13 Burst results for "Mattachine Society"

"mattachine society" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"53 years ago, police raided a gay bar in New York City called stonewall inn. That raid sparked a series of protests and riots that would later be deemed the start of the LGBTQ rights movement. But gay rights organizing had been going on for years before that. Mackenzie Martin of Casey you are tells us why Kansas City Missouri was a foundational location for rallying. Decades before the stonewall uprising in June 1969, gay rights groups were known as the homophile movement. And in 1966, the groups held their first national meeting. Here, in Kansas City, because, as gay rights activist Frank kemme put it from February 66, in Kansas City because Kansas City was equally inaccessible to all the organizations that then existed. Equally inaccessible, unless your name was drew schaeffer. He started Kansas City's first gay rights organization. The Phoenix society for individual freedom, joining a roster of national groups like the mattachine society and the daughters of belies. I think he was just a very outgoing sort of social guy. Stuart Heinz is the cofounder of the gay and lesbian archive of min America, and a curator of a traveling exhibit about Kansas City's early gay rights history. Between laws banning same sex relations and workplace discrimination, the 1960s was a scary time to be gay. But to put it in perspective, Heinz says, the environment in Kansas City wasn't the same as in, say, New York. Here it wasn't nearly as oppressive. There was a pretty friendly relationship between the bars and the authorities. The Phoenix society's headquarters, AKA drew schaeffer's house, was located in Kansas City's gay bar

Kansas City Mackenzie Martin stonewall inn Frank kemme drew schaeffer Phoenix society for individual mattachine society Stuart Heinz New York City Casey gay and lesbian archive of min Missouri Heinz Phoenix society's headquarters New York AKA drew schaeffer's house
"mattachine society" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"There was actually entrapment of gay sailors and the early part of the twentieth century In newport rhode island we go through the second world war and then. This is one of the things that i think is very interesting. Because during the second world war the us army and the us military was very busy fighting wars and they weren't able to discharge as many people as they wanted to Four homosexuality so they just gave them these blue discharges they didn't actually court marshaled. But here you have from our archives a document from the joint chiefs of staff in one thousand nine hundred forty nine now that the country is not at war anymore laying out the three principal grounds that you could actually district dishonorably discharged somebody from the army or from any of of the branches of the service this went to the secretary of the army the navy and the airforce and the three categories was if it was if there was a sexual relationship that was forced class to was if it was consensual and the most importantly to understand was class three and class three was simply if you were suspected of not being a heterosexual you could be discharged for that entire for for for that idea that somebody had a view shortly after this This came into place in nineteen forty nine as i said in shortly after that president. Dwight eisenhower issued an executive order which he said homosexuals could not serve an any part of us military because they could be blackmailed. Of course the only reason why they would be. Blackmailed is because the government said it was a bad thing for somebody to have shame about so they created the problem and then punish people for the problem that they created things happened of course in the nineteen fifties and of course it was wonderful that organizations like the mattachine society and the daughters politis grew up and and really a big pivotal point was nineteen. Seventy five when you had leonard matt levitt who had received a purple heart and he came out as gay he. The government said to you we will not do. We will not discharge you. You can have your benefits and your va benefits and all that stuff. But you have to publicly say you'll never have sex with a man again. And he refused to do it. He was discharged and he ended up. Suing the government to get benefits back. They settled out a court. We don't know how much that was. Unfortunately he died of aids in the nineteen eighties. Jimmy carter was somebody who had some support for gays in the but of course things really didn't change until bill clinton in nineteen ninety two when he ran on on the platform that gays would-be allowed into the us military. He ran on that. Many get gave people thought that was going to happen. It was one of the first issues he took up in january of nineteen ninety-three and here. You see a usa today full page ad in usa today..

army joint chiefs of staff us army rhode island newport mattachine society Dwight eisenhower leonard matt levitt usa navy government Jimmy carter aids bill clinton
"mattachine society" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

The Ladies of Strange

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

"Hey hey happy pride. Y'all hey what's so. Beal june for you guys. But it's june or according this so happy pride everything's great. Let's talk about what we did. This whole lordy start off. Because i know you're excited and you have done probably the most out of everyone. Yeah oh really yeah yeah. I didn't do anything except for. I existed abby pride. Okay so this month. I kind of went. I started off the month going like balls to the wall on pride stuff and then towards the end of the month of is just like you know what i'm going to enjoy pride and just like be me so a couple of things that we did. I looked up some lgbt. Listen to And the one that stood out the most was making gay history. Now if you listen to our bonus episode that came out for pride We discussed a podcast a few times and it was like. I'm not gonna tell you what it was. It was making gay history such a good show. So the first season focuses on pre stonewall. Lgbt movement it talks about the mattachine society daughters of In its this guy who in the eighties and nineties went out and interviewed these people. And it's all of his like audio recordings. Oh seriously hearing the people tell their own story. It's so cool and then As you go along it transitioned into stonewall and then after stonewall and then stepping outside of the united states it's really cool and every episode is audio there so many people podcasts audio from the people that you're learning about it's their actual voices historical recordings so many people out there that are like you know what. Burn start podcast. And we're actually going to make a difference. And there's there's what who earn like cats death. Dick's aliens tagline. Hello and welcome. We are the ladies strange. Cats digs death and aliens mean you're for it strangenesses a spectrum but this show was amazing and i binged all eat seasons in a week..

Beal mattachine society abby united states Dick
"mattachine society" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

The Ladies of Strange

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

"I q scores in education and she was going to perform these studt of these tests on them and then afterwards have professionals analyze the data to see if they can tell who was gay based on these like certain tests that they did. And i'll tell you the tested minute. So like a single blind with a controlled sample group. Yes but she said. I'm just sitting here pictured. Like did she put up a picture of a scantily clad woman and scantily clad man and see which one gets their brain waves going. No so how. Are you gonna find thirty openly homosexual males in the nineteen fifties gay bar. What am i brain. Go craigslist thing of thirty twenty to fifty something. Gay men emailed me a doctor hooker. Oh my god. I guess it was the fifties it would have been aol but no gay bars. Were being rated at this point in time. Remember stonewall being rated but that doesn't mean that they weren't still existing. That's true but you had to know where to go. One of very under the radar all convenient that. She has to gay best friends true but instead she went to the mattachine society which was one of the first gay rights organizations. Whenever i told you that like stonewall is considered like the start of everything. The mattachine society in Daughters of believes the to like big kick starter for the community gutters of believes that was the first lake lesbian organization. Which you can hear more about when sage in tales comes out and tell you about that awesome podcast but anyway so she went to madison society. And obviously there like. We've got an abundance. A plethora of homosexual men take your pick but bindi dreams to come true we another plethora of the homosexuals. What does that sound like. I'm selecting a cheese. Oh cheese here for okay you cheddar think about it before you bring it.

mattachine society aol madison society bindi
"mattachine society" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The us can't move forward on. Lgbtq rights without reparations by omar margie encarnacion encarnacion is professor of political studies at bard college where he teaches comparative politics and latin american and iberian studies. His new book is the case. For gay reparations. It is generally hard to know when a social revolution has achieved. Its goals in the case of the american gay rights revolution. However it appears that this is an easy one to call at least as far as the national media is concerned. The view that gay rights have been decisively one has become conventional wisdom victory triumphant. Gay revolution is one of the best known journalistic accounts of the struggle for gay rights in the us that books premises pointedly echoed by a twenty nineteen article in the atlantic titled. The struggle for gay rights is over. But america's gay rights revolution seems unfinished or incomplete in the absence of a national reckoning with the country's shameful history of systemic discrimination and violence towards the lgbtq community. The absence of this reckoning makes the us an outlier among western democracies with a history of repression of homosexuality in recent years. The idea of gay reparations. Broadly understood as policies intended to make amends for the legacies of systemic. Gay discrimination and violence has become something of a global phenomenon and twenty seventeen the british parliament enacted turing law a legislation. That conveyed an apology and a posthumous. Pardon to those convicted of gross indecency a criminal charge intimately associated in british history with the persecution of gay men. Since the victorian era it honors alan turing. The famed computer scientists credited with breaking german military codes during world war. Two and nineteen fifty. Two touring was convicted of gross indecency after confessing to a homosexual relationship with another man and forced to undergo chemical castration. Britain's example has been emulated by ireland canada and new zealand. Germany has offered financial compensation to those who faced prosecution under paragraph one. Seventy five the infamous portion of the german penal code that criminalized same sex attraction dating to eighteen seventy one. It also built a national monument to the victims of the so-called gay holocaust the unknown number of gay males who perished in nazi concentration camps as part of a policy of moral rehabilitation. Spain has pledged to wipe clean the criminal records of some five thousand gays and lesbians imprisoned under the homophobic laws of the franco regime. Given the variety of gay reparations available which one should the us embrace for the mattachine society of washington dc. The most prominent american organization demanding gay reparations. The united states should emulate the british example in particular the matter sheen's whose name references a pre stonewall gay rights organization that fought for acceptance of homosexuality within the legal and medical establishments.

omar margie encarnacion encarn united states bard college british parliament alan turing atlantic Pardon Britain ireland new zealand Germany mattachine society of washingt canada Spain sheen
"mattachine society" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The us can't move forward on. Lgbtq rights without reparations by omar margie encarnacion encarnacion is professor of political studies at bard college where he teaches comparative politics and latin american and iberian studies. His new book is the case. For gay reparations. It is generally hard to know when a social revolution has achieved. Its goals in the case of the american gay rights revolution. However it appears that this is an easy one to call at least as far as the national media is concerned. The view that gay rights have been decisively one has become conventional wisdom victory triumphant. Gay revolution is one of the best known journalistic accounts of the struggle for gay rights in the us that books premises pointedly echoed by a twenty nineteen article in the atlantic titled. The struggle for gay rights is over. But america's gay rights revolution seems unfinished or incomplete in the absence of a national reckoning with the country's shameful history of systemic discrimination and violence towards the lgbtq community. The absence of this reckoning makes the us an outlier among western democracies with a history of repression of homosexuality in recent years. The idea of gay reparations. Broadly understood as policies intended to make amends for the legacies of systemic. Gay discrimination and violence has become something of a global phenomenon and twenty seventeen the british parliament enacted turing law a legislation. That conveyed an apology and a posthumous. Pardon to those convicted of gross indecency a criminal charge intimately associated in british history with the persecution of gay men. Since the victorian era it honors alan turing. The famed computer scientists credited with breaking german military codes during world war. Two and nineteen fifty. Two touring was convicted of gross indecency after confessing to a homosexual relationship with another man and forced to undergo chemical castration. Britain's example has been emulated by ireland canada and new zealand. Germany has offered financial compensation to those who faced prosecution under paragraph one. Seventy five the infamous portion of the german penal code that criminalized same sex attraction dating to eighteen seventy one. It also built a national monument to the victims of the so-called gay holocaust the unknown number of gay males who perished in nazi concentration camps as part of a policy of moral rehabilitation. Spain has pledged to wipe clean the criminal records of some five thousand gays and lesbians imprisoned under the homophobic laws of the franco regime. Given the variety of gay reparations available which one should the us embrace for the mattachine society of washington dc. The most prominent american organization demanding gay reparations. The united states should emulate the british example in particular the matter sheen's whose name references a pre stonewall gay rights organization that fought for acceptance of homosexuality within the legal and medical establishments.

"mattachine society" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Feels like an obvious at the time it was kind of almost a revolutionary that respect because it was so trying to transform opinions not just like seek protection protection from police or stop violence and harassment and things it was actually designed that it was it was actually largely formed by a bunch of wealthy gay men their status trying to be like right. What if we tried to start organizing can tell from the mattachine society like a you know right there. It's not no act up. It's like you know madison society So they were like bye-bye this rights movement and i you know. They weren't into julius because they knew that julius wasn't gonna serve homosexuals and so there was a uniform cops who'd be stationed outside there and so one of the guys that you know we. We knew that we wouldn't be served there so when we walked in and the bartender put glasses in front of us and we they were like we're gay and we attend to remain orderly. We just wanna be served. And then the bartender would be like well. Hey if you're gay. I can't serve you. And then he would put his hands over the top of the class right And so this thing but they would do and so. They did sort of soggy dan summer essentially what they would do is the i got a bunch of the reporters to show up there and that would like tip the cat. They would like let the reporters know that like that. This is what was going on. It was able to catch attention to the Let's see who is. Yeah so with the help of the aclu. The mattachine society ended up filing a discrimination charges. Because the new york times had run the headline three deviates invite exclusion by bar extra extra deviants deviates yay deviates in the village voice and the new york times. So there's no end they didn't come deviants according to this article deviates tveit sounds like many pop group three deviates god the dvi. It's like a cape. So yes so they were they. It was pretty much. It was a very organized like sip end because they made sure the reporters were there and then he was like very loudly while. If you're gay. I can't serve you hand over. Top of glass like of courtly leaders at the scene society to do a full theatrical production of a end rates so anyways they were able to with aclu to form a charges alongside with their human rights. You know the whole thing that ended up in courts and the constitution says that people have the right to peacefully assemble and the things were peaceful than a penn state. Can't take that right away from you. And so the liquor authority can't prevent people from congregating in bars And they just you know took that was that was the they. They also won their court case. So go off managing society Humour team or here juicy ones. I wasn't gonna. I was originally was just five but they were so good. So there's only two that we're not gonna do. You can look at the articles so you have homework listeners. There is one that it was like their goal. I forget what society it was but they were like. Let's you know the lesbians had to dress in lake skirts and the men had to wear suits. They're trying to be like very presentable. Like don't hate us. Look like you. And i didn't think that was interesting of a protest actually also familiar much so this one is the black cat..

five julius new york two one three guys mattachine
"mattachine society" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Is these queens at had cell phones back. Then you know it would have been caught on. People can see how there are being being treated and it. That's why stone was. What was the biggest one like you said so hot that media attention to it i actually wanted to. Dewey's did do is stop denying service to people who appeared homosexual so do case like they did not revert back they actually they actually like one but yeah contents in right here on our our our our backyard here. I have another another another couple of if we will. It's important to hear our history so you know what we're going to take the we're gonna take time because i i can honestly say i didn't know a single one of these stories. I did not. I had no idea. I'd no idea so this is the julius is Sip 'n and new york city. Yeah april twenty first nineteen sixty six so again in. New york's state the liquor authority had borrowed establishments from serving boost to gays And which we needed our drinks but they wouldn't get us and let stupid because you're missing out on money. 'cause will like drink exactly that we didn't go have kids like yes. Were missing all this disposable income y'all and so members of the mattachine societies if you don't know about them but they took a page from the civil rights movement and new conservatory theatre today show but the mattachine society and i tell you i learned from them. How would you describe the mattachine society. They were like an activist group. Org of yes hey In nineteen forty eight and in los angeles actually went onto be different units one in new york in one of the chicago. And they were it was designed actually around trying to it was kind of a radical almost notion of viewing If that they viewed it like gay history primarily i think there is strictly gay men as uplifting bear history and their community the way the civil rights movements had with with With the black community or without with jewish populations and communities in immigrants and trying to Assimilate them into the culture to stop the oppression..

los angeles New york new york jewish april twenty first nineteen si chicago today Dewey new york city julius one single one of mattachine couple rights nineteen forty eight
"mattachine society" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Comes in beautiful red velvet bag. And don't you just love little velvet bags small enough to take with you anywhere marked for children ten and up but you know i'd let her really clever play. Plus love letter costs less than to drive through the meals. You can get your copy of love letter from zemun games dot com your local target or and i underscore this one. Their local games store brick and mortar. Mom-and-pop shop you really need to have a copy of love letter from seamen games. You're on your brain on facts. I may not have all the answers but if your question is how can i find a sponsor for my small podcast. I do have the only answer. You need pod. corn pod. Corn is a marketplace that connects podcasters and businesses many of them small businesses to create ad campaigns. That work for both parties. This is not a situation where you're going to have to have twenty five thousand downloads per episode. Before anyone will even look at you. Popcorn is easy to use free to set up you retain all the rights to your podcast and everything else and you get to tailor the ad campaign in a way that works for you and the sponsor whether it's a host read at or an interview you can get started today by going to pod corn dot com. It's like popcorn but for podcasts. Pod corn dot com. That's the narrative. We hear every june now. Gay rights movement was born in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. A beloved gay bar called the stonewall in the stonewall right began a drag queen through brick and a police officer or a window. the gay community was emotionally reeling. From the death of judy garland. The riot culminated. Iraq had style kick line of drag queens facing off against the riott. Cops okay. Those last two bullet points aren't as common but they're definitely circulating. Let's break this history down point by point. Gay rights movement was born in nineteen sixty nine a beloved No that's when the straight people started to notice it even before stonewall there was the daughters of politis a lesbian civil and political rights organization formed in san francisco in nineteen fifty five as a social alternative to gay bars before that there was the mattachine society formed in nineteen fifty cut. Try to imagine wanting to be out in nineteen fifty. And when we broaden our scope as we should always do we find the movement actually dates back at least to eighteen. Ninety seven in berlin with the founding of the first gay rights group by magnus hirschfeld stonewall wasn't the genesis but it was certainly an accelerate. The gay liberation front was born out of the ashes of stonewall metaphorical ashes. Of course it wasn't accelerate but was it a riot and uprising a rebellion or what. The violence of the first night led to five more nights of more organized demonstrations with a more optimistic feel including chanting and dancing in the streets. The stonewall uprising didn't start the gay rights movement but it was a galvanizing moment for lgbtq political activism leading to the formation of numerous gay rights organizations including the gay liberation front human rights campaign glad gay and lesbian alliance against defamation and p flag parents friends and family of lesbians and gays eddie. Beloved gay bar called the stonewall inn You heard me described the stonewall and at the top so you already know. It wasn't exactly cheers for the flamboyant set in a recent documentary. Those who were there that night describe it as a dump a hell hole. Dirty rundown a sleazy mafia bar in there were a lot nicer gay bars in the area. Stonewall riots began when a drag queen three brick and a police officer or window by their own accounts. It wasn't the two people. Most commonly credited marsha p johnson or sylvia rivera. Johnson herself later said that the riot was already in full swing when she arrived. I was in town. I didn't get downtown to have to a caucus when i got downtown. Plays with already on buying a raid already. Similarly rivera delivered a speech in two thousand and one clarifying i have been given the credit for throwing the first molotov cocktail by many historians but i always liked to correct it. I through the second one. According to witnesses there was a gender non conforming person who touched off the big to do. She was very butch she was tough and the police were being rough with her and she was really fighting back. Some people say that person was stormy della. very cheap who sometimes took credit for it. And sometimes didn't there's been no conclusive proof one way or the other who exactly that. Which woman was something else we have. No actual evidence of what exactly was thrown. Some people say it was a shot glass which makes sense in the context of a bar and also let you call it. The shot glass heard round the world if it was a brick. Where did they get it. Cities may be made of bricks. But they're rarely remaining around wild. Maybe there was a construction site nearby. People say that is certainly possible. But it's more likely that someone left the scene to find a brick after the action was underway. If someone did leave a regular night at the bar looking for a brick is that heroic or you know worrisome. Hey jamie calling it. A night already know. Just going out to find brick. You'd have questions. Stones may have been used in the initial fractious if there were any loose cobblestones in the nearby tree pits though the gay community was emotionally reeling. From the death of judy garland. You're killing me smalls. please tell me that. None of my brainiacs belief that the troubled singer slash actress described a time magazine review as elvis for homosexuals died of a drug overdose on the twenty seventh of june nineteen sixty nine. Stonewall started the following night many. Lgbt people were fans of garland as were many street people. She was one of the biggest stars of our lifetime. Her funeral was mentioned in one. Count them one newspaper account of the uprising from decidedly right wing source. Nineteen ninety seven book the gay metropolis. By charles kaiser is one of the culprits in the propagation of this. I don't even want to call it. A myth no one will ever know for sure. Which was the most important reason for what happened next. The freshness in their minds of judy garland's funeral. Or the example of all the previous rebellions of the sixties the civil rights revolution the sexual revolution and the psychedelic revolution. Each of which had punctured gaping holes in crumbling traditions of passivity puritanism and bigotry. The second one chuck. It was the second one. This misbelief keeps popping up including in the twenty fifteen movie stonewall which should not be relied on for historical accuracy authors and journalists really need to get correlation doesn't equal causation tattooed on their forearm before they can get paid for their first story to suggest that a celebrity's death is more likely to be the cause of insurrection rather than generations of repression and violence is trivializing condescending and demeaning not.

charles kaiser marsha p johnson berlin san francisco sylvia rivera Johnson rivera jamie two people two thousand today Nineteen ninety seven book first five more nights stonewall twenty five thousand downloads first story second one magnus hirschfeld both parties
"mattachine society" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"Because it was a i mean we. We pretend it was a big deal. It was not a big deal in terms of society. It was a big deal in terms of our society. So it didn't change anything materially. It changed our mood changed the activism. There began to be a an activist element that had been buried in in sub rosa. Things like the mattachine society But there were eight. Didn't you didn't feel any different when you were out about on the town. But i was first of all i was as a fabulous i was like bisexual had girlfriends and i always thought that was what i wanted to do. And the certain point. I realized that if i really wanted to marry a woman and have children with her she deserved better than a guy who was going to go. Skulking off the greyhound as stations to pick up a sailor and i that was when they say gay is a choice. I made a choice to be my authentic self as opposed to masquerading. Somebody else right back at that time. I know i came out about probably ten years or so after you did. And it wasn't really a whole lot of comprehension for even for us as to what it meant to be a gay encounters but you didn't understand the concept of a gay lifestyle and having a gay partner for a long time or having a permanent relationship it was. It was difficult to come to terms with that. Well i yeah i. i think that. That's that was absolutely. You're absolutely right. I mean because a you you had affects royal drive and you exercise. But that didn't mean you were looking to live that life. It meant you were looking to satisfy scratch that hitch and that you had other plans for your actual life and at a certain point you realized this was going to be a fundamental part of your life and you might as well adjust. Adjust your sights and there was also of course no no concept of coming out at that time. People didn't make declarations They it was all very quiet in coming out happened later. And i'm glad i did because it was the only way to be got nash. Visibility the idea of actually announcing to the world and having enough pride to announce to the world that you were gay and it was okay That that came later on that was a a separate piece of activism that got subtraction.

eight ten years first rosa
"mattachine society" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"mattachine society" Discussed on The Takeaway

"He said yes. Marie emily in the seventy social workers were quietly placing queer youth with gay and lesbian foster parents at a time. When homosexuality was criminalised in the us. How do you square the state sanctioned placement of these children with gay and lesbian families with the fact that states themselves were simultaneously anti lgbtq. It seems incredibly radical. But it's less so when you think about why it is that people were afraid of gay lesbian parents. No one was sure how it is. That people became gay right. There was this theory that dated back decades that people learn. Learn to be gay right. It wasn't innate trait but rather that people learned from role models and were indoctrinated into the so-called game lifestyle and so one of the big fears in the lesbian mother and gay father custody cases. Was that by allowing these parents to have custody of their children. The state was basically going to allow these children to grow up to be gay. What made the adoption and foster care. Context different is that these were self identified gay and lesbian teens so this harmful outcome that this fate had already fallen them. So it's not like gay. Lesbian parents could make the situation bad. And it was already there The the real shift And sort of radical move was when gain lesbian parents started. Fostering young children who didn't self identify in any particular way and at point. A lot of social science research had come out showing that parental sexual orientation had no impact on children's future sexual orientation. Social workers were much more comfortable with that. Michael what was it like for the foster parents themselves and and you spoke to some of them to hear from a social worker to get a call and for them to become parents sort of unexpectedly. Yeah i think the foster parent. I spoke to best exemplifies. This is karen burke who fostered a child in rochester new york around nineteen seventy two and the way she described it to me that it was such a surprising thing to be asked. That just couldn't turn it down. Just because it felt so revolutionary. She almost felt compelled to do it. and so the way it happened for her a newspaper article newspaper ad from nine hundred. Seventy two in which the County social services department had advertised in the game newspaper for rochester. Essentially saying we have this girl who's been in and out of the system this trans girl in their exact wording Something along the lines of we feel that a gay family would be the best placement. Karen hagberg doesn't remember exactly how she responded to that ad but at some point she did and she was at the time. Living with a girlfriend named kate In the two of them responded said they were interested and the county sent them over paperwork. And i mean. I mentioned also because the paperwork wasn't even really ready to have queer parents as foster parents for instance on the papers that they were assigned to fill out in order to register with the county assumed that the couple would be a man and a woman so karen and they literally just crossed out man and woman and instead wrote lovers and so the system although the county had reached out it wasn't necessarily equipped to deal with her parents and i also think a an important thing to note too that you know karen. Kate were in their early twenties at the time. And she like she did. Tell me that almost felt compelled to say yes because it was such a radical proposition in the first place. But i mean she. Herself was quick to admit that she didn't know that she was the most equipped to be a foster parent in the end. I think that was true of the foster parents that i did speak to. It just felt like how could you say no to this you know. They did their best. But i don't think any of them necessarily thought that they were as ready as they could have been. And then in terms of finding foster homes for these queer foster youth what ruled did activism. Play at this time really. I mean in terms of like just making sure that these kids were taken care of and highlighting these issues chosen workers were turning to gay lesbian rights groups and they were self identified as gay lesbian rights groups at the time as lgbtq And we're asking them to find foster parents for them. So some of these organizations like the mattachine society the national gain lesbian task force They were setting up formal programs to put social workers in touch with a potential foster parents. sort of these ads in enganed lesbian newspapers That michael described Are ones that Gay and lesbian rights organizations are are producing their circulating. There's also a sharp increase in the number of organizations addressing Game lesbian issues. There are specific lesbian mothers groups gay fathers groups and they provide networks of support for people who want to become parents marie emilie. Let's talk about today. Michael reported that only twenty five states prohibit agencies from discriminating against perspective parents on the basis of sexuality and gender identity and some agencies today continue to reject gay parents for foster placements because they're gay President obama barred such agencies from receiving federal funds. President trump reverse that meanwhile the supreme court is expected to rule this year on whether the city of philadelphia was within its rights to not renew a contract with catholic social services because that agency won't allow same sex couples to foster children. Could that supreme court case. Be a breaking point in in this Story that we've been talking about. It's been ongoing over the last four decades. So it's possible that the court will rule that these agencies can't discriminate based on sexual orientation it might also be the case that the court rules they can but there's also some possibilities in the middle. They could really narrowly tailor this and say look. These agencies are private agencies. But they're performing a quintessential public service right. Foster care has been a state program. They're working as agents of the state and so because of that were gonna treat them differently than say a private business. And so we're gonna say you're basically acting with the state's authority which means you have to follow the rules of the state. Imposes marie emilie. Michael thank you very much for taking the time. Thanks for having such marie emilie..

Karen hagberg Michael karen burke Marie emily kate marie emilie Kate today michael nine hundred philadelphia karen first rochester couple this year seventy social workers rochester new york twenty five states one
Revisiting the Archive: Frank Kameny

Making Gay History

03:55 min | 2 years ago

Revisiting the Archive: Frank Kameny

"Mattachine Society of Washington was formed around my personality. We characterized ourselve- within ourselves within the movement as an activist militant organization. Well those were very dirty. Words in those days was sixty one in sixty two. No one else was except for the civil rights movement was just beginning. But I mean even within the game movement even more so you weren't supposed to be overall goal plan that you stated what you're going to do as an organization that was sort of set up an statement of purposes which I could dig out generally. What was it generally to work for? Gay Rights Solo. Gay Rights has such wasn't necessarily the phrase of choice of those days but to to achieve equality for homosexuals and homosexuality against heterosexuals and heterosexuality that was equality. I guess primarily wasn't born in sixty nine or those I certainly Nhar. The sixty nine have happened if we hadn't come along for years you well. No that's not how it wrong. They would not. We started to digress before I get back We started picketing in here in sixty five which I created the mindset which allowed for gays doing openly public things by way of demonstration ask gays there would not have been stonewall if they hadn't already gotten the mindset had already been established for that by us in sixty five with subsequent demonstrations year by year. Widely publicized in New York at Independence Hall every Fourth of July. Each year after sixty five. And which was being publicized in sixty nine and prepared preparation for that one when Walker and it would have never have a card. Gay People do anything publicly if we had already started it. What happened to your case. My case was dead with the Supreme Court that ended that permanent. The commission changed. Its rule is seventy five Yash. You must recall what I hearing about that. They they called me up. They knew by that time I was on. I speak with obvious. Hyperbole and figuratively on virtually daily communication. With general counsel. This Service Commission cases. You knew other things that come along. He people were coming. Oh yes. He had informed the eighteen months before and seventy-three that they will beginning the process of changing their policy but there were a lot of minds that had to be changed inside the commission and he informed me that it was going to come out on July fourth except for the July Fourth Holiday. So we're going to have to be July third very appropriately. And that's when they issued a news release and the former change in policy seventy five. Yes of course in seventy eight under Carter Administration. The Civil Service Reform Act went through Congress and that abolished the Civil Service Commissioner under that name. It's the office of Personnel Management. The Oh pm chains all the laws. So that's one battle one book that has nicely been closed and put on the shelf as a complete success at this point. I'm sort of I don't know people call me a living ledger. And you're like being called a living legend. It doesn't bother me No excuse complementary or the humorous. The world's oldest living homosexual or the grandfather or the great grandfather of the game which was not which is not technically as you well know live takes turnings and you don't foresee them but ultimately I think. In retrospect life has been more exciting and stimulating and interesting and satisfying and rewarding and fulfilling the night possibly have dreamed it would have been.

Walker Mattachine Society Of Washingt Service Commission Independence Hall Civil Service Commissioner Office Of Personnel Management Supreme Court New York General Counsel Carter Administration Congress
50 years of Stonewall

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

08:06 min | 3 years ago

50 years of Stonewall

"Fifty years ago this week patrons of the stonewall in a gay bar in New York's Greenwich Village stood up to police who had raided the venue since then the stonewall uprising has become the most storied event in the history of the LGBT, right struggle. But there's a history that has been and continues to be both under documented and overlooked. There isn't even a consensus on exactly what transpired on the evening of the uprising itself, I wanted to find out more about what forces have shaped the documentation of LGBT history to begin I paid a visit to pick Marcus at his home in Manhattan. My name is Eric Marcus. And I am the founder and host of the making gays repot cast. And we bring LGBTQ history to life to the voices of the people who lived it, and we draw much of material material from my archive of one hundred interviews that I recorded thirty years ago for an oral history book of the same name. I knew nothing about the movement before nineteen sixty nine I thought everything began stonewall. I discovered that was wasn't the case that I was really outraged. I thought why didn't I know this history to me? And so in most ways the most interesting part of our history is the history before stonewall, and I was able to find all of these people, mostly elderly, who had been there at the very beginning of the movement in the US, and I got to record their stories, my conception of LGBTQ history, changed dramatically that I spoke with people on there wasn't much written about it at the time I started my work, and so I had ideas about people, especially in the early movement that there was some how accommodation as so that all they wanted to do as simulate and it was the perspective of the people who wrote about it writing through the lens of the nineteen eighty s. What I didn't realize what the times were like and what people were up against early in the movement, and how courageous really radical, they were in their thinking that they that they imagined a world that could be different and slowly found a way I fit into the world. And then to begin changing it, and that to me made them radicals, even though some of a lot of the activists came along later looked at them and thought of them as less than and old fashioned that somehow there, what they did didn't matter very much, given the, the history of the movement goes back so far before stonewall. What do you think explains the editor of stonewall as a kind of watershed within algae, PT, Hugh history, stonewall uprising in stonewall was indeed a watershed of the movement? It was a turning point. But there were between fifty and sixty existing organizations in nineteen sixty nine there was a, a modest national movement. What stonewall did is it? Channeled or I should say the organizing that happened in the aftermath of stonewall based on the infrastructure that existed already channel, this new energy and anger into a much larger national movement. It, it inspired it triggered the gay liberation phase of what had been called the home afoul movement. So you went from fifty to sixty organizations in nineteen sixty nine to a year later, fifteen hundred organizations across the country, and then another year later twenty five hundred organizations thousands of young people at colleges and universities were brought into the movement. It was very young movement, and the people who are involved earlier were for the most part swept away some people continued on through the next days of the movement, and they brought their experience into this new phase of the movement. In fact, the first organizing meetings that were held right after stonewall were hosted by the Mattachine society, an organization founded in nineteen fifty in Los Angeles. And the daughters of leaders in organization for lesbians, founded in nineteen fifty five so it didn't. I thought that the movement sprang whole from the uprising of the stonewall inn, I didn't know, otherwise until I did my research and discovered that. It required. Concentration organizing in hard work to get from the stall uprising to the first pride March here in New York when you're later and then to this movement, that's now grown across the country and all over the world records of LGBT life have been shaped by the same divisions influence other histories, these include splits along sexual racial and generational lines. The lesbian her story archives are a historical repository run by lesbians for lesbians. I met Maxine Wolfe, one of the archives coordinate is in the Brooklyn brownstein. Whether kept most archives that call themselves LGBT are g and t they have practically no ill. Okay or be. So part of it is that we can't rely on other people to preserve our history. If you read most history books about the gay movement. A lot of what is in. There is about men and their movement, not what lesbians would doing at the same time, and even if they're lesbians in the organization, they don't get as much visibility. So this is about making sure that lesbians are at the center of that history. Also the way that we define it is very different than most archives. We define it as being as broad as possible we don't want to create an archive that's about only about famous lesbians, which most archives, they want material from well-known members of the community, and we have that, but we also value, the idea as Joan Nestle said that any lesbian at walks in here can see an image of herself which. Means that we have the papers of lesbian prostitutes, and go, go dancers, and truck drivers and secretaries as well as having papers of people like orgy Lord, or Audrey enrich, or other well-known, lesbians, would you mind showing me around? So on the first floor we put the things that most people who are not necessarily academic, researches would want to see novels autobiographies biographies. We also have literary criticism we have and Thala geez. We have poetry books. We have poetry anthologies, my favorite thing on this floor, though is we have books from other countries. And one of my favorite books is this, which was may? It's, it's called a Dikshit airy and it's handmade by a group of Japanese lesbians who brought it here, and it has phrases in English, and then Japanese, and then Japanese and English, and you can see it's all handmade. So it has things like are you monogamous? Women's take back the night it has a Butch on the streets in between the sheets. This is all an English. And then in Japanese this, reflects the way that I think, so many lesbians feel about wanting to make sure that people remember us. And that's what this archive is about the most touching thing that happens here is to see somebody come in and see something that they were part of some lesbian will walk through the door from some other state and, you know, an older woman who will say, you know, I was part of this poetry, collective in one thousand nine hundred seventy five and I bet you know, we did this book but you probably don't have it. And then I'll say, well, let's look, and then we look and we find it and people cry, you know, women cry when they come in here and see a couple of things not just something that's there's, but a place that respect. Who they are a place that is beautiful, and that is put together and that cares about who they are. And that's very important to me. And I think to everybody who is at the archives today, LGBT history is documented move freely in extensively even ever before. But as the wheel celebrates pride this month, we would do well to remember the people whose lives anti, we're not giving the attention. They deserved for multiple twenty four in New York on Henry Sheridan.

Stonewall New York Eric Marcus Greenwich Village Manhattan Founder United States Joan Nestle Mattachine Society Maxine Wolfe Los Angeles Brooklyn Editor Audrey Thala Henry Sheridan Dikshit Hugh Thirty Years