35 Burst results for "Matthews"

Court Unseals Documents in Ghislaine Maxwell Lawsuit

Bloomberg Law

05:44 min | 3 d ago

Court Unseals Documents in Ghislaine Maxwell Lawsuit

"Unsealed documents show that Jeffrey Epstein was offering advice. Take Elaine Maxwell as latest 2015 despite her lawyer statement that the quarters socialite had no contact with the disgraced financier in a decade. Maxwell's in a federal jail in Brooklyn after her arrest this month on charges of engaging with Epstein in a sex trafficking scheme, she's trying to stop the disclosure of documents that include her sworn testimony in a civil case. Joining me is Bloomberg legal reporter Patricia Hatano, who's been covering the Maxwell case that give us the background on these documents there? This is a prolonged involved. Story goes back here. There was a young woman named Virginia Robert to Frank's, and she says that when she was 16 years old, she encounters going Maxwell at Mar a Lago. Her dad works there, the maintenance man, he gets a job at the law. She's handing out pals and ah lovely woman. British woman comes up to her She's reading a book about massage and offered her a job working for this wealthy man who wants to go looking for a private, Mr She said. She was 16 years old at the time. So she goes to the mansion. If it turns out, she's introduced Jeffrey Epstein and he immediately and Maxwell, she alleges. Forced her to perform sex acts with the two of them program and she became a sex slave she and alleges that was in 1999 2000. So then she ends up. Trying to join a law with victims of Epstein after everything gets his secret plea deal, and she makes him comments about Maxwell publicly and Maxwell coming back and issued a press release in January 2015. She makes pigments and says that this woman is a liar. Would provoke a pram a defamation lawsuit. Dupree, Suze Maxwell for Defamation and Natural gave testimony under oath questioned about the sex trafficking. Judy was very, very aggressive. Her lawyers included David Boy and this guy Bradley, Edward and Pottenger in Florida, and they really went to question Maxwell at people that worked at the stain home in Palm Beach. All kind of allegation. Soju phase allege with force have sex that you have traffic in Spain. This man including alleged princes, possibly Prince Andrew. She named him and Maxwell denies it. So what happens is the stuff was all settled right? On the eve of trial, 2015 losses got settled right before trial, And then the documents were under field. So how did all those sealed documents get unsealed before Jeffrey Epstein's suicide? But after F being gets prosecuted, the Miami Herald goes to ask why this field And the Court of Appeals. Second Circuit Court of Appeals directed that the judge who had originally had the law didn't properly feel you shouldn't have properly field everything. It was improper to keep all the documents from the public. And so that's how we get to this point. The circuit orders last on the order all these documents and fields and all the documents start hitting the docket. And the next day, Jeffrey Epstein is found dead in his jail cell of an apparent suicide. So the document release was sent back to a new federal judge to preside over what properly on field in what should not be properly and field And you can imagine there's all these implications for other people whose names may can't come off other victims who allegedly were there when the trafficking occurred or were also traffic who may not want to have their names come out there like a Jane Doe Juan and a Jane Doe two and no Mortal, Jane Doe and also John Doe. So Judge Preska on July 23rd shelter hearing after you know, Matthew now been charged and says, Okay, let's go and have a hearing about what you get on field, So she ordered the first transfer documents to be unsealed last Thursday night, So that's how we get to the testimony. Maxwell with questioned under oath. The government used the testimony as a basis say stay. She lied and committed two counts of perjury for lying when she claimed she was never present. When Ft may have been sexually abusing, underage girl know, and she'd seen anything like it, she was not aware of that activity, illegal activity no more. President ever witnessing it so that testimony remains under seal because she went for an emergency motion and after the court of Appeals to again stop the release. Thursday night, the 30th so that was on 11th hour stock about part But the rest of the documents hit the docket starting at like 9 30 on Thursday night. How many documents are already out 2000 pages released in August. So that's when we started first seeing these allegations of possible you know Prince Andrew's involvement, some captains of industry more implicated some senators from former president their allegations that were flight records of people who were on the plane. Two F Things Iowan in the Virgin

Elaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein Mr She Prince Andrew Judge Preska Court Of Appeals Circuit Court Of Appeals Bloomberg Jane Doe Juan Spain Jane Doe Patricia Hatano Virginia Robert Reporter Brooklyn The Miami Herald President Trump Judy
Hypocritical Judgment

Andrew Rappaport's Rapp Report Daily

01:35 min | 4 d ago

Hypocritical Judgment

"We start to look at Matthew Chapter. Seven verse one, the versed at. So many us to say that we shouldn't judge other people. They say judge not that you be not judged and yet they ignore that verse to he goes on to state how to judge others in the issue he's raising is not that we shouldn't judge people, but we shouldn't be hypocrites in the fact that we hold people to a standard. We don't hold ourselves. He makes it really clear in versus. Three to five where he says, why do you see the SPEC that is in your brother's eye but do not notice the log that is in your own I. You hypocrite first take the log out of your eyes. You can see clearly and take the SPEC out of your brother's eye. The issue he was addressing is the Pharisees that were so quick to measure everyone else as being wrong and sinful and. An unrighteous and yet they refuse to look at themselves and hold themselves to the same standard that they're holding others. The issue that Jesus was raising in. Matthew Chapter Seven is not the issue that we shouldn't judge other people know he's actually saying we should judge other people because he goes on to give us the standard of judgment he saying that we shouldn't judge hypocrites. When we judge others, we should be holding ourselves to same. Standard that we hold others to, it's very easy to see wrong and other people even though we may do far worse than they do because don't look at what we do is wrong and we accept what we're doing. This is what he's addressing. The hypocrisy that he sees in the Pharisees don't judge is a hypocrite

Matthew
7 New Ways to Grow Your SEO Traffic

Marketing School

04:40 min | 4 d ago

7 New Ways to Grow Your SEO Traffic

"To another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. Hotel and today we're GonNa talk about seven new ways to grow your seo traffic. So I'll start first because they had a Webinar on new ways to do SEO. So the first way to grow your SEO traffic new way to grow your seo traffic would be to think about on surp- seo but does that mean exactly so Serb assertion that result page, and as you know Seo now is getting more difficult because the search result pages are so dynamic you have sometimes you might have apps you have knowledge box you might have featured snippets you might have site links there's a lot. Of changes happening. So what you gotTa do from your and we've talked about Faq Schema before in the past, we've talked about all these different tactics those all fall on the search engine result page. You GotTa think about how you can do on Seo part of what you can do using software or you can do it on your own, but you can use our software. If you want click flow, you can test your titles Meta description and that is basically one element of on as he'll. There's a lot more that goes into that but I just want to give you one piece. Number two is create new formats of content. So you don't have to just do text based content. You've already seen that Google ranks videos, but did you know Google also rains podcasts? So now crawling podcasts transcribing and indexing them and getting driving traffic to them as loss. So don't create text based content, considering creating all the different types of media formats that people really leveraging these days such as video audio off Cassie I should out there make she include keywords with whatever you're talking about your research on. What you'll find is some of that context also start ranking. For many listings are pushing up just classroom pushing up just video results. So it's a way to grab more search traffic bubbling people already. Number three kind of alluded to this a little earlier. But if you Google, Matthew Woodward Faq Schema. You'll find a way to get Faq. Schema. Set Up, and in some cases you click the rate actually might go higher. This is kind of continuing to follow the theme of on Surp- SEO number four by websites now for their back lanes buying for their brand and their existing traffic and there exists. You'll traffic merging into your site makes you deleted duplicate content merge than duplicate content together what it mean by duplicate is not word for word content. But if I have article on Seo someone else has an article on Seo and they both talk bout began as a test yo you don't have to pay design begins Guy Teissier you'd WanNa merge tackle only do that. What you'll find is Marshall Tropical to ring for Marquee Words All. Right. Number five. So even though we talk about it, I don't think a lot of people do this enough think about how you can build your own widget or how you could build your own software where those will basically because those to me, there are a little more defensible than making new book or a new Info Graphic, for example so An example, this Neil night I talked about this website when covert initially hid a lot of late in the United States a lot of layoffs started happening. So these layoff tracker started going up I was actually looking at one of the layoff trackers recently, sixteen hundred referring domains going that's a lot of lakes. So if you can build something, that's helpful. Genuinely helpful. The people that's very lincoln asset. This is evergreen SEO tactic but nobody has ever talked about talk about Lincoln assets, but don't talk too much about using a product to help with branding or product to build lakes. Another thing that you can end up doing is. Look at popular tools on the Internet that are Mir Space Adam to your website. You can find a lot like code canyons stuff like that will find his they tend to create a lot of brand queries more BRANCUSI's. You have the easier to rank on Google. So yes, eric talked about lingual acids but you can also get tools that create more brand queries will you'll find as you rankings for all Europeans go up even if you're not getting into links. All right number seven kind of similar. Building on the example I gave from number five where you build a where you lied with a product could be a widget as well. But let's use Neil Uber suggests as an example, he has a lot of data, a lot of click stream data. And basically, the great thing about that is that he can make really data loaded post that nobody else can do so I remember recently, I just read something from about how everything you know about click the rate has changed, but they were pulling proprietary data that they have. If you have your own product, you're able to glean zone insights and you can produce. Content that stands out on its own which you have liquid asset that's helping you produce more link cable assets with your content.

Google SEO Eric Su Adam Guy Teissier Marshall Tropical United States Neil Matthew Woodward Lincoln Brancusi
More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

04:42 min | 4 d ago

More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

"We're GONNA talk about recommendations. I for the long haul and these are things that we are either current or in the way back and there's this you know the. He is like when I sit down to try find something there's so much going on that I spent like an hour being watched I don't WanNa Watch. That should do this and it's like I, just want someone tell me what to watch. That's what we're going to hear for. Yeah. So we're GONNA basis off the some of the nominees for best show in the emmy categories I start off with HBO's watchmen as from Damon Lindelof this set in an alternative universe and drafting off the ground and comic book watchmen is It's like this dazzling procedure designed to also make you think that twenty six emmy nominations, the most of any serious. Like NERF gun to your head best show of the year. What would you say? Oh, it's watchmen watchmen to me like for limited series. So it's an a different categories, but I would even say it's better than all dramas on I. Think. So it's it's crowning achievement of TV this. So for sharp for me, I'm I'm thinking of like I want a show that looks great. Visually also will make me think. So I I wanted to go directly off of Damon Lindelof because I feel like he's kind of peak of his powers right now. So guys are wondering like other stuff he's done and I I can't think about the leftovers it's a similarly. It's a great show. It's alternative universe incredibly well, made really thoughtful but also like very simplistic in terms of you applying it to your that feels like watchmen felt current but also set in a different time. And leftovers current but also sat in a different times. So I love that the weirdness of the masks in watchmen which was so precious. So yeah, it's it's. It's phenomenal the other one I was thinking of when I want to. Recommend a show in in that Washington vein I'll say Black Mirror it's close enough. It's not really narrative based. Yeah. It's vignettes and different standalone stories, but it's kind of an alternate. Reality it looks close enough to realize that you're not sure that it's not. Yeah. But it's also telling us some darkened weird stuff about yourself. And the good thing about Black Mirror is to watch it. You're not watching it in each episode is its own Y'all episode so That's will put like some of our own favorite episodes that we both have really loved that we can include in the note. So you don't have to wonder because listen that first episode it's Just you just need to skip it. Hear me if you don't hear anything else if you don't hear Jamie doing the weird change of momentum at the beginning of the show if you forgot that already that's okay. Forget it. Here me this do not watch the first episode. Mom Don't do it dad don't do it much mom don't do it nobody do. It. Would be a mistake. Okay. It's a for me. If you love watchmen where you're like, that seems like it's good. Let me tell you to other shows that are good. So on that flakes, you can watch Jessica Jones I chose this because you got strong female lead just like you have in watchman, you have a superhero component which you also have and Jessica Jones it's dark. It's Gritty the villain in Jessica Jones is played by David tennant in that first season and he is per faction it keeps you on your toes. It's also very you're very to the visuals also recommending legion. Hulu. That's weird. Right because I think when you watch watchman, you're like I'm confused. Limits where you're like I, need to watch this again. Being, existing Ip it makes you think should I know that and I can confirm I. Didn't know. And watchmen I would sometimes read like recaps after I. Would Watch an episode and that would help me catch things maybe that I didn't grab the first time with Legion stars Dan Stevens? Famous playing. Matthew on. Downton Abbey He. It's a done by Noah. All Superhero Jason because this is the story of professor x his incredibly powerful, mentally ill mutant sign and so it's it also stars Jean Smart who is also in watchmen man she's in a Lotta. Golf that she has very good taste, and so it's weird enough that you're like It's not that classic Superhero which is what I also like about watchmen if we had done if we'd time traveled and done a designing women saying draft Jean Smart would not be my. Number. One pick would be any pots it would be we'll for private. Not. It be any pods, Anthony Delta Burke Julia sugarbakers. dixie Carter lab next to last over Jean Smart. Yeah. My point here is everyone would have been before Jean Smart Jean Smart was second. I'm going to be in Sweet Home Alabama and you're not going to know what to do with the low key cares. Okay.

Watchmen Jean Smart Jean Smart Damon Lindelof Emmy Jessica Jones HBO Anthony Delta Burke Julia Suga Jamie Hulu David Tennant Sweet Home Alabama Matthew Washington Dan Stevens Golf Noah Jason Professor
Augustines Teenage Coauthor

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 4 d ago

Augustines Teenage Coauthor

"In three eighty, nine Augustine Co wrote a book called it the teacher. The title comes from a Text Matthew Chapter Twenty three verse. Ten. which reads for you have one instructor or one teacher. Christ. Augusta and said, this book discusses and inquires and discovers that there is no teacher who teaches men knowledge accept God. As, written in the Gospel and he quotes Matthew Chapter Twenty, three ten of course that is very significant the title of the Book and where it came from it's also significant that this book was written in three eighty nine. It was just three years after Agustin's conversion you remember his story, he leaves Hippo there north. Africa goes up to Rome goes to Milan is literally running away from God like Jona or the Prodigal son. But God catches him. In fact, God has been directing him and directing every step of his path straight to him and in three eighty, six in. Milan. He was converted and three, eighty eight he leaves Rome, and heads back to Carthage, and then onto the gassed and hippo in North Africa, and there he will serve for the rest of his life as bishop. But this is in three, eighty nine. It is early in his Christian time. So the title is significant the date is significant but what is really significant is that Augusta had a CO author for this book and this was not just any CO author. It was a teenager sixteen year old came along to help Augusta and write this book. And was not does any sixteen year old? It was his son at data's the teacher is a dialogue, a dialogue between father and son the father. Augusta and the Sun Addio data's his son's name literally means a gift from God dot to means Gift Day Oh of course God and awe is the preposition that means from. He too was converted right at the same time Augustine was, and they were also baptized by Ambrose there in Milan and audio Dada was baptized as he was turning fifteen he went with his father back to Carthage, and then in three eighty nine, they wrote this book together in the confessions. This is what Augusta says of it. There is a book of mine called the teacher which consists of a dialogue between Avocados and myself, and now Augustine who in the confessions rights most directly to God, and so he says, you know addressing God let all the ideas expressed by the second speaker in the discussion his. Although he was only sixteen when it took place and I learned for myself that he had many other talents, even more remarkable than this, his intelligence left me spellbound and who but you who but you? Could work such wonders is so here's a guston singing. The praises of his son at your data, and as they wrote this book together well in the Book Augusta. Talks about how we use words to communicate words are symbols, their signs, they signify things. Patio donnas comes to realize that words put us on the alert they make us ready to learn. But ultimately, the words we used to learn ultimately all that is sourced in God in Christ is our teacher well, then conclusion Augustine says this to no end to love him and his to know and to love God is the blessed life which all proclaimed that they are seeking but few have the joy of really finding that is to say all want the good life but only few find it. And that was Agustin's hope for his son Avocados. Well, sad to say that a year after this book, his son at Yoda's died in Augusta who was very sorrowful from this could at least take comfort in the fact that his son died in Christ and so a Guston was confident. His son Bodice was with God.

Book Augusta Augustine Milan Augustine Co Agustin Carthage Rome Instructor Guston Africa North Africa Jona Dada Yoda Ambrose
Lions say Stafford's coronavirus test was a false positive

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 4 d ago

Lions say Stafford's coronavirus test was a false positive

"The Detroit Lions say star quarterback Matthew Stafford does not have covert 19 in the statement just released this afternoon. The Lions say that it was a false positive test that landed Stafford on the cove it I our list. He has since been reactivated, they say, has had three tests since the false positive, all of which were negative. His entire family has been tested a well and as well rather and they're all negative. As

Detroit Lions Matthew Stafford
Michigan orders coronavirus tests on agricultural, migrant workers after outbreaks

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 5 d ago

Michigan orders coronavirus tests on agricultural, migrant workers after outbreaks

"It is an outbreak of coven 18 at farms in food processing plants in Michigan, prompting the state order testing for workers WW Jay's Jim Matthews reports. The agricultural and migrant workers will be tested for the Corona virus, says official site 11 outbreaks in recent weeks. The emergency order issued Monday from the state Department of Health and Human Services, says migrant housing camp operators have to do initial baseline testing of all residents age 18 and older. Also, any agricultural operations with more than 20 workers on sight at a time will undergo testing as

Ww Jay Department Of Health And Human Jim Matthews Michigan Official
Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue

Lee Matthews

00:38 sec | 5 d ago

Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue

"Soon before there may be another Corona virus relief Bill White House chief of staff Mark Meadows was in talks Monday with Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi was productive. We're moving down the track their differing on Lovelace benefits the dam's calling for $600 a week, the GOP says that should be more like 200. They're also debating how much age to go to Renner's facing eviction. Nail president. Trump says he may come up with a package of his own. So I have a lot of, uh, powers with respect to executive orders. One thing a lot of lawmakers want to see another $1200 stimulus payment to taxpayers.

Chuck Schumer Chief Of Staff Mark Meadows Donald Trump GOP Lovelace Nancy Pelosi Renner President Trump Executive
Loving Jesus Supremely (Luke 14:26)

Pray the Word with David Platt

07:01 min | 5 d ago

Loving Jesus Supremely (Luke 14:26)

"Luke Chapter Fourteen Verse Twenty Six. If anyone comes to me. And does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters. Yes and even his own life. He cannot be my disciple. What statement? Now we've seen this language before earlier in. Chapter? Nine. Verse Twenty three she said if anyone comes to me. So again, this is enter Dr he what it means to follow Jesus. He says he must hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters. And even his own life like what does that mean like? Elsewhere in scripture we honor Your father and mother love your wife lay down your life for your wife and your children and brothers and sisters around you like love, your family love and brothers and sisters in Christ. Certainly. I, Love Your family. So we see that in structure. So what is Jesus saying here then? And basically, and this is a powerful picture. Jesus is calling us. To love him. So. Now again, this is what it means to be a follower views. Introductory to love him so supremely. that. Even our closest relationships in this world look like hate in comparison. Do you. Do you love Jesus like that. The I love Jesus like that. Even my relationship with my wife like I. Love My wife's. I love my kids so much. Love My mom, my dad. But do I love Jesus. In a way that makes those relationships look like, hey, in comparison is what Jesus said this exact language you just used in Matthew Chapter Ten and a similar passage where Jesus said, whoever loves his father or mother more than me is not worthy of me like this is the greatest commandment, love God with all your heart and all your soul, all your mind, all your strength. So today reprint for the Kashmiri. Muslims. In Pakistan one point, two, million of them and So Kashmir's contested region all round that combines Pakistan India in particular but the Kashmiri Muslims are Sunni Muslims. If. Someone who is a Kashmiri Muslim. Here's The Gospel and decides to follow Jesus. The likelihood is they will totally lose their family. Like home and dad would disown them. Brother or sister disown them may even try to kill them. Like I've I've been near this region in the world I think about one man and his wife who came to know Christ. Up In this area who upon coming to know Christ were kicked out of their homes. They ended up getting married as followers of Jesus and they worked they wanted to get back to their families to be able to share the gospel with them. So they worked their way back to where they could go visit their families, their families welcomed them in or so they thought one day they were standing. There with her family and he left the husband left to go and visit with his family. And when he came back, his wife had been poisoned to death in her own home buyer own family. Jesus says. If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters. Yes and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple. I. This is what it means to follow Jesus. So. God, we praise you I. Praise you that. Upon coming to faith in you. That I didn't. I didn't lose my my family on this earth. God I know that's a reality for many of our brothers and sisters in Christ. We pray we prefer strengthen them. Pray, for your help. In their lives. Got I pray for this husband. Can pictures face right now mention his name but I pray you continue to strengthen him and help him in a pulled him. God regardless. Of where we live in the world, we pray you would help us. To obey your word here in Luke Chapter Fourteen Verse Twenty Six help us to love you Jesus supremely. And we pray that this would transform affect our love for father, mother wife Children Brothers, and sisters, and even the way we look at our own life guy that we would love others for your Sake, the God we pray that all be driven by supreme love for you got refrain each of our hearts I pray this in my own heart and this over every single person who's listening to this right now. Give us Elvis to grow in love for you that would make our closest relationships in this world. Look like hate in comparison help us to love you with all her heart and all our soul all our mind, all their strength and how lay down our lives to love you more than we love our own lives and we pray that as we do this, you would use our lives to make your love known right around us and our families and our churches in our cities and to the ends of the earth among Kashmiri Muslims in bogus I was delayed out has to make your love known among more and more and more Kashmiri Muslims in Pakistan. We. Love you. We WanNa grow in our love for you even as we praise and worship and glorify you for your love for us. We pray all this in Jesus name.

Jesus Kashmiri Muslims Luke Pakistan Elvis India Kashmir
Philadelphia Phillies Return From Layoff With Loss To MLB-Best New York Yankees

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:30 sec | 5 d ago

Philadelphia Phillies Return From Layoff With Loss To MLB-Best New York Yankees

"The Phillies 62 there in the seventh and just got back under way after a rain delay. But by that time, Brett Gardner, Geo or Shelagh and D. J. Lo Matthew. They all hit homers while starting pitcher Gerrit Cole gave up one run on five hits. A tropical storm. Is Willis a hurricane at this point, a little stronger. It s a yes is why Tuesday's game has been rescheduled as part of a double hitter Wednesday down in Philadelphia, where they had been scheduled to play single games Wednesday and Thursday, anyway. Or the

Phillies Brett Gardner Gerrit Cole D. J. Lo Matthew Shelagh Willis Philadelphia
Coronavirus cases in California surpass 500,000

NPR News Now

00:38 sec | Last week

Coronavirus cases in California surpass 500,000

"Become the first state in the country to half a million in factions. NPR's Matthew Schwartz reports estates also seeing more daily deaths than ever before two hundred nineteen people lost their lives to the coronavirus in one day California health officials reported Saturday. It's the state's highest daily figures since the pandemic began bringing its total holidays to over ninety two hundred including the state's first loss of a teenager which officials announced this week. With more than five, hundred, thousand total cases of the virus. California is leading the nation edging out Florida which has four hundred and eighty thousand confirmed cases

Matthew Schwartz California NPR Florida
Boston - Marqise Lee Becomes 7th Patriots Player To Opt Out Of 2020 Season

CBS Sports Radio (Stream Only)

00:11 sec | Last week

Boston - Marqise Lee Becomes 7th Patriots Player To Opt Out Of 2020 Season

"Quarterback Matthew Stafford, Patriots wide receiver Marqise Lee and Jets linebacker CJ Mosley are the latest NFL players topped out of playing this season over health concerns from Cove in 19 and from

Matthew Stafford Cove Patriots Marqise Lee Jets Cj Mosley
Red Light Cameras Activated At Lindbergh & 70th Street In Southwest Philadelphia

Ken Matthews

02:58 min | Last week

Red Light Cameras Activated At Lindbergh & 70th Street In Southwest Philadelphia

"Because now the so called speed cameras air up. Here's the danger of progressives with this they use the Roosevelt Boulevard. To start the red light camera movement. Meaning that there are now nine red light cameras there, But there are multiple red light cameras all over the area. Probably more than 20 or so something like that. I get stopped in New Jersey. The idea was we look a dish. You got a highway coming from City Grant and the boulevard? How many years ago? Did they start with the red light camera there and all the nonsense associated with it. Then after that, it spread well, we need more so I tried not to travel to read the Red light camera Bermuda Triangle of the Roosevelt Boulevard. If you're going 56 you're going to get a ticket. Now you've been on the Roosevelt Boulevard. People trying to You know, make time, it said or a 56. I think a lot of people could be doing that. What they do next, though. You'll hear when we need speed cameras over here, too, not just the Roosevelt Boulevard may take a year. Revenue. Revenue Revenue control revenue revenue revenue. There is a red light camera. At Market Street, Really? It's broad street headed south at City Hall in Philadelphia. Market and brought brought a market right there. CITY all if you turn headed south And I've seen so many people that get caught because you think you're going to get through the light. Then there's a jam up there and you got a red light camera tickets. It's outrageous. $100 ticket or it used to be. It might even be more now It's the speed camera. All this nanny state stuff. Go on to the guys. Well, you have to be a maniac to be against this stuff were just protecting. You were making a lot of revenue along the way for other progressive causes, But we're just protecting you. You should never get caught with this. Now You know how often it could happen with weather conditions. Being in a situation with a light. You got somebody on your bumper behind you. You feel you have to go through. It ought to be up to cops to make judgment on this and yet We're living in a city here in Philadelphia, where you see all kinds of illegal, outrageous behavior Go on, and nothing is done about it. It comes back to the same thing with the protesters and all the stuff that we talked about around that. So this idea of speed cameras now let's have them all over the place. I think we have too many cameras already. I get it. The usage in solving crimes occasionally and all that. But how far do we want to go? How much intrusion do you want? How many cameras do you want? Eyeballing you around the clock. That's always what the debate is. It's it's enough already. Speed cameras and always using the Roosevelt

Roosevelt Boulevard Roosevelt Philadelphia City Grant City Hall New Jersey Bermuda Triangle
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last week

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Matthew McConaughey to release his first book: 'This is not a traditional memoir'

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:28 sec | Last week

Matthew McConaughey to release his first book: 'This is not a traditional memoir'

"McConaughey has taken time out from writing around town in his Lincoln. To write his memoirs. Alright. Alright, alright. Old green lights waited to do out in mid October. McConnell He says that it's not a traditional memoir. He describes it as a book of advice. Based on the adventures that he's had in his life. More specifically, the publisher says it will be based on a diary McConnell he has kept for the past 35

Mcconnell Mcconaughey Lincoln Publisher
Police arrest suspect in arson fire at Arizona Democratic Party headquarters

Mac and Gaydos

00:33 sec | Last week

Police arrest suspect in arson fire at Arizona Democratic Party headquarters

"Some more details about what led to the arrest of a former Arizona Democratic Party volunteer who allegedly set fire to the headquarters in downtown Phoenix last Friday, Phoenix police Sergeant Mercedes Fortune tells Jr Before one o'clock this morning, they were able to develop that enough probable cause to make that arrest and the arrest of Matthew regular for the arson. There's been a couple of social media posts that believed to be authored by him, and that was that were posted by him. 29 year old Agler had been banned from volunteering with the party, apparently over bad behavior in the past. He's been booked on one count of arson of an occupied building. You

Arizona Democratic Party Arson Phoenix Matthew Sergeant Mercedes Agler
Police arrest suspect in arson fire at Arizona Democratic Party headquarters

Dave Ramsey

00:37 sec | Last week

Police arrest suspect in arson fire at Arizona Democratic Party headquarters

"Led to the arrest of a former Arizona Democratic Party volunteer who allegedly set fire to the headquarters in downtown Phoenix last Friday. The ex police sergeant Mercedes Fortune Teller. Running. They were able to develop that enough trouble cost to make that arrest and they arrested Matthew regular for the arson. There's been a couple of social media posts that believed to be authored by him, and that was that were posted by him. 29 year old egg Lor had been previously banned from volunteering with the party because of apparent bad behavior. In the past, he's been booked on one count of arson of an occupied building. You

Arson Arizona Democratic Party Mercedes Fortune Teller Matthew Phoenix
Removing Logs and Specks (Luke 6:41-42)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:02 min | Last week

Removing Logs and Specks (Luke 6:41-42)

"Luke chapter, six versus forty, one and forty two. Jesus says. Why do you see the SPEC? That is in your brother's eye. But do not notice the log that is in your own I. How can you say to your brother brother? Let me take out the suspect that is in your eye. When you yourself do not see the log that is in your own I, you hypocrite first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take out the SPEC that is in your brother's i. Mrs. Pretty clear what we see in Jesus teaching here and really all over scripture, it is far easier to see sin in others than it is to see sen in ourselves. I get his. It's much more natural to us to observe sin and others, and not observed sin in ourselves. And, so Jesus is saying very clearly here. Whenever you notice sin, others stop like immediately. Stop and ask. What evidence is there of sin even specifically that Sen we see and others. In our own lives. Like. Sin Around us should immediately cause us to examine sin in us. To ask, how do I need to be more holy more like Jesus? What do I need to confess and so to do this? Like Jesus not saying not to help your brother or sister to help someone turn from sin like he wants us and cause us to. The Gospels thing. About Matthew Chapter Eighteen all throughout the new task, we are commanded to help one another grow in hall in his to become more like Jesus to spur one another on toward Christ restore one another when we are caught in sin like we do this word. This is one of the ways we love each other. If someone in my life, see sin in my life, and just doesn't say anything just ignores it, and lets me continue down a sinful path, and that person does not love me like if they love me, they will call me away from sin, but they will do it with a humble heart. That has examined that sin, and just the presence of sending their own hearts in the process, and in this way we realize that helping one another turned from sin as long as we're doing it, luke six forty, one to forty two style like letting that lead us first and foremost to examination our own hearts, we realize. That we grow in Jesus in this process and others grow in their relationship with Jesus and likeness to Jesus in this process so God help us. We pray to do this well. God opener is to sin. In, US, and around us. GotTa we want to turn from sin, and we want our brothers and sisters in Christ turn from sin. We all want to experience the life you have for us, so give us sensitivity to send Anna's and around us when we see sent around us God. We pray for Hugh, Melanie. We pray for honest self examination. Even practically right now. As, we might think through. Where we want to help those around us grow in Christ, God show us ways where we need to grow in Christ. God us even seeing sin and others to expose in your own hearts and. Do this work of sanctification in us, and then you ask God, please use us to. Do this work of sanctification and others lives for their good God. We pray. You'd help us to remove logs from our eyes. And to remove specs from our brothers and sisters is and in this process God. Please make us all look more like Jesus help us help us to be sensitive to sin in others lives, and in our own lives, and in the process opposite to confess it, honestly humbly to repent of it, and to follow you and experience the life. Eve designed for us to live. We pray this in Jesus name. Amen

Jesus United States SEN Luke Matthew Anna Hugh Melanie
"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"<Music> Can <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Trust <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Even. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> If you have a moment <Speech_Male> today. It would help ton <Speech_Music_Male> if you leave us <Speech_Music_Male> a review on Apple podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> show this episode <Speech_Music_Male> with a friend, be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sure to follow the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> on twitter and Instagram <Speech_Music_Male> at carried <Speech_Music_Male> the fire pod <Speech_Music_Male> on my <Speech_Music_Male> producer. Andy <Speech_Music_Male> Laura and all <Speech_Music_Male> of our executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> Adam Collins <Speech_Music_Male> Amy Armstrong. <Speech_Music_Male> Andrew Diaz <Speech_Music_Male> Brianna. Web <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Brian Wise Becker. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cameron Lane Colin <Speech_Music_Male> Hawthorne. Denise <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Akita David <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cobb Drew Para. Para <Speech_Music_Male> Eric Zala <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> gave Munis <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gary Juki. <Speech_Music_Male> Homs about honey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jeremy. Robinson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just card. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John Buchan. John <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Deere John Angle <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jonathan, Clark <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jordan Goodman <Speech_Music_Male> Jordan. Everley gesture <Speech_Music_Male> Malara <Speech_Music_Male> Kyle. Star Look <Speech_Music_Male> Labor Louise's <Speech_Music_Male> Rivera Losing <Speech_Music_Male> Rica's Marco <Speech_Music_Male> Pidonia Mark Francis <Speech_Music_Male> Mark Weiss <Speech_Music_Male> Match Folks <Speech_Music_Male> Matthew, alcon <Speech_Music_Male> Michael, Maitland <Speech_Music_Male> Miguel Tina Bra <Speech_Music_Male> Nathaniel Bailey <Speech_Music_Male> Ronald Burqa <Speech_Music_Male> Ryan Cornelius <Speech_Music_Male> Samantha Simmons <Speech_Music_Male> and Wide <Speech_Music_Male> Myers Stephen. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> SAUCER, Susannah <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Coleman Ted <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Riser Tiffany <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pain Timothy Dwayne <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> William. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so much for carrying <Speech_Music_Male> the fire with me <SpeakerChange> and <Music>

"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

07:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"The franchise. was just that it was just kind of mind numbing entertainment in that way, and and even George Lucas. Admit that I've seen a conversation between. Gene run very son and George Lucas kind of talking about this reality. Star Trek Star Wars very much you know. Of course. They had some themes around, but the themes. Yeah, it's more mythic. It's more almost like a fantasy. It's just. Exactly. We're star Trek Fantasy Western yes. And Star Trek well the original series of star, Trek. Has A lot of western feels to it as well. I think in terms of the format how they shot. The template of the day. And they you know they. They use that format to communicate a lot of truth and but. Yeah I. It's a frustrating thing because I think when you really look at the legacies of both. You Know Star Trek Truly Sifi. It is everything that is amazing about sci-fi. It's theorizing about a better world in future. That's unimaginable to us. Currently. It also gave us so much technology. Star Trek also so many astronauts and people that signed up for NASA. were influenced by watching Star Trek as kids. I mean the IPAD is pretty much an invention from star trek like there's so much tech actual technology part of our day to day lives, and even the modern space program was modeled after Star Trek to the point where even this new space force that Donald Trump is trying to. Push forward. They stole the emblem for. So I duNno, it's the original and and I'm in love with. I love all the shows some more than others deep space. Nine's probably my favorite, and then the next generation, original series and voyager. And then the new show star trek discovery epic. They literally shot it like a movie. It's one of the most action packed. Great story are from whole seasons beginning to end I love I. Go back and Rewatch them all the time. And then these are the car an. Is there an order that one should approach them? You know star. Trek's a hard one because it's thirty years of. Original series sorry to count next generation deep space nine voyager. Enterprise Discovery Card there are seven star Trek shows in the last thirty years, and then there's about twelve to fourteen movies motion picture film, maybe maybe fourteen fifteen when she had more than newer ones that we're kind of the Judy Abrahams renditions, which are kind of like a different alternate timeline. So it's it's hard because I. Don't know where to tell people to the. You could start chronologically I wouldn't necessarily do that. I probably would highlight this. I would say start season two of the original series go through that just these into, and then of the of the like the old. The old old ones start making start there. They're weird. They're they're so different. They're so seventies sixties and seventies and so abstract, and just the way they're shot is just kind of cool to there. I would start there and then I would start season three of the next generation. And maybe why not start the being well? There's always kind of a thing star. Trek shows are always the best, the first season or two. Okay, but usually by season three or four they they pick up so much, and that's another thing you kind of like you commit to the series, so I think if you start there and watch some of the highlights and best you can then go back and watch some of the older episodes. They were good episodes and some of those earlier seasons. But they're still trying to find their way so to speak. You could tell by like season three. It hits its stride. It was even nominated for Emmys next generation was because of how good the acting was and the storylines. Start Season Three. They're same defacing. The accident destroys nine from the beginning. All seven seasons are incredible. the voyagers the same way it's like a lost in space version of Star Trek and then I. Don't know discovery. You could start those from the beginning. Those are very well written from the beginning, so I would really I think in this time where everything feels really dark and it feels. Even sometimes hopeless I think what Star Trek is offered is at its best. It's brought a sense of optimism about the future and a sense of hope. And it has like I said help. People work through real moral conundrums and philosophical. Issues that resonate like there's a lot of teams around. Sina Phobia and around Racism a lot of the episodes and I don't know I think it's feels more relevant now than ever has, and so I'm happy that they're relaunching the whole star. Trek Franchise they've got three marshals in the works brand new star trek shows CBS's developing. On top of the two ones that are already on air. And so yeah, they're really rebirthing. The whole franchise colleges a really exciting to me. Yeah. That's cool. Yeah I feel like. My kids would probably dig it. They're like super into everything. Sci Fi and fantasy. So. have to start intimate with them my. Not The excited, but yeah. My mom wasn't the biggest fan of it. Either should watch this they are. David fused these things called sharks which are little ten minute blow things, one or two of them are animated, and now they're about to drop a new star trek show. That's completely animated. It's called lower deck's. That's about canal. Yeah, there's there's some I think kids would would really take some star trek so cool. Yeah, as I was like doing some research to talk to you today and looking through some the star trek stuff I found. Some of the Vulcan Philosophy was Gerrad like so the whole infinite diversity through infinite combinations. real into that And then this quote from Gene Roddenbury saying mankind will reach maturity in the day learns value diversity of life and ideas. ooh is good. One I've heard that before, yeah! And then this one Is In an episode? Maranda talking to spot, and she says I understand. Mr, spock, the glory of creation is in its infant diversity, and he says and the ways our differences combined to create meeting and beauty of ood. Super into that and I I, this is making me WanNa Watch. The show was Yeah I think those ideas. I don't I. Mean I heard that when I was younger been like. Cool. Like I. Know I. I was two. And a kind of gets at at some of this the way you balance, goodness, truth and beauty but I. I I was too much way too much truth. You know when I was younger and. So those differences to me weren't. It was something to to be sorted out right to figure out. What's the right? What's yeah, and also too? I think there's. On top of that, there's a sense of. We want to be heroes so bad. And Star Trek does this interesting thing of showing you? How at times you here on at times, you you try to be. The hero makes you the oppressor. And, so there's there's real like it's showing you life and truth from multiple angles rather than you know sometimes the action fantasy stuff is just about being the hero which I think. That's why psychologically we.

Trek Trek Franchise Gene Roddenbury George Lucas Donald Trump Judy Abrahams NASA. Maranda spock David CBS
"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

08:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"matthews" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"What he will. William Bars tried to do is he's trying to rewrite the narrative from the place of the Congress? But when he fails to realize, is that our our history will be written by by the marginalized in the people, because what the civil rights movement particularly will. Let's say the emancipation proclamation all the way to the civil rights movement what it did, and this is why black people are going to always be the thorn of the flesh to dominate white culture is we unmask. White culture dominant culture for what it really is, and now because of. Decades of of. Black people beginning to flourish beginning to to. Own their stories. Beginning to tell their stories, it's it's a Su- NAMI wave of of a black stories that have been in black resistance that is overpowering the dominant narrative myth. Of that America has created, and that's what's happening in this historic moment right now with people and the protests and acknowledging systemic racism is actually were saying no longer. Are we letting the conquerors rule? Our perceptions of reality, or they're false revisions narratives of history. Four you again, thank you for taking the time I. Really appreciate it and excited to talk to you I feel like A. Have had a few lately. Where I've talked to someone where I've heard their voice like a fair amount, feel like I kind of know them, but it's like a total false. False relationship. But. Do that in my head you're you're kind of my friend. So that's and what we've had some limited twitter twitter action. But Yeah I appreciate it. Yes the show were kind of talking about the the good that you're in the beautiful. and. just using those as lenses to look at. Everything around us, and I liked to start out asking I feel like this like a bucket for the sense but growing up. what would cause you to feel a deep sense of wonder about the world? Yeah I grew up with the very strong. Curiosity my dad. Really cultivated curiosity and me and my siblings He was constantly. Putting us in new environments environments that were made to stretch us. I mean I was I was swimming really well by two years old? and. He would take us down the street to the park in Detroit. I how to play tennis. Right or he would. He would stretch us kind of beyond like. Even some of our. Cultural values to try different types of foods on Internet. Judge it and to find things you like about it. What music was like that literature reading psychedelic group in a household that just valued curiosity and I think that was my window into. Wonder you know. Like I mean he was? He was really cultivating that as a value for you oh. Yeah, absolutely! My Dad was cultivating. Cheered curiosity beauty and wonder about God about the universe. We were a big star. Trek family too, so I mean he would like sitting down in the basement when he would like. He would be working on different things, and he would put on video tape recordings of all these old shows whether they were westerns or like little rascals Shirley Temple Star Trek. And, so I would just like soon. My Dad while he was kind of tinkering in the basement and Mike Watch these TV shows that just would like. Expand my brain and my horizons, and so yeah I think I have to give it up to my dad for. Giving me like a real sense of beauty and wonder an all. That's awesome. And it's a perfect transition into. I was going to ask you about star Trek because I feel like. I don't really know. That I know of I. Don't know any like trekkies, but I feel like you post about it a lot. Probably. No good and it. It's been like. I grew up. And I saw I would see some next generation and you know movie here there, but. I was never like way. In I think. Part of it. I didn't love the. I like the grittiness of like star, wars or something like the way that the universe felt a little more like lived in. But I think part of that is just because you know. It's supposed to be the future and star Trek and so. Stuff's cleaner or something I don't know. Like too much like button pushed about an ethics, but I remember seeing some really interesting episodes and You've been tweeting out some stuff. Some of the newer shows and just little snippets and I. I don't know I'm realizing there's a lot. A lot more there that I need to dig into so what? What draws you to star Trek? So me on it, yeah! So Gene Roddenberry. Who is the creator of Star Trek? He had a pretty unique philosophical vision of. Human history, but also our future he he was theorizing. In which humanity had overcome a lot of our baser instincts, and had put down war, famine, disease and poverty had overcome those things. And transcended them, and so he theorizes universe where our ability to lay down. Our propensity for war would actually cause us to. Want. Travel the galaxy and increase technology to explore strange new worlds, new civilizations, seeking peace and exploration. You know and so star Trek was really much a optimistic vision of the future, and especially being created in the nineteen sixties so much social upheaval gene put the first interracial cast on television. That's what Star Trek did back in the nineteen sixties had. You had an Asian American a Russian American a black woman. Of course, white men, you had you had so much diversity in the cast and crew of the original star Trek Enterprise. And and that was his point and there was. A fun little story. Nicole. nichelle Nichols who plays lieutenant you Harare was the first black female. In that role in in the Star Trek world side, no also star Trek did the first interracial kiss between her and Captain Kirk the first time on American television. An interracial couple had ever kissed own star. Trek, She had wanted to quit the show, and then she met Dr. Martin Luther King and Martin Luther King at told her. Star Trek is the only show I. Let my daughter stay up and watch, and it's so important for you to be on this show because you represent what black people look like in the future. And so she brought that back to gene Roddenberry, and that you could tell it really had an impact on them, and it pretty much became the core philosophy moving forward for all the Star Trek movies TV shows. It's the universe. That is more dealing in philosophical concepts. That's why star wars thing is interesting. Because Star was just action fantasy that's not based in any type of reality. Star Trek has has a moral guiding principle, and it's wrestling through moral quandaries. And Philosophical conundrums on the regular like that's the entire thrust of the show, so I think it was packaged a little slower and a little more intellectual which I think. If. You're into it. You're into it, but if you're not, you're like I. Just WanNa see laser fights like i. just want to see. And I think that's kind of like star. Wars kind of becoming.

Gene Roddenberry Star twitter Dr. Martin Luther King Su- NAMI America William Bars Congress Detroit Nicole. nichelle Nichols tennis Mike Watch Harare Captain Kirk
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"Okay Yeah Yeah it came from some things that will not go and not sure sure but yeah it was a nurture thing I learned how not to ask and I become very good at that. See now I have known you for a few years. I have to be honest with you. That fact fact that you say that is completely surprises me. Because I think you're so intentional in the words that you choose in the actions that you make as as somebody who is voyeur in your life at different times. I'm surprised that that's an admission that you feel like you can't ask because I'm trying to think back to when I've ever heard you ask for something and I haven't but at the same time I just feel like that because you you feel very comfortable in your skin and so the hesitation surprises me. I agree that in the most complementary way because everything about you is so intentional That I am surprised is that you have admitted that actually is a first step. Isn't it yeah I like it I like it right. I stepped in many problems. Meeting there may be an issue but I think it spawned a lot of independence and You know I really have to be fully unable unable to do something before I'll go. That route writes writes it. It was interesting. I remember when I bought my first Apple Computer. It wasn't that long ago because I was a PC GAL. I was in defense contracting and Blah Blah A- and And so I had always used a PC and it came time to leave the corporate world and go out on my own and so I sat down with my son and I said well what do you think ought to do. He said cargo to Apple. You get away from this world and I said okay. I don't know anything about it Come shopping with me. And he did and he prescribed the right machine with the right Storage and all that sort of thing and he looked at me and he said no mom. If there's anything you don't understand or if you have any questions let me know and I'll google it for you. Well what do you think I I do a lot of now I google. That's so I mean it worked. Yeah yeah no one hundred percent so okay. Well that's something I learned about you today because I'm not prepared for you to say that I in my mind you are You're very strong. You're very independent like you said you're very intentional. You're very eerie supportive. Other Women And oh I can ask for other people. Yes yeah good good. Good good yes good okay so so now that. I know that I'm GonNa pay attention to that with you. So that's that's awesome. So so what's next for you. What else what are you working on right now that excites you finally wrote the book? Which I'm proud of you because we've had that conversation for a few years so what what's next for you? I've just completed writing the next book though. This one just launched on the twenty sixth of January. Yes I finished writing it now. That doesn't mean it's edited just means it's written The book deals with issues concerning public. Speaking MHM On Two levels one dimension ghosts too The fear the gloss of phobia that exists in the other goes to actually constructing a indecent powerpoint prison and there must be two hundred tips in this whole thing of how to do it and how to do it right so it's another basic how to book limit The the first book is part of a series. So they'll be more invisible people. I mean down the road. Okay yeah people yet to be seen yeah. Invisible workers invisible professors invisible students invisible invisible clients. We live in a remote world. Yeah for sure what What tools do you have to motivate yourself? What are you reading? What are you listening to? Who who do you follow can of what brings inspiration to your life okay? Well in the morning I follow Darren Hardy K.. And he does the Darren Erin daily and he's the publisher of Success Magazine And I've always been a proponent of it he launched the magazine and every magazine had in it a CD Of Their special speakers. So you can listen to that. Go into work but his daily routine is usually just a a three to six minute spiel and and you walk away with something pretty much. Every day that's applicable to your life so that's motivational for me Cynthia Trevino's he knows book is what I'm looking at right now The she markets because she gets into the fact that as women. We don't ask what is marketing it's asking. Yeah so looking at those two primarily right. Now okay yeah plus the schoolbooks. Yeah yeah reading in Creswell yet again and then in addition to your your books being published what what other projects are working on that excites you. Anything with your clients right now. It is bringing joy to your life. client work. I swear every time one of them wins a contract. My heart just skips a beat. I'm always happy for them. Yeah so we're either working on moving them towards a big award or celebrating the fact that it occurred so so that's been interesting and fun for me. I love it love. I love my clients and that's good. Well the I'm sure they love you and the fact that you said my job is to help them make more money for them. Yes yes I mean. What a tagline that is right that will will come to you and and what you do? Yeah so what. Let's let's dive into that for the last couple of minutes here What are most people's challenges from not making more money okay? The biggest in this is a generic challenge. But you can apply it to just about everybody. it's the issue of change management assignment right now. I'm teaching a course on how to be exultant and more often than not which are helping a company do is deal with change. Usually they don't call you until they're having a problem with change in most change brings problems so the issue of change and change management is probably the one that seeks out the most. Where do they need change? They need change with human resources. They need change in cutting costs. And how people are reacting to cost cutting if you're scoping down your Your brick and mortar footprint people are being displaced and they have to work remotely outling And dealing with the changes coming up there a number of change models and you pick the right one that goes with that particular client. One of my favorite models is John. Qatar's he's at Harvard and has done a spectacular job creating a his change model but there are others that are apropos to the situation MHM Good I love it. Who's been a big mentor to you? Probably Well obviously you start start at home With your parental influence in for me. That was my mother. Her two values were religion and education. Location and I went to twelve years of Catholic school so we we got that. Check mark and Education onto the the doctoral level. So those were her two who primaries but through life probably my biggest mentor. When I was with the feds for example was Carl? He's the guy who call it three thirty and energize me to go another eight hours course. Okay he was phenomenal. Put me in the right place at the right time in front of the right people and I will be forever grateful to him for that. That's nice yeah. Do you feel alight beyond your students that you have an opportunity to mentor people right now Beyond by students. Why spend a lot of time with them? I'm not just teaching the three classes but also I have eight. Yes eight students I'm on three committees and chairing five five dissertations right now so. I spend Saturdays. One on one with my The people cheering amazing. So they're kind of students but they're not really because they're more candidates at this point so I enjoy them. I love interacting with younger people. Yeah it feeds my soul. I am not my age. No I am forty seven. I have decided I am forty seven forever. I love that I love that. Well which is why it surprised me when you said that you went back at sixty one because I know you to be twenty six g that you bring to the room so thank you all right So before we close I just WanNa make sure sure that everyone knows so the the book is called the invisible leader. Yes by Dr Gladys and can be just on your website or where books are sold Amazon on the the easiest fastest quickest way to get it. Or if you happen to know me I'll sign a copy for you and heartbeat. I love it okay. Good all right. Are you ready for the rapid fire. Questions no Komo neither the pilots. Okay so always ask my guest the same set of questions so you have people who've already answered with these questions but I'd love to compare compare answers so title of your lifetime movie how to lead a fear based life fear based Yes yes interesting. Yeah that has another story associated. Okay okay that's a whole other podcasts. That'll be the next title podcast. Okay perfect if you could change places with any celebrity right this minute who would it be. Michelle Obama I love it. Okay good when do you feel happiest. Oh God I'm so so happy. I'm happy when I'm with my children. I'm happy when I'm with my granddaughter. I'm happy when I teach. There are rare times when I'm not happy because I've constructed instruct my life around two things. Does it feel money. Art doesn't feel my pocket. I know I love that I would say that you probably are one of the most the happiest people that I know every time I and the other thing you do very well and I will compliment you on. This is that you have a great capacity for to make somebody feel like you. They're the only person in the row. Oh never realized that. Yeah Oh good when you are in a conversation you are in a conversation. You aren't checking a phone or looking across the room or anything so I thought that I could do better. If you were running for politics what would be your biggest campaign promise. I know this goes back to Reagan but free education K Ultimate Dinner Party. Which for guests do do you invite and why Oh four guess why would invite my children? Okay okay that's too right. That's that's yeah I have to. They each each have a significant other so I probably will have to expand this beyond four. Yes okay okay I think I would look at et In fighting someone who brings humor I've had the opportunity to hear Jay Leno live up in Newport Beach uh-huh and he brings a sense of joyous nece to people and so I think at a party that's that's important I would bring someone. WHO's a good thinker thinker and? I had a professor for Zine majority who was amazing he could bring heart soul and academics together in one. So I would. I would bring those to other people as well. I love it. What a gift to your to your children? Good company right right this minute. You have to get a tattoo okay. Okay what are you getting. Why Okay it's not GonNa be a tramp stamp you already have? Of course yeah right maybe maybe the name of my grand dog okay. Do I have to say wear no. No No. We won't help the rating would would be it would be probably somewhere. That's visible though. Okay if you have I love my grandma okay. I love that and his or her name is. His name is bacchus Chris. The God of wine no great surprising right exactly exactly okay. Biggest pet peeve in business. Oh my God lack of responsiveness I keep telling people it cuts the ego of your clients. You must be responsive I try to set a standard of two hours. Even if I can't do something in two hours a let them know you're on my rader thinking about you don't insult someone's mm-hmm sense of Ego Oh I and I hate when people make me feel stupid or say.

google Apple Darren Hardy K Michelle Obama Cynthia Trevino Darren Erin Creswell Qatar Jay Leno bacchus Chris Harvard rader Success Magazine Carl John Catholic school Dr Gladys Newport Beach
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"And I've done this before last exit plan I did was seven months long but it included things like allowing for vested stock options. Don't cut off your nose despite your face so always think in terms of exit plans to an appropriate once. Yeah I think doc you know. My parents were both lifetimes at at their profession. Now both retired but my mom's almost forty years at an organization and and to me that's like how could you possibly right now that we're in this like GIG economy. I know that my niece and nephew. Who are you know late teens? Early Twenty s will never spent forty years at no a workplace right so just the dynamics of just what it means to go to work every single day I think is changing aging. Definitely in the amount of time that I've been working and I'm sure in the growth of your career as well where people are doing more of a Gig economy where they can really sort of respond to what what makes me happy. I don't need to be for forty years but at least I can find the kind of work that I liked to do and it might be at multiple places. It doesn't necessarily always have to be the one place for forty years. Exactly right so exact graduating from college and not thinking I have to be at this one company for the rest of my life but really marketing yourself so that you you do have opportunities to jump from opportunity to opportunity and not just necessarily job to job right. There is no requirement for monogamy when it when it comes to a career we are a profession or a job earlier today. I was giving a presentation and I. I had a church that spoke to what I call gigs tres and gangsters or people who practice the the GIG economy. Some of this is being promoted because we're hearing younger people talk about. Ha- always have multiple income streams. I heard a guy the the other night you said half ten which I don't know that I can't even keep track of that. That's like a like ten children my God but you know he said multiple income streams are important case. One gives out on you so I have Some research and Statistics on that by the year. Twenty twenty seven the number of gangsters and the the number of people who have jobs jobs will be equal. It's a fifty fifty split after that the lines on the graph part and we'll have more gigs tres than we have people who have jobs jobs. Yeah so we have a horizon on the way that's very very interesting right well and it also so speaks. I think that's those are powerful statistics because now the marketing of yourself is so much more crucial whereas if I had a job job up and I can kind of get that job and then sort of park myself and maybe I'll get promoted ebay while but I still have this sort of security in the sanctity of that organization Whereas if I am gigging I now have to you know? I can't put all my eggs in one big whale. You really can't have my big fish client because with that goes away now. I'm sunk so now I have have to continue to market myself in every single to you know to opportunity that I can't so those soft skills marketing entrepreneurial classes are gonna be so important for the next generation if you will the Gig sirs because they are anticipating. I only need to do this one time. And get my Gig. You know. That's not going to necessarily fulfill their financial requirements that they need it absolutely absolutely. I have a friend and this is a career path. That's been around for many ears and it may be the first gig career And I had never thought of it this way and she said And I just sold a house. She's a real estate agent. I just sold the house but you need to understand. I am constantly interviewing for my next job. You just never know when the next jobs going to come in who you're going to have to worked for. Yeah Yeah definite profound. It is profound so your new book is called the invisible leader. Yes and I know you talk a lot about the virtual workplace workplace which I think is fascinating because your the beginning of your career obviously wasn't for no. You're very traditional in that sense right. So where did that shift come from in terms of thinking like a traditionalist versus now a were a virtual workplace guru. Actually it happened when I was employed for the feds and I was the first Federal leader on the West Coast. Start telework okay. And this was like twenty remember years ago and And I know I did it all wrong but I learned from it and And I always felt very fondly about the topic and I saw would start to grow. I saw who fit well into it and who which people were totally uncomfortable and I talk about some of them in my book. Their stories stories have changed the names to protect the innocent and But some really really interesting and funny stories about moving into the virtual workspace. Especially if it's not your thing and so when I started my doctoral program of course you course. After course. After course. But that's not the mainstay mainstay of a doctorate. The mainstay is not to be. Abd All but dissertation so you have to write the dissertation and for that. You need a topic so I chose to look at leadership behaviors in the virtual workspace not traits not traits like generosity but the behavior savior that underlines that so. That was the crux of the research that I did and I wrote up the dissertation and while it's interesting in its essence. Oh my God. It's written up in a very academic style with all the citations and references and Blah Blah Blah. So the book is a translation of the dissertation into Real Real discussion so I actually got to have a voice. Yeah and So that made needed a lot of fun and so it takes something that was steeped in lots of research and turned it into something that was more practical and understandable tangible by people who are actually doing it and people who are leading in how they're screwing up. Yeah Okay so how are they screwing up. Okay first of all you have pretty much three kind of leaders in this world you have the leader. Who says okay? You're going to work at home. Thank God you are so oh high maintenance glad to have you out of my sight now. Obviously these words aren't uttered but that's the leader. He's not going to pay any attention to that person. Wants the person walks out the door oren starts working. God knows where You have another kind of leader who is a micromanager and who worries that if his or her numbers fall the look bad. So they'd become the constant micromanager. They're the ones who asked that. You keep the camera on all day so they can watch you know crowd. Yes yes really our leaders like that. Yes and GOB. Then there's something called the transformation leader and that's leader. Who tends to do it right? That's leader who can actually get a forty percent increase in productivity by taking someone out of brick and mortar and putting them in a telework environment or virtual environment assuming that they're prone to it not everybody is right for that kind of job right. What are the characteristics for the for virtual worker her to be successful? Yes for that kind of person. very organized is able to work on his or her own. You keep in mind. A lot of people thrive off of the interpersonal relationships in in Myers Briggs difference between the introvert extrovert The extrovert derives Energy by working with people so if you have extroverts maybe not exactly suited for it those who who liked to work cerebral early on their own more suited. I found when I made the switch when I became an entrepreneur it's also about discipline and most people think it's discipline of. Aren't you distracted by so much going on at your house you know like. Wouldn't you rather be doing the laundry than working well. The laundry doesn't make money so I had the reverse the discipline problem in that I would never stop working Because because there was no natural sort of end to my day At the time I had a boyfriend who is living with me and when he would come home that would be sort of my internal final signal. Like okay I should no longer be working and probably be a girlfriend now and we should have dinner and enjoy the evening but when he went away. So did my boundary of working right so then now I am paying attention to the clock based on. What's on the television as my background noise? So when the late night shows start coming on and you're still sitting Maher. I found that I needed to set better boundaries in terms of stopping to work whereas some people would find their distracted by you know the laundry. So you're cleaning the bathroom or which never even crossed my mind but see. Those people are equally distracted when someone walks in there. So it's interesting and there's a whole host of of characteristics of the people who work better at home. It's a good idea that employees have assessment done before they embark on it. And it's a good idea that the leader has an assessment done to be sure that they're really prone to lead well that way Working virtually or allowing permitting someone to work virtually is a lot like giving a sixteen year old the keys to a car once. You've done it very difficult. Difficult to ask for the keys back or even demand them so you know. Be careful what you wish for okay. So let's talk about how you do you lead a team. That's virtual so what are some of the characteristics best practices stories in your book that you tell in terms of people who are doing that successful successful yeah. There are four characteristics that really underpin the entire leadership paradigms one is I call a give a damn. It's called individualized consideration and what it means is that you take the time to acknowledge the person as more than an employee that this is really a human being and keep in mind. Human resources are humid. So the same way you would walk into an office and say good morning it might be a good idea to say good morning to someone who's out there in the hinterland. Okay If they have a birthday wish them. Happy Birthday I have one story that I absolutely love about a company that did the following The person was working for this company on a large scale. proposal for a very very big government contract the work involved in excess of one year of working pretty much twelve hours a day seven days a week The person was working offsite but not at home so it was kind of a remote not in the office. Not at home and The the proposal was finished and they won the contract. This company did something I've never heard of anybody doing again They sent something to the employees home. It was a big big box. Every bit of three by three by three uh-huh big-box arrives at the House. It's address to this woman's children and and it was filled with toys But it was more importantly filled with a note or had a note in it. The.

GIG economy ebay Ha West Coast Myers Briggs oren Maher
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"I follow Darren Hardy K. and he does the Darren Erin daily and he's the publisher of Success Magazine and I've always been a proponent of it he launched the magazine and every magazine had in it a CD of their special speakers so you can listen to that go into work but his daily routine is usually just a a three to six minute spiel and and you walk away with something pretty much every day. That's applicable to your life so that's motivational for me. Cynthia Trevino's he knows book is what I'm looking at right now the she markets because she gets into the fact that as women we don't ask and what is marketing. It's asking yeah so looking at those two primarily right now okay yeah plus the schoolbooks yeah yeah reading in Creswell yet again and then in addition to your your books being published what what other projects are working on that excites you anything with your clients right now. It is bringing joy to your life. client work. I swear every time one of them wins a contract. My heart just skips a beat. I'm always happy for them. Yeah so we're either working on moving them towards a big award or celebrating the fact that it occurred so so that's been interesting and fun for me. I love it love. I love my clients and that's good well the. I'm sure they love you and the fact that you said my job is to help them make more money for them. Yes yes I mean what a tagline that is right that will will come to you and and what you do yeah so what let's let's dive into that for the last couple of minutes here what are most people's challenges from not making more money okay the biggest in this is a generic challenge but you can apply it to just about everybody. it's the issue of change management assignment right now. I'm teaching a course on how to be exultant and more often than not which are helping a company. Do is deal with change usually they don't call you until they're having a problem with change. In most change brings problems so the issue of change and change management is probably the one that seeks out the most. Where do they need change. They need change with human resources. They need change in cutting costs and how people are reacting to cost cutting. If you're scoping down your your brick and mortar footprint people are being displaced and they have to work remotely outling and dealing with the changes coming up there a number of change models and you pick the right one that goes with that particular client. One of my favorite models is John Qatar's he's at Harvard and has done a spectacular job creating a his change model but there are others that are apropos to the situation MHM good. I love it. Who's been a big mentor to you probably well. Obviously you start start at home. with your parental influence in for me. That was my mother. Her two values were religion and education location and I went to twelve years of Catholic school so we got that check mark and education onto the the doctoral level so those were her two who primaries but through life probably my biggest mentor when I was with the feds for example was Carl. He's the guy who call it three thirty and energize me to go another eight hours course okay. He was phenomenal. Put me in the right place at the right time in front of the right people and I will be forever grateful to him for that. That's nice yeah. Do you feel alight beyond your students that you have an opportunity to mentor people right now beyond by students why spend a lot of time with them. I'm not just teaching the three classes but also I have eight. Yes eight students I'm on three committees and chairing five five dissertations right now so I spend Saturdays one on one with my the people cheering amazing so they're kind of students but they're not really because they're more candidates at this point so I enjoy them. I love interacting with younger people yeah. It feeds my soul. I am not my age. No I am forty seven. I have decided I am forty seven forever. I love that I love that well. Which is why it surprised me when you said that you went back at sixty one because I know you to be twenty six g that you bring to the room so thank you all right so before we close I just WanNa make sure sure that everyone knows so the the book is called the invisible leader yes by Dr Gladys and can be just on your website or where books are sold Amazon on the the easiest fastest quickest way to get it or if you happen to know me. I'll sign a copy for you and heartbeat. I love it. Okay good all right. Are you ready for the rapid fire questions no Komo neither the pilots okay so always ask my guest the same set of questions so you have people who've already answered with these questions but I'd love to compare compare answers so title of your lifetime movie how to lead a fear based life fear based. Yes yes interesting. Yeah that has another story associated okay okay. That's a whole other podcasts. That'll be the next title podcast okay perfect if you could change places with any celebrity right this minute. WHO WOULD IT BE MICHELLE OBAMA. I love it okay good. When do you feel happiest. Oh God I'm so so happy. I'm happy when I'm with my children. I'm happy when I'm with my granddaughter. I'm happy when I teach there are rare times when I'm not happy because I've constructed instruct my life around two things. Does it feel money. Art doesn't feel my pocket. I Know I love that. I would say that you probably are one of the most the happiest people that I know every time I and the other thing you do very well and I will compliment you on this is that you have a great capacity for to make somebody feel like you. They're the only person in the row. Oh never realized that Yeah Oh good when you are in a conversation you are in a conversation. You aren't checking a phone or looking across the room or anything so. I thought that I could do better if you were running for politics. What would be your biggest campaign promise. I know this goes back to Reagan but Free Education K Ultimate Dinner Party which for guests do do you invite and why oh four guess why would invite my children. Okay okay. That's too right. That's that's yeah I have to they. Each each have a significant other so I probably will have to expand this beyond four. Yes okay okay. I think I would look at et. in fighting someone who brings humor I've had the opportunity to hear Jay. Leno live up in Newport Beach uh-huh and he brings a sense of joyous nece to people and so I think at a party that's that's important I would bring someone who's a good thinker thinker and I had a professor for Zine majority who was amazing. He could bring heart soul and academics together in one so I would. I would bring those to other people as well. I love it. What a gift to your to your children good company right right this minute. You have to get a tattoo okay okay. What are you getting why okay it's not GonNa be a tramp stamp. You already have of course yeah right. Maybe maybe the name of my grand dog okay. Do I have to say wear. No no no we won't help the rating would would be it would be probably somewhere. That's visible though okay if you have. I love my grandma okay. I love that and his or her name is his name is bacchus. Chris the god of wine no great surprising right exactly exactly okay biggest pet peeve in business. Oh my God lack of responsiveness. I keep telling people it cuts the ego of your clients. You must be responsive I try to set a standard of two hours even if I can't do something in two hours a let them know. You're on my rader thinking about you. Don't insult someone's mm-hmm sense of Ego oh I and I hate when people make me feel stupid or say something assuming I am yeah but we'll stay with responsiveness responsiveness good fun. What is your wish for the next generation.

Cynthia Trevino Darren Hardy K. Creswell Darren Erin Success Magazine MICHELLE OBAMA publisher Harvard John Qatar rader Dr Gladys Chris Catholic school Amazon Reagan Newport Beach Carl Jay Leno professor for Zine
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"Ever start it was JC Penney and they did it with customer service and they hired a lot of women who were working at home okay and the calls came in and they took care of they were able to take care of their families and that was that was a good start for them. Of course it was all very much hinged on technology. If you don't have have the right tech- you can't make it happen so they've done really well on the flip side. We've seen Yahu and several years ago go Mussa Miro. When she became CEO she actually backed off from virtual work remote work now? The press she got was that she she took it all away from everybody but she didn't which he ended up doing was taking it away from about just two hundred people they happen to be the innovators in the best and the brightest. There were also the sixteen year olds who had their car keys taken away. Yeah didn't go over well especially in light of the fact that not long after she did that she gave birth to her first child and built a huge nursery that tells isn't that working at home so it was it it was kind of an interesting situation for the people who actually worked there I don't think it turned out as well as she wanted it to. so what about a cooperative workspaces we work downtown works popping up all over. Hera hub here in San Diego if I am an independent pendant and I'm in the GIG economy sort of working for myself. How do I benefit from working remotely if I'm not going to what company like what are best practices. I can implement for myself if I'm working in a cooperative working space but nobody's working on my same project right. We're all just physically. They're together but we're all L. ducks of a different feather right so what are your thoughts around cooperative workspaces and were there opportunities perhaps culture of that workspace that some of this could be created bright those people are sometimes referred to as digital nomads because the working and Airbnb the work in a hostile there they'll to work at Co workspaces him oddly enough. I just finished a presentation earlier today. At downtown works and it was part of their lunch unlearn program and downtown works does a lot to facilitate the sense of community within the space so even though we have people working in so many different kinds of businesses they have a chance to come together and learn from each other I spoke with an attorney who focuses on on divorce coaching and helping people have appropriate expectations as they go through that we had a number number of folks that were in the luncheon from the world of it we had some nonprofits sitting in the room so but they all were looking at a sense of community now again. I talk about flip sides. If I owned a company and I had some someone sitting in a Co workspace with other people who worked for similar companies I would kinda worry about how much of my business might be shared in under the spirit community but it seems to be working very very well and they're happy people yeah and that's what makes the difference yeah yeah that that sense of competition that is interesting. 'CAUSE you're right. Most of them are sort of in like spaces. You know the certain industries that started lend themselves to being a digital new mad yeah think about coders or graphic designers or somebody who really can just work anywhere as long as they have their laptop all of the intellectual kinds of jobs it was when was it gosh two two thousand fifteen. I did a presentation at Harvard and it was standing room. Only usually don't come to these very dull dry conference conference presentations but the title was would brought them in and my title was you can't rivet an airplane in your jammies so that's it as you're alluding in two. That's one of the jobs that doesn't go home with you. it's not a remote job yeah. It's Jammie job for something else. Yes definitely the digital. Nomads faces definitely been been of interest to me. I love companies like a remote ear. that are illiterate physically moving people around the world and creating this very global work experience uh-huh again as long as you have your laptop right. It's you can be anywhere in the world. We could be having this conversation in Barcelona Rome so I think there's a lot of value value to that. I think it's again going back to you know if I'm in the GIG economy am I thinking about things like retirement and and you know much at and having to be much more diligent in terms of making my own contributions to a retirement those are the kinds of things so I think from an experiential standpoint the GIG economy the remote the digital nomads I love I'm totally on board with Ab. Within the practical side of me says there definitely has to be a piece of that where it's it's great that you're working in Barcelona this month but when you're sixty five or you're going to be able to retire or you're so having to chase the dollar because you haven't been thoughtful about your Your Business Planning Yeah and if chasing the dollar is a game you WanNa do it forever forever and if you're still intellectually sound and can do that why not not yeah for sure but we we are we have what close to five generations in the workspace right now and we've seen a cultural shift two people who prefer experiences as opposed to things things have to be cared for they have to be cleaned. They have to be fixed. Experiences senses live on forever chapter and so we we find a transition to that we also find a transition away from a lot of responsibility fewer children are being born born and that has a different component in terms of time energy and money so the idea of living more of an exponential exponential life as opposed to a materialistic life has its enticement to people absolutely absolutely so what's a what's a normal day look like for us to work work remotely right you work in your Home Office. So how do you keep yourself disciplined. How do you set your boundaries. How much of your time Ramos sort of spent at the office versus with clients can talk through. What's a normal looking day for you yeah well. I think the first thing that's really important for all of us. Not just for me is to look at my energy algorithm for me. I do my best thinking in my best work in the morning so my most important work gets done in the morning. I have a lot of clients on the East Coast. That's fine. If I'm up working at five it's eight for them. that'll conjoined just great so. I find that I'll spend my early hours doing the more intense mentally oriented work after that it's time to get up and walk the city. I love living downtown and so as soon as I can get out and walk. I clear my head and I plan for four other things. During the day then I try to get out then it's back to the desk than I teach and the morning part is generally writing and meetings okay and the later part of the day is more of the teaching and the social part so happy hour was made for me because I don't do much thinking yeah in the evening and teaching very easy for me. I don't do both at the same time by the way that's class. I sure our share yeah. I've seen you drink and I see the benefit from from all they are mutual leaks. Yesterday aren't mutually my classroom classroom. sue so the the intention of my podcast is the big ask yeah so. I'd like to kind of dive a little bit deeper into win in throughout your life. Have you felt like you've made ate a big ask and what was that process like and what was the results and what is your current big. Ask Okay. I'm really happy that we're going to discuss this this because it's a real big problem that I have asking is almost a near death experience for me. I don't like to ask for things. It's it's it's worked my advantage because I tend to be very independent. anche really try to do something on my own if I'm asking someone for something because because I really need it. I just tend not to ask I'm trying to get over the Adan. I WanNa have more of the mentality that the average salesperson salesperson has the ever salesperson says it's okay if people turn me down. I am that much closer to the yes. Why can't I live that way. I really wish I could so I thought a lot about the big ask and you know I I applied for my doctoral program that was kind of an ask but it was done on paper deeper and and if they said no they said no I if I got thrown out that was okay. There were times. I thought I couldn't complete it and I said we'll stay here till I'm thrown out and graduated with four zero and with lots of accolades so that went will but for me at this point. I'm trying to to ask for more so today. I'm going to have a big. Ask My big. Ask for today's to buy my book okay. I can say that more easily because a portion of the proceeds I ghost was scholarship foundation so I feel more comfortable asking and and I will ask you to buy the book two hundred percent so that's my big ask for today. Yes okay. I love that I love that so listen a little bit deeper though into your hesitation to ask so. Is that a a we need to bring a psychologist for that so so is that a nature or nurture. Have you been nurtured to not ask because growing up. That's what girls didn't do or is it just innately who you. Dr. Do you think no. It's an archer thing okay yeah yeah it came from some things that will not go and not sure sure but yeah it was a nurture thing. I learned how not to ask and I become very good at that. See now. I have known you for a few years. I have to be honest with you that fact fact that you say that is completely surprises me because I think you're so intentional in the words that you choose in the actions that you make as as somebody who is voyeur in your life at different times. I'm surprised that that's an admission that you feel like you can't ask because I'm trying to think back to. When I've ever heard you ask for something and I haven't but at the same time I just feel like that because you you feel very comfortable in your skin and so the hesitation surprises me I agree that in the most complementary way because everything about you is so intentional that I am surprised is that you have admitted that actually is a first step. Isn't it yeah I like it. I like it right. I stepped in many problems meeting. There may be an issue but I think it spawned a lot of independence and you know. I really have to be fully unable unable to do something before I'll go that. Route writes writes it. It was interesting I remember when I bought my first Apple Computer. It wasn't that long ago because I was a PC. Gal I was in defense tracking and Blah Blah A- and and so I had always used a PC and it came time to leave the corporate world and go out on my own and so I sat down with my son and I said well what do you think ought to do. He said cargo to apple you get away from this world and I said Okay I don't know anything about it. come shopping with me and he did and he prescribed the right machine with the right storage and all that sort of thing and he looked at me and he said no mom if there's anything you don't understand or if you have any questions. Let me know and I'll google it for you well. What do you think I I do a lot of now. I Google that's so I mean it worked. Yeah yeah no one hundred percent so okay well. That's something I learned about you today because I'm not prepared for you to say that I in my mind. You are You're very strong. You're very independent like you said you're very intentional. You're very eerie supportive other women and oh I can ask for other people. Yes yeah good good good good. Yes good okay so so now that I know that I'm GonNa pay attention to that with you so that's that's awesome so so what's next for you what else what are you working on right. Now that excites you finally wrote the book which I'm proud of you because we've had that conversation for a few years so what what's next for you. I've just completed writing the next book. Even though this one just launched on the twenty sixth of January yes I finished writing it now. That doesn't mean it's edited just means it's written the book deals with issues concerning public speaking. MHM on two levels one dimension ghosts too the fear the gloss of phobia that exists in the other goes to actually constructing a indecent powerpoint prison and there must be two hundred tips in this whole thing of how to do it and how to do it right so it's another basic how to book limit The the first book is part of a series so they'll be more invisible people. I mean down the road. Okay yeah people yet to be seen yeah. Invisible workers invisible professors invisible students invisible invisible clients. We live in a remote world yeah for sure what what tools do you have to motivate yourself. What are you reading. What are you listening to. Who who do you follow can of what brings inspiration to your life okay well in the morning..

google JC Penney Yahu CEO Airbnb San Diego Home Office Barcelona Rome Barcelona East Coast attorney Harvard apple Ramos one hundred percent two hundred percent sixteen year
"matthews" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"To welcome. Dave Matthews to studio. See we are live in Los Angeles on channel one. Oh, three one. And were also in Boulder Colorado at on KABC. Oh, so thank you for joining us. Both. Thank you. Well, read. You know, anyone who I I feel like I should give you an introduction. But at this point anyone who doesn't know who Dave Matthews is has to be have been like hiding under a rock for the last five years or so frequently with groups of people that that don't. Where strip clubs. I don't frequent them for this. Oh, you you are here in town to show tomorrow night at the Pantages theatre. You are doing the second. Dave matthews. Tim Reynolds tour promoting the third the second one that I know about the second one was ninety five I think ninety six was the second and the I ninety five which is where the live album is taken from while. You're here solo today you got guitar in hand. How about starting with the song? We'll play some really long and slow. Radio. I don't think. So what do you? What are you going to do for us? We'll start with thingy thingy. And then we'll go on with that other thing. Okay. Dave Matthews in studio c on channel one zero three one and KABC. Oh, thank you. The forum. Oh, brother.

Dave Matthews Los Angeles Tim Reynolds Pantages theatre Colorado five years
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"Eight. I'm your host Nicole Matthews. I'm so excited to introduce you to my friend. Kristen Casado Associate Director of of Communications for the Alzheimer's Association of San Diego and Imperial County. What I love about Kristen is her passion for very personal reasons for finding a cure for Alzheimer's Marin Dementia Related Diseases for those of you who've been in San Diego for a while. You'll recognize Christian's name from her days as a news reporter and anchor with chaos. I San Diego in her new role away from the news industry. She is focused on communicating. The amazing work the Alzheimer Associations does both locally and beyond with the goal of one day having in a cure to a disease that affects way too many people so thank you so much for joining us today Kristin. I'm so happy to see. It's great to see you for having me. This is wonderful. I felt like I should wear my purple. I wasn't remiss not wearing my scarf. You get through the Alzheimer's Association. That's right so for those of our listeners who don't don't know a little about your background. Can you give us our thirty or thirty minutes a three hour presentation on who kristen just your quick sort of background on how you found yourself here at Alzheimer's and what your trajectory has been very interesting. I believe truly that I found myself when my mother started losing herself so my mother was diagnosed in two thousand nine the age of sixty one tender age sixty one with a type of dementia called Lewy Body Dementia and we can talk about that later as far as the different types spat dementia is the overall umbrella term Alzheimer's the most common type and Lewy body is the kind that my mom had and I was here working. Monte and the decision was made at the time the diagnosis was made that I was going to go back okay and live with her and a sister this be with her holder hand yeah because we're best friends and so we did we were together for the four and a half years that it really was racking her and she passed away age sixty five and in that process. I learned so so much about dementia that caregiving about patients about skills you don't even know that you have and put it all together and ended up actually working for the Alzheimer's Association. Can I get for a couple of years okay and after mom passed away I love San Diego. The ocean called me back. Hey I came back here and not too long later and it appeared association wonderful so talk a little bit about the diagnosis is that your mom has and how that might be different than what people understand be dementia so what made hers particularly unique or different so right now. There isn't a way ages specifically determine exactly what type you have except for symptomatic thing is so in my mother's case some of the things that she had included some early hallucinations at one point she thought that my brother and I were in the same room and neither of us were in the state she said I thought we were watching TV together. Whoa what's what's going on with that. also some a lot of gate issues a lot of balance issues a lot of false and some bit of shaking. Parkinson Tony in tremors at tend to be one of the things that kind of lumped lumped into a lewy body diagnosis and it's got some of the a lot of some of the things things that the that allows us to hear typical Alzheimer's although there is no typical Alzheimer's but some of those ten signs like a lot of the memory issues and the wandering and then getting lost and you know forgetting about losing a lot of your short term memory shares that's Lewy bodies a little bit different and what normally ends their life that I am assuming that that that's not the the disease that ultimately makes them. Is there a secondary disease. She dies from your brain stops functioning because it's shrinking neurons are dying and a a are not able to communicate so if your brain controls your whole body and eventually you stop remembering how to swallow and you stop obviously can't fend handoff things so pneumonia is a lot of ways that people pass away My mother stopped swallowing so she stopped eating and drinking yeah yeah because they ask for eight it goes. I was on the wrong hole right now. It's like do I breathe is address. Walvis while there's no comprehension of that and no ability of the brain to tell so in fact she just stopped updating okay started and it was time to go she. She was like sixty eight pounds when she passed. Oh my God this giant Downer but yeah yeah wow goodness. What did you learn as a caregiver in that experience. Do you have an hour. Yes we have plenty of so many things the one of the biggest things. I think I learned in that. I like to share with people's that you do not have to do this alone. People think Oh my God this hit me. This hit my family like a truck. I'M GONNA silo borough in in and do what I gotta do. Gosh there's so many people who've done this before you moore going through it now. But who are maybe a different stage. Whoever different outlook that net sharing tips is just so incredibly crucial so joining a support group or even going onto any website you know aol dot org that's.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Association San Diego Kristen Casado Lewy Body Dementia Alzheimer Associations Marin Dementia Related Disease Nicole Matthews Imperial County Christian Associate Director of of Commu reporter Monte Kristin moore pneumonia Downer Parkinson Tony
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"Expert him have a drink have breakfast west go to an event socialize and then do business on the side. I agree. I agree completely. I think that our membership of the University Club really reflects on the importance of getting involved. You know it's very easy to start spending money all over town. You could be have a membership here or this networking organization or this women's group super this or this this but if you aren't going to use it it's such a waste of money a hunter blue now and there have been many people you meet at the university club who say I almost gave up my membership until I joined a committee and then I got involved in. This is certainly not a commercial for the importance of joining a committee at the university cloud right. You and I both have benefited from that but also just just whatever your university club is a women's group a golf club or rotary rotary whatever it might be. You've gotta get involved otherwise it's just a waste of your your time and your twenty five dollars or fifty dollars or your seventy five dollars to to attend something you know. I think that people just sort of think. If I become a member then you know you know they build it. They will come or if I build it. They will come and that's not necessarily the truth. You still have to put in the work. It's a beautiful place to go have breakfast but if you're always having breakfast by yourself herself you know you're not growing your business and so you know hopefully that is a a little bit of a motivator for anybody. Who's listening that it's not just about being a member but you have to be engaged in in what you're doing in order to maximize it avenue really if your goal is to grow your business you gotta get involved and you know you gotta get your hands dirty definitely swift circle back to the book for a second. What's the timeline on the book. Oh I'm so glad you asked put a little fire on you know what I finished my first draft aft- amazing and that was two months ago okay my job. Now is to read my first draft type so nervous and I've I've started and then we actually just went through a huge insurance claim ourselves where we're literally still living not in our house oh come from a kitchen flood and and and so I thought maybe I'll have time to do it during this time and it's totally not so. I'm going to be putting myself into a writing retreat here. In the next couple of weeks. Good read through the whole I draft my goal was to have it published by the end of the year and I think that's an unrealistic goal however it's not impossible so if I can if I can focus and really get it done then it'll be out by the end of the year which I'm super excited about because all I have is about three more rounds of editing and the perfect so and that's super smart smart that are that you are now in a place of editing right. The biggest thing is the words on the page. Oh yeah right and that was the best piece of advice I had. When I was writing. My Book is just keep moving forward and and always go back. You can always enhance a story you can always at it but just get the words on the page. So what was your process like when you were writing. Did you carve out time name specific time for writing. Did you SORTA stop when he became inspired. What was did you have a sort of formal process for writing the draft. I have tried every formal process us because I'm an insurance agent. I am not an author. I am not a writer. I actually love to write. I love to journal. I love to to to do that kind of stuff but that's not real writing you know and so yeah. I I've tried ten minutes a day of tried five minutes a day. I've tried an hour a a day. I've tried two hours a day. I've tried every other day. I've tried nights. I've tried mornings. I literally tried everything and what I've come to find as the only way that I can get the paper. We're on the the the words on the page. Is I need a full day okay so I need about an hour and a half just to settle down and focus so that ten minutes a day was a total and then I can get into about a four to six hour our session okay and just write and write and write and write and right and then obviously after take shut. That's the best way that I found so I have have to block off a day or two okay and and that's how I was able to finally finish because I went through months of trial and error yeah yeah and did you. Have Anybody coaching you along this process or did you just decide one day. I think I'm going to write a book and I'm just GONNA start putting. I'm just GONNA start typing. Oh you know me so well L. Horse. I hired somebody. I figured I'm not the expert them yes. I did partner with a company a wonderful company that that is an expert expert at at helping people like me that have a dream to do it and don't know where to start yeah the company's called Author Bridge Media and I'm sure you know Helen Chang Yeah. I met her as a member of the University of and that's another you know Yep. It's not all about the university club not to bring it back to that but it's not about just growing my business. It's about I'm a client to yeah so she had a service and and she fulfilled that service that I hated that that specific moment and so yeah they've been a a godsend really being able to guide me through you know how what and when and where and and and they'll do my editing for me. We're actually going to do my my layouts. They're going to do my book cover design. They're they're. They've been great resource because for me to go out and outsource everything right. I'll have time for that in order to start right so right. Just go to the experts yeah. They you know there is a lot to publishing a book beyond just putting the words on the page some too I found actually the writing was the easiest part it was everything else around it for finding the right publisher or self publisher to the right designer to design on your cover all that kind of stuff matters you know it needs. It's almost as important as what's actually inside the book at least to get it onto the shelf or wherever you're going to solely anyway so. I and I also found too that just having an I had I guess I would say it was a coach as well just having that accountability would set some deadlines for me because you know like you. There's a million things going on and so it'd be very easy to say oh. I'll get to that tomorrow. I'll get to that tomorrow but if it's a priority in words are there and the stories already to be told. It's important that you honor that in give in give that time and have deadlines in order to say okay. I've gotta get two chapters done in the next week or two weeks so that I say on. Stay on path so yeah so that's exciting. I'm super excited for you. I am too and you know it's it's it's one of those things that I always wanted to do. Never thought I would do it about my business thought it would be something totally different but this just really makes sense for the the time that I'm in right now and I think it's something that is needed. The public needs yeah and and I'm excited to share it yeah but yeah yeah thanks for bringing. You know. I'm excited just have a title yet or is that enter wrap. It doesn't have a title and you know that's the funniest part. Is that I could've could've had. It ghost written. I'm much easier. Let me just tell you all the stories right it yeah. But of course that's not the path. I chose and I was like nope. If I'M GONNA DO I'm gonNA write it myself horse and so you know being able to go through that process and really getting deep into myself and deep into my mind and meditate meditate on it and really allow the words to come out versus me telling yes. is a process in itself. Yes and it's almost magical goal because all get into the zone and then I'll read what I wrote and I'm like that is not me. I can't believe I wrote that. It's really cool processing so I think that's why it's taken me a little bit longer to because I really becoming embraced in that feeling of wow like I can really do do this and this stuff is really good and I and I want the title to be organic like that as well so I don't want to just name my book and then you know I want the name to come from the content and really it just organic like that was what the book was to be called and I think you'll find that I think once you so you have completed the process and then it's sort of like naming your child right. You know what the right and even child and so I think you'll you'll find that that's that's what will happen so so that's a good segue into being a mom so I I know you've got two beautiful little boys who you mentioned earlier so you're a business owner and a mom and so what what is that process been like for you in terms of juggling lots of balls now in the air yeah. It's it's been a lot of of calendering the Mike Calendar has never been more important than it is. Today I live and die by that thing and now they're getting older. So it's a lot of there's a lot more involved with activities and places to be and stuff like that and so you know when I got married and I had my first child. I thought but maybe I'll be a stay home. Mom like I always dreamed of being a stay at home mom and then I was three months into my material even was like I have got to get get-back-to-work. I couldn't wait to get back to my office and Luckily I had a job where I can pop in and out whenever I want and you know everything was being handled on the backside ride but yeah I fairly quickly learned that that isn't for me and that's okay. It's okay to be a working mom and it's okay hey to have a career and it's okay to be you know driven and have goals for your own and so that was my path and and I'm totally happy with it and I wouldn't trade anything. My kids are amazing and and my kids are happy. They're happy to see me as a working mom my son Giovanni who's five. He asked he's asked me this twice. Now and I don't know where you quite gets this from I'M GONNA blame it on school but he asked me Mommy. WHO's the boss. Are you the boss of daddy or his daddy the boss of you you oh interesting and I'm like where did you get this question and he's asked it to me twice in my answer to him was we're not the boss of each other. You know we we live together. Thir and we make choices together and were your parents and neither one of us are the boss of each other and it's interesting because I think what he sees is. Both of us are high level bosses in his mind you know we're we're their boss and we have these jobs in we're doing these pickups and the drop-offs were managing. Everything and both of my husband and I are very hands on I very lucky in the fact that we're we're definitely co-parenting and both of us are very involved and so the kids see that and so they don't know who the boss's my husband. I think it's a good sign. That is a good. I think it's also good to see that they see you know obviously being a little boys. They see a woman who's handling business in lots of different ways. You know they're going to grow up understanding that women are strong and successful and can run businesses and in still be great at being a mom and that's I think important lesson for them. That will serve them. Well going forward and Giovanni loves to COME TO MY office. I sure he we need gets to watch cartoons to work and I WANNA go to your office getting you know and he knows that and when we drive down fourth he's like hey. There's your office totally. He relates to Mommy's business and I want him to see that you know I want him to to see that. It's not just you know a man's world. It's about there too when and all of his friends are girls so yeah so that's good. He needs to learn it early right exactly so when is the last time you ask for help in the spirit of the big ask podcast..

University Club Giovanni publisher writer University of and business owner partner Helen Chang ten minutes seventy five dollars twenty five dollars fifty dollars five minutes three months two months two hours two weeks six hour one day
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

14:09 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"Because I'm hearing this more and more from entrepreneurs. The people were super successful seemed to get up the crackdown will every book. I've ever read has said that. The most successful CEOS in the country are up in working before most people are even rising out right and so I know I'm a morning person though my energy level doesn't it doesn't curb your as God so when's the last time you ask for so help me as your last big ask. When was my last big. Ask so you know I am a unique in the respect that I have to ask for help almost daily to get what I want I don't need to ask for help in very many remedial things but I definitely look I don't do in. You're aware of this but I don't do any marketing or advertising for my practice. My Ugly Mug is on a bus bench. Anywhere I don't twirl signs lines in front of stores right and so a hundred percent of the people I meet is predicated on my clients feel uncomfortable to make an introduction for me and so because I don't do any marketing or advertising the only way that happens is I have to ask in. It's silly enough. Nicole where I joked that the phone that that sitting to my right doesn't even accepting coming calls. I mean that's what I believe because people do not call financial advisors looking for help it just just does not happen. we have to proactively reach out introduce ourselves an almost try to insert ourselves away in the most. Pc Way we can insert ourselves yourselves into their financial lives to try to help them out with that said because there's no magical list of people looking to meet with me and my phone's not ringing off the hook and the the Internet people that apply on the Internet are garbage I have to I have to ask my clients daily for help. You've been through this process with me me right. I feel like I get creative to a certain extent but the reality is I hate doing that. I don't think that the big ask is human nature. Yeah I mean you are certainly more of an expert on this than I am but I don't believe that that's something that you just grow up understanding how to do it the right way. It takes guts. You know I feel like the most the thing that shines through the most with asking for referrals is interpersonal will risk that is at the end of the day for me what it comes down to what am I afraid of right afraid of the person saying no. I'm not willing to give you a referral. I'm I'm not willing to introduce you. and that interpersonal risk. I think rules a lot of how people act on a daily basis share and so to answer your question. My biggest was asked recently as probably yesterday right and it'll probably be today in the probably be our. Hey I just have to do it. I think I was very impressed. Actually the first time you and I met or one of our meetings that and then you asked about referrals you know I had become a client and so you knew our relationship was moving forward and I I think as a kind of a takeaway for listeners would be the fact that you had tangible names or specifics on this. This is who I am looking for. It wasn't just hey if you liked this. You know think about me for your friends or whatever but it was like you know I see that you're connected on linked in to you know Oh bill and sue and Gerakan and and so I think from a from a referral standpoint it does start to put you know the the wheels start to turn quicker than just if someone happens to say oh in the market for a new right you know financial advisor then that's an easy referral more spin but being more proactive at it. I I would say that I I've paid attention to that every time you and I have met and and tried to now think about my own business in the way to being much more concrete and and these are the specifics on who looking for not just anybody who you think might be effet very I always say and I wrote about this in my book if I don't don't know that you need help. I don't know how to help you of course right so when you send me give me a list and say these people as much easier for me I can I can be very targeted and Matt or be reactive to that versus this imaginary person up in the air who I might run into at a starbucks. I mean here's the quick skinny on that is in my industry story for in particular when you go to a social barbecue with your friends or picnic or a ballgame. You're not talking about money. People are not talking about how much they're investing or what they're saving what they're trying to accomplish long-term with their financial goals. It's just not on the radar of subject matter that people are accustomed talking about what their friends so. I just asked you point blank. Who Do you know who needs my help. You're GonNa look at me like a deer in the headlights so what I've taken the liberty of doing as saying because now I guess in a way contradicts what I said a minute ago that I'm not very well versed in technology but somewhere down the line. I'm sure I stole this idea from. Somebody is used social media to your advantage by saying listen. Here's some people that look like the type of people that I would enjoy meeting. How would you feel about introducing using and even so Nicole when that goes well the ratios for any a person working in the referral culture. They're still the same right I mean you introduce me to ten of your best friends. That would pick up your phone. Call in a heartbeat and would accept your endorsement in a heartbeat but when I call them I'm still only going to get a hold of baby three of rain and it's just the the the the business and so I if I was to give any kind of advice is here in finance for financial planners out there. I would tell you that if you cannot come up with a creative way to have your clients feel comfortable introducing you to their friends in their family. You may experience some intermittent success right but long-term mm-hmm. You're either going to be working with a bunch of assholes a bunch of people you do not enjoy working laughing or you're going to be working with people that you don't have really solid personal relationships with and I don't want either of those things. You can imagine so oddly enough when my clients refer me to other people usually what I find. Is there birds of a feather flock together so I'm like Nicole. I'm pretty confident. Nichols going to refer me to other people. I'm probably GonNa Light Yeah right exactly. That's you can't take that for granted. I mean that's so that's so important business for sure much so last question before we get into the rapid fire sure sure so you and I definitely bonded over sort of our willingness and respect for giving back may we you and I are both giving back among us and we can say that you know humbly that we are. We're good at that and I had recently heard somebody speaking. I I need to track down who this person has but you know we were talking about for a long time. Everybody was in their gratitude journal. Write down the three three things that you are grateful for case we've gone through that phase now and this person who is speaking talked about instead of talking about what you're grateful for talk about ways contributed right so what are the three ways have contributed today versus what you're grateful for like grateful. There's no action sort of about being grateful. If you WANNA meet rape at home at home I can think about ways that I can be contributing so I know for you. the lemon. Alex's lemonade stand says Karuk so you know that's an important 'cause do and so just highlight that for a second in thirty other organizations that are important to you as well yes so so my my wife and I have been on this on the same page on this for years now. I always like to say that to answer that question. I can very distinctly tell you the three ways that I donate my nighttime or my resources. The first one is through Alex's lemonade standards. that is aimed to help fund solutions nations to finding a cure for childhood cancer and the way. I give back is I put on a big charity golf tournament once a year we just raised forty four thousand bucks yeah it was. It was fantastic fantastic. It's always the chair that committee who runs it That's the first way that's that's what I consider donating my time. Because that's one resource I do have the second one is I always give no time and no money to prostate cancer awareness USC in the way that I donate is. I grow very disgusting mustache once a year. November and it's always a funny thing to me because I think some people look at at that and say well. You're not really donating anything there and I say well. I'm donating my branding away because every meeting I show up to with clients in November where I just have a Moustache Ashia and I'm really teetering on looking right between cop and a porn star. It becomes a pretty interesting discussion with the client. I'm so schedule. Right now meeting in November you'll see I wear dirty stash every November and then the last one is I always get back through to the military by wounded warriors and and I will always give my money to that so the way I the way I view it as I give my time to Alex's lemonade stand I give my facial hair to prostate cancer awareness and then I give monetarily to another charity and so as you mentioned in the Intro I'm I'm really big on the philanthropy. I feel like if you really if you're in any kind of entrepreneurial field. I think the best way to increase your own business is get back and not because we do it. You were I for having return but let's just talk about getting out being social extroverted meeting people If I had my druthers I would only do business with people that gave back to the community right and it's such a great way to just you know there's always a hard day. When you're an entrepreneur right the greatest morning in the worst afternoons Rhino I always say say that it's the greatest love of my life and the thing I want to feel them but I think also I mean you and I share a passion for pediatric oncology my work through three the Leukemia Lymphoma Society Yours through Alex's lemonade both amazing organizations but it's very easy to just sort of be involved but when you see what those families are going coming through my worst day is an entrepreneur has never been executive hugh what those families have gone through couldn't agree more so it. It just puts everything into perspective Joe Joe. Oh thank you for the good work that you're doing. Do we always end every podcast with some rapid questions favorite ones ray so this season of this podcast. These are the questions we have got him. First thing comes to your mind. Go CASO note give you don't have to put a tough odd into this is the first thing title of Your Lifetime Movie Gosh. I wish you could see in the face. He just gave me it was literally like deer in headlights. The title title my lifetime movie I would say versatility. I thought I'd have something to do with a wave. No okay all right listen. It's no I'm not in a place of. I felt like I was being judged. There sorry all right if you could change places with any celebrity right this minute. Who would it be God. I can think of thirty often my my issue. I would not just in today's Day and age Oh Gosh what is his name. I cannot think of WHO's the guy that does a ton. Hon of charity work with kids in hospitals. I can't I'm spacing on his name skip okay. Let's give it all right back to windy. Feel happiest at home okay. If you were running for politics. What would be your biggest campaign promise to do exactly what I said I was is GonNa do Okay Alternate Dinner Party which forecast you an invite why living or dead real or fictional matter boy the Dalai Lama Comma Okay would be one Rob Machado. Most people would know that is but Rob Machado would be too you and number three would be Rodney dangerfield interesting. Why Rob Machado. Do you know who Robinson's yeah yeah. I grew up surfing with ROB L. He was on the Surf Team with me. We will have the same high school I look at someone who has come back due to his roots full circle he's also very much a philanthropist I just think he has done his profession. In the most outstanding way he's he's not pompous arrogant guy he's very down to Earth and humble and he has tremendous amounts of success and so I think combined the the fact that he's Uber successful successful very humble and he comes back and helps the community. What's not to love that absolutely okay good. He's invited for sure right this minute. You have to get a tattoo patio where you get y. Gosh a the right answer. Here's my wife's name now of a relationship the you know it's funny. I do not have a tattoo nor do I but I just think it's interesting what people would select yeah. I would probably select a wave okay. That's where I'd probably put the ocean on my body perfect okay biggest pet peeve and business people that don't have the guts to say no. When does your light shine shine. The brightest when someone around me is the happiest game but is your wish for the next generation.

Alex Nicole Rob Machado advisor starbucks cancer ROB L. Gerakan rape Matt Nichols Joe Joe Rodney dangerfield Surf Team facial hair Robinson Leukemia Lymphoma Society
"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

Nicole Matthews

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"matthews" Discussed on Nicole Matthews

"I show another words I have my benefits provided to me by northwestern mutual but everything else in my business everything pertaining to my business is self funded all of my income. I have to pay my taxes on. I don't have taxes withheld and so it really get in my opinion granted. I am biased but it gives me the best of both world because if you talk to business owners like yourself. Nicole one of the biggest challenges is how do I provide benefits for myself and so I love that relationship upside past that northwestern provide some supervision capacities but that's really it so everything from an entrepreneurial standpoint it is up to me how I interact with my clients is my choosing the business trip you and I were talking about coming up next month by one hundred percent of that right and so it enables me in my the opinion that enables me to not be bias with my clients which is the most important point and just to expand on that for minute I shared this with you when we started working together. If northwestern doesn't have the right solution for the client city Dow with I'm not compelled in any way to work with them. if if I'm helping my clients invest money and northwestern mutual doesn't offer the right platform for whatever the reason I'll just go to another company okay in northwestern dozen. They're not they don't frown upon that okay so great yeah that is the best of both worlds is thing too. They need an event planning yeah right exactly exactly so what makes a great wealth manager. I know you're really looking to grow your team. pretty substantially right eight like twelve to fifteen people something like that big kind of big vision goal. So who what do you look for in. Do you have to be a numbers person. How much of this can be taught how much of it again kind the nature nurture conversation but what what what do you look for when you sit down from across the table from a potential applicant so just to make sure we're or not muddying the waters here so I really wear two hats. The first hat is is spend time working with my individual clients mind you that that accounts for approximately seventy or eighty percent of my day the other twenty or thirty percent of the time. I am the managing director of a firm mm-hmm four northwestern mutual where my my objective is to grow feet on the street another words to hire train and develop new financial advisers that can help clients within the communities in where we served so we're talking about the latter half of how do I work with What do I look for in an applicant. It's a really unique discussion because five years ago. I would have a different answer than I do today. I hate to be cliche but I'm not looking for too. Many millennials not for all the same reasons that we've seen in the media I think there's a lot of value to millennials. The challenge with millennials in my industry is really twofold number one. They all want to be entrepreneurs but very few of them have had any realistic experience as to what that slight so in other words the most common theme it in my discussions with millennials. Neal's when when they're in an interview with me as they always say why want unlimited income John I wanna make my own schedule. I WANNA be able to have better work life balance once now say if you want those things truly you will have to go into business for yourself at some point whether it's here or go open a McDonald's but you have to do you something like that and the challenges once you get into the weeds a little bit and talk about what kind of self discipline it takes to be an entrepreneur very few of them are willing to put forth that effort right and so as much as I have nothing Porta say about millennials. It's just a different type of higher dance. Your question directly who I'm looking for Israeli twenty to forty five years old some sales or marketing experience in the past has experienced success at some MHM level whether it's Incom- sports athletics ran a business themselves but they have to have. They have to know what what success feels like in any extent. I love it when they're more established so they're married with children. That's great. I love when their local although they don't need to be that's not a prerequisite and most most importantly is I put every applicant I have through a personality profile that tells me a lot about the question you just asked him or they introverted or they extroverted me right as relationship relationship building second nature to them or native tongue and and so I'm always looking for the person that I believe if they were sitting down in front of a potential Henschel client. Do they have the believe ability and integrity to make a difference right. That's it and and Nicole I have I have interviewed Multiple Times. I've interviewed the people that come to me and have impressive sales resumes and won numerous awards and I look at them and I know they're in sales. I can tell there and sales but they're better with transactional sales and as we've now seems to be the theme of our talk a little bit. This business is made for an should really quite frankly only be about relationship building transactional sales's what gets our industry into trouble which is why stay steer clear away from it yeah and yeah. I think like my industry in in event planning and Personal Concierge I mean at the end of the day what you and I are selling is trust very much right so if if a client doesn't trust me to produce their event in order to manage their busy life and get really personal in their life then there's no there's no relationship right so that trust factor has to come first through the relationship like those things are always played together can't have one without without the other regular. you know. I I always I I celebrate elebrate that that you are so committed to that because I think that's why you're businesses accessible and you're not going to stray from that you know the first and foremost it's like create the relationships and then the business will come on a side note. Just kind of interesting is I've website. It's pretty shoddy but I do have a website and I don't have a major footprint on there but interestingly enough every now and that maybe once a month couple times a month. I'll get a internet lead August someone who goes on my website and requests information and country to what a lot of sales people. I think believe they look at that as well. That's gold that is like I got a warm lead really warmly. Yeah I can safely say that not one of those turned out to work with me as a client ninety nine percent of them just WANNA transaction. They're reaching out and they say you know John. What are you charge or. What would it cost me to do. This and I always go immediately into. Why don't we meet. Let's get to know each other. Let me understand what you're looking to accomplish first and then I can be more than then happy to help you and they never yield anything right and and as such a direct understanding as to why relationship buildings important my business and the importance of so referral to very much so very very much so so you mentioned before millennials let's talk a little bit about genetics and millennials and sort of where they are in their own heads with wealth management is is it even on their radar. We what are they doing right. What are they doing wrong. In of where where do you see coming down the pipe that could be disastrous or could be it really amazing for those generations so I can probably set the stage here by. I sharing that so once a month I do a class talk at Cal State San Marcos Marcos where I have an excellent relationship with many of the professors on campus there and for years. They've asked me once a month. I come and speak to a to a class of seniors usually in their business. Leave section of the school and the professor always asked me to do a talk on very elementary financial literacy literacy and so the classroom typically has thirty forty kids in there and I'll always ask the question I asked I when I'm in front of the class so raise your hand. If at any point up to this point in your life someone sat down and talk to you about financial literacy and I usually get one or two handsome and so it becomes apparent very quickly that our parents don't spend time having these discussions in fact to hear you say that in him by parents raised me tattooing on my body the importance of saving you're you're an anomaly in that respect Nicole and so because most people don't really have any any kind of upbringing where it's teaching them about it. It's really that's my job. My job is to help. Bring that to the forefront so your question. What do I see out there. I think it's very straightforward. I think I think millennials aren't really sure what to do. Which is probably the answer that could go back hundreds of years again. I think it's our job requirements to teach them to do. I see Gen xers as freaking out a little bit for a variety of different reasons presence. I think a large part of that's the media I think what you picked up and what you see and what you fill your head with but there's an interesting what makes our generation very interesting is his our parents are all coming from the generation where pensions were still at the forefront of a lot of people's professional occupation people could would save a million dollars into a 401k and if that's what they had by the time they turn sixty five. They'd be okay buying one house in living there for forty thirty years that those were our parents generation in our generation. Unfortunately Kinda got thrown a lotta that got thrown out the door. It's very common now to own multiple multiple properties through your life We're never satisfied with one. We're in pensions have gone the way the buffalo retirement is now one hundred percent contingent contingent on our own personal efforts to leaning on a company and then of course the big elephant in the room which is no one knows of social security is going to be around and and so when you take those things in in a nutshell it becomes somewhat of a scary proposition which is why a lot of our generation is freaking now because they don't have the they don't have the direction or the guidance to know what to do and most people our age because we're stuck with that still the parental generation we had were still somewhat naive in believing that our employer if we are loyal and faithful will somehow somehow help us get to retirement in the reality is even though there's a portion of that's true by providing things like four one ks benefits. The reality is You can't put enough money into a 401k every year to retire the way that you want not with inflation and taxes and all the other moving pieces and so Josh it becomes an interesting paradigm shift where we need to start thinking a little bit above where our parents were thinking and we can't ever get as low was the millennial generation right. We need to be in that. Middle Yeah and I mean I you know the millennials they think are so categorize sort of this gig generation right in so they wanna be these freelancers like you were talking about. They WANNA freelance. They want to be entrepreneurs. WanNa do these gigs. They WANNA hop from GIG GIG right which is disastrous for your point of view right because unless you're completely disciplined. It's very easy to say that thousand dollars. I just got today spend today and not worry about Oh. Oh that's a problem. That's GonNa come to me. Sixty years from now will throw you know and so what we need to do as a society Where's where's the disconnect like. How do we fill the gap? Yeah Good Question so interesting statistic on this topic. the average person changes jobs seven times throughout their career which in my world means that seven four one ks that most people usually leave behind somewhere right but but in reality what do we need to do. I think first and foremost starts like anything it's education right. I mean I I know you started out this podcast when we were kind of laughing about how we met but the reality is what I hear you're the most when I meet with. New Potential clients is very there's a common theme there right. It's either I do. Have these old. 401K's at this whole job. No one's ever advise is going to do with it or how I've heard. This is something I should put my money. In this is something I should and I love some direction there and then more importantly than any of it is I really need someone to kick my ass to make me stay disciplined to my goals but where where people I think need the most help as just education in today's Day and age we educate ourselves right the only ways that adults learn new things now as Google right and so if we spent we as a generation spent as much time came under standing the importance of financial planning as we do about the yelp review at the restaurant we wanna go eat we everyone would be better off. Which is why have taken taken that approach in my personal practice of saying you don't need to become an expert at what I do but I need you to know enough to be dangerous and that's kind of the theme that I've always operated traded under because that is the number one pitfall to people not being prepared long-term. is just lack of education. Yeah and one last note on this is that the challenge with education I think is and this ties back to the Internet is right. Everyone knows that everything on the Internet true yeah absolute ripe and the in reality when we look at the Internet whatever were looking for validation for we find right if I wanna find why this restaurants the greatest I can find it. If I want to find the restaurants socks I can find financial planning is not exempt to that and so what then what happens in society is for example..

Nicole one professor Henschel San Marcos Google managing director Incom Multiple Times Neal McDonald Porta John yelp Josh one hundred percent 401k ninety nine percent forty thirty years forty five years
"matthews" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"matthews" Discussed on World Cafe

"That same Cup joy begin is Dave Matthews of Dave Matthews band. New record is called come tomorrow. You know what's interesting about the way that you describe that opening line. I guess the song that opens the record is that to my ear. This sounds like one of one of one of the least ominous or or looming danger, Dave Matthews ban records and on the surface, I think to to some fans ears that that I've heard it. It doesn't necessarily sound like it has as much galvanizing ideological content or or political, but but it's so the way that you're describing what you set out in that opening song as as saying, let's level the playing field. All of us here are coming here naked and afraid like that. Sounds radical the way that you described the way that you describe it now and it sounds like one of the more political things that you could say it so personal. What I do think those simple ideas the the real radical ideas. You know, God is not a radical idea. God is comforting idea only gets confused when there's two different images of God or ten different images of God, that the things that connect us are now in the strange world, the radical ideas and to say, we're all the same is, is an obscene people get deeply upset about that to say that too, that the lives of people that were not born in America are absolutely in every way as important as the lives of people that are born in America. It's insane to think that there's a good percentage of people in this country that don't believe that that is, but Zohar and is terrifying to me that someone might think of a. Person that looking for a better life as a parasite simply because they're looking for a better life and or that they're dangerous simply because they see God in a different light. That's the doom of the human race. If we separate ourselves out until we realized that if everyone's not included in the in with the same respect, we're all doomed. We're all your also you're, you're born in a place where you saw the consequences of placing different values on people's lives based on arbitrary things that don't make all your born in Johannesburg, South Africa apartheid era, and went back there as at thirteen or fourteen right, and made the decision to leave rather than be drafted into the to the military and and and fight the fight that was going on there. How I guess. I mean, I'm sure that that's incredibly formative in the way that you're thinking about. Equality now or the way that your speech you can never know. You know, I spent my so much as whites have African. I can never know what it's like to be an Indian South African or or a black South African or what they would call colored South African mixed race out African. But I know from my view as a person because of my mother and the way I raised, I was raised that judging someone for. Something that they were born with the learned jotting them severely for that is just absurd. And so a system like that can only be justified because somebody wanted more than their share at some point. And it's the same history that we have here in many ways. I mean, our society was of. Of our country was born out of division in born out of wealth, created from oppression. There's no, you know, we teach history classes obviously here that that this country was built on an ideal of Justice and ideal of freedom, but that's gobble goop and you know, in this you except that it was some rich guys, would you ever said, I suppose that that said they, they want to be free to do as they please. The country was really building on on similar in a way different, but similar goal, an idea. That's how Africa, which is to have a group of people that are that have had their humanity taken so they can serve as as the people you can the labor force. And that's what built. Such a young country America's young country was built on the fact that someone like Thomas Jefferson with all his brilliance had the hands of three hundred people to build his dream. Out those three hundred without those slaves couldn't have. He could never have done what he did. Not even partly not even shadow of what he did and and the idea that the Boston tea party was an taxes where the whole. Reason for the revolutionary wars little simple..

Dave Matthews Thomas Jefferson America Zohar South Africa Johannesburg Africa Boston
"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

09:07 min | 2 years ago

"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"Not only that so I was talking last week with Someone you've worked with for a long time. Who was full of praise for the way You keep it? She was like here's a guy who drives his kids to school. Every morning does make a big deal about where he lives. It's not super secret. Dave Matthews lives in Seattle. And you drives a Prius. I try not to stick out to try to make my strange stay on the inside as much as possible. I do think it's better for my kids. I do feel like if I walked through an airport by myself. That a much better chance that no one is GonNa notice me then if I walk through the airport with Posse if I really don't want anyone to see me will then I just won't go outside and I and I do think I don't want people knocking on my door and saying I made you this jam or won't you come to my wedding. I don't want strangers coming in the house but I feel like if you're sort of accessible it makes the curiosity to what they're less less interesting treat yourself like a normal person. People will show you a normal person. We mentioned that you took a a summer vacation last summer. Did turning fifty have anything to do with not going out for summer tour for the first time in a long while still work. I did go on tour with Tim. Reynolds light. It's easy enough just to Qatar. Som turning fifty also. My view of things changed a little bit than to because how well I was not totally unexpected. But it was my fiftieth birthday. Did Fall right around the same time as the seven deadly sins or the Carlson's took over the highest office in the nation. Your birthday in January. And you're saying it was around the time of the trump inauguration. Exactly you turn fifty. You have this moment. Of what thinking do I keep doing this? Do I change what I'm doing like? What are you going on? I think there was a lot of different thoughts I think for me. I've never been on grateful for what I've managed with the band. And what all the guys in the band of taught me but I do think when I turned fifty. I was like I really have to have a selfish year. You know it's all relative not regardless of everybody else but just because of me and so I told my kids. What do you want to do with what kind of party my wife had? What kind of party for? I don't WanNA party had to give me a surprise party but I do want to go have a trip and I haven't figured out yet but I wanNA take you all on a trip and I wanna go somewhere. Where and then I wanNA take all our cell phones away and take all hide everything and I do something. Where'd you go? We ended up going to Kenya to re Teddy this incredible elephant sanctuary and some other places and had I think all my vanity would agrees. I'm not saying that everybody can hop in a plane and go to the middle of Kenya where there's nothing but it was everything that it could be an although I felt selfish In some ways if I looked at it it was just a UN believable time for me. And my family to indulge each other and to enjoy each other's company and to and it was really nice. It was also beautiful because he wasn't a battle even in the remotest way these have ipad. Oh can I just check my man? It was like there was none of it. It was crazy but it was because we were around all think. It's easier to be without your IPAD when there are elephants make it easier to forego. Social media is wild. That alone is a good argument for an hour ban of ivory in this country. Sure Atl conservation will help you stay. In the room sure stay will run authorises although they are not as smart as elephants did not know. Going elephant is hauntingly smart. Hannah if I was gonna tell anyone to read a very simple very quick read about elephants does Oh beautiful book that anyone would enjoy by Lawrence. Anthony called the elephant whisper in. It's just his experience with a herd of wild. Elephants is mound boggling. The respect you will gain from a very unassuming book but it will make you wonder at the universe to turn fifty. You took your family to Kenya. But did you have that moment? I always think that Neil young song. I'm the ocean. Yeah people my age. Don't do the things I do. It's funny because I do sometimes hear my own voice saying there's no way. I'm going to be doing this when I'm forty. I mean I could hear my no my own voice and it was going well. I there's no way I'm GonNa do this on on forty now. I feel like I was wrong. There aren't a lot of people who get to keep doing this. It is a crazy thing. And unless you're working as a musician and you had to work on to be lucky enough to get where we are and keeping to do it at that very lucky. I don't take for granted for the most part everyone's while I take it for granted I do feel like I don't care as much about what people think as they did. Twenty years ago I. I think I deeply cared. Now I'm Kinda like if you don't think that what I did was good. I don't care I'm not saying you're wrong although I think you're wrong I I'm just saying that I don't care because it's good. It's funny to it's a different thing. When like the people who grew up on your music start telling their stories. They start writing their rock history. Because they don't do it. It's the same thing I was thinking about this. The other day is black. Sabbath we think of black Sabbath this fucking Sabbath but in the seventies if you're reading rock criticism it's like they're no good and they're not really. Satan s that's not real and it's not good. It's not good music. That's that fundamental to us. Yeah I just I just know that it's at the core of me. Know I do remember being almost frozen with joy fear when I was in a gym here in the city and Ozzy was on a treadmill near me walking up and he's walking not running. He was running but he was the whole shaking. A whole he runs like Frankenstein which is not surprising but he was like I mean his feeder hitting the grammy that I was like how it was. Bones hold up. He was running and it was not long. It was a decade ago. I was impressed that he was running. But also just like you know and eventually got the courage to go you know Biden bug him too much and he's of course as we all know now having watched charming he wasn't his. You know the first and only show. That was actually worth something. But in my strange opinion the only reality show the only family reality. Show watch great. Why do it again? That was perfect. Just watch reruns. It was perfect and he could see was a loving amazing person but what great music to hate. You know you might hate to admit it. But it's great right in my bones. We're now at stage where the stones are on tour and they're in their seventies. You can probably do that to let that happen when it does well. The way I feel right now is that I cannot believe how new new this how good I feel about this record. I think that if someone listens to this album and says I don't get it. They should either listen again or I don't know. Go eat a cupcake. This is their loss to me. It's such a good record of feels good about it and you back out on tour. This summer I cannot remember feeling this elated about playing music with and feeling so lifted by the experience as I do with you know the same people and some New People that I've ever felt in my life and it's just what the hell did I do right but I just feel like when I look at Carter and I know that we were in his basement practicing Stefan fifteen year old kid when I first approached him when I look at them now and I see those same people. You don't really see how much eight you know that makes me think we did something right. Even though we've lost some friends along the way we did something. We've found something in each other. That is remarkable and I don't take it for granted. Devlin leave it there. Thank you so much right on. It was really nice. Talking yet is fantastic into inside. The studio is an iheartradio original. Podcast created by Chris Peterson. This episode was written and hosted by me. Joe Levy our executive producer. Sandy small ones for automation in our mixer is Matt Noble like to give a big thank you to Dave Matthews and RCA records. Follow inside the studio on Iheartradio or subscribe. Wherever you listen to podcasts..

Kenya Dave Matthews Seattle Posse Iheartradio Chris Peterson Matt Noble Qatar UN Reynolds Carlson Tim Devlin RCA Joe Levy Anthony Neil Hannah
"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"I sort of said well. That's not finished. I don't have a place for that yet. Because we didn't finish that product. Then we did grew brooks and we finish that record and I love that record and then I did some more recording you know so we did grew with Ravelo and then I did more according with Alasia who I always right John alasia. Who's one of the producer? Always ride with him the record that we had sort of show before that we are doing with Batson and then I made another album. I went back. We did an album with lily white. That I'm happy with some songs I don't think in the end I don't think it was. The best of the album could have been but I still. There are some good things in there and then I went in the studio again with Rob Cavallo and we had the beginnings of works for Awhile on an album and we had more than the beginnings of a great record there but again for whatever reason I think disappointed solve my own head getting. You know a lot of things on my mind about the ban. My I desperately wanted to make a not feel disappointed in some ways like a little bit the way the world although again. I don't want to throw a baby with albums. None of them are. We're not gonna but but you have said that away from the world you feel. You went back to almost over work. Yeah I feel like that and feel it. Lost some of the teeth then. I went back in the studio and I was working with John. Malaysia and Rob Evans to the producers. We started listening to some of the songs as really just saying that is as good as anything I've ever done. That's just how I started thinking of everything at the same time. I'm also writing more music. And they were all also telling me was like this stuff that we were doing right now was as good as anything that we have in the back. So we've got this super creative process going. It was like a a monument. That's not the right word. It was almost like a something to hang. The whole process on was really when I went back and listened to the track can't stop. Which has lou Roy Moore on it and it was sort of a live performance and bats and was in the room and who is one of the two tracks that go all the way back two thousand and six? Yeah alasia and Rob Evans went in and took the track which was recorded with bats and they mixed it and they said this is what we came up with. An ice sat and I was like. Oh this is a monster and they had rob Evans likes to get to Carter's drums as a beast. So then everything the way that I was thinking about it was everything has to be as strong as that. You haven't made an album in six years but it's almost like this is a greatest hits of the last twelve years or something. It feels like that in a weird way feels like this is the best I've done and Greeks was the most focused album because in the middle of we lost Roy so it had this real purpose. That was behind to which was to pay homage Omar depending on how you want to be to Leroy and so even from the cover everything about it was Roy and I think that's what Sorta gave me and Carter and everybody the motivation to get that record right and rob Cavalli met and Doug who met Roy and we'd all lost him so that sort of focus was like we had a finish. This great for Roy. In this instance I do feel like I. Someone said you need to step back. You need to look at what you've made and not discount the heart that you put into some things and so I started digging through and there's a lot of music I couldn't get on the album. I want this is. This is a very focused record in a different kind of way for you in that. I don't think there's been a record that is quite this inward looking from you. Before Lotta songs about love love songs. They seem to be about marriage either about lasting relationships. I'm often used to your songs addressing the outside world a little bit more whereas this felt like very personal my family kind of record. I think maybe there's sort of allowing myself. A little bit of that was feeling comfortable to talk about it. Maybe that says something about where I am with my family and also where I am the band maybe as turning fifty make whatever or past that whatever it is I do feel like a lot of this is looking inward and even that song. Blackened Bluebird Bird is a little bit of a part of conversations that are had with my son and my daughter's it's sort of is like the words the things I've learned to think about in some ways are wanted them to think about when we're having conversations either about the world about selfishness or about what's happening or the wonder you know always trying to remember that the universe is much bigger than we are and just that kind of idea from my kids is I want them to feel stunningly small and and therefore inspired as opposed to. I can't stand my old phone. I need a new on is the worst. That's fine to have some emotional that but I'm grateful that my kids aren't overly obsessed by that kind of stuff. I think that Song Wordy way of saying that we are so tiny in the universe that if all of us in everything on the planet vanished tomorrow. Nothing not even the moon would notice our absence. That's really interesting because particularly at this moment in time and this is a difficult period in American history. Put it mildly. Yeah and the world I mean you watch everywhere these waves of self absorbed self righteousness and sort of ignorant arrogance scary combinations of personalities and also to connect what's happening in America to world politics waves of nationalism. We would. You're a very different kind of thing here. In this country I think nationalism yet that very often allows the most disturbing things to happen in cultures when a culture stars to think that it has somehow reached further or is the example of excellence or should be acknowledged as the most excellent. When that happens very dangerous dangerous things happen I think. Nationalism is what allows apartheid. Nationalism is. What allows Hitler not. It's all fine to be you know. Un-american I'M PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN. That's fine but you have to be able to say that feeling that belief is no more reasonable or more true than if a Canadian says I'm Canadian and I'm proud to be Canadian and I'm great. It's no more true. I also grew up being taught that saying. I'm proud to be an American meant that you were setting an example that you wanted to share with the world and not. I'm proud to be an American. Stay out keep to yourself. That will be on our side of the world. You'd be on your side. Yeah it is a scary time and I do think that the sort of sense of entitlement or the idea of being your born in America for whatever reason that for no reason other that you are worth more than someone who was born in Panama. That to me is an obscene concept that the value of a human being could in any way come from where they're born or who helped them and you did mention apartheid earlier when we were talking and of course that is the idea something you grew up with and assist them. That said you can be born here in South Africa and still be worth less. Oh Yeah that people here and that my concern in this country is that nationalism that we have to keep out all these people because this is hours. 'cause we were born here or we arrived here. That is truly strange coming from a country. That's so young and is so recently created by immigrants. This country is half the soldiers that fought on the side of the Union is of a war word immigrants so it was a civil war sorts but it was thought by people that were coming here that were from somewhere else. We always have to acknowledge that. Because if we don't then I feel as Americans go because I wouldn't born here. I'm less American by some people standards than someone who was born here which doesn't fit in my opinion the America that I think in my ideal view of it it could be to look at the state of the population of this country and the all our differences and to acknowledge some things but not acknowledge others. Talk about America's if it's this land of justice and freedom and then not acknowledge that it's a land of immigrants and not acknowledged that much of it was built by the hands of slaves and that certainly it couldn't be what it is now. Had it not been for the hundreds and hundreds of years of enslaved people doing a lot of the work? The album is named come tomorrow. The title track is about this change. We WanNA SEE RIGHT. It would be great. There was talking. I when I had Alan Together. There's some murmurings people saying we should put come more out as a single and I. I just said even though it was written before the most recent argh horrifying shooting I wrote it and we recorded it before that but that said regardless the timing of it would make it seem pretty on the button and I felt like that also would be. I've felt like it might be perceived sort of stepping in to something. That really isn't my place. I'd rather be supportive of the efforts to get some sort of sane situation with guns and automatic weapons in this country rather than I would try and jump in the middle of somebody else's terrible situation. Pretend I'm part of it. That song is at the same time as it's in some ways for me quite cynical it is also you know when I talked to my children about how they see the world I mean their view is so much more open and tolerant. Even though I feel like I grew up very tolerant person and the seventies was as far as the authorities were concerned. The late seventies was a very tolerant. Time it was like suddenly were all like laughing at the stupidity of are the girls are teenagers sixteen. Yeah and if you have a teenager now than you are likely involved in conversation about gender and fluidity. Yes that is not the one that you and I grew up with. No it's almost unthinkable but my kids they're also connected to each other now as well through technology not always great but I think a lot of times. It is actually not a bad thing because they're always in touch with each other a lot of time. Maybe it's not the deepest conversations but sometimes it is deep conversation. I learn to be more tolerant. Watch myself around from them more as they learn from me. I'm glad maybe I made them lean toward a kindness. But you know sometimes I found my pig. I'll say something in the car. I never can't say that Dan. I say I can say it and I will say in the safety of my family knowing that you better know that. Have I say some crazy shit that you know where my heart is because you sit around in my house and Smelly.

Rob Evans lou Roy Moore John alasia America producer Rob Cavallo Batson brooks Carter Ravelo Malaysia Lotta South Africa Dan Hitler rob Cavalli Omar Alan Leroy
"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"But they became celebrated when kids who'd grown up loving, their music began to make records or right rock criticism of their own. Looking back now you can see how Sabbath gloom in emotional chaos told us certain kinds of truth through seventies. Kids let down by the implosion of the sixties. And just maybe the Dave Matthews band represented something of a flip side sort of hope for its audience. An interracial band? Led by a guitarist who'd grown up in South Africa. The Dave Matthews band came to prominence around the time Bill Clinton was elected. They were about the world as you wanted to see it rather than the world is it was? And if that sounds like an exaggeration. You haven't talked politics Dave Matthews a committed progressive. I think the best political position for me is as far left as you can. Before you, start going toward somebody else's right so I think we made a mistake here off of saying you know you have the right and you have the left. We barely scraped the left in this country, but if you can go further left and then stop, which would be the real center before you appear to be going towards somebody else's right. That's good, because then everybody on the left. Then within the truth is that we really would be best off if we were all in our communal left. Rather than everybody's absurd radical right, the radical right is the problem I don't know if my the radical left. I think they're all reasonable. Come! Tomorrow has some songs that date back more than a decade to two thousand six. Matthews worked with four producers in pull out tracks from sessions that have been left on the shelf. That sounds like it could be a mess, but it isn't. Some more focused album that he's made in the long while with a bigger heavier rock sound. The version of can't stop from live tracks volume six recorded twelve years ago..

Dave Matthews Bill Clinton South Africa
"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"matthews" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"This time around. I got a chance to go along with Dave Matthews. which if you've ever spoken with Dave? Single sentence. I love about Dave Matthews. Is this guy who's passionate about what he does? He takes it very very seriously, but that doesn't stop him from having a wicked sense of humor about everything including himself. We talked about why it took six years between albums. Why it took a year off from the road with the Dave Matthews Band. The secret connection between his band and Black Sabbath than what it was like to turn fifty. And keep on going. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one. The Dave Matthews Band played their very first shows in Charlottesville Virginia at a benefit for middle, eastern children, and also at Entertain Festival Matthews was born in South Africa and grew up in America and England, but he was back in South Africa for high school, and after graduating in nineteen eighty five five years before the apartheid regime began to crumble, he moved to Charlottesville rather than serve in the military. He was tending bar there at a place called Miller's and he had to be coaxed by friends in performing his own work in public. But once the Dave Matthews Fan came together. Things happened fairly quickly. The band released its first album. Remember two things a mostly live collection in nineteen ninety three. Two years after those first gigs. They built a passionately devoted audience in part by using the model of the grateful dead meaning. They encouraged the crowd to tape and trade live shows. Two years after that debut album. The open three shows for the dead on that band's final tour in nineteen, ninety five. The next year they were opening shows Bob Dylan, and the year after that nineteen, ninety seven, the rolling stones. Of course, they were growing their own audience that whole time, and by nineteen, Ninety Eight. They were headlining stadiums. That's the year their third studio album before these crowded streets debuted at number one starting a streak that's continued across seven albums right up to the recently released come tomorrow. Curse Dave Matthews band album in six years. Though, they were almost always described as a jam, Dan and still are. The Dave Matthews Band became one of America's biggest rock bands in the nineties. A position they've never really given up. They wrapped a bunch of different audiences into one thing sort of the same way. They wrapped a bunch of different music. The jazzy saxophone of worry more, the Blue Grassy Violin Boyd Tinsley the solid Funk, bottom, drummer Carter, beaufort and basis defined with hard into one thing. It's easy to understand the significance the Dave. Matthews Band took on for the grateful dead's audience after the death of Jerry Garcia in Nineteen ninety-five. What's obvious is the role. They played for nineties rock kids around the same time since nineteen ninety-five also the year, the pro jam stopped playing the United States for three years while they waged battle with ticketmaster. In the Post grunge moment. Music that sounded both happy and sad that mixed the intimate with the epic. Was a style looking for a hero? Some bands could latch onto it for a few minutes. The way that remember them, Marcy playground or the spin doctors did. And some could manage for few albums. The Way Stone. Temple pilots did. But aside from Dave Grohl. Hard pressed think of anyone who's managed to make it last for a career that spanned decades the way Mathews has. Dave Matthews hit experience loss early on his father died from cancer when he was just ten years old and songs like satellite or lie in our graves talked about the fragility of life. Look, so did tripping billy's in its own way. Other songs like crash into me. We're about chasing down pleasure. A big audience, trying to figure out how to make sense of bad times and make the good times last found something in the Dave Matthews Band. Look, it didn't always translate from performance into the recording studio and that may be the one thing the Dave Matthews band. Truly shares with the grateful dead. But the live show became a defining experience. Documented on more than forty live albums. the, Dave Matthews Band audience is loyal for them. It is not summer without sitting on the lawn at a Dave Matthews amphitheater show. In North America. They were the biggest grossing band of the two thousand selling within Hi Andrew and twenty million dollars tickets. and. That slowed down only slightly. According to billboard in two thousand fifteen, the band played fifty shows. Selling seven hundred twenty thousand tickets and earning forty two million dollars. The last year. Couple unusual things happened the Dave Matthews band. The first is that they took the summer off and I think that might be the first summer in twenty five years without Dave, Matthews Band shows. As. Matthews explained to me. Turning fifty had something to do with it. My Fiftieth Birthday did fall. Right around the same time as the seven deadly sins, or the cardinal sins took over the highest office in the nation birthdays in January. Are you saying it was around the time of the trump inauguration? Exactly you turn fifty. You have this moment of. What thinking do I keep doing this? Do I change what I'm doing like? What's going on? I think there was a lot of different thoughts I think for me. I've never been ungrateful I. Don't think I may have been tied, but never been ungrateful for. What I've managed with the band and all the guys in the band have taught me, but I do when I turned fifty I was like I really have to. Have a selfish year. So in two thousand seventeen matthews took time for himself with his family and thought hard about the future of his band. While he was thinking about the future. A reconsideration of the past was underway. Thanks in part to Greta GERWIG use of crash into me in her coming of age movie, Lady Bird. Song turns up twice. I when Lady Ladybird laid by Shurshid Ronin. Plays it over and over again with her best friend while she's crying her way out of high school heartbreak. And then later. She's riding in a car with your new boyfriend. WHO's one of the cool kids? And crash into me comes on the radio while he's talking trash about not going to Brown. fucking hate this song. There's a lot going on here. A young woman standing up for herself, not letting other people define her, but also. It someone in high school, saying fuck it to being too cool to admit that she loves the music that she actually loves, but as poignant moment in the movie I, tell you what she asked if she could use the song I was like yeah I didn't really. Scripted you. I could have, but she's a talented actress and it was a few years ago and I was like this at the beginning that she asked because I think for her. It was a poignant song for the you know. I'm grateful, but then when I watched I was like what that's a super generous place to put, it also shows sort of exactly what I was saying, but it was a beautiful place that she put it so at a center note and say thank you so much well nice of you. What happens in the movie is a little like what happened to black sabbath or kiss in the eighties and nineties. Those pants were pretty much hated by rock.

Dave Matthews Dave Matthews Band Dave Matthews amphitheater Dave Dave Matthews. Matthews Dave Grohl Entertain Festival Matthews America Charlottesville Bob Dylan Way Stone ticketmaster Temple Jerry Garcia South Africa United States Boyd Tinsley Miller Greta GERWIG