17 Burst results for "Matthew Shepard Foundation"

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

12:13 min | 7 months ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I WANNA fast forward another ten years. Tenure anniversary of that law being passed there was occasion for there to be a commemoration of it in a place that I spent a lot of time the Department of Justice in the Great Hall. Describe what happened? Inches McLean getaway. Pre asked Now I'm happy to talk about. It was a interesting moment. Say The least. So the Denison. Judy Shepard were not there. They had a prior engagement. They could not a town they would have attended they would have attended but we were asked by the Matthew. Shepard Foundation was asked by the Department of Justice to come and give just a few remarks commemorating the ten year anniversary of law. Remarks were read by James Birds Family and I was there as representative from the Shepherd Foundation to read a letter from Dennis and Judy Shepard which I did. The shepherds had been asked to send some remarks several months before that date and Dennis said you know we can't go. Could you go for us and I said I would be honored to read your letter and the first ladder let then sent me Suffice it to say my response back to Dennis was you can't say that you I can't please. Don't Oh God because we can't say that with the shepherds wanted to communicate more than anything else were to things. In that. In their remarks one was to express their gratitude to the line attorneys the career attorneys at the Department of Justice for enforcing what they see as their sons law. Their son's legacy and many of these attorneys are their friends and they're my friends and they just want to say thank you for their dedication and for their commitment to enforcing the rule of law by enforcing the statute that was the the first thing. They wanted to communicate. The other thing was to express their extreme displeasure at the attorney general for not protecting the rights of all Americans in this country and especially the rights of transgender individuals. They didn't see that it was fair to argue against protecting the rights of trans individuals in certain federal cases before the Supreme Court of they are doing as they are doing and also to commemorate the ten year anniversary of the shepherd. Bird hate crime law. They didn't see that. Those two stances by the Department of Justice were in alignment with each other. Would Dennis kept telling me as you can't have it both ways. You can't tell the Supreme Court the Trans individuals have no rights and yet be proud of ten years of Shepherd Bird. You can't do it the same way. The shepherds remarks went through many many many rights. And a lot of a very. How shall we say? animated Conversations between Dennis and I but at the end of it I kept telling him I will read what you write. I will read what you write. This is about you. This is not about me and so I read their remarks which was As you know your prior position being in the Great Hall the Department of Justice is awe inspiring. It's a it's very reverential to me. It's just an amazing location to be an and the last thing I wanted to do in any way was to disrespect the Great Hall and a disrespect the Department of Justice as a whole as an entity so some of those remarks were a little a little difficult to read an so in the final draft. You did say the following on behalf of mets parents. We Find it interesting hypocritical that he wouldn't invite us to this event commemorating a hate crime law named our son and Mr Bird. Well at the same time asking the Supreme Court to allow the legalized firing of transgender employees. Mr Bar you cannot have it both ways. What was the reaction when you said that and at the end of your talk well the the audience in the Great Hall the I I would say one quarter to one. Third of the audience were members of the Department of Justice and the FBI and their invited guests. The rest of the Great Hall were private citizens who came to watch and there was intermittent applause. I think when that line was my read that one piece and at the end of the three quarters of the room stood up and cheered and clapped and screamed and hollered and I quite certain I cried all the way back to my seat. That was not the reaction. I thought I was going to get. I thought it would be. You know that I would have heard a pin drop and gone back to my seat in my head and it would have been over but I think the speech it spoke to the people in the back of the room. Who Were there to commemorate the Law? It's spoke to them. Spoke to what they saw as justice Whether it was justice for Matt Shepard or James Byrd or any victims of hate crime and what that law symbolizes to so many people and it also just think spoke to what they saw as the Department of Justice may be going down a bad road so we passed. That law took a longtime throw. The Laws of people think about passing their other tools. We think about giving to dedicated agents like you to prosecute hate crimes and to educate about hate crimes so if we do more of that will solve the problem right gets to the ultimate problem right. People put on. Law Enforcement Sometimes intractable problems of society whether it's corruption or in this case something that's very difficult we've been since human beings have been gathering even before the social contract probably how you stop people from hating other people based on who they are. I can't think of anybody better to ask than you. Although you've applied those skills in a particular way based on the job you had and holding people accountable for acting out in a particular way. But that's not gonNA solve the problem you know more prosecutors. Fbi agents can help amount even though if hate crimes are particularly deterred because you're talking about a mindset on the part of some folks. I don't know if they're thinking you know before I do something like this. It's GONNA add some time to my sense if you're acting out of some bigotry and rage and yet we do it because we're making a statement and we're holding people accountable and we're we're causing people not to be invisible as they have been for a long time and recognizing the special terrorism that these cases and these acts symbolize but how are we going to make the country better beyond simply prosecuting. These things the two answers that I've come up with our I don't know and I'm not sure but I think it's big picture little picture so the big picture is who are our leaders whether it's our president. Our Attorney General. Our governor our mayor who were the leaders that we are putting in office and those people profess attitudes of acceptance and equity or not so. I think it's it's the big picture issue and it's a little picture so what I often tell law enforcement officials that I train on hate crimes. Prosecutors is I know you all go to cocktail parties. I know y'all go to dinner with your friends. You all go to bars. You'll hang out with your friends. This might come as a shock to you but lawyers have a tendency to talk about their cases in about their careers and police officer. Do the same thing right. Well it's the opportunity to share stories. That are impactful and meaningful to you. So it's taking the time to share a story not just about this funny bank robbery case that I have. It's a chance to share a story about yourself. And how something about you made your journey and your upbringing interesting and valuable. So you talk about your background. is an Indian American. I talk about my background. My grandparents are from Mexico. You know I talk about who I am. And what makes me and other to you in every chance that I get. It's really difficult to hate someone who story that you know because you heard them so it would be really hard. Well I hope this has never happened to you but it would be very hard for you to have a conversation with somebody about your background. Preet and have them still hate you if they talk to you in person and get to know you if they're open to listening to your story and I think that's that's that granular drilling down into these person person conversations and just being human with each other that you can learn about what makes us all unique and different and beautiful at the same time and I. It sounds like I'm back to being that thirteen year old. I'd idealistic kid. We could we could use in Ohio but I think that's what it is. It's just being it's being human with each other and you didn't have to tell your story. You could have just started your story when you were the. Us Attorney in the Southern District of New York. And that could just be your story. But you don't you talk about your pass in about your childhood and about your family and it makes you human an interesting invaluable in different and it breaks down all those barriers to being different and makes us more of one does very well put at the risk of ending. Not as optimistically as I might. I reserve the right to cut this. Oh have to end optimistically but do you think we're doing better. I mean all signs point to anti-semitism being on the rise Shir anti immigrant feeling being on the rise anti-muslim feeling being on the rise. All these incidents of anti-semitism one of the things that prompted my thinking about having guests like you on the show more in these months has been these attacks on members of the Jewish community. I saw a statistic somewhere that said half of the hate crimes in the New York area last year. We're members of the Jewish community. And that's a big picture problem. Small picture problem or both. But you'd like to think that as years go by as Matthew Shepard caused people to think about what are we doing in our society and a log. It's pass another ten years go by that. The trend line should be positive. What is the trend line? I think the trend line is clearly indicating that hate crimes are going to increase. We've seen that in the last couple of years. These statistics are their harrowing attacks against the Latino Community against the Sikh community against the LGBTQ You just even the ones that are reported. Are you see that the ARC is rising year after year? I think the other way to address the instance of hate crime is obviously. If there's you know it's the same thing that we knew living in New York on nine eleven. If you see something say something right so teachers see a student who is drawing swastikas and his notebook. I think she'd probably have a conversation with a teacher so trying to catch these kids early on in their lives who are demonstrating and exhibiting hateful behavior against certain people. I think that has to be addressed but I think that law enforcement officials and this does not apply to New York City Police Department. Who Do they do a great job with those? But there's so many other police departments that don't train their officers on how to identify investigate and prosecute. Hey Crime I pre- doing this for too long and I still get the same answer when I asked the same question of law enforcement which is when there is a swastika on a synagogue. And you have that call for service officer. What do you see when you arrive? More often than officer says graffiti. And I'll say okay right and then what else do you see? And he'll say vandalism. Okay let's there's one more thing one more won't say it and sometimes the ostrich says doesn't see that that's an expression of hate so I think it's also a training issue as well as just trying to catch these kids before they become a problem for your colleagues at the Attorney's.

Department of Justice Great Hall Supreme Court Dennis Judy Shepard Us Attorney New York officer Matt Shepard attorney Shepard Foundation FBI New York City Police Departmen McLean Denison mets James Birds Family Shepherd Foundation Shepherd Bird
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Clusterf*cked

Clusterf*cked

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Clusterf*cked

"Why don't we all move there and we can take place over which I think was a little tongue in cheek but eventually they settled on New Hampshire there's there's definitely some residents to uh-huh those messages of keeping the government out of your your private life well. I'm a little tongue in cheek to you know on this podcast when I say the new liberal movement must be literal I know that you know what you spoke of earlier is certainly rings true that obviously people move where they move if they move for communities and in some of these smaller places there may not be as much but you know I I think of clustering also as figuratively to where I find you know a lot of liberals are sort of just talking to people who already agree with them and they're certainly after trump was elected there. Was this understandable reaction. I'm I don't even WanNa talk to a trump voter. You know I'm I'm I'm. I'm angry and I know plenty of people who defended anyone in their social. Media feeds who supported trumper trumper Republicans or anything and it's under is an understandable reaction but I you know the reality is that we you know we do ultimately want to win more elections and persuade people and see see more people come on board on our side of the aisle so I feel like figuratively we shouldn't be clustering either and you know it's great to hear of these people like you said that are staying in Wyoming and and just living by example and and making the case you know where there can be common ground found. It sounds like that's what's going on relief. I think so I mean what I think has been helpful in mainstreaming. LGBTQ people in Wyoming is disconnecting it from a partisan hardest orientation for people increasingly to understand that there are gay conservatives and there are lesbian being Republicans and that it's not required to be you know a dieted wool liberal to be a member of our community I think as the understanding of that has spread that it's been easier for people to be inclusive of of of our community as a result of not feeling so politically threatened by our beliefs I think it's equally true that conservative people cluster they just do it in different places in different ways they cluster around religious institutions or recreational activities or and in many cases living in exile in a rural environments and there's plenty of them that don't WanNa give the time of day to a liberal as there are liberals who don't WanNa talk to the people with the red baseball cap so I totally I agree the obviously but I you know my thing is I just WanNa see you know. Democrats and liberals win more elections so to me. It's all about let's instead of breath finding common ground which is a phrase. We hear a lot and I think I even used it a few minutes ago to me. It's more about I would rather see you know. Liberals persuade and the way you do that is not yelling. People are calling them bigots or whatever even if you may feel they are the way you do that is to make your case and not be afraid to do so. I you know it's encouraging aging to me when I see liberals doing that anyway. We are running out of time here but before I let you go I mentioned off the top. It's coming up on the anniversary. Three of Matthew Shepard's death do special events at the foundation around that anniversary. I would describe it as an exhausting whirlwind of a little bit of everything. Take speaking engagements all over the country in the next three months we have law enforcement and prosecutor trainings community hate crime panel discussions fundraising events special performances of the Laramie project in various parts parts of the country has mouth said give me three men and I'll take a village you know I I will talk to anyone who genuinely wants a better understanding outstanding of what happened to Matt and what it means and what they can do and as packed as my calendar as Judi dench shepherds is his vastly more so anyone listening to this anywhere on the continent if you're in an airport look around for a familiar face Judy Shepard might be standing in line behind you to board a flight to go talk to high school students and the middle school students were getting invites for more often which is very affirming and positive yeah it will be will be very busy so amazing thing that out of you know such a tragedy that so much energy and and positive you know force can come can come out of it especially for her for having lost a child can't imagine a bigger tragedy in the way the in the way that had happened but it sounds like you guys doing great any numbers on how often the Laramie project has been performed in total my God a few thousand performances minimum There's an agency that sells the rights to probably should call them and ask for an updated number but we we knew it surpassed two thousand years ago first or second most performed play in American high schools most years and and rightly so because it's it's tremendous educational opportunity for students and faculty and the community in parents to give some thought to what are the actual results of hatred and how doc do communities deal with it. If this happened in your community how would you how would you respond. Would you rise to the example of Laremy and heartfelt conversation about diversity in your community because this could happen anywhere today and any community could be faced with those but those choices and being performed in red states as much as blue which is encouraging absolutely it's been performed and some of the smallest rural slows that she didn't even know where out there we've talked to teachers in Iowa Missouri Nebraska and other places in the heartland to have lady conservative school boards are superintendents about what is the case to be made for putting this on and knows educators educators usually have a positive result to talk to if need be they talk to superintendents about you know here's what this play really is all about and what comes out of it and we try to arm them list of information but nine times out of ten at least that played does get performed it's well attended in it does have an impact. That's fantastic. Thanks really appreciate you coming on the PODCAST. It's my pleasure Jason Marsden executive the Director of the Matthew Shepard Foundation you can find them at Matthew Shepard Dot Org that wraps up another fine edition of Cluster Lester fucked to listen to more episodes of this podcast visit c f the PODCAST DOT com. That's C. F. The PODCAST DOT com now we are available on I tunes and Stitcher and spotify and all the other places that you love to get your podcasts but we do enjoy when you visit the website as I mentioned all the episodes are there and there's a mailing list mailing list is what we really love. We can keep in touch with you that way. Update you on episodes when they're released and anything else we might might be doing at CF headquarters. You just never know what's going on so join the mailing list it's free you'll see the I think the bottom of the homepage there you can just fill it in takes a thirty seconds and there's a support the podcast button as well. 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Matthew Shepard Wyoming New Hampshire twitter trump facebook Matthew Shepard Foundation Judy Shepard baseball Judi dench CF Jason Marsden spotify prosecutor Matt Iowa Lester
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Clusterf*cked

Clusterf*cked

13:49 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Clusterf*cked

"King in both the intro episode of this podcast and episode two. We focused on the state of Wyoming. It's kind of my template for a small population red state that liberals could maybe flip. We're GONNA focus on Wyoming again today. A little bit with with our guest it was twenty one years ago this October that University of Wyoming Student Matthew Shepard was beaten tortured and left tied to a fence he died a few days later and his murder brought national attention attention to hate crime legislation. LGBT rights and protections and along with the subsequent murder trial inspired a number of works including documentaries and the stage play the LARAMIE project. Matthew's mother Judy went on to start the Matthew Shepard Foundation in Casper Wyoming so today we are joined by the Executive Director of that Organization the Matthew Shepard Effort Foundation Jason Marsden Jason Welcome to cluster fucked. Thank you glad to be with you. How did you let's start here? How did you get involved with the foundation and maybe tell us a little bit about the the mission of the foundation sure I'll start with the second I the foundation's mission is to replace hate with understanding compassion and acceptance which is a very ambitious goal for an Organization of Eight Taipei personalities were cannot have a little office in Denver Colorado but it's our belief that is accomplishable if individual people in large numbers decide that they want to live in a world free three of hey it would it could happen free of charge it would make the world a much better place and it would fulfill the fondest hope of Julian William Dennis Shepherd which is being in a position to close the organization down because it's no longer needed because the work is done as it stands it is very much needed and and always has been over the twenty years since its formation it grew out of spontaneous generosity from people when Matt was in the hospital and after after he died the shepherds received about twenty five thousand pieces of mail within rich many people enclosed cash or checks and and the money wasn't asked for and they weren't sure what they were supposed to do with it but there was enough that they felt that they could at least a cornerstone for an organization that would give them some resources to continue being visible advocates for civil rights for LGBTQ people also for all marginalized is populations and I was a friend of maths and gum a reporter at the statewide newspaper when all this happened so I was very close to the story and I decided to come out in a column on the opinion page and Mrs Shepherd came down to the newsroom to thank me for for writing what I did about Matt and for standing up and being visible for the community which under the circumstances they were dealing with. I couldn't believe the kindness of of of her to come in and speak to a little twenty six year old reporter and so I stayed in touch and I volunteered I was one of the people who who went to the basement of the law firm downtown where they set up tables and put up rubbermaid containers and we opened in sorted those twenty five thousand pieces of mail which were letters from LGBTQ people were letters from parents of members of the community. Some who had lost loved ones to hate crimes already in their lives lives and drawings by children letters from fourth grade classrooms letter from Credit Scott King every kind of earth person was represented in that avalanches of goodwill certainly the opposite of the hate that fueled the crime in the first place yeah yeah it's a spontaneous outpouring of love and compassion and it was like coins in the wishing well as I thought at the time and people were sort of wishing that maybe maybe they're twenty dollar bill might make a difference and create disorganisation so at the time as you said you were a reporter and how soon after his murder did you write that column you mentioned where you came out well. He was in intensive care for four or five days before he died in the early morning hours of October twelfth which was on a Monday morning so I came into the newsroom that morning and decided I was going to write that column ran in the paper the next today a very bold move needless to say and how was it How was it received very warm? Lead people people send flowers. I got letters and cards. It's phone calls. The very conservative speaker of the Wyoming House of Representatives called me and he and I never agreed much on the time of a day I think but he was very gracious. Thanked me for being courageous and it you know I got a couple of pieces of hate mail. I keeping Ethan here at the foundation. Still I WANNA have a chuckle at what people were like in Wyoming twenty years ago but the vast majority of them were just just were just lovely about it on that note I would imagine that you know in Wyoming his murder activated the LGBT movement. I mean wh what was the atmosphere. At that time. I mean obviously you wrote the calm to come out so you out. was there much going on in that community the at the time yeah well I was in and out and coming out is the thing that you do every day. Every time you meet a new person but I was out to close friends out to my mom out to my sister but not out to you know the people who worked in advertising or circulation at the paper or the people in the Sports Department or some of the reporters I didn't work closely with and you know not out to my grandparents remind remind aunts and uncles and so it was kind of I was halfway out and the community I think was similarly disposed disposed people there certainly was a gay community. We knew each other We knew who each other were. There's a social life. Although there isn't really Lia wasn't at that time really a highly organized community like in terms of a nonprofit or resource center or even a gay bar there still isn't one but informally me through the network see having small towns we we were I think visible and people in the broader community certainly stood with us were candlelight vigils all over the state with hundreds of people at them and you know the vast majority of those people were heterosexual presumably but it felt like the community was standing in solidarity with us at that time did a lot of other people take a similar action to you then at that time I mean obviously not everyone has a newspaper column to do so but we're other people also sort of inspired out of the tragedy to enough of this. Let's go there. Were there were a few people I talked to that. Time similarly came out to more distant family or in their workplace. you know it wasn't a groundswell swell or anything. There's hardly enough people in Wyoming to get the wave going at a football game but it. It definitely moved a lot of people in our work over the years. There's I've encountered countless. LGBT people my age who also came out around that time because of there that's how they felt about mass murderer in the feeling that they should be responsible for some change. Would you say that it activated a LGBT Community Unity in in Wyoming or was it still at the time sort of scattered as you described it earlier I guess I would describe it as being at the beginning point of of where it got to now there was already a statewide organization but it had very kind of limited reach mostly in the Cheyenne and Laramie area and they started around that time to grow their board of directors and grow their annual pride event and expand what they were offering in terms of HIV prevention events and and so on but it was a a gradual transformation their newsletter to to this day has a little corner in it with a called Matt's corner every issue that comes out with the image of a lit candle in it in the words never again so now people are still still very cognizant of that tragedy and how it activated Wyoming's LGBT community to a greater degree to had been did you when you mentioned earlier that you when you personally came out and you know even close relatives did not know was there any backlash personally not at that time I have some relatives who are not LGBTQ accepting and that's been it's been a personal challenge but that came about years later but at this point nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight everyone really was just concerned about my well-being in the communities wellbeing and really just feeling the tragedy for what it was you mentioned early. Are you actually knew Matt Legg how well reasonably well you know we were. We weren't best friends or anything but he was one of the few people in the Gay Community Ah that time whom I knew to be engaged in civic life what's going on in the news and opinionated about politics politics and was a strong interest in foreign affairs and particularly in human rights women's rights and was very focused on having a future in either the diplomatic service working for an international relief nonprofit something like got so I you know when I would run into him at the silly little parties that made up gay social life in Wyoming in late nineteen nineties we would talk about President Clinton's impeachment or things that were going on in in the world. and I don't think he really had anyone else to talk to about that and I I didn't really so that we kind of fulfiled a particular role for one another so he was almost ahead of his time in a way like being I mean I don't mean that following Clinton's impeachment of your time and I just mean very politically active and thinking about the greater world beyond Wyoming yeah he clearly had a future outside the four corners of the state we felt I felt my now. Husband was a closer to Matt. They were glass meets in school. They acted in a performance of camelot together together. in like tenth grade I think so and he and I were just beginning to date at that time so he experienced this lost through is a similar lens one of the you know maybe the fourth or fifth quote unquote date we went on was to Matt's funeral on Casper and he if I am not mistaken went on to become mayor of Casper Wyoming correct yes he did. He was the first openly gay elected official in state history. Not The first is gay one but the first one who was who was out in what year was that that he went election he was elected to the city council in two thousand two and he served as mayor in two thousand five was he outed the time of Matthew's murder or or same scenario as you same yeah the same scenario I he was out to family he and his friends but he wasn't a public figure in any way so there is really no there's really no need for him to to be publicly out in any way assisted assistive just a college student but within four years he's elected as mayor of Casper and is at that time open and out correct yeah they did a piece of five years later in Time magazine in two thousand and three and a reporter kept asking around town how has life changed for. LGBT people and several people were like well. There's gay city councilman here now. so the reporter the late John Cloud who is really a great journalists on much missed tracked down and interviewed him and he actually early called Judy Shepard and asked her for some advice about how to navigate the coming out publicly because during the campaign we didn't you know didn't say gay on his yard signs or anything right campaigned largely on infrastructure issues in West Gaspar which is the the word that he represented and no one asked us about it and you know we the address for his campaign was my house and all the people we knew knew that we'd been together for four years at that point but didn't nobody thought to ask his sexual orientation so he had to that had to decide am I gonNA come out about this publicly in the news media and decided of course why would I and so he came out to the Casper Star Tribune and gave them an opportunity to break the news before he did the Time Magazine Interview Yeah that was quite a journey yeah I can imagine it.

Wyoming murder Matt Legg reporter University of Wyoming Wyoming House of Representativ Time magazine Matthew Shepard Casper Wyoming Judy Shepard Matthew Shepard Foundation Matthew LGBT Community Unity Casper Star Tribune Taipei Julian William Dennis Shepherd Denver
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"A seal. Once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, pick Rum's trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime law. But prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivation, Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why biased should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law. So using the somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious. I'll send it more serious. But the salt assault matter how you look at anybody's series front, right? Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced as far as penalties but spot seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers. Those guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor of rock being thrown through window may be just that. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman sends a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas Volare, who oversees Durham and the surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out and in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville, Virginia, Cynthia Dido. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that. But we don't know. No. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen. A seven year old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus and a separate incident white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduced change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to evolve, if you know, I don't like the idea of somebody feeling. Uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around a table and the campus cafeteria. The officers used some of the language of crime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media are quick to call something, a hate crime, without knowing the facts, still, the officers say they see the training is helpful the chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train, we don't stay on top of the current changes in laws and the.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation New Hampshire chiefs assault Cynthia Dido Durham Charlottesville Rum prosecutor university of New Hampshire Justice department Dave Kerr Thomas Volare FBI Cinco de mayo Virginia
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, pick runs trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime, blah, but prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivations Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why bias should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law. The somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious just. I'll have more serious. But the salt is salt about how you look anybody's series front. Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced as far as penalties but far seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime laws. There's one of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people. And why were those certain people more special than somebody else? That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers. Those guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor rock being thrown through window may be just that. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman since a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees durum surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out and in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville Virginia Cynthia deal. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that, but we don't know. No. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen. A seven year old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus and a separate incident white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial, and rest that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduced change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to off if. I don't like the idea of somebody feeling uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around table and the campus cafeteria the officers used some of the language of crime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media quick to call something, a hate crime, without knowing the facts, still, the officers say they see the training is helpful the chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train, we don't stay on top of the current changes in laws.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation New Hampshire chiefs Durham Charlottesville prosecutor Cynthia Justice department university of New Hampshire Dave Kerr assault FBI Cinco de mayo Virginia UNH murder
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"See, once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, pick runs trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime law. But prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivations Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why biased should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law using the somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious just. I'll consider more serious. But the salt is the salt in the matter how you look at all the good anybody's serious crime. Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced as far as penalties. But sparse seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief, Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers as guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor rock being thrown through a window may be just that. But. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman sends a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees Durham and the surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville Virginia Cynthia deal. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that, but we don't know. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen. A seven-year-old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus and a separate incident white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduce change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to if off if you know, I don't like the idea of somebody feeling. Uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around the table and the campus cafeteria, the officers used some of the language he prime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media are quick to call something, a hate crime, without knowing the facts, still, the officers say they see the training is helpful the chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train, we don't stay on top of the current changes in the laws and the attitudes and.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation Durham New Hampshire chiefs Charlottesville prosecutor Cynthia Justice department university of New Hampshire Dave Kerr assault FBI Cinco de mayo Virginia UNH murder
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I see. But once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious should start with, you know, hey Queant, trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses? The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now no state hate crime, blah, but prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivation Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law. The somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious. I'll send more serious salt is the salt limit. How you look anybody's series. Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race religion. It should be enhanced aspire as penalties. But sparse seriousness, I don't know that back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as. Durham chief Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers. Those guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor rock being thrown for window may be just that. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman since a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees durum surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of. Groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville Virginia, Cynthia Dido. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that, but we don't know and you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen a seven year old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus in a separate incident white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduced change. Just. Because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to if off if I don't like the idea of somebody feeling uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around the table and the campus cafeteria, the officers used some of the language of crime. Skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media quick to call something, a hate crime,.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation New Hampshire Durham Cynthia Dido university of New Hampshire Charlottesville prosecutor chiefs Justice department Dave Kerr assault FBI Cinco de mayo UNH murder Virginia
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's a seal. Once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, take Rum's trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime law. But prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivation, Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why biased should even be a factor if there's no hate crime law. So you're saying the somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious, just. I'll consider more serious. But the salt says the salt, no matter how you look at anybody's series, right? Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced inspire as penalties. But sparse seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief, Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers as guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor rock being thrown through a window maybe just that. But. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman sends a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees Durham and the surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There's some people who are being singled out in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do in? How do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc and Charlottesville Virginia, Cynthia Dido. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that. But we don't know. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen a seven-year-old BI racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus and a separate incident white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduce change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to if off if I don't like the idea of somebody feeling. Uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around the table and the campus cafeteria, the officers used some of the language he crime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media are quick to call something, a hate crime without knowing facts. Still the officers say they see the training is helpful the chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train if we don't stay on top of the current changes in laws and the attitudes and the climate that.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation New Hampshire chiefs Cynthia Dido Durham Charlottesville prosecutor Justice department university of New Hampshire Dave Kerr assault FBI Cinco de mayo havoc UNH Virginia
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eight thirty in the morning and about fifty officers from different police departments. Some in plain clothes, some in uniform file into an auditorium at the university of New Hampshire degreed old friends and make a beeline for the coffee and muffins. But once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, pick ones trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime law. But prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias is motivation, Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why biased should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law using the somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious just. I'll consider more serious. But the salt and is as the salt in the that how you look at anybody's series, right? Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced as far as penalties. But sparse seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who is in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief, Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers as guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor rock being thrown through window. Maybe just that. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman sends a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees Durham and the surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville, Virginia, Cynthia Dido. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that. But we don't. No. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen. A seven-year-old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus in a separate incident, white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduced change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to evolve if you know. I don't like the idea of somebody feeling uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around the table and the campus cafeteria, the officers used some of the language he prime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media are quick to call something, a hate crime, without knowing the facts, still, the officers say they see the training is helpful but chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train, we don't stay on top of the current changes in the laws and.

officer Albert Moskowitz Matthew Shepard foundation Durham New Hampshire university of New Hampshire chiefs Cynthia Dido Charlottesville prosecutor Justice department Dave Kerr assault FBI Cinco de mayo Virginia UNH
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Eight thirty in the morning and about fifty officers from different police departments. Some in plain clothes some in uniform violin to an auditorium at the university of New Hampshire. They agreed old friends and make a beeline for the coffee and muffins. But once they settle into their seats, the mood turn serious. Maybe we should start with, you know, pick runs trainer Albert Moskowitz is a former senior Justice department prosecutor, he poses. The big question many cops have about hate crime laws. Do we need them? What do you think? At first, nobody responds. Then one officer fidgeting with his pen says he supports the approach New Hampshire takes now. No state hate crime law. But prosecutors can seek tougher sentencing when bias motivations Moskowitz pushes the officer to explain why biased should even be a factor. If there's no hate crime law. So using the somehow these crimes are more serious than they would otherwise be serious, just. I'll consider more serious. But the salt is essentially salt in the Matt how you look at all against anybody's series right? Yeah. So why would it be more serious? If the assault is substantially motivated by the person's race or religion. It should be enhanced as far as penalties. But sparse seriousness, I don't know. That back and forth happens at nearly every stop of this traveling workshop. It's put on by two advocacy groups, the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. The trainers know they're waiting into a long simmering debate over hate crime. Laws. There's one set of the population that looks at hate crimes and sees laws that were passed to protect certain people, and why were those certain people more special than somebody else. That's another trainer Cynthia deal. A former FBI special agent who was in charge of the bureau civil rights unit. She's now with the Matthew Shepard foundation. She's done this training all over the country and says the mood each time is set by the local chief here in Durham, both the local and campus. Police departments welcomed it as Durham chief, Dave Kerr's made clear to his officers as guardians of community, it's important for us to understand that a simple misdemeanor of rock being thrown through a window may be just that. But then, again, it may not be just that supporters have hate crime laws say the idea is to acknowledge the sweeping impact of targeting someone, simply for who they are the torching of a mosque is felt by the larger Muslim community, for example, just like the murder of a trans woman sends a message to others who identify as LGBT strafford, county attorney, Thomas velocity who oversees Durham and the surrounding area says he sees hate crime laws as restorative. There are some people who are being singled out in some instances hurt, and we need to do something about that. And we're sort of struggling with how do we respond to that? What do we do? And how do we do it? The trainers are careful about the framing stressing how it's just good police work to stay on top of hate incidents that might point to a trend or signal the formation of groups like the ones that wreaked havoc in Charlottesville Virginia Cynthia deal. Again, none of us want you to be the next Charlottesville, or the next Charleston or the next Pittsburgh. We don't want you to be that. But we don't. No. And you need to be prepared. Police in New Hampshire have already gotten a taste of how fast racist incidents can outpace their response in the fall of twenty seventeen. A seven year old by racial boy was the victim of a racist attack on a school bus in a separate incident, white teenagers allegedly put a rope around another by racial child's neck and pushed him off a picnic table. And the UNH campus was reeling after a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, that time was sad. But there were opportunities. That's university of New Hampshire. Police chief Paul dean, he says this training is one of many ways he's making good on a promise to students to learn from twenty seventeen and introduce change. Just because something has always been the way it is doesn't necessarily mean that's the right way. And we need to if off if you know, I don't like the idea of somebody feeling. Uncomfortable in my community. It's hard to say whether the chiefs commitment has trickled down to the rank and file during the training few of the officers volunteered, their thoughts, they opened up a little more over lunch. Sitting around the table and the campus cafeteria, the officers used some of the language he crime skeptics, there's not an increase. It's just that there's more reporting now or the media are quick to call something, a hate crime without knowing facts. Still the officers say they see the training is helpful but chiefs asked that we not use their names. We don't train if we don't stay on top of the current changes in laws and the attitudes and the climate that we're going to pay a big price for them. Lose the trust of the community, and we can't do the trainers don't expect to change minds after a single workshop, but they say getting police to think about and talk about hate crimes is a start Hanau lamb impure news Durham New Hampshire..

officer university of New Hampshire Durham Matthew Shepard foundation New Hampshire Albert Moskowitz Durham New Hampshire chiefs Charlottesville prosecutor Justice department Cynthia Dave Kerr assault Matt FBI Cinco de mayo Virginia
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Dennis Prager here. Like look to do a poll of Americans who heard of Matthew Shepard. So we'll give you a liberal source. Liberal left. Matthew shepard? This Huffington Post. What what's the date? February two twenty sixteen exactly two three years ago three years ago. Matthew Shepard murdered by bisexual lover and drug dealer? Stephen Jimenez claims in new book. The it's pretty much accepted by people who have looked into it. The book is accurate. The book was Jimenez himself. Okay. The post reached out to the Matthew Shepard foundation for comment surrounding Jimenez is new claims defending shepherd is having been the victim of a brutal anti gay hate hate crime. A spokesperson for the foundation replied attempts now to rewrite the story of this hate crime appear to be based on untrustworthy sources factual errors rumors and innuendo rather than the actual evidence gathered by law enforcement and presented in a court of law. We do not respond to innuendo rumor or conspiracy theories. Instead, we recommit ourselves to honoring Matthew Shepard's memory and refused to be intimidated by those who seek to tarnish. It we owe that to the tens of thousands of donors activists volunteers in allies to the cause of equality who have made our work possible. In other words, exactly what I said, fighting homophobia is more important to the Matthew Shepard foundation than the truth. There are so many values bigger than truth. Truth is like the bottom. It just isn't it just isn't value. It wasn't a value in the Vietnam war. This is not new the purpose of a journalist for most journalists in the Vietnam war was to report how much the the president that lie another liar. President Johnson was Aligarh. They're always like anybody who opposes what the left stands for. And the guy was a democrat a liberal Democrat passed the most far reaching social legislation. Expanding government in American history, or at least since FDR. It proportionately or do it. Absolutely. Get a different result. There's an entire there's a major book on the press. And what does it and the Ted offensive because on how they lied about that they portrayed an American victory as a defeat. This not new. What's just it's it's now enshrine that our purpose is to promote our values. Not tell the truth. By the way. It doesn't matter. How many of these race hoaxes come out? How many swastikas were painted by leftists? How many and words were smeared on doors by leftists or by blacks themselves? It doesn't matter of that. Obviously, there's going to be a legitimate disgusting hate crime legitimate in the sense that it really happened not legitimate morally for those who monitor my show and seek to pervert my words. You know that a guy wrote Breitbart had a big column on my appearance on John John Janine? Was on on Saturday night on judge Janin's this show on Fox News on Fox News twice last week. And. I should philosophize. We've you once about TV versus radio. This is fascinating. Juxtaposition. And what did you just say to my ear? Okay. Very nice. When I go on television. Which is I don't know the word frequent is an odd word compared to whom. Order said go on TV about twenty times a year. About right. And if I sort of I one more, I don't I don't tend to seek it. But I know how little time television affords anybody and often I am they're more generous with me than others Justice Janine, judge was very generous with me. But I know I have very little time to develop an idea. It's funny because I read there were there were many many comments on the show on the internet. Well, why didn't Prager say this? I AM The Answer is because in six minutes, some of which the host is actually speaking you can't say everything that's why..

Matthew Shepard Matthew Shepard foundation Stephen Jimenez Dennis Prager Huffington Post Justice Janine President Johnson FDR Fox News John John Janine president Breitbart Ted Janin shepherd two three years six minutes three years
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:10 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"So let let's talk about an area Cynthia that you, and we share a lot on and cooperate on which is providing law enforcement, the understanding the tools the infrastructure to respond to heat appropriately talk a little bit about that in the importance of it Essex to Cynthia deal, the FBI in my humble opinion. Now that I've laughed. We would not sorry. I can't use that pronoun anymore. Or they would not be as successful. Were it not partnerships and liaisons and collaborations with folks like you. So it is very well known that the FBI and the Justice and many, local and state law enforcement agencies have very solidified partnerships with the AD L, for example. Michael lieberman. Are you still hear various so Michael Lieberman? Dear friend, and colleague of mine, we start working together when I was chief of the civil rights unit and the FBI headquarters, and we had so many conversations and meetings and collaborative efforts to try to figure out how we could force multiply each other to combat hate as it would appear in a variety of forms. And that's how the FBI is successful. That's how long forcement is successful. Is when private citizens give information to the FBI when they collaborate when they say, hey, I got a weird posting on my Facebook page. Will you take a look at this? Or I think there is going to be a unite the rally in my community. Let's collaborate to make sure to make sure that everybody at that space is safe. So the protesters the counter protesters the law enforcement ages. The business owners in that community that everybody is safe. And that it's done within the bounds of the law that rally so collaboration partnership transparency is key. Government like the FBI government agencies like the FBI department of Justice have to be transparent and genuine in what they give back and how they behave. So that folks like you will trust them to do the right things questions. Stacks of thank you. Are they easy, okay? Off the top. I will turn it over to you. But I think that's those partnerships have to be sustained have to be cultured and developed and capitalize on to keep everybody safe. I think again, I think that's right for a lot of agreement here. And I think that we as sort of private communities in in a way have a role as well. So the plaintiffs in the Charlottesville lawsuit arcola of students clergy community members who were impacted by the violence, you might know the Pulitzer wedding photo of this African American man pushing a woman out of the way the car he's sprawled across the front of the car. It's Marcus Marissa. They are two of the plaintiffs in the suit. We're obviously injured by a car that killed header higher and injured many more on these very brave courageous plaintiffs have put their name on the suit because in another law enforcement in and of itself wasn't going to be able to make the forward movement on this issue that we felt was necessary. Which is that there was a conspiracy to commit violence here. The students under something called the KKK act of eighteen seventy one which was passed by the Reconstructionist congress as a way to protect communities against pro civil war violence, it obviously has not had to be used very frequently in recent years. I think one of the more recent uses was during freedom lines. So needless to say. We're dealing with a somewhat unique situation. But at the same time, the fact that law enforcement on their own is certainly prosecuting. I think everyone knows that James field who drove the car was convicted of murder, but at the same time there needs to be or we thought there needed to be additional forward movement here. And in this case that would send a clear message greatest wrong legal precedent and help deter future acts like this. So having that that sheriff balance between law enforcement and people who are willing in their private capacity capacities to do something that I think is pretty brave and courageous which is put their name on a suit. Like, this is really important. Let's stay with law enforcement for a few minutes. Law enforcement is appropriately often called out when engaged in ongoing activity or failure to respond appropriately. Or even to give him at violence that. Has certainly been a theme and the ongoing issues relating to criminal Justice reform in community. Policing are very real do. We in fairness, however, give law enforcement as part of their routine trailing in an ongoing basis. The tools to both understand how heat manifest itself and the importance of their role in making people feel safe regardless of their identity. The AD L does a masterful job of training, federal state and local law enforcement officials to understand the origins of hate and to know how to combat it to know how to attack it from a legal perspective, they do an excellent job. And the Matthew Shepard foundation, and the lawyers committee for civil rights have partnered with the L in numerous cities to affect you eight these trainings what we found is. Is engaging with so many law enforcement officials is they have never received training on would you know, a hate crime. When you saw it if you respond to a call for service outside of a bar that is known to be frequented by the LGBT community. And it's an assault. Are you going to put those two things together? Are you going to ask the victim? What was said if anything during the attack are you going to know it when you see it, and sadly, there is a lack of training. It's it's very apparent lack of training for local law enforcement officials to just simply no a hate crime. When they see it. And even if they put two and two together, and they say, okay, this is a synagogue, that's a a swastika on a synagogue. I get those two things go together. I understand that. Are you going to know how did that investigate that improve that bias motivation? That's key. If you're trying to convict someone for violating a local hate crime statute, do you know how to prove that vice motivation? A very sad lack of training on that issue. And the other part of this is even if the law enforcement officials do everything right and get it and go to social media and get the the evidence of bias. Are they in alignment with their prosecutor's office? Is that local assistant district attorney going to say, I don't I don't need that. I don't need to know the bias just do simple assault. Simple vandalism. And this case is over. Or is the ADA saying this is fantastic. I wanna prove that buys motivation. I want that to be in court. I want that to be part of this case. Because what that does is it vindicates the victim. I wasn't just assaulted because of a happened to be standing where I was I was assaulted because of who I am. And that's not. Okay. So if the victim feels comfortable with the law enforcement agency to say, this is what happened to me. And that law enforcement agency says I get it. I understand what this is. And the prosecutors also in alignment, and then when this is all over you circle back to that law enforcement official who then reports that incident to the FBI's uniform crime report as a hate crime, the circle is complete. And that's the one thing that we're trying to do with the Matthew Shepard foundation, and the lawyers committee for civil rights, and the AD L is to make sure that everybody's local law enforcement agencies. Have that training that they know when they see it and they're aligned with assistant district attorneys, and they can complete that circle before I giant. Integrity. I for America. I was a senior advisor to the new York Attorney General, and I think as we've been talking about obviously in the last couple of years there's been alarming rise in hate crimes and Amy's botanic that local police department around New York did not have the resources or the tools to actually identify the hate crimes and do exactly what's described. So we put together a guidance in late twenty sixteen after that sort of first uptick in that we used to working in concert with the J CRC in New York. A number of other partners from all different backgrounds and provided a written hate crimes guidance to these local police departments and mobile prosecutors and other folks so that they could answer those questions and actually make sure people are being held accountable for hate crimes, but not every state has an attorney general that will necessarily do that. And I think again that makes it all the more important to have folks like working in your communities. To connect those dots and make sure that this is happening. So that is a sort of a takeaway as a practical matter that while we have he crime legislation that was written some time ago by a team of folks, including the aforementioned Mr. Lieberman that has now adopted in one form or another in forty five states is not equal. There are very Asians in terms of remedies in terms of resources, we know that reporting is still a vastly lower than what is capable. That's what is actually happening that sometimes information, sometimes it's vulnerable communities who do not trust law enforcement. There's work to be done there. In terms of empowering, folks and figuring out mechanisms in your local communities, the legislation can be improved and quite frankly law enforcement, oftentimes, even if they have good intention, they have resource limitations as a practical matter which impede their ability both to get training on a continuous basis. Their ranks. Continue to change, but also the resources on the on a very localised basis in terms of response investigation. This is an added complexity the the importance of this cannot be understated. It's both for the reason that of that it is anti-democratic to suggest that somebody can get away with a crime on the basis of your identity when we are a country of individual rights, but it's also because it's a crime against the community writ large that if you seek to disenfranchise one person on the basis of the identity, you're sending that message more broadly. So we Doronin with the Anti-Defamation League. The idea of responding to the heat and empowering law enforcement another mechanism for trying to control the heat is to understand who the heaters are and to attach yet another price to their conduct. Which is what the litigation is meant to do. What has been the reaction so far give us just a quick sense of who? The defendants are if you will. And what you're learning in the process. How were they responding to being held civilly accountable for their actions? They're not responding. Well, we'll tell you that. The lawsuit was originally filed and Tober 2017 by this coalition of Charlottesville community members who were injured in some way, whether it was on that first night of Charlottesville, where we saw the premise this March and lati- Tarshish champion things like jeers will not replace us or blood and soil, which many of you know, it's a holocaust crop. And in some cases, they literally surrounded there were students and other members of the of the UVA community had surrounded. Believe it was the Jefferson statue on campus to protect it from the protesters. They had things like fuel other unknown liquids thrown on them Tiki torches wave, obviously if you are someone in the center of a circle of Nazis and white supremacist that is terrifying. And then of course, the following day. There was the March and the ultimate the ultimately the car driven by fields into the crowd of protesters which killed Heather higher and injured many more. So there are a number of people in this community who were directly impacted physically emotionally and otherwise on the defendants are a coalition of twenty four Nazis and white supremacist. Another them, you might know like Richard Spencer, Jason Kessler crest cantaloupe was known as the crying Nazi and others. Are are group's white nationalist groups, including Francis identity Aropa, which I believe is responsible for about sixty percent of. A lot of white nationalist anti-semitic propaganda on college campuses. According to some recent stats, so I think some of these individuals and groups you you might have heard of others. You might not know about you. You certainly know their hateful work. They filed a motion to the Smiths after the lawsuit was filed arguing that this is their first amendment, right? If their first amendment right to conspire to commit violence against people we argued..

FBI Michael lieberman Matthew Shepard foundation Charlottesville assault Facebook Cynthia deal official James field Marcus Marissa Anti-Defamation League Reconstructionist congress department of Justice
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Dennis Prager here. Like to I've looked to do a poll of Americans. Heard of Matthew Shepard. So give you a liberal source. Liberal left. Matthew shepard? This Huffington Post. What's the date? February two twenty sixteen exactly two three years ago three years ago. Matthew Shepard murdered by bisexual lover and drug dealer? Stephen Jimenez claims in new book. The it's pretty much accepted by people who have looked into its the book is accurate. The book was Jimenez himself. Okay. The post reached out to the Matthew Shepard foundation for comment surrounding Jimenez is new claims defending shepherd is having been the victim of a brutal anti gay hate hate crime spokesperson for the foundation replied attempts to rewrite the story of this hate crime appear to be based on untrustworthy sources factual errors rumors and innuendo rather than the actual evidence gathered by law enforcement and presented in a court of law. We do not respond to innuendo rumor or conspiracy theories. Instead, we recommit ourselves to honoring Matthew Shepard's memory and refused to be intimidated by those who seek to tarnish. It we owe that to the tens of thousands of donors activists volunteers in allies to the cause of equality who have made our work possible. In other words, exactly what I said, fighting homophobia is more important to the Matthew Shepard foundation than the truth. There are so many values bigger than truth. Truth is like the bottom. It just isn't it just isn't value. It wasn't a value in the Vietnam war. This is not new the purpose of a journalist for most journalists in the Vietnam war was to report. How about the president that lie another liar? President Johnson was Aligarh. They're always like anybody who opposes what the left stands for. And the guy was democrat a liberal Democrat passed the most far reaching social legislation. Expanding government in American history, or at least since FDR. Proportionately or you do it. Absolutely. Get a different result. There's an entire there's a major book on the press. And what does it and the Ted offensive because of on how they lied about that they portrayed an American victory as a defeat. This not new it's just it's it's now enshrined that our purpose is to promote our values not tell the truth. By the way. It doesn't matter. How many of these race hoaxes come out? How many swastikas were painted by leftists? How many and words were smeared on doors by leftists or by blacks themselves? It doesn't matter that look, obviously, there's going to be a legitimate disgusting hate crime legitimate in the sense that it really happened not legitimate morally for those who monitor my show and seek to pervert my words. You know that a guy wrote Breitbart had a big column my appearance on judge Janine. I was on was on Saturday night on judge Janin's this show on Fox News on Fox News twice last week. And. It's I I should philosophize with you once about TV versus radio. This is fascinating. Juxtaposition. And what did you just say to my year? Okay. Very nice. When I go on television. Which is I don't know. It's word frequent is an odd word compared to whom. Order said go on TV about twenty times a year. Is about right. And if I sort of like, the one more, I don't I don't tend to seek it. But I know how little time television affords anybody and often I am they're more generous with me than others Justice Janine. Judge name is very generous with me. But I know I I have very little time to develop an idea. It's funny because I read. There were there were many many comments on the show on the internet. Well, why didn't Prager say this? I AM The Answer is because in six minutes, some of which the host is actually speaking, you can't say, everything that's. That's what. But you have to learn to do that you must get your point across with repetitive. I'm sitting on my sponsor as a like to say. The X chair. They now have an x four I'm sitting on the x three that's amazing. What's the X four like? Must be awesome. I mean, this is awesome. Anyway, there's now a wider base model for those of you who need it. And now you can finance the purchase of this..

Matthew Shepard Matthew Shepard foundation Stephen Jimenez Dennis Prager Huffington Post Justice Janine Fox News FDR President Johnson president Breitbart Ted Janin shepherd two three years six minutes three years
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Dennis Prager here. Like to look to do a poll of Americans. Who heard of Matthew Shepard? So we'll give you a liberal source. Liberal left. Matthew shepard? This Huffington Post. What's the date? Figari to twenty sixteen exactly two three years ago three years ago. Matthew Shepard murdered by bisexual lover and drug dealer? Stephen Jimenez, claims new book. The it's pretty much accepted by people who have looked into that. The book is accurate. The book was Jimenez himself. Okay. The post reached out to the Matthew Shepard foundation for comment surrounding Jimenez is new claims defending shepherd is having been the victim of a brutal anti gay hate hate. Crime is spokesperson for the foundation replied attempts now to rewrite the story of this hate crime appear to be based on untrustworthy sources factual errors rumors and innuendo rather than the actual evidence gathered by law enforcement and presented in a court of law. We do not respond to any Wendo rumor or conspiracy theories. Instead, we recommit ourselves to honoring Matthew Shepard's memory and refused to be intimidated by those who seek to tarnish. It we owe that to the tens of thousands of donors activists fallen tears and allies to the cause of equality who have made our work possible. In other words, exactly what I said, fighting homophobia is more important to the Matthew Shepard foundation than the truth. There are so many values bigger than truth. Truth is like the bottom. It just isn't it just isn't value. It wasn't a value in the Vietnam war. This is not new the purpose of a journalist for most journalists in the Vietnam war was to report how much the the president that lie in other liar. President Johnson was Aligarh. They're always like anybody who opposes what the left stands for. And the guy was a democrat a liberal Democrat passed the most far reaching social legislation. Expanding government in American history, or at least since FDR. Proportionately or you do get a different result. Does an entire there's a major book on the press. And what does it and the Ted offensive on? How they lied about that they portrayed an American victory as a defeat. This not new what's just it's it's now enshrined that our purpose is to promote our values not tell the truth. By the way. It doesn't matter. How many of these race hoaxes come out how many swastikas were painted by leftist? How many and words were smeared on doors by leftists or by blacks themselves? It doesn't matter of that. Look, obviously, there's going to be a legitimate disgusting hate crime legitimate in the sense that it really happened not legitimate morally for those who monitor my show and seek to pervert my words. Wrote Breitbart had a big column my appearance on judge Janine. I was on on Saturday night on judge Janin's show on Fox News on Fox News twice last week. And. It's I I should I should philosophize with you once about TV versus radio. This is fascinating. Juxtaposition. What did you just say to my ear? Okay. Very nice. When I go on television. Which is I don't know the word frequent is an odd word compared to whom. Order said go on TV about twenty times a year. Is about right. And if I sort of like one more, I don't I don't tend to seek it. But I know how little time television affords anybody and often I am they're more generous with me than others Justice Janine judge. He was very generous with me. But I know I I have very little time to develop an idea. It's funny because I read there were there were. Many many comments on the show on the internet. Well, why didn't Prager say this? I AM The Answer is because in six minutes. Some of which the host is actually speaking. You can't say everything that's what. But you have to learn to do that you must get your point across with repetitive. I'm sitting on my sponsor as a like to say. The X chair. They now have an x four I'm sitting on the x three that's amazing. What's the X four like? Must be awesome. I mean, this is awesome. Anyway, there's now a wider base bottle for those of you who need it. And now you can finance the purchase of this..

Matthew Shepard Matthew Shepard foundation Stephen Jimenez Dennis Prager Huffington Post Fox News FDR President Johnson president Janine Breitbart Ted Janin shepherd two three years six minutes three years
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:39 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Admixed mixed over many decades, and we certainly know from histories perspective that when you have economic anxiety or actual exactly about fear for your children for your community, and the dislocation some had sided trade and globalism as being highly dislocated communities traditional communities here in the United States. Who are we in conversation with we know who the haters are to adopt the ideology, but part of mainstreaming is the process by which larger and larger groups of people are willing to buy into the symbolism the tropes. We certainly see in the Jewish community. The number of conspiracy theory theories that have arisen both on the left and the right to describe Jewish power and the role of of Jews including tragically in Pittsburgh where again, this toxic combination of fear and the internet enabled somebody to believe that Jews were behind the caravan. We're intending to do harm. Where is the conversation? With folks that might be people of goodwill, but who are afraid and who don't have an alternative ideology. Someone in the last panel talked about being very mindful with their social media housings, and even if you participate in the women's March, or what you deal in your day to day life being very mindful about what is your narrative, and what is your message? So if you use social media to just simply re post or re tweet articles that are. Pronouncing. The hey are showing off the haid. So she was talking about you, keep hosting the picture of the swastika on a synagogue, mass shooting and all of your posts. Probably not intentionally are just giving more attention to the hate instead of good. That's what's going to keep your page alive. That's the messenger. Sending is look at this. Look at this eight over here look at this height. Where can you turn that around? And you say, hey, look with his little first grader dead with her prophets from a bake sale. And she gave it to the local homeless shelter Cynthia detail of the Matthew Shepard foundation uplift that make that your narrative. Make your narrative in your message something positive every time you re tweet repos something. That's hateful. If you're trying to draw attention to all the hate that's out there. I understand that it just it keeps all of that very much in the news where if you turn it around. I think the messages that will continue that will resonate with families are the ones that are positive and uplifting. And I think that's that's how you change the ideology around. How many of you have? Okay. Shelf hands. This is engaging. Okay. Ready? Okay. How many of you have participated in some type of March? Okay. That's fantastic. How many do you have children? How many of you took your kids your March? Exactly, that's what to do, grandchildren. For that one. Great-grandchild? Great, great, grandchildren nieces. Okay. What's up? But that's the point right. Is you're showing your children, your, grandchildren? I'm using my voice, and my time to show my opinion because I want to spread the good and the love, and that's why we do it. And that's how you start changing that narrative around. That's right. And I think the other thing that we need to recognize particularly as a community, which very heartened be a big part of the conversation this week, and in general right now is that these guys on the other side, they had all of us Amy's Potomac. They hate us for our skin color. They hate religion able because their sexual orientation or gender, and we saw that in Charlottesville. We see that in the many other harmful horrible hate-filled incidents over the last few years, including Pittsburgh, where the shooter attack the Pittsburgh Jewish community because they were helping immigrants and. Intersection on this way. But but they are very intersectional in their hate. They hate all of us. They might be motivated by individual factors. But at the end of the day, they are out there storming Charlottesville, attacking our communities because they hate anyone who sort of is different than their their vision for what this country should look like and all of us in this room are different than what that vision is. And so we need to be mindful of that. And we need to be intersection on our own approach to fighting this. We're not going to be the white nationalist movement. The white supremacist movement anti-semitism simply by focusing on anti-semitism, but we have to focus on rate, racism, homophobia, misogyny on everything else that really motivates these guys. I've heard it said that the haters don't discriminate another way to think about it. I think they hate amongst themselves to. So if you do really if you spend a lot of time looking at some of the dialogue within that, white nationalist white supremacist movement. You'll see how. There's so much discord amongst themselves. So they might have sort of a common mission and goal. But even when you dig really down deep a lot of them hate each other for you didn't go the last March March with loud enough voice. You wore the wrong. I told you to wear this color shirt. You didn't you see a lot of just all consuming hatred? Even amongst groups of people that you would think would all get along. And I always hope that that hate which is self destroy those types of organizations because it is true. When you're so consumed by hate, it is all encompassing all destructive. So let's look at the flip side of hate. And that is that it has our attention has the media's attention to as many of our leaders attention. It's part of the conversation. I think on a regular basis, and that attention perhaps rely an opportunity and with my personal background, which is in law. I have a lot of belief in our institutions, I think our institutions are being tested. But let's talk about the infrastructure that we have within our institutions of government to combat hate and kind of resource that's necessary. And maybe how we can engage in coalition with some of the work that you do. So let's talk about an area Cynthia. You and we share a lot on and cooperate on which is providing law enforcement, the understanding the tools the infrastructure to respond to appropriately talk a little bit about that in the importance of it. So the FBI in my humble opinion. Now that I've laughed. We would not sorry. I can't use that pronoun anymore. They would not be as successful. Were it not partnerships and liaisons and collaborations with folks like you. So it is very well known that the FBI and the Justice and many, local and state law enforcement agencies have very solidified partnerships with the AD L, for example. Michael lieberman. Are you still here areas? So Michael Lieberman. Dear friend, and colleague of mine, we start working together when I was chief of the civil rights unit and the FBI and headquarters, and we had so many conversations and meetings and collaborative efforts to try to figure out. How we could spores multiply each other to combat hate as it would appear in a variety of forms. And that's how the FBI is successful. That's how long is successful. Is when private citizens give information to the FBI when they collaborate when they say, hey, I got a weird posting on my Facebook page. Will you take a look at this? Or I think there is going to be a unite the right rally in my community. Let's collaborate to make sure to make sure that everybody at that face is safe. So the protesters the counter law enforcement ages at the business owners in that community that everybody is safe. And that it's done within the bounds of the law that rally so collaboration partnership transparency is key. Governments like the FBI government agencies like the FBI, the department of Justice have to be transparent and genuine in what they give back and how they behave. So that folks like you will trust them to do the right things questions stacks. Thank you. Are they easy? Okay. Off the top. I will turn it over to you. But I think that's those partnerships have to be sustained have to be cultured and developed and capitalize on to keep everybody safe. I think again, I think that's right for a lot of agreement here. And I think that we sort of private communities in what way have a role as well. So the point of the Charlottesville lawsuit coalition of students clergy community members who were impacted by the violence, you might know the Pulitzer winning photo of this African American and pushing a woman out of the way of the car. He's sprawled across the front of the car. It's Marcus Marissa. They are to the plaintiffs in the suit. Obviously injured by the car that killed header higher and injured many more, and he's very brave courageous plaintiffs have put their name on the suit because in law enforcement in and of itself wasn't going to be able to make the forward movement on this issue that we felt was necessary. Amy's Potomac executive director of integrity. I for America. Which is that. There was a conspiracy to commit violence here. The students under something called the KKK act of eighteen seventy one which was pacified Reconstructionist congress as a way to protect communities against fellow civil war violence, obviously has not had to be used very frequently in recent years. I think one of the more recent uses was during the freedom lines. So needless to say. We're dealing with us somewhat unique situation. But at the same time, the fact that law enforcement on our own is certainly prosecuting. I think everyone knows that James field who drove the car was convicted of murder, but at the same time there needs to be or we felt there needed to be additional forward movement here. And in this case that would send a clear message greatest wrong legal precedent and help deter future acts like this. So having that that balance between law enforcement and people who are willing in their private capacities to do something that I think is pretty brave and courageous which is put their name on feel like this is really important. Let's stay with law enforcement for a few minutes. Law enforcement is appropriately often called out when engaged in ongoing activity or failure to respond appropriately. Or even to commit violence that has certainly been a theme and the ongoing issues relating to criminal Justice reform and community. Policing are very real do. We in fairness, however, give law enforcement is part of their routine training at an ongoing basis. The tools to both understand how heat manifest itself and the importance of their role in making people feel safe regardless of their identity. The AD L does a masterful job of training, federal state and local law enforcement officials to understand the origins of hate and to know how to combat it to know how to attack it from a legal perspective, they do an excellent job. And the Matthew Shepard foundation and the lawyers committee for civil rights have. Partner with the L in numerous cities to effectuation these trainings. What we've found is engaging with so many law enforcement officials is they have never received training on would, you know, a hate crime. When you saw it if you respond to a call for service outside of a bar that is known to be frequented by the LGBT community. And it's an assault. Are you going to put those two things together? Are you going to ask the victim? What was said if anything during the attack are you going to know it when you see it, and sadly, there is a lack of training. It's it's very apparent a lack of training for local law enforcement officials to just simply no a hate crime. When they see it. And even if they put two and two together, and they say, okay, this is a synagogue, that's a a swastika on a synagogue. I get those two things go together. I understand that. Are you going to know how did that investigate that prove that bias motivation? That's key. If you're trying to convict someone for violating local hate crime statute, do you know how to prove that vice motivation? This is she's bread radio programming from Monday WC SBA from Washington. A very sad lack of training on that issue, and the other part of this even if the law enforcement officials do everything right and get it and go to social media and get the the evidence of bias. Are they in alignment with their prosecutor's office? Is that local assistant district attorney going to say, I don't I don't need that. I don't need to know the bias. We can just do simple assault. Simple vandalism. And his case is over. Or is the ADA saying this was fantastic. I wanna prove that buys motivation. I want that to be in court. I want that to be part of this case. Because what that does is it vindicates the victim. I wasn't just as halted because of a happened to standing where. I was I was assaulted because of who I am. And that's not. Okay. So if the victim feels comfortable with the law enforcement agency to say, this is what happened to me. And that law enforcement agency says I get it. I understand what this is. And the prosecutors also an alignment, and then when this was all over you circle back to that law enforcement official reports that incident to the FBI's uniform crime report as a hate crime, the circle is complete. And that's the one thing that we're trying to do with the Matthew Shepard foundation, and the lawyers committee for civil rights, and the AD L is to make sure that everybody's local law enforcement agencies. Have that training that they know when they see it and they're aligned with their assistant district attorneys, and they can complete that circle before I try and integrity. I I was a senior guys are to the new York Attorney General, and I think. As we've been talking about obviously in the last couple of years, there's been an alarming rise and hate crimes, and we found that local police departments around New York did not have the resources or the tools to actually identified hate crimes and do exactly what's described. So we put together a guidance late two thousand sixteen after of first uptick in that we used to working in concert with Jay CRC in New York and number of other partners from all different backgrounds, and provided a written hate crimes guidance to these local police departments mobile prosecutors and other folks so that they could answer those questions and actually make sure people are being held accountable for hate crimes, but not every state has an attorney general that will necessarily do that again that makes it all the more important to have folks like you working in your communities to connect those dots and make sure that this is happening..

FBI Matthew Shepard foundation Pittsburgh Charlottesville United States Amy assault Michael lieberman Facebook Cynthia James field ADA New York America
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It's got a show tonight. Brandin went last review. How about a quick review? Solid. A and the only reason it's on an a plus plus because he's seventy one and just doesn't sound the way he sounded in seventy eight like on the greatest hits album or whatever. But he played all the hits. I imagine same show tonight. The farewell yellow brick road toward which by the way lasts until December of twenty twenty two years to catch me somewhere around the world. He's going to Europe Asia back to America. So it was awesome, though, sold out two shows Pepsi center. What do you think he makes a show million? How much we're tickets Brandon? Kef. You'll know how much we're ticket. I think there were varying prices a couple hundred bucks down low, maybe more if you know, the right people that were less. What do you think he made Kathy L made like how much did he gives you? Definitely over a million over a million. Or show. Okay. Well, I could see why he'd want to do it on an average of yet. A couple of hundred dollars worth of tickets and came down scaling how many people thirty thousand eighteen thousand per night. So thirty six so thirty six thousand people in the low tickets, you said were two hundred dollars. A right around one hundred up top top ours had zeros on them because they were free tickets. He he's not gonna he's not gonna make a million to show on that easy. I know this the merchants full retail price because we looked at EBay for reason. At the lowest say each ticket was one hundred bucks. He would make three point six. But no, no, no. That would be what the venue would make right. Oh, yeah. That's what I'm saying. So so I would say. Primate, like seventy eight million not including merchandise and everything for the night. The night shows. Do you know what John does too when he comes to a town? Because especially if saying they're multiple nights hill retrofit, a hotel room with a piano because he wakes up the middle of the night. And you have to have it soundproofed and stuff I have a friend that stayed in the Elton John suite at the Marriott in Indianapolis because they bring the whole tour, and they say, you let us do this one room will bring in the piano, we'll pay for that cost. And then we'll bring you two hundred rooms of the whole crew or whatever. You seem old and tired or was he? Yeah. He he didn't seem super spry. And he's not I'm clearly not in the best shape. He does have a lot more hair than he had it various points, and it's a nice golden Brown, but he didn't see out of breath. Even I'm sure he's in town for a day or two getting used to the elevation telling Rick that Elton always put on a charity event for the Matthew Shepard foundation. Yes. Yes. Donates his time in pays his band to do the to do the event and takes all the money that they raise from ticket sales and gives it to the foundation of his band was rate Brian Johnston, I guess play guitar form for fifty years or close to it. The drummer Ray Cooper played percussion because he played two sets of three drum drummers up. There basically is wild roots? Was wondering like how much he pays his band? I wonder what the the side they call side men are side players in the band make because no one would ever know who they were right? Twenty bucks an hour. Probably no wonder, you know, 'cause we we'd heard like bands like Boston. For instance. Their bass player said she made seven hundred fifty bucks a show seven hundred and fifty dollars hit in Boston was making probably have two hundred three hundred thousand. Nobody knew who she was. But nobody knows who these guys are you Tom Scholz in Brad dealt. Everybody knew who they were. They're making all the money. I know they don't pay these touring musicians all that much. Surprisingly, wow, how much do you think? Kenny aronoff makes. And he tours with big musicians. I heard five thousand per show per show when he was with John Fogerty. He lost that gig. What about Bob Seger making less when he was with Bob Seger. How much you make? I don't know. Elton, John and Gordon on his website Elton, John dot com slash the band played over thirty eight hundred shows with a backing band and a lot of us have been with them for a long long time. Buddy. My with Justin Timberlake made four hundred bucks a night that's hit because he gets a different guys on different shows in Timberlake. Probably made a half a million to a million a show. He's paying this guy. Four hundred bucks. He made Timberlake made all the money. But that's like Ted Nugent made all the money. It's one thing. I'm sure you want to be part of that. But really, don't you? Listen, I would want to do it. I'm not doing it for four hundred dollars unless you start with him from the beginning. Once you start with him from the beginning in one hundred bucks. No because he wasn't with them from the beginning with tour. So. If you were together from the beginning, and you guys all started together. I'm sure like Zac Brown. I'm sure he pays his guys a lot of money because they've all been together from the beginning him. They don't nobody comes to see their bass player. Right. No. But do you recognize their their, you know, their fiddle player and their bass player and their guitar player. You know, he features them during his show like the Dave Matthews band at one point five of those guys were five equal members of the ban one. They just kicked out recently passed away, by the way, you know, what the internet says we played this game before I feel like he's worth more. Now, John what Ellsworth now I would say Elton, John Elton, John. I'd say he's worth. I'd say one hundred and forty million five hundred million to twenty-five Kathy nails it on the nose. Right. Five hundred million. She doesn't have a Google owner. The tech screen up in front of her. Wow. Three or three seven three eight five five you wanna call in a text from the seven to show, a pack of coyotes would kill Allama and then eat. It's butthole caviar. The wild. And then he gets butthole the caviar the wild. I think that's a reference to a previous show for three weeks. Yes. Because in parentheses. Okay. So we don't have Joel Navarro. Let's check traffic out Tammy video..

John Elton John Kathy L Pepsi center Justin Timberlake Bob Seger John Fogerty Brandin Europe Kenny aronoff Matthew Shepard foundation Ray Cooper Asia Indianapolis Boston Ted Nugent EBay America
"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"matthew shepard foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

"Nary boy is in the prologue of considering Matthew Shepard, a three part orchestral and choral work. It was ridden by Craig, how Johnson the concert moves through the life and death of shepherd and the resulting trial of his two killers alternating John RA and perspective in the production Johnson wanted to show that Matthew Shepard was more than story. I've got to include Matt in this piece, not just Matthew Shepard, the conic name, the concert is touring the country. Now it's the latest major contribution to the canon. Shepherd's staff compelled a lot of artists to respond in unique ways. Over the past twenty years, countless paintings musical interpretations, poems in theater. It's even been a story arc in popular TV shows like six feet under and west wing. Like when Representative from the shows president confronts the victim's parents lady. I'm not embarrassed that my son was gay. Government is art has become central to story of Matthew Shepard. Steph Johnson says it allows something deeper than just reading news clips. We come together, we grieve together, we, we ask our questions together. So that alone is is one significant aspect of a way that performance performance art music can hold a story and give us the possibility for processing the first major artistic work to do that was the Laramie project. That's the city where shepherd was killed. Leon account ski is the head writer. He was in Laremy just weeks after the attack talking with locals and gathering interviews. She says, the play is still relevant today. It continues to be wildly popular, especially in high schools like Johnson. She sees art is playing a role in the conversation. The art either leave kind of elevates the discourse elevated the discourse that we can really look at it from many. Many different perspectives and come to a deeper understanding both of the magnitude of the loss and the meaning of the laws funded hausky doesn't think the Laramie project was necessarily the reason for all the art following it. She says, the tragedy was bound to galvanize artists. It was something about his heart, his. You know, I can't think of any other way to say it just his light, his life force. There was something that just moved people to want to investigate further and to want to make art by. It's been twenty years since Shepard's death in artists have had the time to investigate unanswered questions. Some wondered where shepherd would be now at each forty, one of his explored, the religious aspect of his death, seeing it as a crucifixion and him as a martyr poet and author of seventy books. Leeann Newman was coincidentally in Laramie the speak about gay rights. The day shepherd was killed. She had her own burning question. What happened at the fence. Now, mad of course, can't tell us because he is no longer with us. So then I had the moment there were witnesses, the fence, was there the moon? Was there the stars where their animals were there? What could they tell me? So in two thousand twelve, she published her book Tober morning song for Matthew Shepard. It's told through victis monologues from perspectives like the stars, the fence, he was tied to and passing animals and really just tried to come up with some truth, not that truth, but my truth, Jason Marsden is the head of the Matthew Shepard foundation. He was also a friend of Matthew Shepard. He Magic's the stories, artwork and poetry will help this story lavar label historical events. Memory of it will fade if there isn't some compelling and emotionally powerful way to keep the story. Vivid to people people in high school now weren't alive when Matt was murdered. So these works are the only way the people will ever have vivid emotionally resident. Experience of this story. Marston says the artwork has changed since the event in nineteen ninety eight with more context, new perspectives and distance, but that even new works considering Matthew Shepard or a gift for anyone who continues to fight equality acceptance for here. Now I'm Cooper mckim in Larry. Oh, and loan on the and this he'd. And Cooper story cuss to us from the mountain west news bureau here. Now, the production of NPR and WBZ our association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young bureau doubt. This This is. is. The wind. I was.

Matthew Shepard Steph Johnson Matthew Shepard foundation Shepherd Laramie project Cooper mckim Matt shepherd canon Jason Marsden John RA Leeann Newman Craig Laramie BBC World Service Representative NPR writer Laremy Marston