17 Burst results for "Matt Welsh"

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

07:55 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Not just, you know, talking about the latest talking point of tearing somebody down or canceling somebody, all of that. And I think that's, you know, I guess, is that what libertarian, I mean, I've never, I mean, I certainly know, well, in your mind, what's the difference between being a libertarian and being a conservative? What's the biggest difference there, do you think? Well, conservative, I think there's more of a sense of it's in the word, you know? You're trying to conserve things about the past, which I actually have more kind of understanding for and empathy with. I'm more inclined towards how does it get older, not that I'm getting more conservative, but I understand appreciating the value of preexisting institutions and to just as a default think twice about scrapping them. So if you're going to pack the court from Supreme Court from 9 to 15, even before we get there, I'm like, okay, we've had a thing that existed this way for a really long time. Maybe that reflects some wisdom that I'm not aware of yet. So maybe let's slow our role here as we approach that. Like, I get that more now as the libertarian libertarian, I think centers so much on the individual and individual kind of latitude. And so libertarians can be pretty critical of even private sector illiberalism. Private sector attempts to stifle people because of their viewpoints because of their lifestyle because of what they want to put in their body or not put in their body. And traditionally when I was growing up, it was conservatives who were on the other end of a lot of those fights. William F. Buckley, you know, was talking about how evil The Beatles were. You know, it's just like, okay, I'm on team beetles. Right here. Although, I apparently he became a Friends with Lisa a couple of them later on in his life. So he changed his mind on some of that. But yeah, I'm more affiliate with where the kind of transgressive independent minded new left was in the late 60s and early 70s. That's what my background is more like in. But I see those people now and I'm even happier to describe myself as a libertarian and not anything else. So libertarians like the future. They like technology. They're not scared of the newfangled thing. They tend to think that those things are going to trend in a positive direction because human ingenuity is this great and ever replenishing source, whereas conservatives sometimes Virginia postural form editor of reason magazine had a great book in the late 90s called the future and its enemies. And she tried to create a new sort of way of thinking about it. Regardless of right and left, you had what she called dynamics and I think she said stasis was the other poll and so you have people who just sort of want to lock things in amber on the left and right, you know, it could be the left has an idea of the 1950s, which is so again, so bizarre, someone who grew up in the 70s that the 50s would be something that the left was holding onto. It was really the opposite. But any conservatives might have their own kind of version of the life was best in fill in the blank time. Whether it's before the new deal or before the immigration act of 1965 or whatever. Whereas dynamics and her view, libertarians were just whatever you might throw in are like, hey, look, more people, greats, more commerce, and exchange, great, more freedom, more local and generally speaking autonomy that is all or mostly to the good and we shouldn't fear it. We should embrace it and be wary of government attempts in particular to stifle it to limit. Well, that's certainly where I where I rest and I've had for quite some time. You're right. I want to take care of the people that can't be taken care of, but at the same time, I just want to be kind of left alone. That's kind of what I look at government for government needs to take care of those that can't take care of themselves. That's been abused. So obviously taking it to a far extreme. Yeah. And I don't care what anybody else does. I do. Thank you. I think the libertarian has that just that right amount of empathy is what I'm trying to get at. I think you have to have a certain amount of empath to be to be an effective political belief. And libertarianism seems to have that level of empathy that I kind of attracted to. I like the word empathy. There's some sociopaths too. Oh, that's true. Let's be clear. No, I think empathy is very much part of it. And I think about this constantly, this is kind of the role that we can play if we choose, and by we are now just saying libertarians, but also sort of political independence can play is that we can do a little bit of officiating or even bring together the sides that are busy trying to law molotovs at each other across a long chasm is like we know what it's like to have our arguments out outvoted. It happens all the time. And like we don't completely lose our marbles over it. And we also know what it's like. I think more so than a lot of people do these days. To be surrounded with people who have very different political viewpoints and commitments than we do. And then with one another. And that's actually great. I mean, the part about American exceptionalism and I say this as someone who's married to a French woman is that it is an amazing thing to have a country that is not a nation state. We don't have an American nation. We don't have by virtue of language, ethnicity or religion. This group of people we call Americans. This is something that Ronald Reagan emphasized over and over again and I wish in lament the fact that Republicans do that much less now. That people are Americans by choice and what a wonderful thing that is. And so if we can, by definition, that means people of crazy different backgrounds are colliding with one another and doing this on this kind of crazy playing field that we've created. How great is that? The default in human history is to take the we only have a tribe with 20 people and you look funny. So I'm gonna do what I can to make sure you can't come near us and I'm going to make a politics out of demonizing you and that has been rightly understood with a lot of fits and starts and setbacks, but that is rightly understood. It's not a very American approach. So yes, that is exceptional. And it's great. And I want to have that, but I also want to have that in our domestic squabbles with one another too. Which requires a certain amount of trust and empathy and willingness to subject yourself to people or with people who don't agree with you and have different priorities. I think that's fun. So I wish that other people would take as much pleasure out of it than I do. Even if and again, like me, you feel yourself bemoaning and bewailing the state of affairs in many different ways. There's a lot of troubling stuff going on out there and I wish I could I could change it or move it in a better direction, but I would much rather be doing it here than in any other country. Yeah, well said, and I knew that's the reason why I wanted to have you on the show. I mean, what you just said right there is exactly how I feel. And I think.

reason magazine William F. Buckley The Beatles Supreme Court Lisa Virginia Ronald Reagan
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Understand the uniqueness and the exceptionalism of the experiment of the United States is troubling to me and even if I talk about that in those terms, I get labeled a certain way that to say that we are exceptional and I guess it's just the difference between looking at, okay, because for me, because of the things that we put in place. That these flawed individuals who had these ideals and had the foresight to put these ideals down, you know, and the whole history of the world, no one's ever done it that way. And that well, and it led to this exponential improvement in so many aspects of lives. We're not finished. But you could argue all those things that we've seen improvements on. Was because of the experiment laid, you know, put into play 240 odd years ago, right? And some people say, no, it just needs to be tore down. And that's what I have trouble with. The tearing down, I don't, that really rubs me the wrong way, but there's a certain a large percentage it seems that over. I don't know if you follow Iowa hawk on Twitter, but he's one of the very greatest Twitter follows. Iowa hawk, this is Twitter handles. Dave burge, which I think is still even a gnome known to plume, but he's very funny, cranky guy who used to live in Chicago now lives down and not taxes in Austin. And a big car fanatic and he has a great weekend car ID based on old photos strings, just apropos of nothing. But he has pointed out that there's this trend among certain types of activists. And this is largely on the left, in this case. Although he aims at the right to. But who take over existing. Revered institutions could be The New York Times, let's say, or could be, could be a museum. It could be that the other. Hollow it out like drive out a lot of the good people make its meaning and emphasis and focus much different and then basically where the institution like a skin suit and I see that process happening a lot. In fact, I'm sitting in our studios for paloma media, which is a small company that I've helped throughout the ground, which little podcast studio. We're right down the street from the tenement museum, which is very famous museum here in New York City in Manhattan about mostly Jewish immigrants and drag trading business would live in these narrow quarters in the late 19th century and early 20th. And fascinating museum and they got people who went on the board of it who said, you know, we need to solve our problem about the lack of representation of people of color here. And which is an interesting initiative until you realize it's the tenement museum the museum that's actually about basically Jewish immigrants in these they wanted to create a an aspect of the museum that was just not part of the thing that it was covering. And it led to people resigning and it's caused a real and you just sort of start thinking about what are you doing and the thing that troubles me and my colleague Nancy Roman also of pelo media and a great freelancer has written about a lot in the context of Portland and the street protests there, which she's covered a lot. She used to live there. Those people there who are going in the streets every day were for more than a hundred days in a row. They really wanted to tear stuff down. They wanted the light fires. They wanted to smash windows and do all of this. And the question that she kept returning to with them in person, but also wondering in prints and elsewhere. Is what are you going to build? What are you building in there? It is you're right. A teardown process and I get some institutions and some legacy systems deserve to be dismantled. I mean, we have in New York and a lot of other places as a legacy of the way that the new deal was applied. You have a lot of redlining that happened back then in which people were kind of encouraged to be segregated by the federal government in order so that these neighborhoods could be loan worthy and these ones could not. Now that's illegal now, but look at the way that your local school district is drawn. And then compare that to the redlining map. And those school districts are most, in most cases, the public wants, you are sentenced to your local school based on where you live. So if the map was created by redlining, which is now illegal, but the school map is the red line app. Well, there is a system that I think that we can talk about dismantling. Maybe break up that map, right? Like be smart about it, but the constitution is not a map. The founding of the country is not a map. It was an incredible set of tools with which we can always tinker with and argue with, but we don't just repudiating it on its own sense for its own reasons, or just repudiating whatever institution, getting rid of one company, getting rid of one person for doing a bad thing. You're not building anything. And I don't see from the types of people who cheer the stuff on. Anytime that they go and try to build a new media property or new whatever, it invariably, really fails. Why? Because it's a really pinched depiction of the world. It's sour. It is not fun. People will actually enjoy humor and enjoy joy and spreading things and being generous. And the kind of institutions that are being hollowed out and PR is one of the national public radio which I've listened to forever. And you can't, it's now we play a game. They're like, how many seconds are we going to last? After we turn it on before we hear institutional fill in the blank ism. And it's, you know, about 11 seconds on average. It's amazing. It's not interesting. And I say this is someone who's written a ton about legacies of racism in the country. It's a fascinating topic and grim in many ways. And it's shaped my politics in opposition to the institutional fill in the blank ism. But if that was all I ever talked about, my God, I would bore myself. You have to, you have to build something else that has any kind of sense of wonder and beauty or anything or positivity, which is not to say that you turn your back on bad news. It's just that build another institution. And I don't see a lot of the tear down types doing that. 'cause it's easy to tear down. It's easy. It's easy. You know, we could sit here for an hour and both of us talk about the things that we hate. And that would be easy. That would be an easy conversation, and it might feel good for the moment, but it's pretty hard to talk about what you really want. And that's the building versus tearing down, right? And medieval on a personal level, when you think about it, you think about, what is it that I really want? What do I really want to become? That's hard work, you know? It's easy for me to go. Why I don't like that. I don't want to be that guy. I don't want to be that jackass. I hate that. I hate this too. What do I stand for? That's what it's really about. And what do you stand? And I appreciate people who know what they stand for. And I'll fight to the death to those who know what they stand for and they can argue.

Dave burge Twitter paloma media Iowa Nancy Roman pelo media The New York Times Austin United States Manhattan Chicago New York City Portland federal government New York
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

08:57 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Been so enamored with the politician of president any candidate that I would just do anything for. I wouldn't go to a and you just see this kind of blind allegiance on both sides and I don't understand that. I really don't. And I think there's something to understanding the consumer side of politics is an ongoing struggle. Let's say, and I think the rise of Trump in particular highlighted how little we were paying attention to that. When all the gatekeeping functions, including within the Republican Party back then, said, okay, come on, let's not do this. This clearly he's not serious for the following reasons. Turns out that people who consume politics, that wasn't what was driving their interest wasn't necessarily ideology. And this is a challenge of interpreting and reacting to populist moments everywhere. And we have been over the last ten years the entire globe has seen a very significant rise in populism. Maybe his tapered off in the last year or two. It's unclear that people who study this are a little bit split on that. But it tells us that politics is satisfying some need that is different than needs that I need to have satisfied and that you need to have satisfied. And part of me wants to say, well, that's because all y'all stupid. But that's not a productive line of thought. And you're not going to you're not going to be able to talk to those people if you truly believe that. And I don't. To be clear, I don't believe that. I recognize that I'm actually wired a little bit differently, like to be, to be a member of any non sporting tribe, to me, sounds kind of crazy. I mean, I'm a California that I'm an American. So I'll take those ones as well. But other than that, I don't understand political kind of affinity that way. But that's a minority position. Not that minority to be clear, like Gallup has been asking people for 40 years, how do you politically self identify it? Regardless of your party membership, Democrat Republican or independent, independent, has been the largest category for most of the last 20 years, including now it's like a 44% or something compared to 20s and low 30s for the main parties. So there is some block like that. But politics is clearly serving some, it could be a psychological need to be a communitarian need. I mean, there's a lot of people have been making the comparison the last few years of that it's taking the place of religion, the role that religion played in certain people's lives. I think there might be something to that as we kind of get rid of our local community bonds and we need we need to have some kind of glue. So I'm trying to understand that and to operate in that world and to be cognizant that my preferences are very rarely anybody else's, but that does lend towards more of a populist bent and whereas popular sell themselves as great leaders actually. I mean, that's part of what they do is that they're going to go clean up the mess, they're drain the swamp. They tend to be more and more outsiders. Bernie Sanders, you know, many senses the most successful populist on the left of the last ten years never quite getting the brass ring, but definitely reshaping the Democratic Party, which he does not belong to. Exactly. Of the party. That's pretty great and interesting. But, you know, those people, they're outsiderness is the whole point. And so people can believe in the fiction that that gives them special secret managerial powers. It usually does not maybe in some cases it can or will, but I haven't seen a lot of it, especially on the national level. I think local level can be different. But Brett Weinstein on show, we were talking, just thought about this. So you're talking based kind of attributed to this kind of tribe mentality, it's biological in the sense that it's rooted in this fear of starving to death, meaning as human beings, we can't live by ourselves, right? I mean, it's just kind of the strange thing about freedom is that we yearn for this freedom to be independent, but at the same time we're so dependent on each other for their basic necessities and needs, and if you're ostracized from the tribe, one of the worst things you can do, you know, if you're in a tribe and you watch a wedding happen and these certain birds fly over and then the next day, the bride dies, well then that starts this whole phenomenon of those birds cause death, you know, so we're gonna kill all these birds. And you're gonna go along with it and even though you may disagree and you're like, hey, you know, I study birds and that's crazy talk. You'll go along with it because the whole tribe is going along with it. You don't want to be ostracized from the tribe because that draw of being or that fear of being ostracized in abandoned into the Woods to starve is so overpowering. I thought that was kind of interesting. There might be something to that too. Biologically, we don't. Yeah, and there's also in sociologically in evolutionarily also we're able to think up into a certain level number of humans. And that we can know in a network in a tribe in a society. And I forget what the number is. It's 20, 40, 50, something like that. Certainly not much more than that. And once it gets beyond that, you're going to need really crudely symbolic signifiers to show that you are on the good team. And in fact, not trying to lay siege or take all your food and women folk and all that kind of stuff. And there might be some ghosts of that too that make us susceptible to believe that the people that we don't know if they have these other signifiers that they are obviously and irredeemably evil and just sort of need to be stopped by any possible blunt tool that we have. And that gets into the engagement thing that we're talking about earlier, that becomes a harder fiction to maintain or harder superstition to maintain when you bring the guy from the other tribe in and break bread and talk and argue and have fun and drink and turn around and maybe you go to their tribe next time, exchange helps lubricate all that sense of trust, but we're going from a traditionally high trust society. The United States has been one of the best things about us over the years compared to even other successful nation states in Western Europe, for example, we tend to have higher trust or have tend to have higher trust, but our trust is plummeting. And part of that is kind of, you know, you want to say good because you shouldn't have blind faith in institutions who have their own corruptions and they've been pulling the wool over your eyes. And the media context, you know, you could say, yeah, we trusted the media in 1969, but there are only three networks, and they weren't really doing a particularly good job. And all the cities were dominated by a local monopoly daily newspaper. Maybe it's good to have that trust you, 'cause it helps bring up a bunch of new competitors. That's all true, but also generally true when you go from a high trust or low trust society, that just imposes all kinds of costs on transactions. Suddenly we're eyeing people with suspicion and we're going to get to the point and we're already there a little bit where your politics will prevent you from having a transaction with somebody or using some service. And that's not the trajectory that I was hoping for, someone who was born in 1968 with, I believe, interracial marriage was only legalized in the federal level in 1967. And the denial of services to people based on group characteristics was seen as pretty bad thing growing up and I worry that it's now going to be seen as tolerable as long as we can identify those things, not necessarily by ethnic group or religion, but by kind of set of political beliefs and affiliations. It is scary. As recently yes, I was can't remember who it was. What was that actor's name? Maybe it was not that I care what an actor says, but at least it gets promoted out there. I think it's Ron Perlman. Was he the guy that played the beast in Beauty and the Beast or hellboy guy? And he's advocating that, you know, and a bunch of other like, well, let's just separate, you know, let's just do scope loose. Let's just make California separate. That people.

Brett Weinstein Republican Party Gallup Bernie Sanders Democratic Party California Western Europe United States Ron Perlman
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:10 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And now, back to the show. Well, I guess where I get frustrated and just kind of falsely assuming that all these people in political positions and power, we kind of assume that they have these concepts of leadership understand. They're not really leaders. In fact, I had Sebastian younger and we show we were talking about this very point that the problem is is that these people aren't really leaders. They're opportunists, right? An opportunist and leadership do not do not lie in the same bed. And that's what's so frustrating because if you're a leader, you're going to communicate like you just said. And I think that's where we get frustrated and we want to grab them by the shoulders because we wanted to think and act like leaders. Problem is these people don't know how to be leaders. As a leadership junkie, to be a leader, you've got to be have a mindset of I don't have to have all the answers. I'm not the smartest guy in the room, but I'm here to remove obstacles so these people can flourish. I sacrifice so that they may prosper. And none of these people have this mindset. They of a teacher scholar relationship. They look at it as a parent child relationship. Some people look at it as a boss subordinate relationship, which is a little better, but they look at his parent child. Like, I know better. It's because I said so, right? And that's your default state when, you know, you don't got time to explain to four year old why you're doing what you're doing is because I said so damn it, and that's kind of how they tell they approach it, I think. Yeah, and that's very congruent with being even overly concerned or overly focused on disinformation. Because what does the whole concept rely on? It relies on that, you know, we out here are these and can be led by some puppeteer magical broadcast Oz who can tell us to think X or Y and they're therefore we're going to do this. And that's not how people consume media actually. And kind of never have and certainly not now when we have such a multiplicity of sources to choose from, but if you truly believe that the people out there are sheep, you're going to be super focused on the shepherds everywhere and saying that they're bad. And you're right, that is not leadership. One question that this raises for me and it's not a happy one is our political process, basically it turns everyone into a congressman. Which is to say, everyone is always running for office, they are not connected usually speaking with tangible making of law even. What do people do in Congress? I mean, all of the law is made in a negotiation between four or 5 people usually once or twice a year when they do a big crumb of us kind of package. If there's no amendments offered to this, all the entire process is completely broken down just in homage when he was in Congress. It was really great on talking about that process and how it's been completely just bulldozed over the last 7 or 8 years by successive leadership on both parties. So what are those congressman and women doing? Mugging for the camera, trying to get the C-SPAN cameras to notice you. So you can have a viral clip somewhere. You're turning into a troll. A media troll more or less. And if that's increasingly that's definitely how congressman act, more senators are acting like that now because a lot of their process is very similar to they don't do a lot of serious work. And those are the ranks from whom we usually choose the president. Certain recent president notwithstanding, none of that is super leadership material and even the referenced president is Trump and while one can have respect for him, especially as a media entrepreneur even more than a real estate entrepreneur, that is similar to a congressman in that you spend your time just sort of like thinking about kind of maximally trolling and mugging for the cameras, which is not you had a great phrase of getting out of the way so that you can allow people to succeed where necessary. And you can apply that also to systems. Look and see where a system is blocking something and clear out the brush in that system to allow things to succeed quicker, which is arguably some of the biggest failures of the pandemic are the blockages at the Food and Drug Administration. CDC two to a different extent. And actually, Trump did a little bit of the unblocking stuff at the FDA on that. But if all of the ranks, all of the pool from which we're getting these candidates are this deeply unserious camera hogging, basically. That is so different than leadership. And you can have and as a component of leadership, you can have kind of charismatic public relations intelligent presence. It doesn't have to not be, you know, the lord knows military history is filled with a lot of media generals here and there. And some of them were actually good leaders too. You could be both. Although it's usually a path to a certain set of corruptions, but you're right. We don't have a big evidence leadership kind of producing machinery right now. And it's worrying. And it's very telling. I mean, if anyone who has led their own organization, I've been fortunate enough to manage people for a lot of my career and started organizations and things like that. And the difference in mindset of what you're doing and the way that politicians behave as they're especially in the crucible moments when they're supposed to be managing things during a crisis, it's profound and it's dispiriting. It is. But I wonder why this kind of slavish or this cut of sycophantic adoration of these politicians. That's why I was like, I could never, I've never.

Sebastian Congress FDA CDC Trump
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

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"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:41 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"I bang myself up over that as a White House that has regulatory power over everybody on some level. Their approach and this approach has been played out and reinforced everywhere in the media it seems. And it's like, well, we need to take the microphone away. And that's just not you've lost sight of what you were trying to do. What is the problem that you're trying to combat? Your problem is people aren't getting enough vaccines you'd like to do them better. And you think that they're not doing it because the information that they're getting is bad. Okay, maybe that's true, maybe that's not my tend to be kind of skeptical about that. But to make the information vanish, no, like you have to, as a public health and it's a federal government, you have to make sure that the things that you say are true, which they've done a very poor job all throughout the pandemic from the beginning to this week. They've done a bad job of communicating truth and also being disciplined about not communicating untruths or not over speculating about what a certain study might say and give people enough information to make their own decisions. They haven't done that. And by targeting misinformation or supposed misinformation because some of these things turned out, turn out in the long run to be approved by the CDC or like official lines about CDC, an example would be Rand Paul was banned, kicked off a YouTube for a week because he suggested that cloth masks aren't very helpful in blocking transmission of COVID. He was right. And he got kicked off for that because back then you weren't supposed to say that in the CDC wasn't saying that. Well, the CDC is saying that now. And so where does he go to get his apology? Well, of course, no one's going to apologize to him. And the idea that acting in such a trigger happy way just about COVID misinformation is going to be helpful when what signal does it send to people who may be more politically aligned with Rand Paul and also skeptical of vaccines. It says you're using your heavy hand to censor people like me. I'm not going to believe the next thing that you say. It is so totally counterproductive. I wish I could shake them by the show. It's insanity because they sit around and look at each other and wonder why we're so divided. It's because they don't never once take a look at themselves and say, hey, maybe I'm the reason why they're so mistrusting. The fact that even just so simple thing of, you know, and where I lost it with Fauci, without even doing any research on them, you know, when he first came out, I'm like, oh, okay, yeah, you know, this is all happening. We're listening to him, seems like a reasonable guy. And then I found out that he intentionally lied about wearing a mask because he wanted to make sure that people didn't, you know, gobble them all up in the first line responders wouldn't have him. Having that kind of mindset just like that totally like, how do you think like that? Why don't you just go on and say what you just said? Hey, look, we're concerned about these masks running out. If you can, please don't buy and let's give them for the first responders. That's all he had to say. Instead of lying, that's all that all had to say. No, it's the noble lie idea. And the thing is, CDC in 2006 published a big kind of the next pandemic type of operating manual. And one of the things that was absolutely critical in it and stress and underlined was that it is absolute crucial that people making public remarks about the pandemic give information, accurate information as soon as they know it, and that they don't abuse that trust and part of giving information is to say what we don't know. What we suspect, but we don't know yet. And trusting that way you build up trust with the American people when, you know, it's the, oh my God, we have to do this time or whatever. And the mask thing from the beginning was just Fauci was the then Surgeon General who didn't, you know, he could have said, please, we'll just hold off on the masks. We have a distribution problem. And when we're done, no, no, no. He said the masks are something like worse than useless. Like, no, that's not that it's not how you do it. And on a couple of occasions, Fauci has said that his, he's sort of revised previous guidelines or metrics or whatever. Saying, well, you know, we're trying to encourage people to do X, Y, and Z people can smell through that. And I can see through that. When I remember drove me crazy because I have two kids, 13 and 6, now 7. And the 7 year old, you know, she's been wearing a mask for two years of her 7 on this planet. And hates it. She was a good soldier for almost all of it, and then even this very morning, what did she say? She said, do you know what I think about masks? I think about them like that really bad word that you know that I know, but I wouldn't say. Which became the B word. Whatever, 7 year olds are a special beings, but there's a month. There's a week in November. In which we had just heard that one of the companies Pfizer, whoever had just come through with a great breakthrough therapeutic that looked like it had a huge amount of promise. So that was happy, and then that was also the first week that the vaccine was available to 5 to 11 year olds. So for those of us who want to have our 5 11 year old vaccinated, that was a wonderful day of relief. And it also got us to think about like, wow, wouldn't it be great in the states that the blue states that we live in because that's where these mandates are that the mask mandates will be taken away and she can see her friends faces and actually hear what the teacher says. And all that good stuff. Two days later, that Friday, Rochelle Walensky releases a video saying ask the science expert kind of thing. And the question was, do we still need to wear masks? And she smiled and she said, well, actually, masks are shown to prevent, you know, like an 80% effectiveness rate to prevent the spread of COVID. Which is just a grotesque misreading of the science. In fact, the vaccines themselves in actual percentage terms. We're less 5 out of the 6 trials that have been done on them were less than 80%, 80% is a huge number in this. Totally made it up extrapolated from various studies and all smiling. And then added like, and also master pretty good for helping spread things like flu and the common cold, so it's just a good idea to do it..

CDC Fauci Rand Paul White House YouTube Rochelle Walensky Pfizer flu
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:38 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Scenarios anecdotal for that one situation. But I mean, you know, no one was yelling. No one was yelling to them. He was protesting, and I was like, I was offend your right to protest. You know, sorry. And even with the yelling at one another, some of sometimes that can be productive conversation because you are able to put a human face at the other side of an argument or a set of beliefs that you might have. You might get mad at that person. I sometimes think that one a bad little turning point or hinge point was when Jon Stewart went on, I forget what the CNN yeah, I think it was CNN and sat down with the guests at crossfire the co hosts at crossbar and said, you know what? You people are part of the problem. Stop it. Stop it. And his objection back then was and I think Tucker Carlson was somehow involved in my brain a little bit foggy, but his objection was that we're doing this stylized rhetorical political combat and that is it's kind of disingenuous and it also just turns it into a spectator sport when it's actually much more serious than all of that. And I get that and I understand that a critique and maybe I shared it on a couple of occasions. But what do we have instead now? We have a bunch of people not talking to one another and then just lobbing like half of CNN's program is about how evil fox is. And, you know, 30% of fox's program is about how evil CNN is. It's like, you know, there's news in the world too. Besides this and there isn't a lot of interchange between those people and you see that. There's just a lot of sorting. I live in Brooklyn where my local blog probably voted about 90% for Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton was more. I think Gary Johnson came in second in 2016 and Donald Trump came one vote in our area, but you see it like people coming up with my daughter. I don't mean to throw in order of the bus, but she reflects a certain attitude that's being kind of communicated at the public school. She's 13. And she will say something like, well, you know, that person's a Trump voter. We don't want any of them around. And I'm like, that's no, that's not our value. I mean, you can't write out 74 million people. That just doesn't, there's no scenario. You shouldn't write out 1 million people. Let alone that. And I think Jordan Peterson actually, I'm not the world's biggest fan. But I find it interesting. You went on Bill Maher a couple of years ago, and he made this essential point that I think about a lot is like to the people who are absolutely outraged that those 74 million people, what are you going to do with them? Like, you can't just keep redrawing various boundaries and maps and platforms and whatever to exclude them from all conversations. You're going to have to deal with them. And I think 2022 this year politically is going to be a year of a lot of Democrats and their kind of allies or ideologues in the media are going to have a traumatic time coming face to face with that Americans are going to be rejecting a lot of democratic politicians this year. Absolutely, it's happening. It's going to continue happening. It's pretty mathematical, almost at this point. And you're going to have to come up with a different analysis rather than, oh, it's because they're all crazy racists who want to destroy democracy. Let's grant that there might be a couple of those. I don't know. But it's just the same way like in Canada where the prime minister Pierre Trudeau and up here. That's a gen X slip. Justin Trudeau, the way that he characterizes the trucker protests of being like, this is just extreme bigoted, you know, Nazi sympathetic people. It's like, you've got to find a way to deal with and understand or be around enough people who think different than you politically, or else you're going to say crazy things. And you're probably going to act on those crazy things at some point if you have power. And it's not a good place. I think it's much more healthy and decent to be having conversations with people with whom you disagree and hopefully drink. Yeah, it's all about engagement. I mean, that's what drives me crazy about all of this stuff that we're seeing, you know, from the Rogan deal to everybody else is like, well, why are you so afraid of why don't you just engage and have a conversation? I mean, because that's how things get better. And to say, well, we got to silence him. That just makes me even more suspect for the motives. I mean, to sit there and say, I mean, I've been saying this for before, even this flap began. One of the single most impactful things that Rochelle Walensky could do to convince people to get vaccinated. Go and Joe Rogan, have your ideas and your science and whatever at your disposal, if he starts talking nonsense, you can disprove them in the moment. And it turns out that he can in the moment say, oh, that's a good point. That's interesting. I was wrong about that. I've seen him do this with my friend Josh zepps from Australia. Talking about the vaccine's effect on myocarditis. And he, you know, in real time, sort of altered his view in the face of evidence. Like go to where there is an audience, understand that there are audiences out there that they might be persuadable. And if we are behind at this point, other countries in vaccine uptake, find out where those people are, talk to them. But that's not the approach. The approach for a lot of people is and including the administration, you know, singled out Spotify again last week, Jen Psaki, from The White House, but also said every tech media company and news organization really needs to watch what they say much closer and they need to be on the lookout for misinformation and to make sure that they are uplifting solid information and kind of downgrading your blocking bad information. I understand on an individual level that one and the individual journalistic level, I take it very seriously, do your darndest to always say things that you know to be true. And if you don't know it to be true, label it in some way speculation or whatever..

CNN Jordan Peterson Tucker Carlson fox Jon Stewart Gary Johnson Justin Trudeau Joe Biden Donald Trump Bill Maher Hillary Clinton Brooklyn Pierre Trudeau Rochelle Walensky Josh zepps Rogan Joe Rogan Canada
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:22 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"That is surprising and it's to watch and it's understandable that Bill Maher would kick against it. The right has departed so many of the things that we grew up with thinking. I mean, at least there was always a rhetorical feint towards free markets, right? Regardless of what Republicans actually did when they went into office, which is usually spent just as much money, but on different things, maybe. But that kind of Trump and the rise of the kind of populist right, there's been a real repudiation of that. So we're definitely seeing a lot of shaking up with the snow globe right now from my point of view. Both the right and the left in their broader organized blocks are veering towards populism and illiberalism, sort of anti liberal in the classic sense of the word liberalism. And that is concerning. It's like the biggest contextual concern that I have about where America is at right now is basically that and it's various products. At the same time as somebody who just doesn't belong to teams that creates a Turk rich environments and it also creates audiences for people who are fed up with the way that those people are being sort of flattered or served. It is alienating. And so I think it's a real opportunity in media, especially but also in politics kind of at least the way we talk about politics, to engage with audiences who just sort of instinctively say, what do you people even talking about anymore? And Bill Maher at his best as always been somewhat to find that sweet spot and to kind of inflame people on both sides while he's doing so. Yeah, and I do think it is something I mean, again, I hate putting people in tight little boxes of bows on them and labeling, but I mean, if our generation, I was rereading, I think you retweeted it and I can't remember who the article was or even the author. I should look it up. But I just read it this morning. You retweeted it and it was about how generation X was kind of this we're in this middle, right? And it's so true. Remember, when we were in late high school and college when Tipper Gore was, I remember how pissed off I was at that time. Remember, in like putting the record labels warning labels on the records and trying to get us to not listen to certain things. Yeah? And I mean, I remember, I remember sorry to interrupt, but even the 2000 democratic convention held in Los Angeles was where I'm from. Tipper Gore showed up because Al Gore was the nominee and I think she was wearing a Grateful Dead shirt and they had a little thing on stage called drummers for tipper. And I was looking around going, wait a second. It was only 14 years ago. It wasn't that long ago, when she was the bad guy here on all this kind of stuff. What do you people doing pretending to dance at this? I think twisted sister was her big ire. I think how crazy it was Dee Snider's gonna talking and going up to Congress and pleading his case. I thought that was a great moment. Political history would see Dee Snider at me. The name. The name of the author is Antonio Garcia Martinez. Who wrote a piece called gen X marks the spot on his newsletter, which is called the pull request. And it's great. I mean, I'm a sucker for anything that venerates gen X, obviously, but there's something to it that there is a we are caught in a sensorial sandwich between boomers who are still exercising their kind of control over culture and their piety about what is good and what is bad. And between millennials who are very much don't have the same kind of bedrock faith, have more of a sense that speeches is a threat. It's violent. It makes them unsafe. Which I think is nonsensical, but holds a lot of sway among that generation. And we're kind of in the middle going, what do people do in here? And the best thing you can say about us is that we still don't have any political power after all this. The people who end up running the country are still going to be boomers and pretty soon it's going to be like Pete Buttigieg. I don't think he's even gen X anymore. Yeah. No, it's so true. I remember when the first go four happened, I think I was a senior in college and I want to buy a computer science teacher. He was a staunch lefty at the time. And he organized a massive protest. On the campus at the time, but I remember we went there. I mean, everybody was cordial. It made me, he was even cordial to me, and I was slated to go into the Marine Corps. I was going through officer candidate school. I knew when I got my degree, I was getting a commission and going into the Marine Corps. And he would talk with me. That's what kills me, right? I mean, he didn't agree with the fact that the Marine Corps, the military, the Marine Corps of the funding all that. And of course I was all for it because this was going to be my career. But he had the civil conversation with me and that's what's I yearn for. Long for those days and now it's just like everybody's throats, you know? I suppose you had it there too, but back then, but.

Bill Maher Tipper Gore Dee Snider Antonio Garcia Martinez Al Gore America Pete Buttigieg Los Angeles Marine Corps Congress
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Maher and I talked to that guy, so that wasn't that long ago. That was only like a week or so ago. So thank you for accepting invitation. The fun thing about going on Bill Maher besides doing it, which usually is pretty fun. I will sometimes it can be terrifying, especially the first time you go on. But is that people will see it that just otherwise would never encounter what you're doing in the media world. You will always hear from that friend in high school, who you haven't talked to for 25 years. My favorite moment like that is I attend a local old Italian Catholic Church in my neighborhood and these great old Italian ladies and one of them came up and you don't associate Bill Maher with religion necessarily it's kind of more like the opposite. And this sweet old Italian Catholic Catholic and he's like, I saw you on Bill Maher, you were great. What are you doing? Watching Bill Maher, but the world is a wonderful. Yeah. No, it's got to be yeah, I can imagine it's got to be terrifying. I always thought about what it would be like to sit up there and I guess you really it's fairly unscripted. I mean, I guess you know topic is two topics are going to be, but you don't know where it's going to go, right? Particularly for the other. Yeah, and one of the fun things about doing and this is true of other media too, because you generally do have a sense of the topics, but there are certain hosts who, you know, their brain just might just veer in another direction entirely and they want to have this suddenly a philosophical conversation about X, I always like that. That's more fun to me than to know, okay, here's the 6 minutes and we're going to stay here on this idea and you've got your 45 seconds to do whatever, but Neil cavuto at Fox is really great like that. He'll just like throw the script out out of the water and let's just now explore over here. MSNBC used to have a few weekend morning shows where that kind of discussion was encouraged and it's always more fun. So bill can be like that. Even if the topic is already been like this before the way that he'll present it and just sort of like throw a jump ball in the air and see if you're going to jump up and hit it is different. So that makes it more of a mental challenge. You have to be flexible. You can't go in to that show at all. I think you can't in general go on TV at all with like, okay, I'm going to say this in this order and I got my subject and verb and predicate all sorted out like nope, that's not going to work. He's going to discombobulate you and also you're doing it in front of a live audience, which is very, very different than almost any other kind of television experience. So it's fun. Yeah, I can imagine. I like that too. I mean, it's like living on it's terrifying, but that's kind of where life begins at edge of kind of being uncomfortable, that uncomfortable zone, right? That's kind of always liking it. I mean, I've been a print journalist since 1986. So it's been a while now. And I always presumed that I had a voice and face made for print. This wasn't going to be the fun thing for me. But I noticed early on when I started doing television in particular, more so than radio. There is so much I used to play a lot in a lot of bands. You know, making music made records. And there is a feeling that you get when you're playing music on stage in front of people. Right before the first note for the first, you know, thing kicks in. That is absolute, beautiful terror. You don't know what's going on. It all could come crashing down right now. This could be the time that it blows up. Your career, especially now in these fraught media times, you know, you slip your tongue up the wrong way in theory, you could be out of a job overnight. It's happened to many people. More recently than ever, but what I notice is that the physical sensation was so much more like playing music. And that's one of the reasons why I like playing music is because that high, you're not gonna get the same thing by going, boom. I just turned in Marty. It is different. There is a whole performance well and an anxiety and then pay off and I used to co host a TV show on Fox business network with MTV's Kennedy and Camille foster called the independence. And what I noticed was like, I think it was at 9 o'clock or 8 o'clock was in the evening and you'd stop. And there was just no chance that you can go to sleep for two to three hours afterwards, because you're just hyped up. Your body is hummed up a thing. So I really enjoy that and lean into it as much as possible. I like that phrase, beautiful terror that is a great way to describe it. I told this story before on the show, but to telling you that I had a, I don't know, maybe 15 years ago, I had a coach here, and she was helping with my public speaking. I was doing a lot of keynote at the time, and she was actually an acting coach that had her sag awards, had worked in Hollywood, had been in a couple of pilots and she moved back here to where I lived in.

Bill Maher Italian Catholic Church Maher Neil cavuto MSNBC Fox Camille foster Marty MTV Kennedy Hollywood
"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:10 min | 7 months ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Well, you know, that person's a Trump voter. We don't want any of them around. And I'm like, that's no, that's not our value. I mean, you can't write out 74 million people. That just doesn't, there's no scenario. You shouldn't write out 1 million people. Let alone that. And I think Jordan Peterson actually, I'm not the world's biggest fan, but I find it interesting. He went on Bill Maher a couple of years ago, and he made this essential point that I think about a lot is like to the people who are absolutely outraged that those 74 million people, what are you going to do with them? Hey, welcome to the dose, a show dedicated to deep and engaging conversations, highlighting individuals that are in the pursuit of authentic and courageous leadership who approach life with insatiable curiosity bold action and common sense in these divisive and uncommon times. It's my hope you take something away from each and every one of these conversations and apply it to your own life, as we all intentionally attempt to become the best we can possibly be. By living out our purpose and calling, committing to life a service and helping make this place better than we found it. Well, it's my pleasure to have Matt Welch on the show today. I've been a Matt Welch fan for a long time, so for me this was a great conversation. He's an editor at large at reason. The libertarian magazine of, quote, free minds and free markets he served as reasons editor in chief from 2008 to 2016. He's also the co author along with Nick Gillespie of the 2011 book the Declaration of Independence. How libertarian politics can fix what's wrong with America? His work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal of The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, ESPN, the hardball times, the Columbia journalism review, salon dot com, commentary, orange Canada register and scores of other publications. These are frequent guest hosts and MSNBC Fox News Fox business network CNN. You probably see them on Bill Maher's show and HBO as well, where that's how I can possibly. He lives in Brooklyn, New York. This is a dose of common sense. I really appreciate it sitting down and talking with Matt about the craziness we see in today's political spectrum. We'll sit back, relax and enjoy this great conversation with the one and only Matt Welch here the dose. I saw you on Bill.

Jordan Peterson Matt Welch Bill Maher hardball times Nick Gillespie CNN Columbia journalism review The Wall Street Journal The Washington Post The New York Times ESPN MSNBC America Fox News HBO Canada Fox Brooklyn New York Matt
"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"The next generation Was one of his first big film roles and the amazing thing is patrick. Stewart has not aged one single day since his appearance in dune in either one thousand nine hundred eighty four. Dry hate you know. it's a dry heat on dune. so this he has been very dry. Dryest captain of the enterprise of my heart for all of my life So i will. I will finish just by saying that. I also saw free guy New movie about a background video game character and npc or non playable character who comes alive and discovers his soul and his reason for being. It's sort of an ai. Pinocchio set in a fake fortnight world. This movie has gotten a lot of very good reviews and it just i did not like it. It felt very forced and calculated to me and weirdly decides to run all of its like Here's the people who hadn't noticed. But they're coming alive and they're individuals and their personalities. It runs it through like a very shallow and thin sort of labor politics like at the end they literally. Npc's go on strike and there's a the the b- plot is all about a couple of indie game designers with like a nonviolent waterfall game. That's really innovative. But some big bad corporate guy stole their ip to. It's literally the the the the stakes in this movie are weather. Indie game designers will get their residuals or not. It's it's not very good it's an empty spot. The reference game especially the end the the most interesting and worst thing about it is and this is a little bit of spoiler so you can shut this off right now If if you don't want any but the most interesting thing is just the way that this twentieth century studios movie which is to say. it is From the legacy of twentieth century fox. Which now is owned by disney which of course also owns Also owns marvel and star wars. And all that right. Yes this podcast. If we're being honest or fog incorporates a whole bunch of ip from the disney verse right of marvel star wars stuff just sort of starts popping up in this movie at the very end until you see the the fully operational disney death star here In wi with regards to exploiting ip and just sort of dropping the entire universe into every single product. Okay so that is all we have. I find if. I may peter the i. I'm not gonna watch movie Hearing your review of it. But i had seen a bunch of trailers that were completely inscrutable. and it became a rohrschack test of. Do you wanna see ryan reynolds Not in full body makeup like he was in dead poll. Which is the only movie. I think. I've liked ryan reynolds yet. So it's like it's. It's a weary of that. Movie was just solely dreary and not really funny but seeming to be making humorous line. That may be would understand if you watched the movie but doing his leg. Confused very much. Ryan reynolds and g thirteen deadpool mode and i guess if you really love that you might find something appealing here but i certainly did not That is all the time we have today. Folks thank you for listening. We'll be back next week with matt welsh once again in the big chair until then happy monday..

Dryest disney Stewart patrick Ryan reynolds marvel peter matt welsh
"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"And and summers off of course and anna month off between christmas and easter. And all of this kind of crap you know. what do you do there. And there are signs that you know the You know the major teachers unions are pushing really really hard to to maintain the site. They were not opening up. You know until everything is safe and nothing will ever be safe enough for teachers to return so you have that question where there is a parallel universe where masking mandates are absolutely gonna stop things from happening whereas you have most of the people flouting mask ordinances as they exist and this brings me to build. James matt welsh when he talks about. Pete rose and ray fosse colliding in the one thousand. Nine hundred seventy all-star star game You know the the fact of the matter is it's illegal to block the plate as a catcher but it was widely practice and that bill. James says you know you can't have a good society where people are openly flouting laws at leads all sorts of problems and you can actually see that informing his later work on various kinds of social issues from baseball but it is true. It's not good to have a society where people are openly. Flouting island that up by rains up for the last part of that answer. Except for when. Nick said the word fosse and my brain was like bob buzzing and i woke up and saw jazz and started snapping napping and then right back this way. You know what. Bob fosse would've would've tagged by vision. Just wonder dancing gifts. I catherine t. And by the way i if i may just say i'm bob willis when i think about fosse of course i think of roy scheider in the same way when i think of patent i think of george scott and when i see pictures of bob aussie unlike terrorism. Vieira all that jazz. If you're not waking up in the morning peter rubbing like really bad aqua on your hands slapping your face after taking a bunch.

James matt welsh ray fosse Pete rose anna bob buzzing catherine t bob willis James Bob fosse baseball Nick roy scheider bob aussie george scott Vieira peter
"matt welsh" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"We need free childcare free this and for that, of course, But he mentions that like economic restrictions. School closures are jarringly partisan. The Brookings Institution, which is a left leaning Think tank found recently. There is no release relationship visually or statistically, between school district's reopening decisions in their counties Cove in 19 cases per capita In contrast, there is a strong relationship visually and statistically between district's reopening decisions and the county level support for Donald Trump. That's astounding. A follow up study in the fall by education next found the exact same leading correlation with the second biggest factor being the political strength of the local teachers union. I'm sure that will just shock you to your core. As with economic lockdowns. Here's where he really brings it home with the help of a liberal columnist in The New York Times, by the way, As with the economic lockdowns, these blue state school closures have disproportionately harmed poor and minority Children. And this is William Christoph in the Freak in New York Times. The blunt fact is that it is Democrats, including those who run the West Coast from California through Oregon, Washington state who have presided over one of the worst blows to the education of disadvantaged Americans in history. Rights. New York Times comes. Nicholas Kristof. Wow, That's some strong language. I'm surprised and missed this that that is amazing. Well, there ever be ever be a Price to pay for this. Well, anybody pay a price for the teachers, unions lose any power wound. Anybody get voted out of office over this because it is It's awful. It's awful what they did the kids in general and in specific Disadvantaged kids in response to your question, I would say it's unlikely they'll pay price. Because guy like Nicholas Kristof, he sticks his head up in the New York Times and goes against the You know the dogma of the left and says, Who's with me? And looks around and doesn't see anybody with them. I don't think read that last part, he said. Again. I insist. The blunt fact is that it is Democrats, including those who run the West Coast from California through Oregon, Washington state who have presided over one of the worst blows to the education of disadvantaged Americans in history, He goes on to say the result. More dropouts less literacy. At and numeracy widening race gaps in long term harm to some of our most marginalized youth. And then getting back to Matt Welch writing Yet instead of confronting, intending to roll back that glaring inequity, the Biden administration is actively made it worse. No doubt and still will not say. Committed to schools being open next fall, which is just mind blowing right right. They mentioned some of the CDC guidance that the kids have to stay six FT apart, as opposed to three ft advocated by the World Health Organization, which is his own pilot craft, But most governments worldwide have agreed with that assessment. And then he gets into how the teachers union nakedly and we talked about this wrote policy for the C D. C on how schools would be reopened, keeping in mind that there are thousands of private schools operating perfectly well with the kids. Three FT Apart, actively participating in sports, and then the recess and the rest of it. And everybody's fine. It's it is a crime against Children. It's historic is Nicholas Kristof says It's amazing. There's a lot more to this and I would love toc sure it with you at some point, but old They were preventing kids from playing outside. When that was by far the best thing they could do. Outdoor play, not just safe but essential for reducing the spread of the virus and increasing the well being of Children. And yet blue states like California kept police tape around playgrounds well into the fall. Unbelievable. And it's all about Trump. Well, that's not true. If you read Thomas. So will's a conflict of visions. There are different P kinds of people. They have a different mindset about humanity about the world. And if you have one mindset, you tend to be conservative. If you have the other, you tend to be liberal. Although there's now a split between liberals and woke liberals that's really, really interesting, but It's an incredible crime against the kids. We've said it 100 times. I'll let it drop. Yeah. Yeah. You know, I'm sorry. I won't let it drop. The fact that it happened Angers may the fact that no price will be paid. And very few Americans are aware of it or even have comprehended what happened And why it happened That that makes me nuts. I can't even think about it. Right? I think there will be a lot more discussion of this. I'm going to assume that most schools will be open next year like normal, but I assumed that for this year and was sure wrong. Um It's gonna be quite the ongoing conversation as schools try to figure out how to deal with these kids. How the hell do you teach a roomful of fifth graders? Some of whom are still third graders, right? Right and particulary poor and minority Children disproportionately. What are you gonna do with that? Lower standards Pretend they're doing okay. Inflate grades. Cover ups. I don't know. Hell of a challenge. I think they'll be a lot of passing along people who aren't ready for the next grade. But man, Oh man. Meanwhile, the folks in the Red States and the private schools they're gonna be saying Well, that's too bad for you guys. That's terrible. I feel bad for those kids, and then they'll get back to teaching because everybody's fine. Any comment on that or text line is 415295 K FTC, We have to do another round of Preakness horse or streaming show and Die yuppie scum of famous phrase of what the eighties early nineties sounds about right has become by yuppie scum as nineties. Rich guy gear is back in style dough, boy. Oh, boy. Stay tuned for that. Armstrong and getting Born.

Donald Trump Oregon Nicholas Kristof William Christoph Matt World Health Organization 100 times California Trump Thomas next year Armstrong Democrats Cove next fall this year eighties Red States West Coast nineties
"matt welsh" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Doesn't listen to study found vegetarians who drink and smoke are still healthier than meat eaters, huh? Must be pretty annoying, having dinner with some of these drinks and smokes and then it's like the chicken breast will kill you. But it's good news because vegetarians have been feeling left out since People who love crypto currency became way more years hating invested in. I know I heard her. Yeah, that's good. That's good. We got sounds annoying, Vegans. Way to go crypto guy thistles kind of breaking news here before we get to what Joe's gonna talk about S O earlier this week. I heard it yesterday It was reported that colonial pipeline Had not and would not pay the hackers the ransom money. Bloomberg is reporting in the last few minutes that they paid the hackers. $5 million in Bitcoin. Contradicting reports earlier this week. Maybe they were trying to keep it secret. And it leaked out. I don't know, but they pay him five million bucks to get the pipeline back. Yeah, I understand why companies and institutions don't want to talk about it publicly. You don't want to say Hey, if you blackmail me, I'll pay get that too. But if crime pays, they'll be a lot more crime. Yeah, I know it hits tough man. Good guys are definitely behind the bad guys when it comes to The cyber blackmail. What do they call it? The Ran somewhere ransomware. That's it. Yeah. Oh, hey. Speaking of tech, though, I want to say a couple more things about allegedly Apple is working with this Rock Lee Photo tonics company, and it's thought that future apple watches will monitor blood pressure, blood, sugar and alcohol levels, among other things. The mark of the beast. That's what an apple watches. I see somebody with an apple watch. I just think m o b point. You know the Bible? Oh, Lord Bible. Here come the emails. Here they come and I get to look at him. Great. Thanks. They used infrared sensors. The gods shine through your skin and can see all sorts of stuff in your blood won't give you cancer. Nothing counts so much as blood. That's right. Jean include Gene Hackman there, Oscar winner. Maybe I don't know, including body temperature, blood pressure and glucose, alcohol and oxygen levels in the blood, I think, actually having Ah, rating on your wrist, all the time of your blood alcohol level. Would be amazing. It's not enough to make me try drinking again. But it would be really cool. Send you videos or we could hang out. And I'll just take a swig waiting, waiting whether it is and I think it could be great for the whole Jeez, I'm drunker than I thought I was Yes, I'm drunk. I will be arrested. If I drive at this level. Yeah, So you know, that's I think that's good. And plus obesity is such an enormous problem. No pun intended in the United States, Um All over the world. Really? Increasingly, but it's such a big problem in this country. If you could see there's a weighty issue. Look at the look at my blood sugar. I'm heading toward diabetes. I think that'd be wonderful so anyway. During Joe's wild Joe talked about that we had B roll of heavy people walking down the street like they do on the news from behind, so you can't see the face down. Yeah, from the neck down to the knees. They just saw the middle of bodies walking down the street of really big people as they talk about obesity. Oh, obesity right right now, If it's your favorite news channel, it's obesity B roll. You've already seen 100 times, There's the fat guy in the blue shorts again. There's the fat gal in the flower top again. Anyway. All right. Changes topic. I found that very interesting from the science desk. Let's stay at the science desk. You're going to hear Susan Collins, the senator from Maine, who we played. A couple of days ago, talking about the C D. C and their guidelines and the rest of it and Sanjay Gupta of CNN as well in clipped 15, please. I used to have the most respect for the guidance from the CDC. I always considered the CDC to be the gold standard I don't anymore. So how would you? I mean Sanjay, There are many people who agree with her. What do you think? Yeah, it pains me to say this, but I I see where she's coming from Senator Collins on this. I mean, I think for a long time that concern was the CDC was providing guidance. You know, at the beginning of the pandemic that was not scientifically based as a result. We didn't do things that we should have done in this country That could have greatly mitigated what has happened here and now I think it's almost a limited the reverse problem. The science is not necessary being followed to the same extent. And as a result, we're probably doing things that we don't need to be doing. So you know, In the end, the CDC needs to be just a science based organization. What does the science say? You don't need to wear a mask outside. It's just one of these things that again. We've known this for some time. How many people on TV on different places, including CNN need to say you don't need to wear a mask outside. People will continue to be wearing masks outside are mandated to in various places and looking at you like you're an ax murder if you don't have a mask in an open air park exactly, But back to the CDC, Yes. So they told us not to masks where masking the meeting when we should have, And now they're telling us to wear masks when we don't need to know this job, And so it makes you wonder. This is the first time we've all ever really taken a look at the CDC, right? They've been giving us guidelines on how much red meat to eat. And how many push ups to do forever she had. How long have they been about all that stuff? Yeah, I don't know. I have no idea, but they are committing credibility. Suicide. Right now, And I mean suicide because if something crazy happens, there is a very inter whatever in the fall, and they start issuing pronouncements, at least half of America is going to say retired of you. I'm sure you make crap up. Oh, sure. At the very least, you'll be very skeptical. So I'm somewhat similar topic or at least tangentially similar. I've mentioned a piece by Matt Welch in their reason dot com A couple of times. It's uncharacteristically long for reason. That's half a book. But it's about the equity mess and he points out. Camilla Harris, who was talking about the women are disproportionately affected by the cove it and Blah, blah, blah..

Matt Welch Camilla Harris Susan Collins Apple Sanjay Gupta Gene Hackman United States $5 million CNN Sanjay Bloomberg apple Maine 100 times yesterday Jean five million bucks CDC Bible first time
"matt welsh" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"The moment The 53 year old was arrested almost a year after he made this video after his wife went missing on Mother's Day. I will do whatever it takes to get your backs. I love you. So Joe told us yesterday. That's Suzanne Morphy. Disappeared. Mother's Day More few who despaired Mother's Day, which is this Sunday, right? Yes, Mother's Day. A year ago. God he snuffed his wife on Mother's Day, allegedly Um, but you know if I'm feeling murderous, some probably not worrying about holidays, even ironic holidays. I'm gonna murder another human being. You know what I mean? Like her. I'm gonna kill a mall. Santa. I'm gonna kill him on Christmas is likely is I'm gonna kill him June the third. It's harder to find you in the third. In your scenario, at least all right, but maybe you know I hate him. My hatred is, you know, it's lasted $6 pounds, but so you just heard the alleged murderer, So he got away with it for dang near a full year. They closed in on him. Somehow, he appeared in court today they arrested him, but that tearful video that he cut I love you. I'm gonna do anything to get you back. Joe. You say that that's like a common among people who kill their wives. Oh, yeah, yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's not proof of anything but the fact that you did that does not make the cops say Well, it wasn't him clearly. He's upset and try and organize a search. No murderer would do that. That was not the reaction that's wild. Yeah, well, I have a feeling the cops had their eye on him from the beginning. It's just a question of getting the evidence together. Yeah, and it turned. I watch a little more of that on good morning America and family friends. Everybody from the beginning was like it was him. Really was him. We know it was him. Yeah, He's the kind of guy who would do this. Yeah. Okay. All right. Complete change of topic here. Love this piece By Matt Welch. I think the Senate was Robbie Suave. I was thinking of something different, but Matt Welch with peace and at reason dot com, Uh and it's all about the whole equity mess. But then he makes an interesting pivot. On, he says, with the emphasis on equity administration officials are inviting. All of us to judge them by their work's not their words, the results. We should take them up on their offer. After all, the results of government covert exertions today, particularly for traditionally disfavored communities, and Democrat govern polities. Areas have been demonstrably brutal. Then he talks about Kamila Harris taking of the page of The Washington Post back in February to sound the alarm about the loss of jobs for women she hit several statistics has enough to fit 40 football stadiums. This mass exodus. Women from the workforce is a national emergency, and it demands a national solution. Then he goes into the stats. Yeah, sure Enough. This pandemic hit women disproportionately hard in terms of lost jobs, and Matt goes on to save her Harris. The economic wreckage from this borderless virus was self evidently a federal issue, she said so herself. But a closer look at state by state unemployment numbers reveals not uniformed damage but striking variation and the determining factor seems to have less to do with the pathogen and more to do with politics. Net number of jobs throughout the whole pandemic decreased in 48 out of 50 states. Okay, And that's why combo, saying this deserves a federal response. But when you start the results by the drop in the percentage of employment, a startling pattern emerges. To wit each and every one of the 18 states that suffered the worst job losses during that span each and everyone voted in November for Joe Biden. In 11 of the 18. Democrats controlled both the Statehouse and both chambers, the Legislature. Meanwhile, the 18 states with the lowest rates of employment change. From Oklahoma to Utah, Utah actually gained employment share their own anomalous political characteristic. They each feature unified Republican executive and legislative control of government. Well, that's pretty interesting. I'm trying to figure out the wise and all that, but it's shooting down or not shutting down to what degree you shut down. Yeah. Ha. That's really interesting, because, remember, we're talking job losses here. We're not talking, you know, sickness, death, hospitalizations, job losses off those 18. But there would be every one of which was Republican on Lee to voted for Biden and those by the slimmest of margins. I agree that the shutdown but, you know, we all know that the demographics of politics right now tend to be more Rural sparks sparsely populated all that sort of stuff tend to vote Trump. So is that certain kinds of jobs? I'm just trying to think there's any other factors that could be going on here Other than just shut down or not shut down. We'll let me share. Some of Matt Welch thinks there are meaningful differences and governing styles and results between the two major parties at the state and local level. Sure that general baseline GOP states tend to have right to work laws. Prohibitions on mandatory in Union membership, I said is all kinds of things involved. Lower taxes, lower minimum wages, lower unemployment rates. 4.6% is the December 2020 median for 25 states with unified Republican government 4.6%. It's 7.8. It's you know, 75% higher in Democratic states that tend to have higher taxes, higher minimum wages, higher cost of living in higher unemployment. And then you get to the blue state governors in California, New York, Michigan have been far more strict about shutting down economic and physical activity than the red State counterparts in Florida, South Dakota and Texas, for instance. And then you'd have differences and how worried you are about being at work or going back to work. A Z. We've been talking about all morning all day long based on your politics. For some reason, I mean, Well in one more point. Women with Children, particularly black women, and those without a bachelor's degree, face the sharpest decline and have recovered it much slower rates relative to those without kids. Why, because many mothers are unable to work while they oversee remote learning and lack child care. Hmm, Where is that happening? Where are the school's closed the longest and most completely. And all the blue states That's really interesting to the different policies there. So many there's so many. The right to work stuff, the whether the school's air open the tax policy just all that stuff that would affect it's really interesting, so in terms of employment and effect, particularly on minority communities, blue State policies have been disastrous compared to Red State policies. Is anybody gonna talk about this? No. Is anybody going to hear this? Is the Washington Post going to write about it? No. No. And even if it did what? Anybody change anything I think I'm on my go. Should rethink this. Of course not. Yeah, This is part of a very long piece. I mean, it's like he Start to write a book. But then he got winded entitled the Equity Mess. It's under hot links that Armstrong and getting Kom aan dit comes all sorts of ground, including this was really good stuff and really well substantiated with evidence. We need to bring you the latest on the giant chunk of space Chinese Communist space junk that may fall on your head and crush you this weekend. I've got the latest. Here's the key, a phrase that I had not read until earlier today. It is the largest piece Space flotsam to hit the earth in our lifetime. It's the biggest chunk of junk ever. It's 23 tons. Yes, I think it's not even exist. I think it's I know it's an entire rocket. Yeah, Yeah, it's it's the size of a 10 story building. Yeah, that's not a piece of something. That's a thing. 23 tons. That's unbelievable. That hits you in the head to say, you know, it's not gonna do any good. What if it hits the White House? But then what do we do? We got it narrowed down to what day they think it's gonna hits. We got more information on that A U. S. Space command is actually keeping an eye on it, and we'll be watching it all week. And that's gonna be the only story in my life are strong and.

Suzanne Morphy Joe Biden Robbie Suave Matt Welch Trump Kamila Harris Joe December 2020 November 23 tons 4.6% Florida California yesterday February Matt 7.8 South Dakota Democrats Utah
"matt welsh" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Yeah. Small government with enormous power over you is doesn't make me feel any better. So on first of all, let's Okay. Let's just you know, also underscore the fact that government has not become smaller under, you know, under Republican rule when we talk about it as, um, you know, like in terms of spending or in terms of the things that they regulate on everyday life, and this is actually One of the great failures of Donald Trump, who came in on some dimensions talking about radically, you know, Rhys izing are cutting back the size and scope of government. He didn't do that at all. I think you're right on by. You know that both the Republican and the Democratic ideal is to use political power, too, You know, create the world and to regulate the world in the way that they see fit. One of the things that gives me great hope. Is there's a political scientist at Stanford named Morris Fiorina, who has talked about how in you know, basically since the Since the beginning of the 20th 21st century, we have seen incredibly unstable majorities that each party gets either partial or complete control of federal government. In an election and then within two years or four years that flips to the other side. This is historically very rare, and he says it's because both parties are they are so extreme that they have reduced the ability to get Much more than 50% of the vote. Plus, maybe one vote or, you know, in the case of many presidential elections of the past 20 years, you know 49% 48% of the vote and you get in you. You the party Extremists take control and they start pushing an agenda which is revolting to most people. And the party gets thrown out. This is actually one of the good things about the 2020 election, Trump was repudiated at the national level. But the Democrats were also repudiated at the congressional level on If Trump hadn't been so awful between November and now the Republicans would still control the Senate. But we're looking at a very, very slim majority for the Democrats now. And if and if Joe Biden pushes his agenda, which The Washington Post of all places said was the most liberal platform that any Democrat has ever run on. You know, like the Republicans will be back in power in 2022 or 2024. On until these parties, I think, get to a closer approximation of what you're going after Bob, which is a government that actually gives people more freedom to live, how they want, regardless of the dollar amount of the government. We're gonna have these unstable majorities and just keep going back and forth between competing and equally repudiated visions of control through political power. My goodness. Thank you. You're reading off by outline what you mentioned Freedom just now I have to look around to see if there's a cam video camera behind me beating my outline for your benefit. So you mentioned freedom on observation on you mentioned libertarians have a point of view that the time has come for free to get attention. The point is, when was the last time That either political party even mentioned the words, Liberty said. We stand for more freedom. When was the last time that was a plank or a sentence? Or even Followed by a semi colon. When was the last time that freedom Morfogen Tum for the individual became an element of a party platform? The answer? Not in our lifetime. But libertarians say that's the starting point. I fear Nick that freedom has become like a disposable commodity. No matter what each either party look at the plank of either party. Both parties always stand for not spoken. But as a result, less freedom. So we have two political parties who are in there in the carrying out of their platform. They are anti freedom, at least not for more freedom. They are for less freedom. That's why they want more governmental power and also Nick Ah thought, because I can't I have my own opinions. I don't know how he got there. I find it to be Astonishing that both on the national level and in in more than one state, like for example, Florida Of course, it's the It's seems to be always the poster child for it about to say, how did it happen? That the country is so close that elections are decided by a dozen votes. It seems like it's astonishing. Now I have my own. I've reached my own conclusion about that. But it can't be like a coincidence. Can it What do you account for the fact that we're so evenly split so close to 50 50. It doesn't make that much sense. To me. It's almost seems like it's random. Yeah, well, you know, God going on eight years ago. Nine years ago, my colleague Matt Welch, and I wrote a book called The Declaration of Independence, TNT. I loved it. I loved it. I loved it. And it was, you know the starting point. The starting observation of that was that when you looked again if you look go places like Gallup survey companies that have been doing this for decades. Around 1970. You know, 50% of the 50% of Americans consider themselves Democrats. If you know if you call them up and said, what party do identify with not That certainly d always vote with them or are you registered, But you know about 50% were Democrats. Somewhere in the forties was you were Republican Now, Would you look at the same? Exclamations. It's 31% for Democrats 29% for Republicans. The two major parties have stopped representing the plurality of American people, and we're locked in, but because they are long, you know, lumbering, slow moving institutions..

Democrats Donald Trump Nick Ah Rhys izing Morris Fiorina Joe Biden Morfogen Tum Stanford scientist Matt Welch Senate Bob Liberty Florida The Washington Post
"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"matt welsh" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"The president is pushing us down this road and if in particular after having sought foreign assistance and welcome Elkin Ford Assistance in the last presidential campaign as a candidate he is now doing the same thing again but now using the power of the presidency then then he may force us to go down this road I have spoke with a number of my colleagues over the last week and this seems different in kind and we may very well have crossed the Rubicon here that was House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff remember him on CNN's state of the Union Sunday talking about the possibilities as of impeach. Hello everyone welcome to the editor's roundtable of the reason podcast. I'm Matt Welsh joined.

Elkin Ford Assistance Adam Schiff House Intelligence Committee Matt Welsh CNN Chairman president editor