19 Burst results for "Matthew Wilson"

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"In orthodox conception of simply saying conception of sex and gender or the nature of marriage that dumb that you might found out and and found in violation of title nine inclusiveness doctrines etcetera etcetera and And publish that. In defense of of academic freedom. The argument i articulated was in terms of academic freedom in because i was seeking to state the argument as most people are relatively liberal as in classically liberal freedom-loving culture Would want to express it. Even though i think there's much more to be said about the need for an orthodox teaching to be taking place within every catholic university and not simply a a sort of anything goes market of ideas. John stuart mill kind of liberalism nonetheless. It was mill. I used as it were as my interlocutor. In explaining to the world y. This was a really bad thing for the university for my university in front of university And something like one hundred fifty to two hundred my colleagues thought no they really wanted to be repressed this way so i have had petitions signed against me but you know i i just hardly noticed I think it was spring was watching baseball. I mean you. You didn't make a big thing about it because i don't even as far as i remember. I certainly don't remember i. I remember. I think i may be remember the article but i don't remember the petition so you clearly weren't making yourself out to be a big victim or anything. Yeah why didn't. I couldn't read through the whole petition because it was half literate so linked to respond to things that Are not willing to read. So i just know. It's like putting a really bad book. Why would you that. You've been assigned to review. I'm not going to review this book. It's too bad to review such such. A last is the ability of many of my colleagues when you're dealing with College freshmen It's true that I i've spent the last. What two hours telling you that we have no culture. We have no civilization. We have an anti culture or falling apart. You would expect that to enter into the lives of young people when it does but it understand really precious and sad way that with which i simply sympathize and that is young..

one hundred two hours two hundred John stuart mill baseball title nine inclusiveness doctr fifty
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Orthodox priest is kind of Psychological humanism and and I'll maybe perhaps still a reluctance to talk about sin Not that we should be obsessed with it obviously And then with the you know the fact that very few people even in sort of conservative catholic land really have a robust sense of the reality of hell and I don't know if that's entirely blamable. On von balthasar. But that seems to have been you know without condemning his work as a whole that that does seem to have been his his most notable contribution to like sort of the mainstream of catholicism as opposed to maybe his his good contributions that intellectuals are specialists might be aware of that seems to have been his most like sort of wide ranging impact. And so i can. I do understand why people would be suspicious of some of these figures or or inclined to treat them as enemies. I guess the big problem for me is when they treat. Someone like barrington as an enemy rather than somebody who may be was unduly optimistic in some respect or got some things wrong I think you do have to be able to distinguish between a a james martin and a jacques tense so to speak. Yeah i think. I mean i i would say von balthasar book on hell was was not a major contribution any point on until the early two thousands it was relatively unknown but i is a pick sticks dissertation criticizing it and and i think probably christina justly brought it to degrade a prominence and brought about a confrontation were a lot of people who had very loving understanding of von balthasar. Projects realize that there are some problems within the within the theology that need at least to be contemplated if out right Set aside or condemned. bobby his von balthasar. Real his central concern in all of his theology is to view the faith as a whole to insist that nineteenth century disintegrated live modes of interpretation such as the higher criticism this out to parse Fact from fiction within the scriptures You can't actually do that by which i mean. A book of scripture genesis is a whole at. Let's say for a moment that it that it is pieced together.

james martin von balthasar nineteenth century jacques early two thousands christina people barrington
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:58 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"When you get to make some new things we time. I see it I'm grateful for you're asking me to read this one for another reason and that it's it's in part about the absence of baseball and i just realized in in four days the first spring training games are going to be played this year. So i'll be glad to have baseball back in my life after several months absence for the offseason but also after the terrible truncation season that occurred last year. So april twenty twenty. The vodka bottle blue is buried sapphire has lane near empty on its side a year or more forgotten. The freezers back beneath the bags of strawberries. Fries nuggets in thickening with a glaze permafrost. The state stores being closed and suddenly without means a by more. I dig it out. This is no era for martinis. All briny and medicinal but sweetness compensatory generous and concealing and so i watch it flow like syrup down into the crevices of ice then top. The high ball off with juice this hour of night in normal times. I take my drink in. Sit a book at hand to catch the baseball game. I'd alternate between the back and forth of lines of verse that volleyed on the page and glances up to see the cubbies struggles there on the screen encircled by the crowd who turned their backs upon the world and yet provide a noisy solitude the pitcher shakes off a signal nods winds up and throws at such removed as art fine concentration the thing made stiffens toward integrity nine doubtful innings fumble to a whole and thus take on kind of permanence. The season like the liquor stores suspended. I feel myself fall back on younger ways. I'd sit up until the early morning. Asleep lonesome undergraduate switch as ours. Past that i drew weary from book to book with each one lighter. Easier in sequence to my eyes at last dropped shots. As i did then i find myself once more alone. A crop of titles at my side i opened up milosz. It's like a phone book not more interesting. at first. It seems the listing hazy images of dreams mistaken by their source for prophecy but when the nazi tanks rolling divorce aw the spine at once. Gross straight the ruined streets in what lies buried in its sudden wreckage. Become too serious in lost for playing a pile of books stacked in a roofless building. The bent faces. Gm donald bruno surrounded by the busy market stalls. The chatter is the tourists spoon. Gelato the poet staring on his father reading on broken statues. Churches emptied ghettos. His voice cries out in heavy lamentation to see the art that he had meant for freedom..

last year april twenty twenty this year Gelato each one first a year Gm donald bruno four days forth
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"I'm here with a many times recurring guests on the show. In fact i've had him on for more episodes than any other guest seven times total if you include his one appearance on our other show criteria and He is a poet. He's a philosopher I had him on in the past to discuss his book. Division of the soul his Bursts cycle the river of the immaculate conception and Had him on criteria to discuss ignore bergman's film wild strawberries which is a really enjoyable discussion. Tim's matthew wilson. He is the author of a new book from angelico press titled the strangeness of the good which also includes his series of poems quarantine notebook james. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me back. Thomas i I'm glad to be this record holder. I didn't know this until today. Well the vision of the soul series. We did ended up being more episodes than i think. I can't remember if we did it. In one. Or two sessions but it ended up being three episodes. So that's why actually you know why even without that you would probably hold the record even if that had been one less episode. Well if somebody starts to approach me let me know. Write another book. We can do another interview out in freight right. I know you had mentioned somewhere that you didn't expect to have another volume of poems out so soon after your previous one Now this this book includes your series corentin notebook which was originally written for dappled things and posted online in the first few months of quarantine last year is like essentially the reason that you had a book out so soon as that. Because because you're putting out all of those quarantine poems and they sort of took up enough space that you could that was big part of it. i subscribe to what i call the anthony hecht philosophy because anthony who was one of the great twentieth century. American poets when you look at his collected poems. It's easy to see that roughly. He was putting out a book every half decade to a decade and when it comes to new poetry. That's about the right pace to do it because it takes a long time for for a work of art to get absorbed into the culture and to be to be read and distributed so if people are still discovering my first book from two thousand fourteen some permanent things and in that regard. I think it's it's it's bad for poets to publish too much i I certainly urge caution on people who come to me seeking advice in a way that i haven't quite followed through here but i in a sense i had. I had no choice for the reason you suggest. I had written vis long quarantine notebook poem which seem to a lot of people who are reunion as it was being written in published..

Thomas last year first book one three episodes twentieth century two sessions Tim today seven times one less episode angelico two thousand fourteen wilson first few months one appearance bergman anthony of the good james
"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

08:11 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"On tonight. Maundy thursday true so no i was gonna say to focus on just the washing feet. Which i think actually is a distraction. It's true that they did do that. And that is a sign of humility. because saint peter's says you're not touching my feet and Christ ultimately says said down by down peter but so much is going on there that specially for those that have never truly embraced the catholic faith the the religion handed down to as a christ. He's handing it down during this thursday night. he's putting all the liturgical pieces in place. I don't wanna say all feel will correct me. But he's a lot of a vast majority of what you would call the ultimately we would become liturgy. I guess he's putting the liturgical pieces in place and he's also ordaining the men who are going to be charged with carrying this out. I mean this is a magnificent thing to behold into contemplate here On this day before we even get to the stations of the cross. I i find this one of the great days of the year the most powerful The lord's tougher With i gotta get kids in bed so i seldom get to go to ten any more but My spirit's isn't ten Which i never even knew was being done in churches when i was young. And i was at notre dame and the lights went out. At the end of ten and brian everybody beats Their hymnal against the against the pews as a single light with carried out Rear of the church. I thought what what a mystery. Yeah what a mystery. And it's the beauty of the catholic The catholic faith so misunderstood because there's so many hundreds and hundreds of years of course two thousand years of work by the bad guys but five hundred and some odd years by people the i don't. I don't know if people think they think that they're doing the right thing. But this lack of appreciation in this dismissal There's just the simple solemn beauty. That is the catholic faith as it was handed down. You know and there's also a huge misconception. Well over the years you guys you beat it up and provided in did this and did that There was some holy ghost guided revelation and addition to the mass. Liturgy into some of the teaching. But really if you want to boil it down and has an all. This is confirmed. Or what's called the council of trent the sixteenth century. You know anyone that has any reason whatsoever. Ought to have a duty before you say i'm never going to be a catholicos. You're okay well. You have a duty than to explain. What the council of trent teachers. Because it's almost fifty years to the day after luther is revolt and council says okay. Let's deal with this luther guy and his reformation thing and let's deal with it head on and let's answer all the questions that have been answered and all the charges we're on trial. Let's answer right. James and the counselor. Trent answers everything. Everything beyond any shadow of doubt including okay. You want to know what the me with the masses here this dismissal here from who we call saint the fit. This is the mass. And it's beautiful. We still say the exact same almost to the letter to this day. If you say it in the in the in the in the latin Maybe i'd make a good apologised in another life Professor you're doing pretty good job now. Yeah i I don't know who these people are. Who would say things like that right. Great built this church upon them. Very imperfect rock named peter and And and gave pizza the keys and asked him To to continue his work and two to preserve the spiritual body of christ in perpetuity through history. And that's just what happened and bodies grow and and there's nothing in the catholic church that has grown make. A cancer has grown. It has grown like a body maturing to answer the needs of the times and to allow those within it to flourish. So i have no idea who those people i thought. Everybody was catholic. But these traditions these beauties survive almost untouched Unless confirmed and then made better all the way up until the nineteen until nineteen sixty to nineteen sixty three and a real revolution set in. And that's not a knock on new people and all of you that goes to the The new rite of the mass. I'm knockin ya and my trying to pick a fight. I'm not saying you're doing anything. I mean Simply observing that There's a reason why. Latin is jones chosen. Why can't we have it well. You use a debt. Use a dead language. There are three holy language. Greek hebrew and latin principally because clay zero latin. And there's two kinds of latin jazz classical and there's a clumsy they're both dead but ecclesia latin is dead. there's not gonna be any in innovation. There's no one's going to get Have you have the word girl. One's going to get chickadee in latin your vulgar example so throughout time as long as we're in time it's not going to change it doesn't need to change. The revolution is we need changed. Almost every revolution is says change commits to change. What changed why women. What can you change about the stations of the cross. How do you improve upon that way. What what are you add. You add a fifteenth station. I mean you see going with this it is diabolical idea that god lift anything finished imperfect if he ordained instead it's good and holy. He left it perfect. He doesn't make mistakes is the point. Does that mean that revelation only goes can't impart or clarify. No it does not answer the charge like an hour. Hear people screaming at their radios making No it doesn't Dr wilson we will see you via some form video At the end or on may day on may the first what a great day to have our congress as we proclaim many things this day. Many things The least of which will be that on this day. May the first saint joseph the worker day no one in attendance. No one listening. You're watching if we're able to pull that off is a communist with hope of a hope for the work revolution for the triumph of the holy spirit. Hey i want to talk to you about promoting the what's going in acquaintance. But where can people that have. Got their imaginations going. Now we're gonna find info out about what is happening at saint thomas aquinas university in houston and the courses and things that you talked about. You can just go to Even go to first of all catholic will report Publish this morning interview with myself which ran. Who's our founding fiction faculty member that doesn't mean he he's he person. He's not like things on twitter. You're talking about but We can help the people who are writing short fiction and novels these go to the catholic world report homepage and you can get a bunch of information on the program through our interview and also just.

James Trent tonight congress houston sixteenth century twitter Greek two kinds five hundred fifteenth station Christ saint thomas aquinas universit two thousand years ten both hundreds Latin peter latin
"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

01:48 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"What i had built hardwood clattered on the road and split exposed peak load of bent and rusted nails. Now spill steve like teeth and bones awaiting tires the feet of jones to lost song to watch his death. When they'll stared up from the crack. Would i talked it out just as they would return you your mother's lap. The fourth station visas has laid in the tomb. Paul on his stored.

"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"But here is what he actually said. A day will come when sons on bread bear wombs ripped body feel like treasure a day in throw the vivid kitchen By strong prescriptions. And ofo at the expert measure. But they win minute last will be potatoes my fearsome kiss apiece but covet every moment buzzer. They watched him turn to climb the hill. His flesh dragged by hidden will and.

day
"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

08:24 min | 6 months ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"We're ready to go. Let's james matthew. Wilson with our fourth annual now reading the hanging god and fourteen stations of the cross here schools on a crusade channel always on air and always online every monday thursday with dr james matthew wilson professor opportunity knocks stages yours across. They should one. He's asked his kingdom. I tried to think for half an hour. About the face of earthly power that would condemn godse. By i listened for medicine cackles the crack of with a clank of shackles and search for dark flames and the through the church window. I heard shrieks of ambulances whose technique would help us to forget our wounds certain home of homeward motors candidates ranked appeal to voters in these this there and voiced i found we kind when comfort here withdraw our weapon with our fear. Should someone are least want deny the second station. Pisa's take cross in every lifting of a phone a hot air in every moon rising from chapel bed in each unfolding the paper to check his shares or learn who raped her in overhearing. What lawyer said traveling between rail stations. Our bodies strain for the weight. You bore oh would be weighed down in bed. The third station. Jesus falls the first time the question scholars ask or us to ask given the cast of vital spirit beck was christ who i read speak of tragedy anymore or is comedy the only bought left in the room where hector glowered shield knowing that faith would never yield till ruined spread or the place. He stood now. The scene follows a fall as an uplifting after all lazarus comes out and eats them food. I'm sure you wondered much. The same as your back. Opened up in pain and sprawled beneath the bloodstock. Would you know thinking about our conversation. Like the That third station bad means something to me is. It's part about The way which the catholic faith inherit transforms but also preserves the greek classical and and tragic vision thing is another one. Always been a favorite of mine. The fourth station. Jesus meets his mother face teams palm when he tries her dark mantle. Nc better eiser counting the strokes toward on his back noting were woven thorns imprinted kingship on his brow. How rust tinted with dance. The dust rooms in his track feels are kiss against showed i and tries to tell her he will not die. She says she'll see him through the race. After all she heard every word for heart received been undisturbed and undisturbed now or soft faith but authorities speak with one accord that hearts pierce seven times by a sword and leads for being so full of grace characters. There aren't a whole lot characters in the asian and the character of finance such an interesting one especially when you get the impression that he really was pulled off the crowd and did very reluctantly and might have even been the sort of person who had contempt for somebody like jesus but was forced to carry. Would've across with him. So here's the fifth station. Simon helps to carry. Jesus cross he had a bit of coin for funding for once and found himself half running to drop some for a jug of wine. Perhaps a plate of smoking meat anything. He wouldn't bleed at home but stash birth time strong greek arm that jerked them out from the mob on the beaten route or bill hill theme to come from nowhere. So did the voice that broke his ear and the bruise man they pushed him near and that blunt would which he must now. He tried to smile at the crowds daring if it were a joke. This sharing thumb hired for bugs command a carpenter's toy of nail and limb a mule. Face boy last on with him but then the woods edge cut his in its purse wide beneath its weights and coins gushed trailing one who the gate fell to whip when he tried to term. Where is your kingdom and your glory. He heard and thought not me. This story slave food been cast out and we'll burn. If that's not my favorite. I think this one has a claim to it Those of you. Who know august booze euros. Break nineteenth century fully paintings. I'm looking at one of the virgin and child right now and And there and there are many others you. You'll see that the halos. They looked like they have the the weight of metal. They're not a sort of revulsion. Cereal heavenly light there like a disk of metal disc cuter. And i've always thought that in materialistic th century so many people began to think that there was no god and all was merely matter. That bussereau made those halos as solid as the metal out of which machines were being made to remind people that salvation is every bit as indeed more real than the stuff of our technology so station stick veronica wipes the face of a moment when her eyes methods been grieved recognize the mark of suffering in this bay. They slow hand. She drew her veil reveals herself ashamed and pale as if awaiting his embrace but he stood delta fried eyes bloodshot she wipe his face. Although that could not fitch refr- our south team standing back then as the crowd rob's she saw the whiteware had been dob with the grave portrait of look as if to prove in every prayer are airy words. Melt that there and even his word in our book are nothing but the fact of flesh staining of the thorn frick mesh upon a piece of woven cloth think of rose painted inc. They're orioles like pewter plate. Show the head of spirits. Draw for our ideas are fading thing. Want change with what. The weather brings but stamped weight of being remain in the seven station. I tried to to make each station and says difference as possible to the meditate on the on the station itself but to introduce different approaches to it. And this is one of which. I'm i'm fond because it's just a series of images of things falling and the different uses the word fall asian seven. Jesus falls the second time all gold leaf to the earth. Returning the hungry winds cracks pains piss turning to shrink and power edens dark the child but his knee newly bloodied. And that there's down. Ice take muddied dropped. During the birthday party spinner seeds spiders thrown and power. The divorce say curled in the shower. The steam rises over her thrown bombs balloons and shining gold hair. The patient's jaw when the showed their malignant cells are waking life the sea by chance a line of scripture or mispronounce it the disk in future of witches spouse or the feast knife raise before is naive to fake pure beneath your weight. These.

james matthew Simon Wilson jesus fourth station Jesus fourteen stations third station second station nineteenth century fifth station seven times half an hour fourth annual each each station first time monday thursday second time james matthew wilson
"matthew wilson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Tuesday as M. U. political science professor at Matthew Wilson says the state could actually play a very big role in deciding the democratic party's presidential nominee ultrabook candidates could be competitive in the state it's a diverse state with lots of different sub constituencies of democratic voters if I think a lot of people's eyes will be on Texas and how the delegates shake out we will have the second largest group of delegates up for grabs on super Tuesday behind only California early voting runs through February twenty eighth and Irving Texas couple who were on their honeymoon on that diamond princes group among those quarantined at joint base San Antonio Rachel and Tyler dot as they initially they had no idea how serious this all was extremely said Hey it's gonna be a twenty four hour quarantine we're just going to get this done and then be done with it and then the next day they had the ten positive cases they said Hey it's going to be a fourteen day quarantine meanwhile new outbreaks continue to expand in both South Korea and now Italy this is raising fears of a global pandemic South Korea reporting another large jumping new coronavirus cases two hundred and thirty one additional infections taking that country's total to more than eight hundred seven people have died cases have also rapidly increased in Italy Europe's first major outbreak of the covert ninety disease attended authority saying five people have died and that they have nearly two hundred infections a dozen towns have been largely sealed off this corona virus scare is tanking the global market as we speak the Dow down nine.

professor Matthew Wilson Texas California Irving Texas South Korea Italy Italy Europe M. U. San Antonio Tyler dot
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

16:47 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Juvenile phrase. One Damn thing after another it never adds up to a whole. I think the the reason that they're despairing is not because life doesn't add up to a whole but rather their despair their dismay their disorder is the inability ability to perceive these holes in contrast a person who tends to be flourishing who tends to have a sensation of happiness tens also be to be someone who can perceive his life as unfolding series of chapters stages in intelligible quest moving from someplace toward. There's something so to go back to your early discussion of do we know God. We love him. Well the answer is both well. Human life tends to be inactive is knowing that becomes more lovable the more we know of it. Human life tends to be more lovable. The more we know as story because stories other forms of our lives so it's not just philosophers who arrive I tried to separate logos for mythos. It's all of us. Our lives depend of being able to be perceived by are being able to perceive them as a kind of story. It also seems like this connects to some of our modern day. Political ideology is that reject the contingent went. Because any story has involved the contingent I mean the rejection of the nation for example is a rejection of story fundamentally. It's it never is because because they they always have to replace it with the story that you know that makes the founding of it the nation into some kind of abominable act you know. They have their own stories. Of course go no. You can't get away from it but you know what I'm saying I do but is there an answer to y. Modern philosophers did abandon this. Yeah I it's so amusing. Take Arts single. Best known work is his meditations on first flossy but is is the two great works. The discourse course on methods imitations and first philosophy and both of them in their own way are narratives but their narratives about not needing narrative live stories about not needing story the story about getting rid of all of the contingent and all of the narrative elements of human life until the mind signed unaided unassisted and unsupported by anything but itself stares at the presence of clear distinct. The ideas now kirk something right. We're all questing to be staring at the truth. That's for sure but we get there by way of journey and his his philosophy was trying to cut off. That journey. Lie was trying to do it. Well I think because he wanted to lower the horizon for what reason actually had to accomplish he makes all all kinds of superficial gestures about the beauties of contemporary life in the contemplation of God but it seems pretty clear that that's not the game that descartes's really after what he he wants is much smaller quarry to discover the mechanics of the body. So as to be able to improve health and extend end the lifespan. Why well because to be lives better than to be dead will why? He has no answer to that except for rhetorical one. ooh You know contemplating God. It'd be nice but he's not really interested in that he's really trying to just reduce the horizon of reason so that it can be fully foley repackaged as a useful tool for the gaining of mastery over our bodies in the material world as a whole. Well that's the story that the modern age tells itself there were these benighted people who spent who wasted their time thinking about things we could never control until human reason woke up and discovered in words a Francis Bacon that knowledge is power meaning not simply that the more you know the more powerful you'll be but rather the only thing worth knowing is what did you power because in fact the test of whether you know something is whether you can have power our over it and so we have this new narrative the emergence from irrelevant contemplation to continuous dynamic mic ceaseless activity for the gaining of power over the earth and of ourselves. So that we may postpone death and end the confrontation with the truth about our lives as long as possible. Fits in itself. A kind of pathology as in psychosis and that is the modern age like to shift you a topic. We don't have to talk about this for very long but something that's very current right now with the popularity of Jordan Peterson Persson and that is another way that the moderns have tried to find some kind of truth in stories and that's the sort of archetypal approach in kind of a psychological away. So you have you know everybody from young to Joseph Cambell to Jordan Peterson. Talking about these things and for whatever reason I never found it that never really piqued my interest as a way of thinking about stories. I guess I'm sure there's some validity to buy is the fascination with archetypes archetypes as a way of deriving some kind of truth from story insufficient. Well I mean the reasons attractive is that thinking about archetypes is a poor man's metaphysics. It's it's not an actual encounter with be forms of being in all their depth or fullness but it is an encounter with a kind of form. It's the forms that constitute human in life and so it's a way of thinking through things exclusively in terms of story without entering into the full depth us of the real and so in vision the Soul I ended up including chapter called novel. Myth reality in anatomy of make believe that tried to account for for why people are so attracted to these archetypal stories and I think it was fair. Well our lives really do have story forms and so when we're encountering archetypes we're encountering universal forms of the contingent lives that we live and presumably gaining in wisdom thereby certainly they suffice as Aristotle's ethics or McIntyre's after virtue will teach US certainly those archetypal story forms provide us the kind of forms we need to contemplate. If we're going to ask questions that are ethical. Meaning what is the purpose of human life. What does happiness look like? The WHO is the good man who is genuinely to be considered happy at the archetypes for the most part are sufficient to answer those questions so they play play a very useful moral role in our instruction Jordan. Peterson's celebrity is precisely because with his union psychoanalysis analysis. As in the background he brings back archetypes to the forefront of people's they get says this is a legitimate way of knowing ethical truth and in this he's actually not very different went from the renaissance humanists. The Renaissance humanists though often lateness lateness in a very loose sense they perceived rightly that to live well to be good human beings to engage in ethics. We need to be able to look at stories. The stories of history the stories stories of literature and to contemplate them and to distill practical wisdom from them but they weren't generally interested in metaphysics theology. They weren't interested in the highest truths and in that respect they go both a write in awry. A right. In this respect late scholasticism asam had been concerned become concerned with questions of metaphysics theology almost to the exclusion of recognizing that it was pursuing. Truths moves that we really need to know in order to be fulfilled to be saved but it began to seem like a mere academic exercise so the renaissance humanists were right to reject that kind of sense of feel logical debate for its own sake without a sense of finally resolving into the prayer worship and love of God but they were mistaken in that there is no escape from metaphysics and theology because human beings as rational are ordered finally to a knowledge being to the fullness of reality and so if we stopped short thinking of human life only in terms of its archetypes. We're actually stopping short of what we nonetheless really need to be true. And that's what happens in a lot of archetypal thinking like Joseph Campbell who say why don't literally believe in these things but I do believe the true for human experience. That's what that's not good enough for us. We don't want to believe in to Plato's phrase for we don't WanNa believe in noble lies. We want to see the real and so you I need to push on through archetypal thinking to a true account of being a need to do it for one final reason. That's your destiny. The contemplation of God is the end of human life. That's to say that's what we were born to do. So stopping in short of it in any way is itself a tragic act. That foils or frustrates. The true destination of our lives and our human. Nature's let's talk about some of the other ways in which logos and mythos are interdependent and the ways in which logos can operate within mythos. There's a line in your book where you say. A that logos is quote a gloss on the reality whose existential fullness might be designated the universe of mythos unquote. Can you explain that. Yeah well that's what I meant sort of gesturing towards through much of this conversation. That logos always remains tethered to mythos toasts. If you want to distinguish the two things in a way that mythos isn't always tethered to logos. It's possible to get to the truth. Something just by hearing the story about it and say not need to talk about it anymore that I understand it. I see the truth. That's in the story whereas logos can never remain fully itself. We can never fully retain the truth as truth if we totally and permanently abstracted from the fuller her story form of things and that's because we ourselves are in our own story. God in the sense could do this but to say that God to do this is basically basically to say God could have created the world but he did of course the stories we tell our themselves glosses on the story the complete lead story that is our lives and history. But that's one of your points. Has that history and and our life is in fact ACTA story even if it's true that the stories that we tell tend to be themselves abstractions of a sort. Yeah I'm saying I want to distinguish to unite night. Philosophers don't try to rationalize without also mythology. Don't try to use your reason in a way that totally abstracts it from the actual context in which it occurs which is within a story and you know what to their credit. Most contemporary philosophers. Do not try to do that. They try to understand their ideas as being conditioned by the time in which they are being conceived. The problem is that then they become mere historisches. They assume that logos are reasoning about ideas is always and totally reducible to the historical condition where it occurred occurred. But that's clearly not the case. Because mythology and logos are both journeys towards the truth that transcends any contingent reality and so that's a despaired twitch. It's not reasonable to given but also the I guess you might say unions. The Jordan Peterson's the table thinkers the people who try to do philosophy not only at the level of mythos. That won't work either. Our ultimate destiny is being as a whole and mythos and logos are two partial ways to partial dimensions elements or conditions or lenses through which we may finally look at the light of being as a whole and so you can't do with one out the other he. I was struck by your claim that the philosopher actually should be a master of myths and images. I oh I think I'll philosophies of Plato. Plato was so q d continue on what you just said you point point out that well you talk about this post modernist suspicion of reason. You're just talking about this. Essentially as conditioned by historical stoorikhel circumstances and thus incapable of transcending them but you say we can see logos as conditioned without suspecting it it. It's conditioned because it is as you say tethered to the stories of our lives and of history but I like what you said. That reasoning is conditioned by history because history is already so eminently intelligible that invites us to engage in intellectual about it. That's right it which we continue continue to do except to the extent that we say well. If it's a story it can't be true. That's the pathos of our age but it's not a healthy one with a bizarre conclusion. When when you really think about it well I know it's illogical in Aristotle's physics he points out that you can only identify chants serve as a second order feature that occurs within a broader intelligible hole impulsive whole? That is to say once you understand how things normally work. When they're following TEELA's when they're pursuing their normal purposes you can point out certain activities or certain actions that occur within the contingencies of things by chance but to say that the world is a whole the chance would be to say that the world is unintelligible and that could be the case but if it were we'd know nothing of it in fact we perceive the world? There's very intelligible. And then we note that there are some things that seem to occur by chance. And that's necessary ordering a things so into say that fundamental tendency in yourself to make sense of the particulars of your experience to see them as a whole is somehow ideological logical or deceptive will that itself of course is a narrative story a myth and for some reason human beans have bought into that myth in our age in a way that they did not before into our cost. What we're about to touch on next goes back to the distinction distinction? We made in both of these episodes about discursive reason versus the intellect properly. Speaking you say that if logos and mythos are are two approaches to Division of truth that means they're both methods that are relative to the vision that they seek to attain and that means the vision of truth in the soul is white is is important not the method that you used to get to it and that and that means that the intellectual life is synonymous with the contemporary of life. It doesn't mean the life life of scholarship of analysis of discursive reason specifically correct the highest expression of intellectual. Life is to be knelt in prayer before the Eucharist. Yup and as much as we talk about you know discourse as a stepping stone to that you've just outlined a way in which which story can be another stepping stone and you know I I think I think I wanNA point out. I think you would agree with this. Is that you know you've talked about silence. As the end end after all these steps of discursive reason but I think that silence can also be and must be a beginning. Yes the relationship Bob. Between intellect US RONCO is one that I think is so important and we did talk about it last time we were talking about it again today now and for good reason that the beginning of reasoning is in silence the silence of our passive section of the first principles that make our reasoning possible in the first place And then we journey on through life reason away trying all the while to arrive at the fullness of truth when we once again Dan may lapse into.

Jordan Peterson Plato Jordan Peterson Persson RONCO Joseph Campbell Bob kirk Francis Bacon Aristotle foley scholasticism asam US Joseph Cambell TEELA Dan McIntyre
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Welcome back to the show everybody. I hope you're ready to hear the final part of my interview with James Matthew Wilson about his book the vision of the soul. We've been talking in these episodes a lot about the disenchanting forests of liberalism and of rationalism and this episode food is no different in that respect Last episode we talked a lot about beauty as an aspect of being that reveals the rich network of relations nations In reality to us this episode is also about a hind of relation. A kind of proportion about how we can see events not just as just a meaningless facts that maternity posits but as having an intelligible relationship to each other which we actually call a story maternity elevated pure abstract reasoning as the only way to know about reality and the irony is that after reason disenchanted everything else maternity ready than became disenchanted with reason itself. So the ascendancy of reason over superstitious myths of the past was viewed by the Post Modernists as just another myth itself itself to be exposed and as James. Matthew Wilson is going to talk about this episode they were right to see that the dictate of reason. We're not wholly separate from our lives this our self images and our desires but we're colored by the stories we tell about ourselves but they were wrong to conclude from this that reason is therefore inherently suspect act. That is because human life really is imbued with an intelligible narrative form and we are capable of telling true stories about ourselves that reflect the actual story form of our lives and of history as a whole reason can function as a kind of gloss on the story of creation. James Argues and the mistake. Jake was thinking that it could ever be sealed off laboratory to begin with so it's time to go back to seeing our lives and history itself as the intelligible stories. They really are. We have to set mythos alongside logos as an essential way of apprehending the truth and then to go beyond both in silent contemplation of the one. One Who told the story before it began. Let's shift depart three of your book which is about the relationship between logos reason and mythos story story. And how modernity has sort of privileged logos over mythos. I suppose we should start with just the very idea that there is such a thing as sort of a narrative reasoning as a source of truth. Yeah it's a claim that some would say goes back to Plato that mythos is storytelling. Storytelling and logos is reasoning and bad. People Charlatans Sophists and old women gossips sitting by. The fire are only interested in mythos. They're only interested in rumors and gossip and storytelling telling and that the proper human activity is to engage in logos. The use of reason to arrive at as you would expect rational final truth about things. The reason people say this originates in. Plato is for the most famous passages is what in the Republican the quarrel between philosophy and poetry and everybody knows who hasn't even even if they haven't read the republic that Plato wants to cast the poets out of town out of the city the the ideal city what plays concerned about there is that there is a way of talking in a way of speaking a way of representing that contents itself. Self with MIR SIMILAC Gra Mirror images of things. And you don't need to know the truth about something to reproduce the image of things things in fact this is what we were just talking about. The nineteenth century was really good at producing works of art that had a good superficial knowledge of the human form. Warm the superficial knowledge of human activity. That's what the novel the nineteenth century novel was such a Master of but without actually getting at the spiritual trolled depth of those realities and play. Oh says we can't just settle for images you can't just settle for likenesses. You have to get the real truth of things if you're going to be to live a proper human life and so it sounds as if he's saying cast out mythos as one more image among images one more imitation and and get logos which alone by way of dialectic can bring you to a vision of the truth but that's just not really what he says yes. There are bad. Mitha way is bad myths. Fictions not in the sense of works of art fictions but fictions in the sense of images that masqueraded rated the truth but in fact are nothing but its carapace but for Plato what we might call myths storytelling is in fact one way of what he most prizes one way of rendering in account logos is often translated as an account as to render an account and we are everyday English. We kind of know what he's saying. If your grandma tells a tale that you know is not quite right. The wait until she's left the room and you say to the person with whom she system speaking. Well let me give you the true account of what happened that day. Hey all right so to tell. The true story is an account but also an account means the stages of reasoning in a good discursive argument meant. It's a kind of logos for Plato. Those two kinds of accounts while not reducible to each other. They're still kinds of accounts and so he routinely moves from what we might identify as the mythical to the logos in back from the logos to the mythical such that we have to say well clearly. His goal is not to eliminate biff end to finally render reason fully rational to have it only dependent upon logos else no to the contrary. He insists that reasoning logos always occurs in a narrative or mythological context and in fact that it often ends there too because myths have a way of giving us in a crisp image in a a single action in a single plot or story that we can see whole. They have a way of disclosing to us a richness that transcends the sum of the parts the integrity of the platform to go back to a coyness reveals the splendor of some greater higher richer and probably infinitely incomprehensible truth. And so. If you're going to abandon mythos you're going to abandon images you're actually going to also abandoned along the way the ability to arrive at a single vision of some of the most profound and important truth we may know there's a number of Plato's dialogues where he has a long discursive discussion discussion. That socrates participates in and then at the end socrates suddenly Shifts Gears and tells a myth. These are often my favorite parts of those dialogues. And it's really interesting because of as you said the way people see Plato as rejecting story as kind of the real way of conveying truth. But of course Plato only communicates to us stories ever is the fact of things but then he's got these stories within the story which are these myths that socrates tells one of the things that I love about socrates stories stories is he always follows it up by saying and you know. I'm not insisting that every detail of this story of what I've just said is correct but what I want you to realize that this. This sort of central metaphysical point of this story is true. It's something like this like his account of the soul going to the judgement after death and he's got a couple of different accounts of that for example and he's not just saying that in a kind of like modern like archetype mongering like purely psychological sense he is saying there's a real metaphysical truth to this but there's also one dial I can't remember which one in which he says you know and I'm open if some more accurate story comes along so I love that it's such a beautiful thing to me that he leaves room for the fact that like this is my interpretation anyway looking at it. In retrospect a story that that is not only conveys a metaphysical truth but is actually sort of true in a more concrete way with its characters in its details might come along. I find that very beautiful. One of the great myths is the allegory of the Cave and within the Republican whole socrates gives us a sense of beginning getting in central particulars and rising by degrees of abstraction to use Aerostat Holes. Idea things to mathematical two things therefore are not sensible but standards in relationship to what is sensible and it up to ideas or forms which are not sensible at all their ideas. Yes and the universal but the destiny of the mind for Plato is the sunlight. That is the good which is beyond four so the reality in its or original and ultimate fullness always stands beyond for beyond ideas so the end of every philosophical act should be or something like this. Somebody might take us further into this light because we know that what is Absolutely real will always transcend the forms will always transcend our Idaho. Sarah ideas and so the question is not which is the form form of reasoning. or which is the form of thinking. That's GonNa get me there or to get me to truth. Because all forms of of thinking can be pathways often interwoven pathways to would arrival at the contemplation. Bead and this is why people who can't account for it the Lofton's say will I really enjoyed. I was enriched by studying theology and philosophy but somehow just reciting the simple prayer rare the Anima Christi for instance draws me into the presence of God and the contemplation of God in a way that all of that discursive cursive thinking. Can't do or the person who says more familiarly will this poem or this story or this work of art seems to to bring me closer than all the language that I've ever used to talk about the highest of realities. There has to be at some point a lapse into silence where we're in the presence of truth where we no longer need to speak. Only the eternal word speaks but there are myriad ways in which we can journey towards that silence that involve all kinds of different speaking and logos might be a particular kind of speech but mythos is also a legitimate it kind of speech and in fact the two almost never are apart. For what another fact a great danger that the modern age poses to us is that rationalism rationalism tries to cut logos off from everything but itself so that reason will be self grounding and self fulfilling and will trust I only to its own discursive processes to be untrue. Deliver of the truth. That's an abortive project. I mean people keep trying it but it doesn't work it ends in what Plato called mythology it will end disenchantment it will end in each. How is it that story can function as a vehicle for truth in a way that is not as you say in the book? Amir example of a discursive argument that's been made or you're as a way of explaining it to the common people or something like that such a good question because it's tempting to say well you know. Socrates he's gives us his philosophical accounting that he just throws in myths as an example. But that's actually never have a function. Let me give you know. They really progress. The they really progress. Grasp the dialogue as a whole progressive. Or even bring it to its culmination right there the fulfillment of the dialogue in the case of what you're referring to the myth of her at the end of the Republic and the the account of the topography of the Netherworld in gorgeous. I was thinking of the ladder because I haven't actually read the republic. It must be gorgeous that I'm thinking about yes that's right. Yeah and that's where he says if so Mitchell recounting all of that. Thank you a quick example. Though that I've been thinking about lately in the Maino Socrates is burdened with having to prove or with explaining how we learn and that dialogs best known for most people because of its account of enemy says the way in which Plato says that all learning is in fact a mere recollected elected any so he takes the slave boy and gives him a series of problems or rather one long geometry problem and asleep boys able to answer correctly through socratic dialogue to arrive at a true answer. And Plato says well this Guy's never been educated so he must be recollected L. Abyss. That's what people focus on what they don't focus on as much as far as I know anyhow is that this is Plato's logos demonstration which follows. There's a seeming total non sequitur from what he's just done which is quoted. Oh Gosh of forgetting who is quoted now the quotes four or six lines of poetry three and says this is my first account and then he goes on to give his demonstration will actually those lines of poetry and his demonstration with the slave boy. Having common is not any explicit discussion of nieces or learning as recollection from the immortal soul. What they have in common actually is in the totally like in every other respect Mula sizes? They're totally like in every respect except that..

Plato James Matthew Wilson Matthew Wilson Socrates Jake Aerostat Holes Anima Christi Mitchell Idaho Lofton Sarah L. Abyss Amir
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Story <Speech_Music_Male> as an approach. To Truth Bruce. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This podcast is a user supported <Speech_Music_Male> production. So <Speech_Music_Male> if you like what you hear <Speech_Music_Male> please consider <Speech_Music_Male> giving us a donation <Speech_Music_Male> at Catholic <Speech_Male> culture dot org <Speech_Male> slash donate nate <Speech_Male> slash audio <Speech_Male> that is tax <Speech_Male> deductible by the way <Speech_Music_Male> also. We <Speech_Music_Male> have two other great <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts. That <Speech_Music_Male> I would love for <Speech_Music_Male> you to check out. One <Speech_Music_Male> is Catholic culture <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> audio books. Yeah <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we've got a steadily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> increasing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> library of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> free high <Speech_Male> quality <Speech_Male> audio books of <Speech_Music_Male> works by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Church Fathers <Speech_Male> Saint John Henry <Speech_Male> Newman and other other <Speech_Music_Male> authors spread <Speech_Music_Male> by voice actor. James <Speech_Male> T Mayevsky <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> He's recently put <Speech_Music_Male> out our first production <Speech_Music_Male> of seeing <Speech_Male> Guston a letter <Speech_Music_Male> to a friend named Januarius <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> and also <Speech_Music_Male> he's begun <Speech_Music_Male> a great classic <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> Christian <Speech_Music_Male> biography which <Speech_Music_Male> is Saint Athanasios <Speech_Music_Male> his biography <Speech_Music_Male> of Saint Anthony <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the desert. <Speech_Music_Male> This is a work that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> has inspired <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> countless monks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and saints <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it even <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> helped to Inspire <Speech_Music_Male> Saint Augustine <Speech_Music_Male> conversion so <Speech_Music_Male> highly recommend <Speech_Music_Male> checking that out. We've we've <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also got way <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the fathers with Michelina <Speech_Music_Male> which is <Speech_Music_Male> a excellent scripted. <Speech_Music_Male> History <Speech_Music_Male> podcast on <Speech_Music_Male> the church fathers <Speech_Male> really nothing else <Speech_Music_Male> out there like it <Speech_Music_Male> and by the way if you you <Speech_Music_Male> enjoy this material <Speech_Music_Male> please share it <Speech_Music_Male> with your friends because <Speech_Music_Male> we want to get <Speech_Music_Male> The church fathers <Speech_Music_Male> out to as <Speech_Male> many Catholics <Speech_Male> and non-catholics. <Speech_Music_Male> Frankly as possible <Speech_Music_Male> all right. So so <Speech_Music_Male> I'll see you next week <Speech_Music_Male> with part three <Speech_Music_Male> of the vision of the <Speech_Music_Male> Saul with James <Speech_Music_Male> Matthew Wilson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> The. <Music>

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

13:17 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"A clarity of vision of the divine and it's it's that we most hunter four in our encounter with beauty because by nature are are intellects are perceiving particular forms and proceeding on this long discursive pilgrimage. That we pray and hope will eventually bear fruit in in a vision of being itself of God. There's a couple of things I'd like to say about this. One of which will lead into a further discussion of proportion first of all in your book. You talk about Umberto. Eco's critique of Manhattan as having given short shrift to proportion in his discussion of these aspects of beauty eighty and. I'm just thinking of Merit and wonderful book. The responsibility of the artist where he in talking about how the end of art is the good of the the work itself and not the maker or of human designed or anything like that. His solution to that moral problem is to say but the artist has a man has further responsibilities to virtue and to the society in which he lives towards God. It and things like that but there's another almost simpler way of putting it that perhaps he might have said if he had given more due to proportion which is that actually the way that art effects its environment for lack of a better term is an aspect of its beauty because it never for is purely isolated Amir Thanh was so rightly I think enchanted by the way in which the work of art could really give us to use Hopkins Raise News of God the way it could reveal the divine intelligence through its own formed. Finish food that he would. He was so talented by that that he was especially attracted to works of art. That actually were kind of indifferent to all their finite proportions just so long as they stood for as intimation of the light of the divine beauty that transcended them and so he even says in a book not quite as late as the responsibility artists but in creative intuition says that a lot of poetry three and modern music has rendered the beauty of the ear in order to get at an ontological beauty. I think that was a real false note in his floss. You could see why he was doing it. He was reacting against a vision of a fine arts that was entirely ornamental entirely technical and entirely academic that they just said if the proportions of the work itself are properly rendered than it must be beauty. And what more do you want. Well there's a whole line where he says you know the pretty is not the beautiful charming is not the beautiful at Cetera and also he wants to rightly point out that you know in art. The ugly can be transmitted in various ways into serving the beautiful. Yeah and that's that's why actually we need to do something something that he was unwilling to do as you pointed out we need to recover the sense of proportion as being at the very center of Beauty. Because what we're talking about. We say that we're proportion is perceptible relations the way you can see this particular form. Not only as fully related waited or whole to itself but as standing in intelligible or perceptible relations to other things the corpse in the battlefield by itself might be hideous and it will contain some element of four and ugliness to it but it also in its very existence stands in relationship to other things and those things were always going to find fascinating and beautiful. We could go through this a number of ways. When we're thinking anatomically to see the corpse the corpse lacks so much that human being to be a full human being or to be the proper human being requires we can still see the wonders intelligibility of the human body as proportion to ourselves we the living who who incidentally also have bodies in the great works of art the dead body or the wounded body is often figuratively and sometimes literally at the center of the canvas? I'm just thinking off the top of my head of that. Great Statue of the dying Gaul that shames mckinney wrote a poem about the gall the barbarian warrior lane down on his shield after he's received his deathblow. It's one of the great works of statuary up there with that sort. More dected. Production Belaya Cohen woodlake wanted sons are being surrounded by serpents. This is a scene of horror and it's meant to excite horrid it's also a seen a beauty and by that we don't mean oh it has two parts beauty in one part horror rather the horror of the situation is part of its beauty because to perceive the beauty of anything is precisely to see how this thing is a hole in itself self that relates to other things too many other things and finally to the whole of reality that's been created by God will it seems it's from from that it sounds sounds as though inside about the way that an artist can transmute the ugly into the beautiful actually relies on proportion for for how it works. It does but he was anxious to ignore proportion because what he was enchanted by was the way in which what seemed disproportionate ugliness could nonetheless reveal mysteries beyond itself and so in the age in which he was writing. This is just is what the best elements of modernism as a whole were attempting the best figures modernism is. They were seen have distorted. How much of a violation elation of various or surface imitation the aesthetic could attain without betraying itself as the aesthetic how much of charm and prettiness beauty could surrender before beauty itself ceased to be beautiful and you can understand why they would do dad again because there were earlier accounts of the beautiful that really did reduce it to the pretty or the charming and to a very superficial vision? Asian of those things but what I think everybody acknowledges got lost. In modernism is the sense of form and splendor as both off-beam legitimate modes of proportion that reveal beauty an effect necessary elements that allow beauty to subsist and so the best works of art will always be those that have integrity to themselves so we can see them as having a kind of visible intelligibility and integrity or wholeness to themselves elves. But that also radiate these lines of connection to other finite things whether it's to their surrounding or two aspects acts of human history and human experience to which there they become connected which they throw out a line as it were and then finally to the divine as again Maryland just. He was so entranced by the mystery of the infinite showing itself in particular her that he was less interested or even willing to cast over entirely any attention to those more mundane finite proportions. Sion's that nonetheless have as much right to be an integral part of beauty as clarinetist us. The other observation I wanted to make is going back to acquaintances other definition of beauty. which has backs too? Many he says beauty is that which being seen pleases and one of the insights. I took from your book is how that itself also relates to proportion if we are to see it as something other than a s- objectivism or a kind of purely sensory experience of pleasure. I think another kind of proportion that it's important to attend to is the way this ties back into what you were saying earlier earlier in this episode and in the previous discussion the way in which reality is actually fitted to us in the way it's actually proportioned to our intellect approach. Yeah that's another aspect I think of the limitation but also the riches of marathons account of beauty. He offers in a footnote. A statement. The kind of contemptuous of our demand that the beautiful thing be proportion to our intellects and his reasoning is easy to find. If you ask a client is got intelligible see knowable acquaintance would of course say not only has got knowable. Oh He's the most notable thing that is he is pure intelligibility but but then you ask him but can we know him as well okay. So he's he's the first noble thing absolutely or objectively as it were but subjectively he is in a very real sense the least knowable thing for us or the last. It's noble thing we have to do a whole lot of discursive labor to come to a knowledge of God is beat itself. We have to be able to think things through through and God is sort of the destiny of that journey for US says acquaintance. So there's what's I absolutely but also I for us with maritime talked about the beauty. He's so enraptured. By beauty as the absolute light of God that he's less sympathetic to those works of art. That would condescend on. Descend to being I for us. That is to say readily intelligible perceptible for us. My big argument within five yards is to say well what we we really want is a work of art bent beautiful in the sense that as perfectly proportioned as possible to the divine light of the creative intelligence but also proportioned proportioned to we poor human creatures whoever receptive intelligence so we simultaneously can experience overwhelming light and not be totally rendered blind by it. It is this modern aspect this modern emphasis in meriden and others on this sort of absolute aspects of the work itself South. Is this why you later in the book referred to Modernism Somewhat surprisingly to me as being sort of a metaphysical realist movement. That's right the Iron Earnhardt not in Catholic theology. The Way I put it is modern. Art Right is the nineteenth century made pretenses of being realistic. But what they meant by unrealism and this is going to be marathons very perceptive on what they meant by realism was a superficial replication of the surfaces of things because they assumed that things have no depth but everything has depth. Whether it's a paper clipper a blade of grass much less a human person and therefore nineteenth century realism fails goes by doubt being nearly realistic enough. You have to be willing to enter into the depths and the mystery of being in order to really perceived the real to encounter the real to encounter being and so a lot of modernist works do it but they do it in a kind of irritated way is in you look at a Rothko opinion just to give an example. Say What is it. I don't know says your friend and then somebody else chime in. Well it must be some kind of you know Sherwood Fourth of the light of the mystery of being am everybody knows their head. Yeah I guess that's it. The surface is so banal that it must be concealing some kind of depth to it an alumna time. That's the case. The modernists were really experimenting to see how far they could go in neglecting surfaces services to get at depth precisely because they were reacting against an age that had tried to perfect surfaces but was totally negligent of the depths of being. That sounds very sympathetic. To me you know the very sympathetic way of casting them. Well there's another way of casting him. which is that? Yeah they were. After the depth but the depth they were after was not the depth of being but the death of psychology and in fact that is apartment of modernism so that modernism becomes pure self expression pure subjective emanation and at which point you might as well just chuck the whole thing if our ever it becomes about self expression that is just not doing. I'm going to close the episode with that excellent observation on Modern Art by James Matthew Wilson as I said there will be one one more part to the interview in that one will talk about the importance of storytelling and mythos and how maternity has rejected.

Umberto Amir Thanh US Manhattan Maryland Belaya Cohen woodlake mckinney James Matthew Wilson Sion Sherwood Fourth meriden Rothko
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Everybody welcome back today. We'll be part two of my interview with James Matthew Wilson. We've been talking about his book the Vision in the soul and in part one. We talked about his argument for conservatism. As fundamentally literary and aesthetic rather than primarily political movement we talked about what he calls the six central insights of the Western tradition the Christian lateness permission having to do with man as an intellectual creature fitted to contemplate the truth a truth which presents itself to him even before he actively begins to seek it. And we've started to discuss beauty as central to the vision of the soul and this episode will be talking more about about beauty as a property of being it is in the nature of being to reveal itself to us and in the natural Plana if things it does so preeminently through beauty a crucial aspect of beauty is proportion because when we experience beauty we perceive a shining fourth of thing in all of its relations the relations of parts to each other and to the whole but also the relation of the whole object to everything else that exists to the whole of what exists and to its maker God before starting the interview. Let me you just note that I was originally going to put this interview out in two parts but because today's segment is a little bit more philosophically challenging. Perhaps I decided to cut at this out as its own episode so instead of two episodes the interview with James will be divided into three. And so you'll get the the final part next week also just like to acknowledge that for most of this episode. The sound quality on my voice is not as good as usual That's something something. I had to mention back in episode sixty as well because around the time that I recorded that and this and the next episode I was having some issues with the APP that I normally he was using to record things and had just resort to using skype. which didn't come out with As high quality of a recording. So it'll be that way unfortunately on this episode and the next one and then after that it'll be back to normal so I apologize for that all right. Let's get started James. Welcome back to the show. Thanks Tom Glad to be here again. We concluded our previous conversation by touching on the difference between reason and intellect more broadly at least speaking and I think this is going to be something that we will need to explain a little bit more at some point during the interview. I don't know when the best place to talk talk about. That would be. Well you know by coincidence into my mind this morning the thoughts of Of Freud Freud in Emerson and I don't remember Freud authored a book civilization has discontents and I think Emerson has some aphorism awesome about. That's sort of anticipation. Afraid about civilizing ourselves to death. I think what they have in common is that both Freud Everson seemed to have thought of civilization as this working out of the reason where the human intellect gradually method is. This is N. disillusions disenchant everything so that we see a clearly but as we come to see it clearly. It's so much less less than we had once. Thought it was so that to know the truth is to discover that there's nothing actually worth knowing to have rationalized. The world will in fact be to have completed the CARTESIAN project of disengaging everything genuinely human and worth loving from the world so that all that's left are the kind of bare stony facts that the psychologist or A capitalist or the scientist has uncovered and reduced to rubble or at least revealed as rebel. That's a vision of the. The human gene is a rational animal. Who's born for tragedy? The more you know the worst life gets so we can civilized ourselves to death just the opposite a jock. Marathon says I think we may have even mentioned this quotation of his podcast. MIRTA says to civilize spiritualize spiritualize. That's in fact. The active discovering the transcendent richness of reality for which reason was born and so there's no possible tragedy leave reason because reason proceeds from form to form from Church to truth until it arrives at the truth itself. I think those are the two choices that modern people usually think themselves as as confronting between a reason that disenchanted or reason that goes up the river into the heart of darkest Africa and says says with Joseph Conrad a horror horror or reason that socrates or with Plato's philosopher journeys out of the Cave which has a brightness to a fire to it but out of the cave into a brightness infinitely more transcendent the light of the sun at the heart of the vision of the soul. Oh is the desire to recover this sense of life as a spiritual journey and a civilizing journey where the eyes of this alert last has made adequate to see what they most desire and not to lose heart in thinking that the journey the intellect is somehow this miserable tragedy Ajeti where we ourselves the author of our own disenchantment and observation. That I've made over the years I think in reading your book sort of clarified. What's going on for me is that I think that even a lot of Catholic intellectuals who believed that there is such a thing as truth outside outside of ourselves are very informed by rationalism in the way that they conceive of the intellectual life in the contemporary of life in elevating eating sort of discursive reason and reasoning with words as almost the highest function of the intellect? So there's definitely Salihi a neo to`must or modern Catholic tendency to kind of rationalism and that neo Tennessee to rationalism it has a reasonable seasonable foundation or origin that we wouldn't want to simply discard but it led to some problems. Origin lies among other places in in the majesty in poverty of Metaphysics which is the first chapter in shock. Mayor Thomas Break Book degrees of knowledge there those opening pages. He looks at the Great. Modern philosophers both Protestant and Catholic. The Catholics were respond del with his action philosophy and he says all these modern thinkers have one thing in common which is their unwillingness to forgive. Human reason for being abstract human reason begins in first principles that are immediate. And when we have a fullness of truth we transcend the discursive the abstract act and just see the truth in its fullness but the middle way the way of the pilgrimage to knowledge that is properly human entails a great deal of use of abstraction and the use of discursive reason that puts abstract concepts or ideas into relationship with one another in forms of logic and in other ways and so this faltering gate of saying two plus two equals four has to occur occur at the level of abstraction at the level of abstract logic. And it lacks the kind of visceral sense of fullness of experience a fullness of existence that we really crave when we desire to know the truth we desire to see it but marathons argument is that however on tantalizing that may be the use of abstraction the use of discursive reason does lead us towards a fullness of truth and for the human person. It's really our only way of moving in that direction. And so we have to respect the limitations and the lack again of this kind of existential richness this that occurs when we're engaged in discursive reason. It's a lack of richness that the ancient world was totally aware of and comfortable with Plato. Aristotle understood understood that you have to progress by way of discourse toward that full intellectual vision of the truth a human being by nature is ordered to and desires most deeply with the most profound erratic drives so mayor talk was right to defend discursive reason and abstraction as necessary for the human person. And somebody that can't be avoided. You were journeyed towards something that transcends it but there was another side to the Early Twentieth Century Tomas Revival and Catholic Vicky. That emerged from it. That came to kind of rest contented with a kind of abstract reasoning reasoning so that it began to think that if you just have the right syllogism you've got everything you need for full understanding of the truth and I think Mayor John and his great teacher guys. You can't really be said to be guilty of that. But there was something in the air air in their day that led others maybe lesser minds to be such victims and so we need to actually step back Jack. We have to be grateful for the defense of discursive reason that New Thome ISM afforded us but we have to step back and recognize that discursive reason in whose end is truth has also Ford's end not just the truth of a statement or the truth of a proposition but the fullness of truth that we really let me see and in order to really do justice to that fullness of vision we have to introduce not just truth but we've introduced were being and we have to introduce its other properties properties goodness and beauty as well I remember when I was a freshman at Christendom College and involved in the debate society which was relatively new at the time. There was a debate on. I can't remember what the proposition being debated wise but it was essentially about knowledge versus love of God as our a final end and of course the answer is that in their fullest form. They're identical we know by loving and it seems that the transcendental which introduces to that way of knowing here on earth would be beauty that property of being that property. Of of God's love is the one that initiates us into the ways of knowing without having to resort to words. That's entirely true. In fact you don't even have to step outside of Quinonez. Thank you don't even have to step outside of the Suva Theologica in order to to show that to be the case the various discussions that acquinas gives us a beauty. He'll point out on the one hand. Beauty like the truth is rooted in the form. The essence the intelligible core and secret of things on the other hand beauty speaks to us us of delight and of love and desire and it speaks to us also of therefore the satisfaction of appetite. So beauty is in that respect to kind have good the way. Historians of philosophy have tended to resolve. This question is to say that acquinas believes that beauty. Eighty is a kind of secondary transcendental that the reason is ordered to the perception of being as truth and that the whale is ordered to the perception or four at petition of being as good in that beauty stands somewhere in back of these things where we realize that to know the truth is good or that what is genuinely good is by definition necessarily true and beauty sort of is kicked to rose or at least one row behind truth and goodness in two rows behind being marathon with what basis nobody really knows rose said in a flourish of I suppose just good French rhetoric in a footnote tards classicism in truth. Beauty Eighty is the synthesis of all the transcendental combined in one sense that feels like empty rhetoric because if beauty is transcendental property of being that how can a transcendental property being be a synthesis of all the transcendental. There's something not quite right there but in another way I think he is right in fact we may have even talked about this last time. That beauty gives self to us I as the capacity of existent forum to disclose itself to share itself with another which I think is really one of the most important things that we can know. So beauty is what fumble is are called called the primal phenomenon. You can't get at being without this first encounter with beauty. That may sound counterintuitive because we tend to fake Oh you encounter hound or something and then you judge it beautiful. Well there's some truth there but beauty is a property of bean is this particular capacity of existent form to disclose itself. It's a beauty is what strikes us first but as we enter into the being that first gives itself to us in its beauty we discover what it is is we discovered truth. We discover when it's good for its goodness. And then we discover that that truth stands within a myriad whole truth for the truth of all. Things is one universal truth and the whole of reality is bordered by this orderly progression of desires. That Dante taste dump for us with that. Great final phrase of the final line of the divine comedy. The love that moves the sun and the other stars when we see truth and goodness whole we discover that beauty wasn't just first encounter with them..

James Matthew Wilson Freud Everson Of Freud Freud Emerson Africa N. disillusions disenchant scientist Aristotle Plato Tom MIRTA skype. Marathon Suva Theologica Tennessee Mayor John Christendom College Ajeti Catholic Vicky Tomas Revival
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

12:52 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"We see that everything we know is stands in splendor. Its relationship with everything else. Just the way that the Son Sen vowed it's raise and communicates its warmth than liked everything else that is so the Christian plagiarism. crispness completeness tradition proposes to us that realities that way that reality is created by God and that God communicates and therefore puts himself into relationship with everything else that exists and everything else that exists therefore stands not only relationship with God but to everything else and so that idea of radiance or clary toss or splendor. Coming out of things is in fact that sense that we already have or that. We perceive of things have standing in intelligible relationship to each other. Now here's the big argument. What I'm proposing there for? Is that true. The truth about things is in itself intrinsically beautiful beautiful and I WANNA go farther. It has to be beautiful and it's only because the truth is beautiful. It's only because beauty is very toss splendor the splendor of that we understand why it is that we want to know the truth. In the first place there are plenty of people who think they only want to know the truth. Because they're trying to get ahead in the world you WanNa know just enough to figure out how to be a good accountant or how to be good used car salesman or how to conquer small country. Most people people have a sort of shriveled rational division of their destiny but in fact we want to know the truth because when we see the truth whole we attain wisdom and the state of contemplation. That is made possible by of achievement of wisdom is not simply a good in itself. It's the good would. It's the thing we desire more than anything. What we really desire of course is to know all things in their relationship to the one who made them and so forth insight? Is that the world as a whole. It's a self ordered by and to Judy. The world is made by gaunt. Want an order to God and not God in some bear unknowing way like God in his in this fullness of his radiance that causes things to be in that calls things back to know him and to stand in loving relationship with him that knowledge so God does the divine beauty but also God as the cause of every earthly beauty at causes. All things to hold were in here as as intelligible hole so oh that fourth point speak primarily about the nature of reality as a whole the fifth one turns to us that human dignity specifically consists in our capacity to perceive even contemplate. That's lenders order. In excellent form of human life is that which is given over to such contemplation. This is in a sensible sound kind and controversial. Most people say that the many people will say that was excellent. Form of life is some kind of action in the world. But I think we all know that. That's it's not true precisely because we all know that knowing has to be involved in the purpose of our lives if we stare before stand before true and contemplate it we. Nobody's going to say. Why would you want to do that? It's the one true end in itself. I think back to the nickelback in ethics where Aristotle gives a wonderful demonstration that the content of life is the good life for man and I love the the rhetoric of his demonstration of brew. Because he says for instance nobody would fight a war for its own sake right so attaining inning. Glorious War can't be a good in itself it has to be only a useful good because we wouldn't want to fight war for its own sake. We would want to fight a war so as to secure peace okay so that we can then live peacefully into something else. I'm sure everybody who listened to a met day nodded approvingly because they were too embarrassed to say actually. Gosh I don't know I kind of thought. Fighting a war was a good in itself because by fighting in a war I could show my courage and by showing my courage even if I die eh I could be viewed as Glorious and that glory would make me immortal. Someone who will be remembered down through history or decades centuries perhaps forever aristotle says no this is not the case because of course if glory were the end it would in incoherence something. That's not really good in itself we'd be treated the would be being treated as good by getting glory good in itself. Well glory you. As as Aristotle's contemporaries understood it was simply a splendor or folders that came from having done something good fought well in a battle the glory itself therefore was just a sort of fruit. But it wasn't a real and how do we know that well imagine somebody had unearned glory. Nobody what he wants to be undeserving glory. Nobody really wants to be in contemporary terms. Amir celebrity where everyone looks at you in your Glory Lori and then looks at you a little more closely realize that you have not one virtue Prophet to yourself. That's actually worthy of admiration. Hence I think the self destructiveness activeness somebody celebrity lives is that they're forced constantly to record with the emptiness of their own success so the only success but it doesn't abandon us in the end is the success of standing in contemplation of the truth in all of its beauty. This is the most excellent form of human life but then we say what is that. Why should that be so good? And so the six inside tells us this contemplation realizes itself self in what we may call happiness or salvation and it is characterized by an activity that resembles passivity that is to say not simply the absence of motion but a fullness of activity that's called peace and freedom what I was trying to get at with this insight. Is that so much of our lives is spent feeling that were either passive roofing acted upon near employees or functionaries or servants war when we reach out and seize activity were the ones who act upon others were bosses or commanders for executives and but we see that neither of these positions is ever final right. I might be the boss of my children until my wife tells me to do something else. Go for the active active to the passive These very partial positions that are never fully expressive of who we are and they're also very partial in the sense that they're not everlasting lasting what we're really striving for is a condition of happiness. Where we say yes here? I have a Ri- I need not go. Oh anywhere else because what I found here is infinitely good so that it can never be surpassed because it is itself on surpassing good and and so we have to understand that not in terms of the question. What next because there is no next beyond with good well? Yeah but what do you do. After that. Well Socrates tells US happiness is the possession of the good forever so there is no after it's everlasting. It's only in this attack of contemplation that we transcend all those partial positions of activity and passivity and become simply fullfilled. Filled up in such a way with with what is good that there's no further. Good that we have to go chasing. If we don't have this position there are a number of things that we can never understand concluding we can't understand how life could actually be purposeful. How life is not just a succession of in the long-term meaningless pursuits pursuits of viscous or that? Good or this or that good but is rather life is one pilgrimage. One quest the find our destiny to be fulfilled into into stand within that fulfillment ever after. I think I hope we can talk again. More about how to overcome rationalism Because that was one of the big takeaways that I had from your book that the degree to which rat rationalism has wrought devastation on our culture and our on our minds the degree to which we actually the weather even believing Catholics thinking away. That's fundamentally different from the ancient people or the premodern people. Could you just quickly before you go. Explain the difference between when you talk about the vision of the intellect the difference between that and what we call reason sure well so so. In the Christian tradition the intellect is is the essence of the soul and within the intellect there's a particular way of thinking Called reasoning and reason is characteristically human. But it's founded on the first principles of the intellect that make reasoning possible. This sounds like kind of classic hair-splitting but it's very important for understanding of what it means to be human reason discursive reason it's generally called it moves from point to point from two to the plus the two to be equal to the four and then once it gets the four it says well then Foreign poorer eight and so and so forth. It's discursive in that. It's always moving down a passage or to the truth but when we have a full of truth we see the truth which we all know because raw Christian blatantness even whether we know it or not we all say things like Now I see what you mean and if you're starting to understand somebody you say I hear you but then once you really hear somebody you see what they mean. We all have a sense of the truth as form as appearance. Let's as an appearance that slanderous. It's only because our intellectual activities are not limited to that sort of haphazard active slow. Oh clotting journey discursive reason it's only because we have the capacity to finally at the end of all are searching sit back and simply see the truth and in a manner of speaking let itsy that we can ever hope that there will be an end to all are striving and finally a piece a piece. That's not a cessation of activity but rather fullness of activity a piece. That's not simply Oga not simply one more good thing that we know but a piece that says I have arrived now. The place I've been looking for all of my life. It's all of this is founded on the idea of the soul having capacity for intellectual vision. And that's why I had to call the book the vision of the soul. Well thank you for that and hopefully next time we can talk about the other ways of arriving at this intellectual vision beyond besides discursive reason and why the true philosopher is not necessarily defined s someone who sits in front of a book and you know makes sort of logical formal arguments about things. That's right yeah with with me. I have to pick up with that committed. A big claim that the there's a particular way to live life that's most excellent and it's a life that involves everybody in a manner of speaking becoming. I mean a philosopher and not the way contemporary culture tells us to become philosophers. Culture seems to be especially in America seems to be modelled on Melville's the confidence silence man. Where you presume everybody's lying to you and so you want to be an educated? One is the one who sees through everybody else's lies that's a good way to survive for a little while but it's no way to live. Okay James Thank you John Drake on. Thanks in case you didn't know the Catholic Culture podcast is just one of three podcast cast produced by Catholic culture. Dot Org I. There's way of the fathers with Mike. Aquilina Mike is at the top of his field as far as presenting the stories and insights of the church fathers in a highly engaging and accessible manner. We've also got Catholic culture audiobooks these are free professionally produced recordings news of the writings of Great Catholics like Saint John. Henry Newman and the fathers of the church. So you can check those out at Catholic culture dot org slash podcast. And if you enjoy please please share with your friends. And I'll see you next week for more with James Matthew Wilson.

Aristotle Mike James Matthew Wilson Catholic Culture Sen US Henry Newman Saint John Judy Ri accountant America Amir salesman John Drake Melville Lori
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Hey everybody welcome back to the Catholic culture podcast. My guest today is James. Matthew Wilson a poet and philosopher. Who Do I interviewed back in episode fifty seven about his recent poem cycle the River of the Immaculate Conception he also appeared more briefly in episode sixty in a a discussion with Andrew? Desa and we're GONNA have Two or three more episodes with him this month discussing masterpiece of a book that he wrote a few years ago called the division of the soul and since we explain what the book is about right at the top of the interview. Let's just jump right in James. Matthew Wilson Welcome back to the Catholic culture podcast. Thanks Thomas Experiment done. So we're back to talk about your book the vision of the soul truth. Goodness and beauty in the western tradition and this is our really book that came out a few years ago was very acclaimed at the time. And I it's certainly one of the best nonfiction books I've read. That's a contemporary book in terms of its staff and I think readability it covers a lot of ground but I think probably be accurate to say that the the central theme of it is the way that maternity has separated beauty from goodness and truth and A. and trying to reclaim the sort of identification of beauty with being goodness and truth as the core of love the western tradition. But that'd be pretty accurate. That's right I guess. This book does do a lot of things because even in that one sentence there were probably four or five things that I wanted to talk about the at the heart of it is if we ask what conservatives want to conserve the answers are not always forthcoming and the most important answer that ought to be given is. We need to conserve a vision of reality and he would person's role in reality. That's that's accurate and worthy of these things and at the heart of that I find is the need for defensive beauty not necessarily after the fashion Russian of the nineteenth century liberal humanism. That's represented by somebody like Matthew. Arnold where beauty is a kind of final no adornment on an otherwise functioning society rather a vision that recognizes beauty as a property of being as in fact a dimension of reality so deeply threaded through it all that we can't possibly understand what Israel without having some account of beauty. Beauty isn't isn't necessarily a perfection or again in a dormant it's actually be fundamental that we have to understand if we're to respond bond to what reality has to teach US accurately you begin. The book with I mean you mentioned conservatism and conservatism. Awesome and beauty are not things that are too Too readily associated in the contemporary mind now conservatives will use truth goodness and beauty and when I was at a small Catholic Liberal Arts College for a brief period of time I honestly felt like they were all sort of thrown around as buzzwords and the the beauty part got sort of the short end of the stick. But there's there's real reasons. In other words that that conservatism associated now with the arts or with putting a high emphasis on beauty but you make a very interesting and compelling argument for that being sort of the origins of conservatism before that at the beginning of the book you make some points as to why. It's a mistake that we commonly associate gate cultural and artistic vitality with liberalism. So why don't we actually start there. Sure yeah that's that was one of the genesis moments of writing. This book was contemplating gene. What the Western tradition as a whole looks like and has to teach us and what it has to teach us primarily really because summed up by Plato in the Republic Republic? Most people are content with a fairly shallow vision of the world that life that reality as such is just a series of shadows a series of appearances but in in fact even a few moments rational reflection compels us to recognize that a shadow has to be protected from something that whatever appears to us is but the appearance of deeper and richer hole and so a full knowledge of the truth will transcend appearances or or go more deeply into them until it reaches. What's the on them and enrich form of human life will be a life spent in contact with reality in its fullness not just with the superficial this is just the West tradition as a whole at? It's not the exclusive property the West because at at its foundation is just the acknowledgement. That reality is truth. Truth one that truth is a hole that contains many troops but they're all held together in in a single coherent order. Inform and that human person by nature is destined to know the truth so every culture is the practice of people learning how how to discern the truth and to respond to it to form the world in accordance with that truth about two hundred years ago. You begin to see a Stirring that associates the arts and the beautiful and indeed culture as a whole with disintegrated rather than unitive forces assists with D. cultivating forces rather than cultivating forces so culture against to become an anti culture. And that win. Did that happen really that that happened with the French Revolution. Great though that was a political event it's always been in a certain sense especially for English speakers overshadowed for what it meant as an intellectual event it was the first first moment where the idea of intelligence the idea of common sense or of speaking. The truth was used to actually hair down rather than build a civilization and from that moment a new kind of perverse tradition comes into our culture that didn't exist before one one that's commonly described just as liberalism. What does liberalism do as it begins to mature will liberalism? Is that ideology. That says there are only two things that we you can approve as goods that must be pursued and those two things are freedom and equality but if you look over the last two hundred years a political fought you'll come across figures really important figures like Alexis de Tocqueville who are thinking through what it means to be a political society largely in terms of freedom inequality in these two things coexist but they don't necessarily call into question those as sort of the foundational terms of political life. That's actually a very dangerous. We all acknowledge acknowledge. That being free is good at least insofar as freedom stands in opposition to some kind of slash servitude or imprisonment. We all acknowledge knowledge. That equality is good in so far as equality means the treating as like that which is actually like but liberalism didn't propose the like should be treated as the like or that freedom was just a good thing in relative speaking to some kind of captivity or servitude would it proposed proposed is to mutually exclusive ideas that freedom was an absolute good so that every form that limits freedom is intrinsically basically an injustice but of course everybody were radically free in the sense of simply being ungoverned uninformed unconfined unattached then nobody would be equal. We'll be oppressing somebody else. Just in your freedom state pure condition of ungoverned nece equality similarly can hardly be in absolute it good because though we want the like to be treated as the like. We don't want irrelevant differences to conceal from US fundamental similarities. Nobody thinks that simply being being treated equal which is pretty much a negative. Good in the sense that it's it's not something good in itself is like recovering from illness. You don't WanNa be ill but you don't think think of health as simply the highest good that you have in your life so it is with equality we want equality where it seems appropriate but equality as the one definite good after after which all civilization that's out as if it were its last final and most important requests that's very empty. So liberalism is just a political philosophy that absolute sizes to who relative goods making them the only goods. It's an incoherent ideology because those two things are beautiful exclusive as I said but it's also a dangerous one because once you're free. You're forced to ask the question that John Paul. The second proposed US free for what and if everybody is absolutely equal. So that there's no difference between anyone if everybody's equal such that everything just seems like a great vast lane of sameness or get Elliott old word but it all seems like pro plan at one things the same as the other. We're just in a sort of primordial primordial soup of Sameness. What would be the point of that with the positive good of that? So liberalism could sustain itself as a kind of ideology for awhile that had its arts of freedom and it's arts of equality. It's works of art. That said we're moving towards freedom. We're moving towards equality but at some point it emerged to realize these are not absolute goods. And so there's really yeah no point to our activity. What would a novel look like? What would a poem look like that? Just described breed them as the mere absence of oppression. So my argument is that this emergence of an ideology geology. The French Revolution certainly made the appearance of being a kind of defensive culture it was active and dynamic and it proposed as good to who clearly definable things freedom equality but in fact. It was vacuous from the beginning. It was nine Listrik from the beginning and what it really did with sought to tear down and every edifice that had ever been constructed in order to help human beings become more adequate to the knowledge of what was true. What was good? It was beautiful. If that's the case case in here Elfin end with this. If that's the case then the first great conservative Edmund Burke was the first person to stand in defense of a transcendental properties. Bean of truth. Goodness and beauty against this kind of nihilistic ideology and he's there for the great defender of not just a counter revolutionary past. We're a pre-revolutionary past. He's a great defender of the whole tradition. That our ancestors worked with great difficulty to build up in the first place. And we'll talk about him in a moment. has this sort of founding figure of conservatism. You know it's interesting you said like. What does the novel look like with Sort of freedom and equality as core principles. And there's many many reasons why modern stories tend to be sort of stuck in darkness and depravity and one reason for that though. Maybe that you need to have sort of conflict without resolution in order to distract from the fact that you once you get where you want to be. It's not very interesting. You know freedom and equality as defined you know in modernity are are are not that interesting you know. It's I don't I don't think that you could have a really beautiful depiction of those things. So all we have our characters who lack those things and are striving for those things but you know if they ever got them. I I think that it wouldn't be very fulfilling ending years ago. I used to read whoever magazine called the Baffler and ahead a wonderful article that pointed out that though old curmudgeon sitting on the front porch shaking their fists at the irreverent young have long since faded from.

US Matthew Wilson James Catholic Liberal Arts College Desa Thomas Experiment Andrew Alexis de Tocqueville Plato John Paul Edmund Burke Arnold Israel Elliott
"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"matthew wilson" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Listeners. Let me just add one more thing to that Promo for the fall campaign that you heard at the beginning of this episode sewed and that is by the next episode of the Catholic culture. PODCAST the fall campaign will be over. We only have until December Ninth S. James Names mentioned to make our full sixty five thousand dollar challenge grant so let me just reiterate that now is the crucial last six days or or so to make that and make sure we can keep on plugging along next year. My guest today as I said last week is the Worthy maker Acre of Poems James Matthew Wilson and hopefully this will be the first of a few episodes. I'll be doing with him. And this one. I will be introducing him as a poet and talking about his most recent book the cycle of poems titled The River Of the Immaculate Conception James. Welcome to the show Tom. Thanks for having me but the beer. So let's just go ahead and start talking about the poem that you've just published. Its out from wise blood books and this was inspired by the recent mass of the Americas. Right that's correct. Yeah the Benedict the Sixteenth Institute which is a a institution that's part of or within the archdiocese of San Francisco and is takes. Its first mission the renewal you will of the sacred arts. In specifically the liturgical arts they commissioned a couple of years ago a massive the Americas that would celebrate both the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception and one that would therefore model with a true inculturation of Latin American culture into the massive into the church might they commissioned Franklin Raka to compose the mass and he did something absolutely marvelous. Everyone heard for the very first time on the fesity immaculate conception just a year ago and I had been asked the fly out for the mass into it and then to go home and write something in response to write a poem in response to it and I had spoken with the head of the sixteenth teeth Before coming out there to say I have a feeling that this is going to be more than just a poem by sense that Luaka with planning to do in the mass or what he had done in the mass which going to speak with a really profound ways to several aspects of the Catholic faith that I've been history that had been in contemplating for a number of years my sense as a child Catholic educated in Michigan and having my understanding of what America was informed not primarily by its settlement by English colonists. But it's much more far-flung flung settlement and and most beautifully expressed by the presence of the French jesuits in the Great Lakes where I was growing up. I had been wanting to write something about that for many years and in fact had tried something. Low Gosh fifteen or sixteen years ago. That was more or less a failure. Just set it aside and I just thought this sounds like a mass is GonNa give me an opportunity to think more fruitfully about America's Catholic history. Some of it lost some Always present I wanted to bring it all together in celebration of what frank had done in the mass. I'll say one more thing briefly but as in my early twenties John Paul. The second's Ecclesia America was published. And the call that he made there for American Catholics to think about Catholicism in America as organic wholes unified whole genuinely and community with each other in a way that we don't always think struck me as really important and as did the call in that same document four bore renewed sates lives of American saints and to sort of field of consciousness of the history of Catholicism in America so all of these things that had been sort of lingering around my mind for a very long time when I heard the first note a Franks mass. I thought this really is going to be the time when I can bring all these things together and make them make sense for me and I hope for the rest of the church very powerful thing to be connected to in our history and especially in a place where we often feel like outsiders. I remember being very moved. As a child by the story of Saint Isaac Jokes and dressing up pass him my elementary school for All Saints Day and things like that you know had the opportunity to sort of remember all that when I visited Quebec for the first time in two thousand seventeen and Saul these relics and didn't North American martyrs and other French missionaries the tomb of Saint Marie of the incarnation who who was canonized by Pope Francis. A few years ago and then this summer I had the opportunity to visit the North American Martyrs Shrine in upstate New York and it was a similar experience experience to reconnect with all of that. And you know there was a site where they said it was the first recorded rosary that was said in the state of New York. Very powerful thing to be aware of yes indeed the saturation of our continent in the faith in ways that haven't always he's been recorded or remembered but in ways that have nonetheless been important for the life of our church is really something. They'd I had a similar goal as to take my kids on a extended trip through upstate. New York with the destination finally being the shrine of Saint Qatari my oldest daughter has particularly love for Seca Teary. So we had hoped to do that. We ended up having to take a slightly different trip instead of that one. But that's sort of our ambitions of the years ahead. I'm glad to hear that you had done. So you know I know that. Just a lot of people have heard about the mass the America's because of the recent celebration at the National Shrine in DC which was live streamed and had a good recording Donovan. I haven't had the chance to listen to the whole thing in yet but it kind of made me wish I had been down there. I know you were there. I was in fact I came into the church into the basilica and the head of the Bendigo Sixty Institute Grabbed me by the arm and made me sit in a particular pew that was not actually the most ideal seating if you wanted to see what was occurring the altar but was the place within the basilica had the most perfect and so I was very grateful. So can you go ahead and read us the first piece kind of sets. The scene of the mass of the poem has seven parts and three of them are are narratives about various saints in North America Various Catholic figures. And then the other four or more personal to you and describing your experience some of them having to do with the massive America's right. Yes well the whole poem. All seven parts are held together a desert by the form of the liturgy of the form of the mass so each part corresponds in some meaningful way eh to the mass as frank composed it and so as you said just a second ago. There's really three basic kinds of home. I'm in the poem as a whole. There's three lives of the Saints North American saints there to longer blink. First Meditative hit a poems about the history of America and then there are two homes book end that bracket opponents a whole that are era most explicitly about the nature of Liturgy and so that first one is really A response to the INTROIT that was performed in the original performance of the massive America's as part of Nova Sordo mastered English. The music had to be reset in reorder considerably for the mass that just occurred in Washington. DC for a number of reasons most obvious one being simply that the extraordinary form and the ordinary form are not the same so part one. Let's tutor instruments was response to the Introit as the music was first being played within Saint Mary's Cathedral in San Francisco and Saint. Mary's is not a church. It certainly known for its architecture but not necessarily for the please UNIS of its architecture. I noticed while they're that on the one hand. The the bronze relief sculptures on sacred subjects. That were in. That cathedral actually did a wonderful job of making the federal. It's sort of infamous in many people's minds to have some kind of genuine beauty to it and then further something that people have to complain about in that cathedral and quite understandably early but still is kind of fascinating if that was a very heavy concrete building a corners are all clear glass and they do have a brilliant effect literally and figuratively so part one but a student instruments sunlight flows through saint. Mary's windowed corners corners with such a grace. It seems that all commune in Brilliance and every surface serves only to magnify with its reflection.

Americas New York Immaculate Conception James Saint DC frank North America San Francisco James Matthew Wilson Ecclesia America North American Martyrs Shrine Great Lakes John Paul Sixteenth Institute Immaculate Conception Saint Mary's Cathedral Mary Tom Saint Isaac Jokes
Beto O'Rourke and Ted Cruz meet for final debate

Larry O'Connor

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Beto O'Rourke and Ted Cruz meet for final debate

"Senator Ted Cruz and his democratic opponent any high profile race for a Senate seat will appear together later tonight for the second televised debate tonight's debate in San Antonio is a local TV station, and we'll focus on foreign and domestic policy. It'll last an hour. Matthew Wilson is a political science professor at SMU in Dallas and says it's an important debate. Likely the last time that the two candidates will appear in the same forum together before election the two debated last month in Dallas. But another debate was cancelled when cruiser was in Washington for the cavenaugh confirmation hearings. A work has significantly outraged the Cruz campaign but crew says he's

Senator Ted Cruz Dallas Matthew Wilson San Antonio SMU Senate Professor Washington Cavenaugh
Senator Ted Cruz, Baidoa Rourke and Senate discussed on Politics, Policy, Power and Law

Politics, Policy, Power and Law

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Senator Ted Cruz, Baidoa Rourke and Senate discussed on Politics, Policy, Power and Law

"Knockout punch during the first three debates in a high profile Senate race in Texas says Republican Senator Ted Cruz is up against democratic challenger Baidoa Rourke in the November midterm election. I will always stand and fight for twenty eight million texts. Whatever the challenges, I know that we're up to the task both candidates. Stuck to their campaign principles the second amendment trade and respect for police all up for debate SMU political science professor Matthew Wilson says neither candidate over. Shadowed the other. I do think it was a small tactical victory for Senator Cruz, but not decisive not a knockout. The next debate scheduled for later this month in Houston. Clayton

Senator Ted Cruz Baidoa Rourke Senate SMU Matthew Wilson Clayton Texas Houston Professor