance to bt wouldn't completely take over because some of those that were sensitive would still be around to be in the gene pool exactly exactly and the companies actually agreed to this in principle but there were these big arguments about how big the refuge had to be. There were some scientists who said at least for some of these bt crops. Farmers should not be allowed to plant those crops on more than half of their land. But the company said that'll never work. Farmers won't go for bt crops at all if there's such strict rules and the companies one and sure enough now there's resistance to bt so scientists like julie are back once again this argument pushing for tighter government rules. We are at an important point where we've seen some examples of what can happen and definitely do need to make some changes. What kind of changes are we talking about here. Dan because it feels pretty late in the game. Right it is. It is but there's one thing that people are focused on there's at least one bt. Gene is still working the bugs of not resistant to it yet so it still is effective against a lot of insects. And it's sort of carrying a lot of the weight right now. It's kind of the last bt. Still standing and scientists are worried. It'll soon break. You know under that weight of overuse especially in the south is used in both corn and cotton to fight off insects so that the environmental protection agency scientific advisers have told the agency it should only allow that gene to be used in one of those crops cotton or corn and it should be caught because controlling the bollworm in cotton is just much much more important economically in corn. It's a minor pest got and cotonou can wipe out your crop. And if you don't let it be used in corn than all those cornfields are that refuge. I see see but the company that owns this gene. Syngenta says no. That's not necessary. And it's not fair and the and the epa is actually backed away from idea. Okay i mean so what happens now dan. Well there are a lot of scientists including julie peterson who say if current farming practices. Don't change. it's possible that all of the bt genes that are currently on the market will stop working reliably within ten years and then farmers will have to find new ways to fight the insects. Maybe they'll be spraying more. Insecticides again or more and this is what julie wants maybe they go back to some more old-fashioned pest control methods you know crop rotations change what crops you plant from year to year. Yeah i mean. Indigenous communities around the world have used that technique for thousands of years some organic farmers due to right the the trick is going to be using those techniques and still producing the kind of big harvest that a lot of farmers and a lot of consumers now depend on. Okay dan charles. Thank you so much for bringing us

BT David Current Jonathan Evans David Kerns DAN Jonathan Julie Texas Saul Mattie North Carolina FBI Elway Gene Julie Peterson
Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

Short Wave

04:18 min | 3 months ago

Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

"Or at quang. I am ready to go back to school with you. Which honestly dreer great. We would be good lab competitive. Yeah we will be competitive but we be great together. I think and so the science concepts. We're going to unpack. Today is states of matter. You know some of those other states of matter. You didn't learn about in science class rights so the physicist i called up to explain this is martin's veer line at mit. and what. i find hilarious. How martin is he said when it comes to his own kid. He actually prefers to keep this particular science lesson. Pretty simple to assam like. Oh yeah you the gas liquid solid bam. Leave it at that you know. He's seven and states of matter is really just a way to describe how a group of particles think atoms or molecules etc move which is sort of beautiful and collective and different from what you would gifts by looking just at a single particle and changes in temperature and pressure can cause those particles to move differently and change their behavior right. We see the super easily with water. That's right in the liquid phase water molecules slip and slide past each other but we humans quickly learned that if you lower the temperature the particles slowdown bam. We see is appear and we fridges. And we're very excited about. That actually was a huge deal hundred years ago to make ice and if we go in the opposite direction heat water. The particles move faster and farther apart and eventually the h. two o. Molecules breakaway and dissipate into the air as water vapor humidity. That's right it is already a miracle in itself. Water exists in these three different states that we can see those states at temperatures that we can reach as a humans in the kitchen. But here's the thing we can only do so much in our kitchen. Speak right speakers though there. But there's a limited range of temperature and pressure that even you can achieve in your kitchen mattie and there are states of matter beyond this okay like do you remember plasma who ya. Sometimes it's called the fourth state of matter and it can happen when matter gets heated to a super high temperature like electrons rips from atoms which actually allows plasma to conduct. Electricity super cool. Lightning is plasma. Plasma is wild. It is wild. Yeah and if we were to go in the other direction to an extreme if martin son were to ask dad what can happen at a temperature much cooler than ice. Is there something else. I might start telling him about these superfluid states of matter which is exactly what martin's studies at mit these superfluids states of matter that we're long predicted but not easily observed in nature. So how many states of matter are out there. Well we don't actually know martin want to even commit to a number. When i asked him this question he actually said ouch. The is apparently no end to the series of interesting new. Twist that nature gives us to to find your states of matter. We just are digging as we speak. We're digging into this all the time and that's because in theoretical physics. You can use math to predict things that experimental physicists haven't observed yet and i say yet because in the last few decades scientists have successfully coaxed atoms under extreme laboratory conditions to enter other states of matter states that could have useful applications for future technologies awesome. Okay let's get this. Emily like how do they do. This kind of lab can had to exist for these other states of matter to emerge. I'm so glad you asked. They had to get cold. Ultra cold we work in the neno. Kelvin regime for breakfast ano- kelvin. So you might ask what so. That's actually very called. It's a billion times cold interstellar

Martin Quang MIT Emily Kelvin
Micro Wave: Why Some Fruits Ripen Faster In A Paper Bag

Short Wave

06:50 min | 5 months ago

Micro Wave: Why Some Fruits Ripen Faster In A Paper Bag

"Hey nerds. So today we've got eight special guest short waves, very own producer Brett Hansen Hey Brit. Hello. Hello. This is your first on air shortwave appearance and I am aggressively excited about this I. Know You are yes, it is. Your. And today we've got our latest microwave installment, you know these snappy episodes with a couple of quick signs tidbits, some listener mail, which I very much enjoy reading every morning except for mean. I picture you with Your Cup of coffee and cats just going through the mail. So you've your investigative reporting skills to work on from what I can tell is your favorite topic of all time peaches US yeah I really really love peaches Yeah. I. Don't know if you know this but I do eat one standing over my kitchen sink pretty much every day I. do know that you've told me that Multiple Times Brit actually can't stop talking about it. They're the best part of summer. But now that summer's over, I've been using that paper bag trick to get them ripe. Do you know what I'm talking about you put them unripe and peaches and a paper bag for a couple of days. Take them out will oh yeah. They're ripe I'm doing that trick all the time I'm doing that trick right now actually knew or not I have peaches from the farmers market in a bag trust me. Okay. Well, that's actually what we're going to talk about today I've been using this trick for years, but I had no idea why it works. So I wanted to find out. So today on the show, we talked to a fruit expert about why some fruits like peaches ripen faster in paperback and why others don't. And? This is shortwave. From NPR. Okay Britt. We are talking about why some fruit like peaches ripen faster in a paper bag. So who did you talk to? Yeah so I called Juan Carlos Melgar he's a professor and pathologist at Clemson University some people say what's Pamala geology the science that study for three? Yes. So matty, full disclosure I didn't know what a pathologist was before I talked to one Carlos somebody who studied fruit trees shame another thing I didn't know is just how many varieties of peaches there are many take a guess how many do you think there are? A eleven. Okay. Well, eleven is a great number. Tell, it's not right. I could tell. But it is not the right number. Juan Carlos told me that he works with almost three hundred different varieties. There's no three hundred and he says compare that to apples. For instance, a lot of people know dame's varieties apples. Gala. Readily shows or whatever. However, nobody knows varieties features. And that's because they're legal Ten days two weeks bad variety is gone. Wow. You're already in my mind but Hansen. Okay. Each facts are facts I feel like I've been disrespecting peaches up until this point and I, need to change. Okay. So what did you find out about the paper bag trick? Yes. So one Carlo says that there are two key factors to understanding why some fruit including peaches ripen faster in a paper bag. So let's start with factor number one beaches produce a gaseous horrible. It's called Italy so. That gashes hormone ethylene is a ripening hormone. So as peaches ripen, they produce a burst of ethylene. So ethylene ripening go hand-in-hand exactly. But it's not just that a ripening peach produces ethylene it also responds to it. So say, for example, you create an environment where a peaches not only producing ethylene, but it's also surrounded by it that right there is the trick to making the peach ripen faster finding away to surround a peach in the gase hormone. I. I'm sorry expect gas or boat. I. Okay. Okay. This is where the paper bag comes in right? Yeah. So you put a peach in a paper bag close it up, and then all of the ethylene it's naturally producing gets captured and starts to accumulate inside the bag which means peach surrounded by ethylene Michael Peach steam room. A. Virtuous. Cycle exactly. That's exactly it's like. Okay. There's another part of this that I thought was pretty cool to arrived impeach. Using lot of athletes could help ripening a piece that is driving yet or not the same banana. Classic example Ou Yeah. So basically, the more ethylene accumulating in the bag, the faster the fruit ripens. So Super Ripe Peach is going to help a really hard peach ripen even faster. If that makes sense personally, I like to call this fruit teamwork. Mattie I think that that's a scientific term. So Okay Br does it matter whether or not you use a paper bag or could you just put the peach in like some other kind of container I actually wondered about this too. So basically, is there something special about the paper bag and this brings us to factor number two respiration? The other characteristics of these fruits is that they have not on the peaking saving. Peaking risk creation there we spiring. Yeah fresh fruit continue to fire or breathe if you will after being harvested so. Even producing carbon dioxide those peaches need that Oxygen Hanson. If. That seal two accumulating, they're they're useless oxygen. refire this. It's going to slow down there. Got It in writing if you wanted to writing to let that go on. Okay. So something that allows like a bit of airflow or just oxygen to be coming in and out. So a plastic bag won't work neither will a tupperware container or anything else that essentially prevents oxygen from getting inside Sudas the paper bag trick work for other fruits too. So it works for some but not all peaches, bananas, tomatoes basically fruits that ripen off the plant after they've been picked. Those are the ones that you can pop into a paper bag. Got It wow Brett Hansen. I. Have Learned so much

Brett Hansen Carlo Juan Carlos Melgar Juan Carlos Producer Clemson University Britt Matty NPR Oxygen Hanson Sudas Italy Mattie Pamala Professor
I Guess It's Time to Move?

The Cut

04:43 min | 5 months ago

I Guess It's Time to Move?

"I gave everything away. One friend took my Ottoman another took my copy of the collected works of Joe Brainard. And unloaded it all in handoffs in the park where I'd played the object between us, and then my friend would take it in their arms. My possessions became the conduit for our intimacy because I couldn't hug them goodbye and I couldn't throw a party. I was moving during Cova D-. It felt like a bonkers idea to move right now. Although it seems like a lot of people are doing it. In this time of enforced stillness, there is so much motion. I moved I moved I moved. Yeah. I did lose during covid from Washington DC. To New Orleans across the country from. And everything I've ever known to the House of my dreams to my parents House Boston to Aspen from Florida to Wisconsin from the area to a big college town in the Midwest I bought a house and moved into an during the pandemic. The. Best part of it was the houses on corona drive, but it's also just been strange per. Hard, to get furniture. Pretty alone. And pretty trapped for me. It's meant. Taking a lot of walks and bike rides often with no particular destination mine, it's been it's very difficult to meet new people and hard to connect to people. I, would see people that I didn't know and wonder what it was like to sort of know those people know the people of this place very much expecting to transform into some. What do we all have that fantasy as moving into a city where no one knows we are becoming the best version of ourselves and that's really not happening right now. The first night the taxi drop me off at my apartment I may as well have been in Toronto or Chicago. The summer heat was homogenising and the museums and theaters and restaurants that had meant New York to me were shuttered. There was nowhere to go beyond the strange new building. I called home. What was this city just beyond the confines of my apartment? I WANNA? Say the thing that really makes a city is the people. But that's the element that really broke my heart. I text a friend like Hey I'm in Brooklyn do you want to hang out? And then it turned out so many of them were moving away. So many of them. Yes. So what the hell away you live included in this mass exodus is my new CO worker at the cut Madeleine. I. I just sort of decided to leave. We're sitting on Mattie stoop in Brooklyn but this week. Mattie is moving to Austin Texas. I knew a couple of people in Austin it sounded really cool. I've never been but I never have been. But. I was like, why not seems cool. I could never take a risk like this. I feel like I was only able to move to New York because I'm from here and my family is still here I had a job here and I planned it all out although Mattias still working for the cut but she can just log onto slack from wherever I think it's cool to be like. To just start a new life and be like, what is it GonNa be like, who am I going to know? Where am I going to go? What's IT GONNA look like. Those uncertainties are very exciting to me. I mean, yeah I definitely felt that. Moving to my new city felt like having crush. But. It was kind of the crash where you don't really know someone and then suddenly you're imagining what your grandkids will look like. Definitely have an image of myself. An outdoorsy person. I'm going to have a car for the first time in my life, which is huge. So I'm like just constantly picturing myself driving around. It's like I can be a new person like you know in this new place that can be whoever I want to be. Although I've heard it said that everywhere you go. There you are. I don't really know how much one can actually change in a new place especially now. Like when I first moved here in the summer I kinda did all the same things? I. Did back when I lived in Oakland I, biked around ad in the park I took a covert test I cooked my dinners at home. I made this podcast in the closet. You can't completely escape your old self in some ways. It's just you in a different room, the of just like logging on. To slack and having everything be exactly the same when I'm in a new city in a new apartment like have gone through this huge change it's just gonNa be so weird.

New York New Orleans Brooklyn Joe Brainard Mattie Handoffs Austin Mattias Washington Toronto Madeleine Oakland Texas Boston Florida Chicago Wisconsin Aspen
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 5 months ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
Don't AT Me: Twitch Has A Stalker Problem

theScore Esports Podcasts

06:14 min | 6 months ago

Don't AT Me: Twitch Has A Stalker Problem

"Thursday September ninth twitch dreamer be X. Bullet posted a tweet longer where she details her experiences with the person she alleges is zero harasser and Stalker. She calls him by name Mattie Rocket Online? He goes by specialty Poof from now on I'm going to be referring to him as suspecting according to the twit longer the problem started when be ex-bull filed a police report against spectacle alleging that he was using quote his or to lure kids into a discord server where he was being sexually inappropriate with them, sharing pornographic websites and images and possibly grooming them for exploitation and quote. Now, the that be X. bullet is referring to is inception east sports which suspect he. Founded and the report she filed to her local police department which was made public last week details alleged history of sexual misconduct, which she claims involved miners. Many of the allegations stem from the inception east sports partner discord server, which at one had over thirty, five hundred members and allegedly had multiple instances of racist and homophobic conversations and whole reason that be ex bullet not respecting is that at one point she was signed to inception east sports as it just chatting streamer it's a twenty four page report documenting in detail with screen shots, videos, and private conversations. A litany of allegations against spectator from his time running three different East sports organizations most recently with inception. To Be X. bullet spectrum somehow found out about the report that she filed and according to her. This is when the harassment began and he's been coming at me everything he has with doc seen harassment bought. Threats Tell you know telling me has my address and like. Saying things like see you soon or can't wait to come visit you kind of stuff from allegedly dachshund her repeatedly to allegedly giving her name and address to people that she describes as dark web criminals threatening to show to where she was on a recent trip and even allegedly having a naked photo of her daughter on his computer. It got to the point where be ex bullet decided to stop streaming on twitch out of fear for her and her daughter safety she. Ran In here and she had underwear on but she bolted in here and I like a lunge data and grabbed her and wrangled her out, and then I ended the stream and as I was doing that I noticed that somebody who was associated with him had clipped the incident and I deleted it right away and I deleted the five and then the next day he sent me a message saying that he had naked pictures of my three year old child saved. And he was using it to blackmail me or to threaten me or to say that he was going to try to get me banned from twitch according to her SPEC D at one point was banned from discord in connection to allegations similar to what she filed in her report. But allegedly, he uses multiple different accounts to remain on discord. She says that even some of his admins have quote emailed discord support trying to get his ulta counts band with no luck and quote now, ex bullet says that she spoke to multiple different lawyers and that due to differing state laws if she wanted to do something legally she. Have to take him to federal court, which would be extraordinarily expensive. She also says that she's reached out to her local authorities, multiple different times but that they haven't been very helpful now, I also reached out to Spec for comment and to get his perspective on the situation, and here's what he had to say it's three years ago and then no excuse for anything but I don't even remember what I did three weeks ago. So my language and talking to people are not asking every single person what their ages on discord and I don't think people do that normally and I watched I watched other youtube channels like. like mcnasty or forty and people like that, and they're talking to people. Like Like. The same way and no one has problem with it a debt why but no one raised awareness back then saying, hey, this a real big problem shouldn't be talking to the minors like this and I know it's not the right thing to do but like. Being Gaming and It's really really a toxic environment and some games, and this is what he had to say when it came to the allegations of targeted harassment towards be X. Bullet Online. So I had the address, they took it and they did. I mean they they found everything. More they found more about her than than I. Even have I, knew I knew what they were I didn't know how or they were going to act on it. I know I didn't know hey. If I give this person, this information that they're going to go really really hard on or are they just going to go look at it and be like whatever. Now, what we talked about here is only a fraction of what's alleged in be X. bullets poor, and while this might be the latest instance of stocking and online harassment in the world of twitch. Unfortunately, it's far from the only one a few months ago. Sweden. Anita who say popular twitch streamer with Threat Syndrome, went public with her own experiences dealing with targeted harassment at a sta the been stalking me quite a few months actually they've been coming to my house they've been sleeping and pretty much my backyard watching the house. The other day. Shop capers had to intervene and kind of holding back while knee chased after. According to Anita this person slept in her backyard multiple times peek through her mail slot. While she was home physically assaulted her and violated the restraining order. She filed against him multiple times. It apparently got so bad that Anita said she feared for her life. This person would bang on her door for hours at a time would constantly send her death threats. He threatened to kill me and the police response has been incredibly underwhelming after he assaulted me, I had a witness I love evidence and the police did nothing she goes on. To say that when the police eventually went to talk to this person about the alleged assault, he was on his way to see her and he allegedly had a knife on him after months of Anita pushing for something to happen. She says that recently the police press charges and this guy was given a suspended sentence of two months in prison and basically a suspended sentences where you're found guilty of whatever you've been charged with by you probably won't be spending any time in prison

Harassment Anita Mattie Rocket Poof Ulta Partner Youtube Assault Sweden Stalking
The Game Changing Power of Acceptance.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:15 min | 6 months ago

The Game Changing Power of Acceptance.

"Pay their sober people and sober solar 's and other people who are just interested in fine tuning near. Mental Health. Yeah it's me Linh and I'm in Georgia peachtree city to be exact for those of you who don't know I. Would like to just kind of reintroduce myself if you're. A recent joyner to the podcast I am a licensed professional clinical counselor with a private practice in Peachtree City, Georgia, and I also practice online with my clients back where I was originally licensed in Minnesota. So if you're in either of those two states that can work with you as a counselor, however I also have sober. So recovery where I coach people because that's what do you do when your therapist and want to reach more people in the world you practice your coaching skills which we also use in therapy. So I've developed this coaching program that I use with people, which is very similar to what I do in my counseling practice extraordinarily similar. And I offer that through private coaching packages where you can work with me individually for a series of months and you can find out more at Lynn. Mattie DOT, com or sober. So Recovery Net, they take you to the same place and you can just check me out there. I started this podcast in two thousand eighteen really as a project to get my voice out there. And share what I know to be good mental health with other people along with issues that surround us when we are in recovery or trying to be sober and all of those good things and today I am surprised. But happily so to know that there are about twenty five thousand of you listening every month and I'm ever so grateful for you picking up what I'm. Putting down. So today's subject I loved digging in two things that interest me but also seemingly come up a lot in my week to week working with people who are suffering in the same way that I dead wanting to make their lives better and finding ways to do that. That are very empowering. So today I wanNA talk about one of the most powerful tools in what? I call the buffer zone, which is essentially your toolkit it just i. like the analogy of a buffer zone because you can grow it really big. I am putting my two hands out very close together at first and then stretching to become a big buffer zone of things that you can do to help you cope and one of the most powerful tools as I said is acceptance. Let's figure out why people often will say I can't. Do this anymore I can't stand it. It's not fair. This possibly could ruin me. This can't be true and it shouldn't be this way. It's almost as if we refuse to accept truths that are right in front of us, and we work really hard to keep it from becoming true. Or that we balk re refused to accept that if we do this thing called accepting. It means a green with this thing that is. Seemingly. Unacceptable standing right in front of us but accepting doesn't mean a green I like to think about accepting as refocusing your energy. Because it's exhausting to keep fighting what is happening right in front of us the reality of what's happening in front of us, and moreover, it doesn't work refusing to accept for instance that you've been fired or that someone's broken up with you that your friend cheated you somehow or did something wholly unexpected and something that goes against your very values you weren't you know accepted into a program that you like. This becomes pain and pain is uncomfortable and it's not what we want to experience. Accepting reality is difficult. Exactly because it's painful, no one wants to experience disappointment sadness or loss but those are experiences that are part of life when we attempt to avoid and resist these emotions. We add suffering to our pain. We build the emotion bigger her with our thoughts and our rumination creating more misery by attempting to. And or suppress these painful emotions

Mattie Dot Peachtree City Mental Health Private Practice Linh Georgia Minnesota
Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

Short Wave

05:36 min | 6 months ago

Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

"We are tackling a question from listener. Rachel. Weiss space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? Okay I. Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving. So quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. But jaw who we met earlier, he says that from sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, and of course, they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. Tend to not should one but many many pieces, hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, environment interactions with you know magnetic fields, and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. But there's a scientist mark. Matinee, at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow. But I feel like if there was a major collision, I would hurt about it, right? Yeah. There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in two thousand, fifteen, for example, the crew. On. The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, thousand, seven, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. Technology. Brian Weeden, remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. So that one. Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and contentedly back at Earth. When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. Even, if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It. Yeah. So Brian says. The risk of space junk involves convincing people, launching satellites, governments, and companies to change their behavior. Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, it's translating into real world costs a satellite. Field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, which isn't good for the commercials base economy, which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah. We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

International Space Station Brian Weeden United States Nasa Cluttering Rachel Weiss Spacex Cracks Lake Scientist Mattie America Hollywood George Clooney Navy Sandra Bullock Secure World Foundation Director
What 'Arrival' Gets Right — and Wrong — About Linguistics

Short Wave

07:27 min | 6 months ago

What 'Arrival' Gets Right — and Wrong — About Linguistics

"Jessica con was a teenager when she first learned that linguistics is a thing. She stumbled upon story of Your Life, a science fiction novella by Ted Chiang. It's all about linguist- trying to figure out how to communicate with well aliens I. Think it was actually probably the first time I heard about the field of linguistics. And then I started college the year I saw an introduction to linguistics curson signed up for it. These days Jessica's field linguist at McGill University in particular I work on. Syntax. Basically the way words combine to make sentences in a few years ago. She got an email to be a consultant on a movie, a movie that was coincidentally based on the exact novella she read as a teenager. I'm not trying to draw any connections that aren't there, but you read about linguistics for the first time in a book that became a movie that you became the the person they consulted with. It's amazing right? It's pretty wild I mean when I first got the email that asks me to work on this film I was really ready to push spam because it sounded very strange and then at some point I saw the story of your life and I wait a minute I haven't thought about that in years and then I responded That Film Twenty Sixteen Sifi hit a rival. So real quick. In case you haven't seen it. Here's the gist. This is Davy arrived. All of a sudden twelve spaceships land all over earth trouble saying. And we don't know why they're not doing anything after landing there. Still no signs of first contact or just the sitting there are at least and so governments around the world are panicking trying to figure out why are these alien spaceship sitting here and different teams are going into try to understand why they're here what they want. And we are following one of these spaceships that I think is somewhere in Wyoming and the. Amy Adams who is a linguist? Production. And her job is to decipher the alien language and figuring out what they want. So today in the show another installment of the Shortwave Science Movie Club what the movie arrival got wrong about linguistics what it got. and. Whether or not Field Linguists Jessica coon has actually communicated with aliens. Honestly it's a tossup. I mattie Safai you're listening to shortwave NPR's Daily Science podcast. So Jessica you were the linguist who consulted on the movie arrival. So give me a big picture sense of what that means like. What did they actually have you do? Yeah. So the first thing I did was I got to read drafts of the screenplay which was really fun because it's a very common thing to do and academia we read things and we give feedback on them but usually not this fund of a scale committee meeting ever exactly yeah. It was very funds so I got to read the screenplay and they especially wanted. Feedback on how linguistics and linguists were represented in the film. So there were lots of places where I gave feedback and they incorporated it into the film. There were other places where they would say, okay just, Kinda yes. Yes. Thanks for your help but really in the end linguists are not Hollywood's primary audience and we're not going to get everything right here and now linguists just get to join like all the other fields of people who get really annoyed when science misrepresented onscreen. So welcome to the club. Sorry, we're not GONNA change that. The movie makers also put Jessica through some exercises, basically giving her a whiteboard and asking her would you do if aliens showed up and those exercises actually informed one of the most famous scenes in the movie when the main character we spanks played by Amy Adams. Schools the guy in charge of the mission about the fundamentals of linguistics. He asks her for a list of vocab words. Essentially, the keywords she was planning on teaching the aliens, that day. Cavaliers responding. Lock. help you understand. So Amy. Adams walks over to the whiteboard and scribbles what is your purpose on earth? This is where you want to get to. The question. Okay. So first, we need to make sure that they understand what a questions. The nature of A. Request for information along with the response then. We need to clarify the difference between a specific you. And a collective you because we don't want to know why Joe Alien is here we want to know why they all landed. In purpose requires an understanding of intent we need to find out. Do they make conscious choices or is their motivation? So instinctive that they don't understand a why question at all and and biggest of all, we need to have enough vocabulary with them that we understand their answer. I love that scene Yes that is one of the great triumphs of of linguistics in the film. I mean this was. So this was one of the most interesting parts of the movie for me because I'm you know this idea of building a base for understanding of a new language is like really interesting and and like the first steps in trying to communicate, which is you know like your thing right? So but it's something that I think we. Just, don't think about into see it in kind of in practice was so fascinating and I'm glad to hear it was like pretty well done your eyes question Mark Yeah I. Think I. Think it was really well done. I. Mean I think one thing that is really neat about this movie and what makes it such? You know interesting and intellectual Sifi is. They're not just typical humanoid creatures. We don't already have some kind of magical universal translator in place, and so we have to figure out how how do they even communicate and will we be able to communicate with them given how advanced they are that they've made these spaceships have arrived on earth I, think it's safe to assume that they have some advanced form of. Communication and that that form of communication should have patterns in it that we could eventually decipher. But thinking about you know, is it audible or is it written or could creatures communicate with smells or we just have no idea what could be out there if it's audible is in a sound frequency that human

Amy Adams Jessica Jessica Con Shortwave Science Movie Club Ted Chiang Jessica Coon Mcgill University Consultant Wyoming Davy Cavaliers Joe Alien Mattie Safai Daily Science Hollywood Mark NPR
How Gene Therapy Helped Conner Run

Short Wave

04:12 min | 7 months ago

How Gene Therapy Helped Conner Run

"Mattie. SAFAI NPR science correspondent. John Hamilton Hi John Hi Mary so John, where would you like to begin I? Think we should start with the scientist. Okay. Let's do it. Okay. So obviously many many scientists have worked to understand this disorder. But today we're gonNA focus on Jude Samal ski back in Nineteen eighty-four and I'll ski was still a graduate student at the University of Florida and he was part of this team that cloned a virus called A V. and those are group of viruses that can infect people but they don't cause diseases. Yeah. I remember I learning about this in Grad School John that discovery was a big deal because basically we can turn these viruses in tools and and that's because viruses on their own are pros at getting into ourselves and getting up close and personal with our DNA, which is exactly where you need to get to treat a lot of genetic disorders at. Their source exactly, and he was one of the scientists who figure that out. So as you these viruses have just revolutionized gene therapy right and after some Oh ski and his team Clone Davie, they wanted to try to use the virus to treat descend muscular dystrophy. That's the genetic disorder you were talking about earlier. Got It. So a lot of these therapies work by kind of targeting gene or genes that are the root of a disorder. So what's The deal with to Sheng muscular dystrophy John Kids who have Sharon. Lack a functional version of gene called D. M. D., and this gene makes a protein called destroyed often that helps muscles stay healthy. Got It. Okay. The idea is if the problem is that someone lack a working gene, you could just give them a working copy of that gene and what's the most wanted to do was packed some of the genetic code from a disrobing gene inside. Right and then once the virus got into the body, it would infect muscle cells, and then that faulty code is replaced with a functional version. Right? smokey says a Aviv, this harmless virus would work. Station service it's a molecular Fedex truck. Carries a genetic payload and it's delivering to its target right but it turns out bring a gene is a little bit harder. Then delivering a package and destroyed gene is especially challenging. One reason is it's is the a the virus are Fedex truck is incredibly tiny even among viruses. It's so small. You need an electron microscope just to see it, and then you have the destroyed gene, which is huge. It's the largest known human gene it contains about five. Hundred Times more genetic code than a so fitting that specific gene into that specific virus would be like trying to get a football stadium into a fedex truck something like that. Yeah, and most he has some other challenges to One is that do sheng affects billions of muscle cells all over the body. So this a delivery truck would have to be programmed to find all of these cells recognize them, and then infect them with this new genetic code. Yeah and some spent fifteen years tackling these challenges he was going along you is making progress he said, but it was coming one small step at a time. This is very challenging. It was mount ever said the gene therapy community in each one of these steps was setting up base camp, but then in nineteen, ninety, nine so mulcahy's work for that matter all gene therapy research pretty much came to a stop. The reason was that a teenager named Jesse. Gelsinger had died in the gene therapy experiment, right? I. Mean I. Remember Learning about that in graduate school in genetics. It was horrible. It was really sad the experiment he was part of had nothing to do with muscular dystrophy or the virus nothing to do with some all skis work, but it didn't matter right gene therapy trials were postponed or abandoned investors disappeared and so did research funding it stopped everything everyone got supercautious everyone except the muscular dystrophy association. The Jerry Lewis Telethon people they continue to push for the advancement of gene

Scientist John Gelsinger John Hamilton John Hi Mary NPR Jerry Lewis Jude Samal Mattie. Grad School Aviv Graduate Student Jesse Mulcahy Sheng D. M. D. University Of Florida John Kids Sharon
"mattie" Discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"mattie" Discussed on Mother, May I Sleep With Podcast?

"This anymore. Calm down talked me. What did to Mattie? Thinking about. I can't sleep when I sleep. I dream about don't do that to yourself. Is Your ID the caused it? Not you'd. I'm the reason she's gone. If people at school, but I did it to. Those idiots thing I know that you're a good person broken. That's what matters. Now I'm not. moral. The police thing I did it to the police. Don't have any evidence to convict you, so don't let.

Mattie
"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"We're back at the races I just I just saw traumatises tweet trumpeting. His his visit he. He says that I've bumped him twice. I think only really once I think just one other time was was. There was some question whether whether the timing was gonNA work but either way it's one of the most anticipated separated conversations after Breeders Cup the Paul Matisse Postmortem and getting into all the vets that work the vets. That didn't didn't what we were right about. What was unexpected? Go morning on the that. You're finally want let me out beyond California and you hang around with those movie stars and you've had the great gambler philosopher only the battler says. You've you've changed if I'd really changed I would've I would've stayed out there because I do love. I do love being out there and this this series of races Paul it always. It's always dissipated disappinted. And some of the best typically some of the best betting opportunities of the year but one observation. The came up. The last couple of days is is that the money was pretty smart about a lot of a lot of horses and that included Bella Fina and without parole role. I mean not necessarily winners but horses that that were bet and ended up running well first before we talk specific races. What was your overall impressions Russians? Well that's one of the overall impressions I had was that even though we've heard that the The horses didn't handle the the tracking and whatever the the you know the force of the highest figures fared pretty well and you know for the most part form held up pretty good. You know a couple of horses you mentioned there. We live in a different world. You know with Workout reports and and such. I would add spun. The run probably a little bit to that category too. You know the You know we have better information. I mean a horse like Without Parole The the Chad Brown horse you know all every these workout people were on top of the fact that he was working working with bricks and mortar you know and add holdings beating them actually beating them and you know and you can watch it to you know we have. XP TV TV which is a an incredible service. I know we probably are a little jaded and take it for granted nowadays but you know this stuff was is unheard of not even that long ago so so you gotta expect a little bit changes where the money is going to be. The money is going to be better. You know we're doing on an everyday basis. The money's better that's a great point that's a great point and I I would also include the understanding that is certain horses says aren't working at as well as might have been anticipated and people. I see people that are dismissive of the workout information. And they say well everyb- everybody's working good. Everybody is working well L. enough summer working significantly better or noticeably just a little less and that might be enough differential when you're building tickets other. You know the other thing where we we. Don't get to see the horses as much you know work out with you and I've talked about this before. Workouts are more important now. Because was it used to be you. You saw the horse run two weeks ago so he didn't care about how he trained. You know. I mean if you watch the Seattle flu win the you know the the Marlboro you don't worry about how he's training into the Jockey Club. It was only twelve days ago. You know fourteen days ago You know it's different now. I mean a lot of these sorts of hadn't run since some of them hadn't runs in Saratoga or Delamarre so you have to You know you're you're look it. You're you're looking at a completely different horse in some cases so you need you need that kind of information you know and you trust especially especially that the the crackers. A- ah they'll probably on some you know on this on a daily basis the clocking information we get should be better but when it comes to the good horses did you know you. You can't fault it. I mean it's incredible my favorite part of for the invariably. Is You know it was with the young horses purses and on an everyday basis on the first years and then when you combine for you know for me to try to sniff out a price thing about Saratoga season for for instance in del Mar it helps to see an obscure horse. That may come from less high profile L. connections that's working well and then when I see that combines with positive sibling Information is that you know that were precocious and and one early. That's for me. That's a the go-to and that's where I find that. It really helpful on a day in day out basis. I I gotTA bring up before. We talk about the series of of races. A Friday and Saturday that comprise the Fourteen Cup events. There was a horse each day. Paul Friday and Saturday that if you played the early pick five and the early pick for that absolutely absolutely would have made your Breeders Cup. That was Mo- fours of course on Saturday Berry Irwin Barrier Berry Abrahams and Doc Peter Miller. That was eight thousand nine hundred ninety one and then there was the Bondi horse on Friday. That Rick Hammersley gave everybody and I and I left off the ticket tap back at fourteen to one and so if you sniff out those two horses either day you were off to a big star. Well I didn't I didn't Tap back got me pretty good on Friday at the race that I did that. I missed and and and I don't know if you if you you probably know on Friday and Thursday night early Friday morning most togas power was out so Friday was the oh no I was out of. You Know I. I had to leave my house because I didn't. I couldn't see the races on Friday so I I didn't didn't get power back until Friday night but So Friday was a little bit of a tough thing. I never would have been able to add. Probably somebody texted me and said Tapa back one. If they it came back from the future is still probably wouldn't. I probably wouldn't got the message even though I really can't complain about that when he was he was a hardcore door savvy he you know he he definitely ran Iran much better. I guess the one thing you could say that race is that that it was it. was there for the taking it. Wasn't it wasn't a great face. It was a very weak. We grace and it was a hard race to figure. I just I never I never would have come up with him on the on Saturday. I actually think the horse that the other race that's going to be important on. The undercard is the flagstaff rate. And I you know I singled him pick five and me too I I use bury a little bit With most whereas even though that wasn't a great result for me but Later on I didn't have I needed home in her in the In the last leg but Flagstaff is GonNa be interesting race. We probably won't get to it later on so you know. The the time that race was was I wanted to mention that the the time of that race was basically the same as Kofi and for whatever reason some of the places that I've seen have already projected that figure down but I I think that's a huge mistake and I would really take notice of the two three year olds. Who wrote ran behind flagstaff? Coming forward They they they definitely improved without many people noticing. Though I think Bob Baffert already had made a comment about roads how happy was with them roadster. We're in the Mandela horse. Extra hope ultrasounds ran really well and are going to be a factor probably next year especially in the early part of next year in California. That's a that's a terrific side bar and you would think that given the distance they'll both be pointing for the Malibu. Yeah I would I would thinks thanks over. The the great thing about bolt sources can definitely go along. Yeah so if they if they go a different direction I may not be great for us if they all end up in the same in the same race. You know but we'll see how things play out there. They're definitely to definitely keep your eyes on point well taken and flagstaff lack staff buy out by every measure on figs. I mean it was a was a single in a stand out and it was weird though that in the early wagering Who was roadster that? That was an early favourite in a strong early favourite before very slowly and steadily flagstaff. Came down to even money and roadster off just a tick under under three to to like you started off with somebody in somebody in those camps must have thought that they that they both have improved. You know that's a general rules about this time of year that I start. I always give Three year old the second look you know and Not just for not not just for stake races but this race is I think in general handicapping when it gets this time of year. Lots of lots of three year olds make big jumps forward. And you know I'd I would I'd that some of my better handicapping at the end of the year I think going forward people should be looking at you. Know is there is a tip off that the sources has gone before no it you know and those to be coming but you know. I think it's a good lesson. You know for racing. We're hearing that extra hope Already will point. For long races Eric Lawson weighing in and I appreciate that would make sense for Samantha. SEGEL's in fact Samantha. The made that race go. I saw her earlier in the week. And we were talking about I said hey you're running this weekend. And she said well extra hopes going to go in the Damascus. Yes and I think they kind of hustle doesn't and we made the race go so that was There's I'd be faded about how he how he ran. I'm sure they are to to keep you ran real well. Well actually. I know it's I know it's turf but I'm just looking down. I forgot what kind of a number Mo four zero came back with. What a ninety six I think he just he just went forward as well? You know again another. I think he was free as well. I guess you could have predicted that it was a you know. It's a lot of red boarding to do that but You know we needed to go forward to win but He kind of figured to get the the trip that he did. So and the three year old forces If you've read any my tweet issue there. They've been hungry bunch you know now so you know looking for an outsider in that race probably made sense but That was a that was a tough race but one that'll work like that could certainly went. Well well I can tell you that. What one thing? I was so happy for Berry Berry Abrahams. who was such a special moment and of course Rosario part of that story but I had sniffed out succeed in surpass? Who I ki- I you find? I like that at eight to ten to one and you think you got something and then I was is like Oh yeah not gonNA catch. He's not gonNA catch him today. Quote Unquote so that got the under since we since we're very very very Very trained for my brother Myself For since for.

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"mattie" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Thursday race fans Sirius. Xm To o-on sports are nine sixty four if you're listening to Siriusxm online and on our website to depict dot com and it's kind of a kind of a mixed morning here in upstate New York watching the action and the weather down in New York today happened to be MTO with Carlisle Bell at Akwa docked. And and they're holding the MTO's there off the turf. At Churchill. I saw that K- K Kevin Kirstein letting everybody know earlier and it's too bad because the as it happens spends the Churchill the church card all the cards just terrific and there's always a an intense Season where the eastern half of the country you know trying to get their last Last listen on the grass before turf disappears and and there was a two year old turf maiden group lined up for for Churchill. And what else that at least one other. Yeah second level allowance as well and quite a few quite a few you in all the allowance races. There's any number of of familiar names fact On the main track today mile and an eighth kind of the CO feature with what what was going to be a turf for second level three year old fillies a mile. We'll see there's one. MTO for really perset reset but Steinhoff Sagamore send the pretty imposing entry three in the eighth race today. Churchill scars are cool. Who of course seem to burst on the scene this summer at at Saratoga for Stanley and travers was a bridge too far early on anyway and scars cool and Grit and glory together but fireball shot in here for Phil Bauer Asmussen with hitch and tank? Commander Donavan EMA looked okay zone and he can really very good group today at Churchill and I'll get to yesterday's results acqueduct mentioning resumes today and drew a really good card for Saturday with three stakes that feature the they're all listed but the Artie Schiller with a big group of twelve that was entertaining the Commonwealth on Saturday at Churchill three year olds and that that also overflow field the the Pumpkin Pie. It's getting to be Pumpkin Pie. Season Phillies and mayor's going seven eighths group of seven there and also the Atlantic beach the the two year old stake going six on the grass. And that's got a full nice field as as well very good attractive. Saturday guard acqueduct. They drew course. Del Mar.. Got Opening Day tomorrow. Kathryn crosby kicks things off. They kind of Wade into the action. Then of course a lot of those those Hollywood stakes then migrated down the DEL Mar.. They'll start to come forward nice card on Saturday at Del. Mar a lot of good racing and of course as we mentioned Incheon yesterday our visit our final visited the season as it were with bill. Downs and Indiana. They wrapped up their season and and kind of kind of interesting and we touched on the on the major players and the the results including including the nice price on that mystery bridled who was up near the. They're the LEDIN withstood. The challenge of the favourite operations. Stevie just a no shy and mystery bridled nine to one nineteen dollars and change Michael Weaver and Diana Weaver and also the The husband wife team name the Jim and Tammy eats nice way to end the meat that came that came in the in the boys race and now the too much coffee and then the slocum. The slocum ended up with two favorites. Two of the favorites expect Indian marinas legacy but three to one marinas legacy wire-to-wire the divine park mayor for Aaron West and bone doctors stable turning back. Andy Burg comes ter- stable table and expect Indi. Who had a nice season out at Indiana so the the midwest turns the Churchill and very slowly and steadily as you know the horses run through their opportunities communities particularly Churchill.

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Empowered to be themselves. Get ready for a lot of last. Unfiltered, by and wine. Get ready to shake things up. Here's caitlyn. Welcome to off the vine on your host Kaitlyn bristowe in the studio today. You may remember her as the Somali did I say, right. Nailed it kiss from great therapy. Episode. Mattie selectmen who is now retired from wine. I'm retired for my my first one career now, I'm just a regular old snobby drinker. Which is why I'm serving you the crappy read today and her friend, Brooke Tom, attach nowadays, you got it. It was good. I panicked. I was. Pitch. And together. They started knows it Nashville see paranoid about high. Because I think it's like I don't want to insult somebody. So I'm always so paranoid about high pronounce it just because I want to make it right anyways. Nashville Nashville Nashville Nashville Nashville, a lifestyle brand and apparel company that gives back to orphans widows and traffic women in middle Tennessee such an amazing organization that you guys have created. Thank you. Good for you. And thank you so much for coming on the podcast today for just doing what you do. And I just wanted to start by maybe you guys giving us a little background on just who you are. Absolutely. I were psyched, I'm psyched to be back. And you're always welcome back. All right. We'll just have to start a new company and another new company. They just keep me on my toes. Retirement interesting for me. Well, all it. Brooke speaking on it first and kind of tell you a little bit about her. This was her brainchild. And then I piggybacked on with her after my after salt and vine finished, which we're all still crying about with the good news is the bottle shop. That's there is going to reopen. The sweet wonderful man who was my GM for so long got the new folks to sublease space. So we can. And what's Nashville? Oh, amazing. Okay. Good near the wind chop up. Well, yeah. Plug it all day sister plug it all day. I'm like go on if you want to. Okay. So I guess this started kind of I was at this crossroads in my life, where I had been a hairstylist, and I ended up realizing that thing I love the most about that was that people get super vulnerable when they sit in your hair, they really think about it. What you tell your hair stylist and Arab bartender. You you are and there's in hairstylist and your therapist. And you know, sometimes you're dislike I can't believe that opened up about that. And I got so excited to go and just listen to these women and just all of their problems. But the bad thing about that is I'd never let them pay me at the end going. We come home and check secure actually losing money doing now. So if you want to be a counselor, go, get your ph. So so I got introduced to a marketing company from hairstyling, and I ended up about six years in I've been leading a team at twenty thousand women how yes our full it has world's part time. It really landed in my lap from one of my clients. And so I love that. And it really is filling. But I've realized what I love even more than the products. I'm marketing is the stories all of these women and just the relationships and the connections. So basically the biggest part of my existence. I feel like is we actually adopted a little girl. Yes. And going through the adoption process. Just wrecked me and just an unexplainable way. And I just can't ever live my life with my eyes closed ever again to it. And so I just started feeling so unfulfilled and like I was just not stepping into my true calling. So I just started thinking what is something that every single day? If I woke up, no matter what mood I'm in. I would want to do and it has to do with women and advocating for adoption. And so the war that kept on being laid on my heart was she like what?.

Nashville Brooke Tom Kaitlyn bristowe Mattie GM Tennessee six years
"mattie" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Mattie. Yes, what you're gonna go to the UCLA Stanford game at the Rose Bowl. Are you make UCLA? Really big fan. Kim. Daughter loved guys out there early tailgating out, of course, of course, I love it. My kind of family right there. You're welcome. music now with the DJ drew on one or two point seven kiss FM. Boy Dillon Francis. What I wish my favorite dish. Can I get a taste become a leg? Nineteen. My body language body. Beasley. Yeah..

UCLA Dillon Francis Beasley Kim Mattie.
"mattie" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Popcast

"Let me see you don't ever come on podcast mattie poppy is from iowa she is how do we she is may be lilith fair monk hey don't say that she is a quirky singer songwriter in the vein of regina spector that is extremely generous thank you and i hope for geeta specter is listening to hear you drag her name through the mud by likening her to mattie poppy mattie poppy i do know that throughout the season this is the one who i've struggled with quite a bit i did not understand the character of her voice the outline the tone of it i just didn't there's no texture to it incredibly neutral i disagree i like to hear more you know i thought her voice was soothing but not to the point of being dull i felt that it felt effortless like i enjoyed watching her saying because it never looked like a struggle on her face i like to personal style i thought not hard okay john are thought she i thought she was consistent in her messaging between her guitar playing her voice and her and her outfits yeah but sound like chicken mcnugget it's the same whether you get it in fargo north dakota or austin texas columbia south carolina was consisted i wouldn't say she was a chicken nugget we really going there today scribe you're like a mass murder i knew when she opened her mouth that she was going to hit notes without me having to be like us she could hit this no and it always it sounded very sweet i just i don't know what really there is to hate about it i didn't it was actually worse than hate because hate implies like some kind of incredibly strong negative reaction but i found i always like mentally zoned out during our reform ince's i just there was no there's no kind of rasp or edge or kind of tough mr voice it's just extremely clean i mean i think we're saying it was clean yeah saying the same thing but we're reacting to that same thing differently okay i'm looking for a calmness and consistency in my lifetime.

iowa regina spector geeta specter john fargo north dakota south carolina murder ince mattie poppy
"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

"To save us from this if born from father he wouldn't have this follow to save out some sun but his bottom zip ni fide significant by the pan of a god that i'm going to give you my son and my son is going to be true the spirit of a holy spirit and this law and tool the spirit of the holy ghost that you may across the bird to believe on this guys may be saved and this was the purpose of the god that he in vigorous hit last fall nations at the medicine should be a one mattie should be followed in with the son the holy spirit and that was the plan of jesus that will declare our family father that that satin should be bombed the help of jesus christ and this holy spirit is our had jesus christ going back to his father when he was turning do once again turning to god and this was data them fat but of jesus christ jesus christ has done back to his father but he didn't allow us to beat the men in loneliness don't want us to be feeding loneliness he don't want to be that the are alone because god won his presence and for his presence jesus said i'm going to my father but i'm going to my help will going to be have you on in the in the in the invite you have this problem in your life when we go into the book of x that is was.

mattie
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"But i'll let you know we do let me get something together awesome and then your instagram i on vine in yours is yes so at salt and vine nashville all spelled out in mine is as we laughed about early regrettably still mattie miti underscore bug for my college nickname yeah but yeah maybe need to make that a little more professional and a little less am messenger call you mattie bug for the rest of our friends it's fitting it's fun right okay less serious people call me being everybody in my home my hometown vancouver where i live for twelve years everybody there calls me being like that was over being that being in bug being bar next podcasts are you go oh oh yeah yeah good even on like the work schedule is like being monday funny i'm actually grown up now my name's caitlin bean works yeah thank you so much this is fun it's been a tree on monday and hopefully suddenly we learned a little know we definitely did and people are going to be really happy to know that the most inexpensive delicious that's it i'll write your session is now ending i hope that therapy was helpful yeah it was kind of therapy right there thanks for listening to off the vine grape therapy tune in to hear new minnie's odes every thursday and checkout new full length episodes every tuesday exclusively on podcast one dot com the podcast one app and subscribe on apple podcasts.

vancouver caitlin bean nashville mattie apple twelve years
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"You know it's presenting older mine i it is it's being funny and it is sort of mocking serious wine snob people because that's who he is in the movie yes but i think it brings a lot of good light to to the california wine industry yeah but it's an entertaining it's actually a very very good like film movies good yeah i've heard talking about it but it's definitely worth a watch i'm trying to google right now i always end my podcast with a joke and i'm like i wanna find a good wind joke i should be all i wish i'm jokes really i'm usually really good but wind jokes this is split my secrets right now i'm not a good joke teller i just google people are still laughing it doesn't matter okay i have one what is the woman's idea of a balanced diet grapes guess great gas a glass of wine in each hand oh yes you know what's fun about being sober nothing right exactly right these stupid what's what's an a women's idea of a romantic night this is the worst job i've ever heard netflix and chill wine it's sad how many my nights are like well yeah that's my every dairy accurate yeah it's not even funny that's not sound okay so where can people on your instagram for salt vine right yes.

california google netflix
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"The reason i'm here i love to talk about this number one hundred one with you and i'm not at my office but i love to talk about wine and it is ever evolving and so those lists are always changing someone we'll be excited to help you and it will they will not be like oh this idiot knows nothing right they'll be excited to share something yeah because in a way it's part of why i fell in love with it and why it rings true to my heart having grown up in an amusing family is like the wine is art yeah it really it's like they're all different and some whoever made this is trying to show you something that the the guy down the road from him didn't wanna show yeah so it's cool to find the difference anyway so i've poured you both winds together okay my number one rule of tasting wine is if you have one glass you're probably drinking two glasses you can really taste and learn so it's comparative so while people are scared of sweetness and white wine there is kind of two fundamental camps i try to tell people figure out what camp you live in red and then you can explore all all the different varieties or styles that kind of fall within either a fruity category again not sweet but ferdi right or a more savory earthy category so i'm trying to remember which one it's always keep the winds in order that's the hard part so your first wine here on your left this is from the island of canada or excuse me the island of sardinia which is of course right off the coast of italy so when we look at island winds whether it be sardenia portugal any of the iberian ones from portugal or spain you're gonna get a lot of ripeness so he think about its mediterranean.

canada italy portugal spain
"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"The following program is brought to you by your friends at podcast one don't forget to download our new podcast one out every so often there's a reason to go to the movies book club has four beautiful diane keep jane fonda candice bergen and berry steve urge i am not gonna let us become those people who stop living before they stop living let me introduce you for christian no tricks are calling book club hilarious certainly sounds like a four star delight the must see comedy of the summer happy reading ladies book club directed by bill holder in theaters tomorrow rated pg thirteen maybe inappropriate for children under thirteen podcast one percents off the vine grave therapy take them brits jokes didn't answer your questions drink to your concession and here you have to say about anything bachelor let's shake it up the more here's caitlyn welcome to grape therapy your session is now starting this is very exciting for me we now do sit somalia well it depends i've been called a somalian i've been called a someone gay somebody a is actually the correct way to say it but just short again somali oh okay we've got mattie selectmen here former former former formerly known yeah that's right yeah okay i was questioning with health yes as jackson yes so selectmen i had to try and get that one down right that's right that's tricky that's harder that really but i thought it would be so perfect to you know eleven am why monday morning everyone hates mondays.

diane candice bergen somalia jackson mattie
"mattie" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on The Big 98

"Boy in may lena's boosters seat nola mattie couldn't have the toy tell is now gone bring traffic turn straight to red eye breaks and mumbled under my breath and his orange drink covered is lab four letter word it started with this and i was concerned said son now where you learn that's all thank you as you john more booms and campbell been watching oh man went through the barn about my head and upgrade real far please mass oh.

nola mattie campbell
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"So interested in mattie at first too other she tried they tried really hard to go all in on mattie and she wouldn't give them like a poor choice and they from preseason i'm sorry terrible question but like where's she been i she's nowhere to be found that was a total fraud that was like parr har levels of fraud nece with her going in the house okay which which on those shaded jp he owns that shit guy was like totally blowing smoke up their ass that i was like some young republican conservative who's gonna fight in the house he's of course of course i really wasn't gonna do that but like this batty that's in house right now bears no resemblance the mattie on the outside i think mattie is is the person that she represented herself to be i see mattie as like somebody an introvert who who would like watches watches the show and in in real life she's like a more shy person maybe or maybe just like how she isn't big brother but like i think she is that snarky person i think if she comes online she comes on twitter she'll probably be great on twitter she'll probably be great in podcasts but just like in person in the game she just doesn't have the social i don't want i don't even wanna say social skills because i'm sure she has them but like again there's just like a wall there that just it's not the swagger like bill says in the chat mattie needs to be reunited with her soul which is in the tomb agree that if you like that sometimes there's a little bit of something missing it sounds like dog dogging her but you know what i dog dog matty i'm not taking on her like i mean we've said this before they often feels like a job interview when she's trying to make bonds with people or if she trained to talk to an h o h who might think about nominating her it never feels.

mattie fraud twitter bill
"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Team there was this was called the birth of jesus christ to place is mother mattie was than guild to georgia but before they were manage she phone out that she was going to have a baby by highlight the message and the god has forced to the holy jesus cries being seen victory v was to be treadmill before he met to jaws and cheerful to be lane this baby before she met joseph son that wall to be conceived by mother mattie from the chun going to scene like me and you born and don't have seen gone to believe in jesus the only hall both then jesus born with shave from this born from father he wouldn't have this power to shave from but significant the debt going give your going to be born tool the holy spirit and spirit and the spirit of the holy ghost that across to believe on jesus christ maybe shaved and this was the purpose of the guard invigorating let the dacians should be a one should be following with sun with the holy spirit and that was the plan for jesus bedwell declare that the shoot be born helpful for jesus christ this have zeppelin jesus christ going back to his father when he was turning do once again turning to god this emblem of jesus christ jesus christ has done back to his father but he didn't allow us to be remaining loneliness don't want us to be don't want to be seen.

mattie georgia joseph
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"And with kayla working for her with jani working for her this is really starting to look bad for maron meanwhile mattie in paris are talking and matty's kind of kind of a little too hyped up here she's like i'm gonna blow stuff up i don't care i don't care what it takes they've woken sleeping giant and peres well i don't know if you need to though don't worry about it because first of all you don't know this but there is a backdoor plan potentially in play this isn't from erica but a lot of people want this and it's definitely a possibility that veronica may be back doored so any chance you get you throw veronica right under that bus but i don't think you need to blow anything up if there goes up you're good you don't have to do anything else and matt he's like okay calm down a little bit it's exactly what mattie needed yeah exactly this is a situation where it's not plans e yet girl sit down like let's just play com okay you know things are starting to shift the critical mass is happening to sort of rally around keeping you save doesn't mean that you should go and like you said star blowing stuff up so i think it was good the perez there was able to sort of temper all of matty's excitement and a little bit of sanity yes so so now allie again elian liver talking about probably keeping mattie alley has a conversation with mattie and this is a very important conversation for mattie because alley still doesn't feel that she can fully trust mattie and if she's gonna end up saving her she's going to have to feel a bond with matt he's going to have to come out of her shell and finally start making actual moves and saying actual things to people and luckily she does a little bit here she's especially armed with the information that alli wants to target for annika matty starts talking all sorts of nonsense about veronica she's the worst i i'm pretty sure she'd cast that hanky vote.

kayla jani maron paris erica veronica perez mattie alley matt alli annika matty peres allie elian hanky
"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"mattie" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Okay oh my god this conversation was fantastic because mattie was so robotic but like accurately assessing the situation so she i mean she's running through okay i am logically assessing what is happening in real time to me right now but not thinking at all about how erica then is perceiving this and how is taking is taking in this information mattie is is oh my gosh there was one moment where erica was sort of trying to cover make clear that he was like about to cry i'm not gonna cry i've been crying i was just sitting at my computer yelling cry like this you need to appeal to the emotional side of erica this is not what's going to try to save you oh my goodness disaster yes caleb on facebook says they woke asleep and giants yeah maybe i think free said mattie was sleeping giants i think i think it would definitely she has the possibility of something like that but i think that just sort of oh my gosh i don't even know i don't even know i mean there was one point where after the conversation was over was like i feel like this changes nothing so i mean clearly all of the talk that matty did really just did nothing i mean did nothing to help her game it was a lot of veiled threats like really sucks that you're doing this and drawing the line not that i'm gonna like draw line but it does point us in a direction not that i'm going to be pointed in a direction but it does do something that is really unfortunate and i think you're going to regret it.

mattie erica caleb facebook matty