19 Burst results for "Matthew Teitelbaum"

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals, They're still able to find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's Iemma Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Cory ER, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registers right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding up and highlight that in your collection, The collection of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston got the latest trend in pandemic distraction..

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Jill Kennedy John Michel Basquiat Kernaghan Sandra Shave Korea NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Cory ER Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I'm gonna say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Corriere, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to Traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The latest.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston NPR Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum Museum of Fine Arts director Corriere
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

04:36 min | 5 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Culture events that have adjusted to these toronto virus. Times is gbh is executive arts editor. Jarred bone host of the tv series. Open studio which you can catch friday nights at eight thirty right here on gbh. to hello. jared hello great to be with you both you. Well i think you. Jim talked about this. philip guston show when i was not here on vacation but there's the head of the mfa yes matthew title man So what is going on with this. Now who's philip guston. What is the so-called 'blacklash what's happening we have a big update actually and i was just the mfa So we can talk more about the new monet show. That's coming up too but the first big update is something that will becoming to the. Mfa the story that we talked with matthew teitelbaum. The director of the mfa about was this philip. Guston exhibition hugely anticipated retrospective This fifty year career of the artists who died in one thousand nine hundred eighty. A major artist of the twentieth century influenced a lot of other artists of all stripes. All media This was to be a partnership between the mfa here in boston. The national gallery of art in dc the tate modern in london and the mfa in houston one of the Part of the subject. Matter of philip guston As he worked throughout his career was depictions. these cartoonish depictions of the kkk. These hooded figures Driving smoking cigarettes almost these kind of comical looks at the kkk. he is somebody who was very progressive in his art. He added very deliberate reason for depicting these figures As a jewish artist in america in california in the nineteen twenties he was targeted by the kkk as he depict had these depictions but as this show started to come to the fore there started to be blowback about why is this being presented. I think the the this contingency of museums didn't necessarily have the proper language to move forward and really got caught and didn't have a perfect answer for it. So they decided to delay the show until twenty twenty four. And this is what jim and i had spoken to matthew teitelbaum about about about..

mfa philip guston matthew teitelbaum Guston Jim toronto executive editor boston director america london california houston
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"This moment to share some. Slow you so much Matthew Teitelbaum is the ANAGRAM gun director of the Museum of Fine Arts coming up for opening up the lines and asking you if art the generates controversy should be exempt from censorship or is everything fair game keep your dial on eighty nine seven. Gbh. Boston public radio. Back to Boston Public Radio Jim. Brady jared bone sitting in for Marjorie. If you're just tuning in, we're talking to Matthew Teitelbaum he's director of the MFA about his decision along with other museum directors three others. In fact, postponed a major X. Exhibit of Philip guston's work at issue or paintings that feature cartoonish to collects clan figures doing everyday kinds of things. The Augusta in retrospect was first open I believe in June the National Gallery of art in DC would then move to the MFA in Houston then to the tate modern in London and finally here to the NFL. The directors of the museums released this joint statement. Here's what they said postponing the exhibition until the time at which we think that the powerful message of social and racial justice in Centerville, cousins work can be more clearly interpreted. But now isn't the time as I asked Mr Teitelbaum when our president sympathizing with white supremacists went is the right time to provoke thoughts about racism and white supremacy, a larger issue jars, and we'll take your calls at eight seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy one is it ever right to I know matthew? Wouldn't use this term sensor or in this case the. So that there is quote context whatever that means or should art be published. A should be presented and let people draw their own conclusions numbers eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, you're the expert. So what's the answer? Censorship is a word that applies in doesn't apply here as I. Know that I know as Matthew Teitelbaum was just saying. They're taking this time and one thing I did hear from him that I am. Informing, my own decision is he like the other museum directors are listening internally to to what people are saying to make this decision but ultimately, the decision, they have made this to take this this career survey of Philip Guston and delay it until twenty, twenty four so that they can, as they argue, take more time to contextualized. Just, a little backstory of Philip Guston. He is somebody who is a major artist of the twentieth century. He was very politically active, very politically engaged i. think you explained this in your introduction but his images of the Ku Klux Klan are cartoonish. He is not supporting. He was not supporting the Ku Klux Klan..

Matthew Teitelbaum Philip guston Ku Klux Klan MFA Boston Museum of Fine Arts Brady jared bone National Gallery of art Centerville Houston Marjorie white NFL president London
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Not to show these images, well, you know what? museums I believe haven't done the work to create the to use the word hospitality the way in which we create the proper and fair conversation imagery, what imagery and frankly. I. Again. Just alone I made it reminded museum colleagues and in dialogue with the NSA staff. My feeling was that this wasn't the time. Without more preparation to actually engage a way of understanding what it meant for this artist to make these images fifty years ago but to present them in this moment. This moment in which the Klu Klux Klan are being a vote again in which they are symbol of a certain set of values and I think that we have to understand. But the pack of the were made with such power conviction empathy serious intent in nineteen, sixty, nine, nine, hundred, seventy doesn't mean they re they are received neutrally. In the museum today and that that's the main issue that I want to talk about other stuff up about it over the course of the next while, which is, what is the response we of the museum to create the space for understanding and how do we assure ourselves that we're creating the right kinds of conversations with the right inputs and I think that we need to do Morrison Institution I think our sector has to do more but I, think the MFA has to do more inviting more. Voices in to create a diverse understanding of how something is looked at from different points of view. But question that's being posed to is that some of these works and I don't know who is lending I I would assume that some of these works are already on view in museums. The catalog has been published and is out there and there are people who say that the work should stand for itself that the values that Guston. That the messages the passion that guston brought to this should standstill. Yeah and I, respect that point of view I i. don't I don't think that it for me to comment on how their institutions contextualized them display of works whether it's passenger other artists whose images create. Response in diverse audiences whatever audience is nothing judgment. What I will say here, we were proud to do the book. It's a really great book. It's got a lot of points of view that many of these issues I just think there's a different by the way people might disagree with me there's a difference between reading a book. Gauging. With. Ideas. And in a physical space. With an institution that has one hundred, fifty year history that's presenting something like these images. Without. Appropriate context that's all and I. Think we can get there and we will get there and we're going to be very, very proud. Do the expedition You Matthew Teitelbaum One more thing just from me on this gusting thing you obviously come. At it from one direction is director of a great museum obviously charities and art critic I am a consumer only. I have to say when I read about this, my attitude was almost exactly the opposite if not now when I assume that you and your fellow museum leaders even before there was George Floyd in everybody's mind were concerned about context and all of the issues we're confronting just not as immediately for the years that you're preparing for this..

Guston Klu Klux Klan Matthew Teitelbaum George Floyd director
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:22 min | 6 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"I don't WanNa get too technical and crashes, but let me say that haven't yet heard. Museum or art leaner say that mission of their institutions going to change. What we're all talking about is within the mission in our case bring. Together to create meaningful experiences with art that in that eliminate our society. Within that mission. we will come up with different strategies and those different strategies will be dependent on our ability to find the resources, they create the structure to deliver our promise. So having out to your question. The things I think you're going to see is in an environment in which international travelers curtailed in which insurance rates are going all over the place. In which the whole ability to move things and to collaborate is taking on a different Ceiling you're GONNA see fewer large international exhibitions and greater reliance on our collection. In order to tell the stories of art now. What I think is also happening and. Slow to come a good development is that we're questioning our histories and most institutions are whether it's racial recommending whether it's gender equity whether it's issues around social justice there are issues that. That by the way are Geek in our collections that are coming to the surface. So what does that mean I think you're gonNA start seeing us with more and leaders in our community whether it's academics, artists, other cultural workers to bring their voices into the institution because need to rely on those close to us to create experiences. That I think is a good thing that I think a very good thing. We want to talk about those artists, Matthew Teitelbaum Director of the MFA in a second but since you brought up racial reckoning. I was GonNa say it's going on in the world outside the museum but of course, whether it's going on as a debatable question, there's an attempt at had going on outside the museum. You're in a unique situation where it's going on inside the museum I think most listeners remember in mid two, thousand, nineteen when the kids from I think it was called the Henry White Helen y Davis Leadership Academy. There were allegations of racism row, racial profiling a year. Later you reaching agreement with the Attorney General, there's now a director of belonging and inclusion. You have an African American President I think for the first time of the board but apparently, that's not all that will come out of this incident from. A year plus ago. What else is on the agenda as part of this arrangement with the Attorney General Matthew Well, you know the attorney, General and they. Came through historic agreement that allowed us to. Deepen our commitment to things. We already doing it didn't imply that we would put resources behind it. Happy to do so. Do, so and it has to do a whole range of things whether it staff diversity whether it's board representation whether it's protocols on the way in which we engage school groups ironic that without having..

attorney Matthew Teitelbaum Director Henry White Helen y Davis Lead Matthew Well MFA President director
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Goldstein Miles Smith are the engineers who run our remote studios and thank you for listening to another edition of Boston public radio. You can tune in tomorrow for Andrea Cabral Chuck Todd with presidential debate preview and NFL Director and CEO Matthew Teitelbaum. Now, Graham is open. Because you, I'm really glad he's joining us. So. Yeah. We have a couple of really important things tonight. One Gilani COBB IS GONNA. Join us from frontline in the New Yorker. Talk about it's terrific frontline piece I believe it's called whose vote counts and also whose vote doesn't count. It's about voter suppression focusing on history and Historian and Wisconsin in particular but its applicability across the board earlier this year just in route was. Killed by the police his sister and his father who believed justice did not prevail in terms of the ultimate determination by district attorneys and others. In this case, they will join me to make their case I'm GonNa talk a little bit about the juxtaposition of what the Pope had to say about civil unions and what we learned about today and what we learned a judge Barrett. Did as the trust, the of a school that discriminates against the GDP families. And something else is happening but I cannot tell a lie I've forgotten what it is, but it's pretty good show at the patch show tonight at seven o'clock on Greater. Boston jared it's always a pleasure to have you. Here and it was great today as well and look forward to tomorrow. Thanks so much for your time. I am Jim Brady and Jerry Bohan. Tomorrow..

Goldstein Miles Smith Boston Matthew Teitelbaum Graham Andrea Cabral Chuck Todd NFL Jerry Bohan COBB Jim Brady Wisconsin CEO Barrett Director
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:44 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Them give them a place to gather. It just feels great em if a director Matthew Teitelbaum says they're opening up museum and phases with a number exhibits on display, allowing people there moments with great works of art that's life affirming, and you know, it's exciting to be able to offer that being shut down and witnessing some of the events of 2020. I allowed the IMF to pivot and focus on the issues surrounding communities today, So when the visitor comes in, the first thing they'll see is black History Back futures, which is a really remarkable Exhibition organized primarily from our collection by a group of youth from Boston. Other highlights include Art of the Americas featuring women Take the floor really tells the story of the contribution made by many women. Over many years. Museum is requiring visitors to register online and when they arrive, they will be screened at the door. Brain tree's getting a new school. It's first building in the high school first since building the high school in the seventies Under a measure approved by 75% of the voters in a special election yesterday, the town Cam borrowed nearly 87 million for a new middle school and raise taxes to pay for it. The Patriot Ledger reports that the new South Middle school scheduled to open in 2023 the miracle Ah historic victory for the town. A special election was originally scheduled for March but was postponed because of the pandemic. Its 3 28 coming up at 3 30, the latest from Capitol Hill, is they prepare for a six week battle and also Ah big rally in Mansfield today. Take your garage to the next level with next level Concrete coatings.

South Middle school Matthew Teitelbaum IMF director Americas Boston Mansfield
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To visitors bring people back in. Serving them give him in place together. It just feels great in if a director Matthew Teitelbaum says they're opening up museum in phases with a number exhibits on display being shut down and witnessing some of the events of 2020 allowed the FAA to pivot and focus on the issues surrounding communities. Today, when a visitor comes in, the first thing they'll see is black history back futures, which is really remarkable. Exhibition organized primarily from our collection by a group of youth from Boston, Gen. Paul in missed taking her 11 year old daughter, Meena to the museum. Meena is part of the young, a Spectrum program I tear up when I talk about it. It's just It's such an important part of our family. The museum is requiring visitors to register online and when they arrive, they will be screened. At the door. The town of Fair Haven, reopening the fort Phoenix, Konica Neck and West Island beaches this morning. As long as there are no further shark sightings in the area. There was a sighting off Hacker Street Beach yesterday. Forcing police to shut down the beaches for the day. There haven't been any sighting since the Fair Haven harbor Master will patrol the area this morning just to make sure the waters are safe for swimming. And for voting. Now let's head north hunting season in full swing up, nor the annual moose huntin Mane is about to get started in some parts of the state on Monday, mostly in the far north and down east regions. The moose Hunt takes place in several short stretches, and this one ends on October 3rd. While the moose hunt is just getting started. The bear hunt is starting to wind down Saturday was the last day mane allows hunters to use traps to lure bears The hunt last until late November, But now you just have to track him down yourself. Seems a little more fair. Art Cohen W. B Z Boston's news radio. It is 908 tow Wall Street now and business with Bloomberg Covert cancelled parties, graduations and weddings. All spring rental businesses were hit hard. It was famine. Now it's Bob Costas is CEO of BC Tent and Awning, which serves the North East. He was prepared for a tough year. But then calls started coming in from Public Health Department's setting up covert testing sites. So then we had a surge of restaurants calling for out there was seeing Which we handled quite a few of them on everybody in my industry, you know, same same pattern. And then August rolled in the schools that just went crazy with the schools, private schools, public schools universities. Now, Costas says they're also searching for outdoor heaters and propane. The difficulty is the supply chain. Tents and other equipment are usually rented for shorter periods, and there's little inventory. Now. Tent manufacturers such as anchor industries in Indiana say they're struggling to hire enough workers. I'm an moss to Bloomberg Business on W. B. C. Boston's news radio Coming up at 9, 15 and update on modern is Phase three. Covert 19 vaccine trial.

moose Hunt Boston Bob Costas Bloomberg Covert Meena Fair Haven harbor Master Matthew Teitelbaum Fair Haven FAA Bloomberg Business Hacker Street Beach BC Tent and Awning Indiana director Konica fort Phoenix Cohen W. B North East
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:13 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fine Arts opened its doors this weekend to visitors bring people back then. Serving them give them a place to gather. It just feels great in if a director Matthew Teitelbaum says they're opening up museum and phases with a number exhibits on display being shut down and witnessing some of the events of 2020 allowed the FAA to pivot and focus on the issues surrounding communities. Today, when the visitor comes in, the first thing they'll see is black. History's black futures, which is a really remarkable exhibition organized primarily from our collection by a group of youth from Boston, Gen. Paul in missed taking her 11 year old daughter, Meena to the museum. Meena is part of the young, a Spectrum program I tear up when I talk about it. It's just It's such an important part of our family. The museum is requiring visitors to register online and when they arrive, they will be screened. At the door. The town of Fair Haven, reopening the Fort Phoenix Scott a kit neck and West Island beaches today, as long as there are no further shark sightings. A sighting off Hacker Street bridge yesterday, forcing police to shut down the beaches for the day. No sighting since the Fair Haven harbor Master will patrol the area this morning to make sure the waters are safe for swimming and boating. Authorities say You should probably stay out of the water until they've made those patrols. Well, the fall season is here. The leaves are starting to change the night's air cooling down and one more sign of the times. It's apple picking season and it's open at Brooks Bee Farms in Peabody. There are safety measures in place. Gotta wash your hands before you head off to fill a basket, And they've also marked a path for pickers to walk and people have to social distance going from tree to tree. But beware. Lots of folks have already visited the farm and trees maybe picked out before the season typically ends 708 to Wall Street now in business with Bloomberg, would you be more likely to take a flight if everyone else on the plane just took a rapid covert test before boarding the industry thinks he would, and that's why it's calling for testing off all international travelers before departure. Alexander Juniac, CEO of the International Air Transport Association, says carriers are witnessing on ly a meager rebound and travelers because they're afraid both of Cove it end of governments wrecking overseas itineraries with travel bans and quarantines. Industry would not recover until we find an alternative trick warranty. That alternative would be rapid and urgent tests coming to market starting next month. Costing as little as $10 and giving a 97% accurate result in 15 minutes. In addition to giving government the confidence to re open borders, it will bruise passenger confidence, knowing that everybody on the aircraft has been tested. Juniac says it would require complete cooperation between governments a tall order but one that could rescue the industry. Andrew Rhodey Bloomberg Business on W. B z Boston's news radio Coming up It's 7 15 a prayer march held yesterday in Washington who will be the first to know who will be will be you will be, you will be because you listen to W B Z Boston's news radio.

Boston Meena Alexander Juniac Fair Haven harbor Master Matthew Teitelbaum Fine Arts Bloomberg Fair Haven FAA Hacker Street bridge director apple Brooks Bee Farms Fort Phoenix Scott Andrew Rhodey West Island Gen. Paul International Air Transport As
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:15 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Em if a director Matthew Teitelbaum says they're opening up museum in phases, with a number exhibits on display being shut down and witnessing some of the events of 2020 allowed the FAA to pivot and focus on the issues surrounding communities. Today, when the visitor comes in, the first thing they'll see is black. History's black futures, which is a really remarkable exhibition organized primary from our collection by a group of youth from Boston, Gen. Paul in missed taking her 11 year old daughter, Meena to the museum. Meena is part of the young, a Spectrum program I tear up when I talk about it. It's just It's such an important part of our family. The museum is requiring visitors to register online first, and then when they arrive, they will be screened at the door. The town of Fair Haven is re opening the Fort Phoenix scan ticket, neck and West Island beaches this morning. That is as long as there are no further shark sightings in the area. A shark sighting off Hackers Street Beach yesterday afternoon force police Shut down the beaches for the day. There haven't been any more sighting since their hair. The Fair Haven harbor Master will patrol the area this morning to make sure that the water's air, safer swimming and boating. They say you should probably stay out of the water, though, until they have been able to make their patrols its fall. The leaves are starting to change the nights there cooling down and one more sign of the Times. Apple picking season is here and it's open at Bert's B farms in Peabody this year. There's some safety measures, though that are in place. Guests will have to wash their hands and a hand washing station before they head off to fill up their baskets, and they've marked a path for pickers to walk. Also, people will have to social distance going from tree to tree, but that's pretty easy to do in an orchard, they say. They also to say that a lot of people have already visited the farm and that they may be all picked out before their season. Typically ends is 508 time now for Bloomberg business returned to office. Yes, push is underway as businesses fear productivity and company culture are suffering. The death of work from home has been written. Tony Malcolm is the head of Empire State Realty Trust, which saw office space in Manhattan empty out in the pandemic. Bernard Gershon, president of Gershon Media, believes Malcolm's pronouncement is wishful thinking to say that worked from home is dead. It's just idiotic. Some firms have suffered infection setbacks as they bring workers back. But the moment the data says only 10% office workers air back. Gershon is the type of business leader that Malbin believes has to set an example. On March 5th. I left New York City and yes, I've been the Hamptons. I think it's time for people to get out of the Hamptons and get out of Aspen and get out the mountains and show up to work. The leaders who are very comfortable in their their their country, homes need to lead Return to office Push is gaining steam. But business is air, struggling with a virus that won't always cooperate. I'm Mona Rivera Bloomberg Business on W. B Z, Boston's NewsRadio and Coming up on the campaign trail, the latest rallies and virtual conferences. The candidates held this weekend where they are and who they're targeting. That's coming up next, along with sports, traffic and weather is 509. Who will be.

Bernard Gershon Meena Boston Tony Malcolm Fair Haven harbor Master Matthew Teitelbaum Bloomberg Fair Haven FAA Bloomberg Business Gershon Media Hackers Street Beach director Mona Rivera Fort Phoenix Gen. Paul New York City West Island Apple
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

02:29 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Centuries of art has been sitting in the dark for six months waiting to show itself again on. September twenty six that will that's when the Museum of Fine Arts says it will open to the public again with a host of new safety protocols, masks required strict social distancing, and a rethinking of which art is on display will museum meet the moment and will it be enough to recover financially after laying off one hundred people over the summer joining us now is the director of the MFA. Matthew Teitelbaum Matthew Welcome back to radio. Boston. Nice to be with you. It's great to have you and I know you have been working towards reopening for a while. Now, some other museums opened his earliest July why the longer wait for the FAA and what makes you feel ready now? Well, we took the time we needed to ensure that an old creaky building could be as welcoming and a safe as possible we were on lockdown During the period we've been closed, which means really nobody in the building we had to do it real cleaning etc after but but the real reason the deep reason is. To Open with two special exhibitions we had planned in before we closed, they were ready to go and we wanted teach show them and share them with our public. The challenge was many aspects already been designed for an old audience expectations. We had to redesign the exhibitions we had to create safe protocols. We had to take down laws. We had to replace some signs on the wall with bigger sign injury had to go to audio use handphones. All of those things had cascading effects and floats down and just interrupt if you don't mind for a minute and just asked to give our listeners the the full picture, what are these two exhibits to win? Yeah. So. So so when we're GONNA Open in three phases when you first come, you'll come to the American wing. You'll see the great treasures of the American collection. You'll see women take the floor, which is an extraordinary collection of work by women from our from our collection has been on view and has been tweaked and changed site to add new artists we'll be showing..

Matthew Teitelbaum Matthew Museum of Fine Arts FAA Boston director
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

01:59 min | 7 months ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Centuries of art has been sitting in the dark for six months waiting to show itself again on September. Twenty six that will that's when the Museum of Fine Arts says it will open to the public again with a host of new safety protocols, masks required strict social distancing, and a rethinking of which art is on display will museum meet the moment and will it be enough to recover financially after laying off one hundred people over the summer joining us now is the director of the MFA Matthew Teitelbaum, Matthew Welcome back to radio. Boston. Nice to be with you. It's great to have you and I know you have been working towards reopening for a while. Now, some other museums opened his earliest. July. Why the longer wait for the FAA and what makes you feel ready now? Well you know we took the time we needed to ensure that an old creaky building could be as welcoming and a safe as possible we were on lockdown During the period we've been closed, which means really nobody in the building we had to do it real cleaning etc after but but the real reason the deep reason is wanted to open with two special exhibitions we. Had planned them. Before we closed they were ready to go and we wanted to show them and share them with our public. The challenge was many aspects already been designed for an old audience expectation had to redesign the exhibitions. We had to create safe protocols. We had to take down laws. We had to replace some signs on the wall with bigger sign injury had to go to. Use handphones. All of those things had cascading effects and Florida's down and just interrupt if you don't mind for a minute and just asked to give our listeners the the full picture what are these two exhibits to win? Yeah. So. So so when we're GONNA Open in three phases when you first come, you'll come to the American wing. You'll see the great treasures of the American collection. You'll see women take the floor, which is an extraordinary.

Matthew Teitelbaum Museum of Fine Arts Boston FAA director Florida
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The nose to the left full hundred and thirty two. Mayoralty agreement back twice. More only to see it fail in what began to feel like the political quivalent of the Bill Murray comedy, groundhog day, Britain's began to refer to the country's political situation as an ominous shambles during yesterday's European parliamentary elections voters, expressed a mix of sympathy and exasperation with the prime minister Warrick bird, former financier put it like this. I feel sorry for him one way. But they thought that being doing account carry on doing this anymore. You know, I'm just mad against the wool may concluded a resignation speech this morning by showing vulnerable side she'd all, but hidden from British voters shortly needs the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold. The second female prime minister, but sesame not the lost. I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country, I love tears in her eyes. The prime minister then turned and retreated behind the door of number ten Downing Street. Frank Langfitt, NPR news. London. To Boston now where the museum of fine arts is under scrutiny students on a field trip to the museum said they were racially profiled and harassed there. And as WVU ours. Christel garra reports the incident has further conversation about how welcoming cultural institutions are for people of color. Thirteen year old David Thomson, worked really hard to make the honor roll this year as a reward for his good grades. He and a group of other middle schoolers from the Helen, white Davis, leadership academy would be going to the museum of fine arts on a field trip. This was David's second time at the museum and at first, he didn't really want to go, but his mom Kimberly encouraged him to attend. I didn't want him to fail like the new. They was white people go, like I want him to stand that I want him to go on a trip. I actually occurs him going ago at first I well that's putting plenty to learn at the museum, what happened, according to the students and their teacher. Is that the group of all kids of color, reprofile, and harassed? It started. David says when a tour guide told them that no watermelon or grape juice would be allowed. No watermelons or juice. Think much of it when it happened. But then as when on started to sing why she think that was David teacher. Marvin Lami was chaperoning the kids at the museum. She says guards followed them from gallery to gallery. Wellbeing lax with a group of white students there, I should note that it wasn't just one specific security, guard anytime we switch exhibits it was almost like immediate like they'd leave their posts. And then start following us around the group of kids say, another museum visitor said and I quote, there's expletive black kids, the trip was so upsetting the teachers cut short David's mother Kimberly, one of the teachers came back out crying if I'm a students over the upset he does say that. They felt uncomfortable. And he said to me, that's why he doesn't like onto white people say, says because he doesn't feel comfortable going after reviewing video footage. The museum band to members museum director, Matthew Teitelbaum says they investigated not to prove, whether it happened rather to implement consequences. Profiled when someone says that they must be right which is to say they must have had an experience that made them feel as though they didn't belong officials met with the students this week to apologize formally.

David Thomson museum of fine arts prime minister Warrick bird Kimberly Bill Murray Christel garra Matthew Teitelbaum NPR WVU Britain Boston Frank Langfitt Marvin Lami white Davis London sesame director Thirteen year
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Backdrop negotiations last year, the European Union pressed may to accept the UK remaining in temporary. Customs arrangement with the U to void a hard border on the island of Ireland, many in parliament saw it as a threat to British sovereignty in the house of Commons. Dealt may historic defeat. The is to the right two hundred and to the nose to the left four hundred and thirty two. Nate the agreement back twice. More only to see it fail. In what began to feel like the political equivalent of the Bill Murray comedy, groundhog day, Britain's began to refer to the country's political situation as an ominous shambles during yesterday's European parliamentary elections voters, expressed a mix of sympathy and exasperation with the prime minister Warrick bird, a former financier put it like this. I feel sorry for in one way. But they thought that being doing account carry on doing this anymore. Against the break wolf may concluded a resignation speech this morning by showing a vulnerable side. She'd all, but hidden from British voters, I will show need the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold. The second female prime minister, but certainly not the lost. I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country, I love tears in her eyes. The prime minister then turned and retreated behind the door of number ten Downing Street. Frank Langfitt, NPR news. London. To Boston now where the museum of fine arts is under scrutiny students on a field trip to the museum said they were racially profiled and harassed there. And as WBU ours. Christel garra reports the incident has further conversation about how welcoming cultural institutions are for people of color. Thirteen year old David Thomson, worked really hard to make the honor roll this year as a reward for his good grades. He and a group of other middle schoolers from the Helen, white Davis, leadership academy would be going to the museum of fine arts on a field trip. This was David's second time at the museum and at first, he didn't really want to go, but his mom Kimberly encouraged him to attend. I didn't want him to feel like a place where white people go, like I want him to understand that. I want to go on a trip. I actually encouraged him going at sei. Well, there's plenty of the learn at the museum, what happened, according to the students and their teacher. Is that the group of all kids of color, reprofile, and harass it started? David says when a tour guide told them that no watermelon or grape juice would be allowed or no watermelons or. Think much of it when it happened. But then as went on I started to think why she think that it was David teacher. Marlin Lami was chaperoning the kids at the museum. She says guards followed them from gallery to gallery. Wellbeing lax with a group of white students there, I should note that it wasn't just one specific security, guard anytime we'd switch exhibits it was almost like immediate like they'd leave their posts. And then start following us around the group of kids say, another museum visitor said and I quote, there's expletive black kids, the trip was so upsetting the teachers cut short David's mother Kimberly one of the teachers came back. I'll cry students over the upset he does say that they felt uncomfortable. And he said to me, that's why he doesn't like to white people places because he doesn't feel comfortable going after reviewing video footage. The museum band to members museum director, Matthew Teitelbaum says they investigated not to prove, whether it happened rather. To implement consequences. When someone says that they must be right which is to say they must have had an experience that made them feel as though they didn't belong officials met with the students this week to apologize, formerly.

David Thomson prime minister museum of fine arts European Union Kimberly Ireland UK Christel garra Marlin Lami Matthew Teitelbaum NPR Boston Bill Murray Frank Langfitt white Davis Warrick bird London director Britain
"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"matthew teitelbaum" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"To the left full hundred and fifty two. April the agreement back twice. More only to see it fail. In what began to feel like the political equivalent of the Bill Murray comedy, groundhog day, Britain's began to refer to the country's political situation as an ominous shambles during yesterday's European parliamentary elections voters, expressed a mix of sympathy and exasperation with the prime minister Warrick bird, a former financier put it like this. I feel sorry for him one way. But a thought being doing out of account carry on doing this anymore. You know, I'm just fake to against the break wool, make included a resignation speech this morning by showing a vulnerable side. She'd all, but hidden from British voters. I will shortly leave the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold. The second female prime minister, but certainly not lost. I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country. I love tears in her eyes. The prime minister then turned and retreated behind the door of number ten Downing Street. Frank Langfitt, NPR news. London. To Boston now where the museum of fine arts is under scrutiny students on a field trip to the museum said they were racially profiled and harassed there. And as WBU ours. Christel garra reports the incident has spurred a conversation about how welcoming cultural institutions are for people of color. Thirteen year old David Thomson, worked really hard to make the honor roll this year as a reward for his good grades. He and a group of other middle schoolers from the Helen, white Davis, leadership academy would be going to the museum of fine arts on a field trip. This was David's second time at the museum and at first, he didn't really want to go, but his mom Kimberly encouraged him to attend. The a place where white people go, like I want him to understand that. I want to go on the trip I actually encouraged him going to go at I say, well, there's plenty to learn at the museum, what happened, according to the students and their teacher is that the group of all kids of color for profiled and harassed. It started. David says when a tour guide told them that no watermelon or grape juice would be allowed. No watermelons or juice. I think much of it when it happened. But then as when on I started to think why she was David teacher. Marlin Lami was chaperoning the kids at the museum. She says guards followed them from gallery to gallery. Wellbeing lax with a group of white students there, I should note that it wasn't just one specific security guard anytime we'd switch exhibits. It was almost like immediate like they'd leave their posts. And then start following us alert around the group of kids say, another museum visitor said and I quote there's expletive black kids, the trip was so upsetting the teachers cut short David's mother Kimberly one of the teachers came back. I'll cry. The students over the upset. He does say that. They felt uncomfortable. And he said to me, that's why he doesn't like going to white people play says, because he doesn't feel comfortable going after reviewing video footage. The museum band to members museum director, Matthew Teitelbaum says they investigated not to prove, whether it happened rather to implement consequences. When someone says that they must be right which is to say they must have had an experience that made them feel as though they didn't belong officials met with the students this week to apologize formally.

David Thomson prime minister museum of fine arts Warrick bird Kimberly Bill Murray Christel garra Marlin Lami Matthew Teitelbaum NPR Britain Boston Frank Langfitt white Davis London director Thirteen year