18 Burst results for "Matt Mullah Wag"

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

03:49 min | 5 months ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

"Introduced me.

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

03:51 min | 5 months ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

"About salaries,.

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:08 min | 5 months ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on How I Built This

"So just think about that number for a second. Something like 40% of the world's websites are built using WordPress. That's a pretty astonishing statistic. If you consider that its main creator, Matt mullenweg, originally built WordPress is a nonprofit blogging platform. That was back in the early 2000s when Matt was about to become a college dropout. At the time, he moved from Houston to San Francisco, determined to join the tech scene. He was an early enthusiast of both blogging and open-source software. Basically, programs or platforms that are free to use, but also designed to be improved by their users. And his big idea was to build a platform free and open-source, of course, that would allow anyone anywhere to create a blog. Now, at the time, starting a blog wasn't so easy. WordPress changed that. But when Matt started to get job offers from some of the big tech companies, he turned them down. Not because he didn't want to work for them as you will hear, but rather, because he knew that going to work for a tech giant would mean giving up his intellectual property. WordPress caught on largely because it appealed to two very different types of consumers. People who didn't know anything about technology or how to code, and people who were hardcore programmers who believed in open-source platforms that they could improve and tweak. Today, WordPress is one of several products that sit under the parent company, Matt created called automatic. A company now valued at over $7 billion. And a business that technically doesn't have any offices, despite having nearly 2000 employees around the world. Anyway, Matt grew up in Houston, along with his sister. His mom managed the family and his dad worked as a computer programmer. Mainly for oil companies, and as a teenager, Matt was actually pursuing a potential career as a musician to be precise, a saxophonist. Saxons just so cool. Who would play saxophone? Bill Clinton played saxophone famously. I think Lisa Simpson on The Simpsons played saxophone still does. It was just a fun and cool instrument. And I chose it because my dad played it. And I love jazz. And a lot of the music I listened to at the time was probably like what we call oldies. And Saxon was much more prominent in music back then. So those are just fun here. Sacks and popular music. So for high school you ended up going to a performing arts high school, which became, I think, pretty famous because of one of its most famous graduate Beyoncé. And their sister solange also went there and this is the high school you went to. Yeah, she went to my elementary school as well. Actually. She's a couple years old in you, right? So I think we overlapped in elementary, and we didn't overlap at the same time in high school. She got pulled out a little early to Destiny's Child. Yeah. What was the high school like? Was it like that show fame, where people were like, you know, dancing in the hallways and playing instruments in the lockers and by lockers and stuff. Yeah, it actually really was. It was a fantastic environment. In fact, I kind of thought that was how I'd make at least part of my living because that was the first way I really earned money, let's play in this excellent. How did your money playing sex? Gigs? Yeah, so it would be like an Italian restaurant. Right. With a big band. Sometimes. So just kind of like, you know, big lean saxophone. You never really play by yourself. You're always playing with people. So I always love the interplay, the collaboration, the camaraderie that came from being a pants. What was the kind of the decision point where you thought, you know, I'm not going to go into music. Was it just clear to you that that was not a, I don't know, maybe it wasn't a practical decision if you wanted to, I don't know, have a stable life. I don't know what was your thinking around that. You know, at the school, some of the kids were just true prodigies. And I was more pretty good. But how to work super, super hard to get there. And definitely not the best. So, yeah, it just became clear and during high school I also started to get a lot more. I'll probably even before that in the computer stuff. I remember when my dad first started to have a computer at home, because normally he would just have one at work. We would build them, so kind of putting them together with a project, kind of like building a kit car or something. We buy the parts, we put them together. So I was always tweaking it and changing things and trying to overclock it to make it faster for games or whatever it was. And I'd often break it. And if I broke it and my dad came home and it was broken, he would be pretty cross with me. So I would definitely try to fix it before he got home as like a race against the clock. Like trying to diffuse the bomb before it goes off. What about the Internet? I mean, were you already, you know, talking to people over the Internet where you in chat rooms were you active in any communities at all on the Internet? Yeah, I think I found my very first post and it was on like a freemason channel. I was really into this idea of secret societies and things. And so the communities would form around a shared interest, but it would really, it was about the other people. You'd get to know the other 20 folks that were there. There was a chat system called IRC. I would log into and use a lot. So it's kind of like a think of it like a text based slack. And then we created them. So one of the best saxophone players still and Houston and one of my teachers was this guy named David caceres. And so he paid me 500 bucks and I made him a website. But then for no good reason actually, I put form software on his website, so there was like this form where people could post. And you could ask them questions, but really it just became like all of his students. And to ask people in town would hang out there and talk to each other. How did you learn how to put a website together when you were in high school? I mean, because it was much more complicated. This is like 2000, 2001. It was much harder to do than it is today. How did you figure it out? Did you get a book? Did you get a manual? Yeah, there were definitely a lot of it was trial and error. There was early website publishing software web services like GeoCities, software like dreamweaver, front page that would allow you to make honestly kind of cool for the time websites. So a lot of my learnings, or this is true of all computer stuff, is I would just kind of click all the buttons. And the other main thing I was doing online was I started a photo website. Called photo map. And I was posting photos. Two website website that you had put together? Yeah. Why use some open-source software called gallery? And it was a PHP script that would allow pre Flickr pre Facebook for anything to post photos and have calories online. And it became really popular about my Friends. They'd go every day, see the photos,.

Matt WordPress Houston Beyoncé Matt mullenweg Lisa Simpson solange Saxon Bill Clinton San Francisco David caceres GeoCities dreamweaver Flickr Facebook
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Interacting with other human beings and not just a computer all the time like i used to that the company has benefited and then when other people do the same work Like any relationship when people invest into improving the relationship that multiplies. And i like to think that maybe not all thirteen hundred. But we've got maybe twelve hundred or twelve fifty folks investing in improving the relationships at the folks that work with and that's when alito much better product over time faster iteration order some of the blind spots. You've uncovered working with coach this year. How limiting my communication can be sometimes even sometimes how ask a question from a place perfectly good intention can put the other person in like a victim mentality but unlike our mentality were on solving things someone. I can play the savior role so they can be very very subtle. It's like. Is there anything i can do to help you. I says what do you need for this to be success. One is like putting the power with me. The healthy other is putting the power with you to define what you need and then i support that but ultimately you have the agency which is far more empowering. I've been learning and working on by the way non. Violent communication is an amazing book and bc. Which has a terrible name was really valuable That was not what this coach but was a game changer. If years ago the other is like i feel like for most of my life. I kind of treated myself as like a brain in jar so like disconnected intelligence that i'd invest a lot in exercising ray brain but not anything else but also not really listening to my body and so something i've been working on a lot is trying to listen to you. Whoever speaking to also listened with awareness of what's going on throughout my whole body and that's been kind of amazing in just this idea that maybe you can name a feeling by naming feelings also hard until inches on on with shane..

twelve hundred thirteen hundred twelve fifty folks this year years One
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Happened five times already because you know when you first look dot com.

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"And so we need to make sure that we have the organizational structures in place at a sport that and we've shifted to the kind of digital berkshire-hathaway we've prioritized some longer. Infrastructure product investments in. Sort of using the opportunity of this year to say. Hey let's let's do this five-year investments and really started now and really make lots of progress on it and then just hiring scaling are hiring and training. It's kind my other obsession. Which i know you. And i have talked about before like if we can make people timbers more effective. That's the grill of hiring one hundred thirty new folks and so how can we invest by the way one side effect of being distributed in having the mastery tommy purpose even credible retention so our regretted sureness something like four percent per year three percent three and a half percent and so if people stay more than a year or two. The probably be here a very very long time so you have to train them. They're going to be around forever. Settle joke like whatever. I train people leave. And like what if you don't and they say that guy we've got some examples of this to be completely candid like we were a little bit relying on in person as a crash so a lot of our previous learning and training happily together in person so we are much like children in the world trying to learn how to do this in a distributed fashion really really effectively and just invest as much as possible in coaching Programs and concepts we like like radical candor. And how do we get that distributed throughout the whole organization so all of this is probably the most important thing we're doing is organization right now. I wanna talk a little bit the differences between public and private. You just mentioned doing this five year. Big infrastructure investment. Is that something that you get an advantage of being a private company. Where you might have more scrutiny. If you're a public company how do you think about it that..

five-year three percent four percent five year more than a year one hundred thirty new folks two three and a half percent one side this year
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Acceleration for our business. Because as the world economy and everything shifts online our e commerce business will commerce the blog inside the site creation. We've worked i dot com even users. Tumbler grew and so everything was up at a time. When i would say are my colleagues are impacted so i feel like we were operating. Probably even still like seventy percent efficiency of what we were pre pandemic and that is largely the. Oh it's it's everything that you can think of. People are literally getting sick. Sometimes they loved ones that are that they need to care from the impact on folks who care for elderly or children versa. You know has been really disproportionate. I think this this year. And so i've seen a big impact for folks like for kids at home trying to home school on like this is really challenging. So we're not operating at our peak at what's funny is other organizations been switching to distributed having talking about how they gained fifteen or twenty percent so my theory is that we were at like one hundred percent we came down to seventy they were fifty percent and they went up to seventy especially if you had kids right and you had elementary school. Children like myself sent home and it's like true working men and eleven year old at home. It's good luck it's a it's different so that has has been a challenge. Were also though at the precipice of of even far more growth so if you look at the percentage of e commerce we have the percentage of websites or anything like that. There's several dublin's in our future. And so we need to make sure that we have the organizational structures in place at a sport that and we've shifted to the kind of digital berkshire-hathaway we've prioritized.

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Create your own version of it but um sort of like have this level of conversation with people and see where it goes. I think that was really effective. I want to go back to decision making a little bit with the the pichu program and having this distributed sort of like record of decision making which seems awesome. Because you'll be able to pick out. People who are consistently right might not be as heard or recognized as because you'll be able like eventually computers will be able to save. This person is more consistently accurate than perhaps they're they're waiting in. The decision happens but how do frame that is. Everything time box like you said at the start. We have thirty six hours to make this decision. What are the parameters that you put along that so that it doesn't just spiral out of control. And how do you differentiate between decisions that need to be made as soon as possible and maybe larger strategic decisions. That can be as late as possible. I think sometimes we do this poorly by the way. So there's definitely threads that get started which don't have a clear goal or outcome or time limit and they can just meander on for days or weeks and then you come to it later like oh my goodness what is that says. Like fifteen twenty thousand words. Do i decipher this. Automatic is written communication culture. And i believe clear. Writing represents clear thinking and we filter for this in hiring and we we talk about writing a lot so we invite writers. We talk about books on writing. Well words at work to like get people to be clear written communicators some of the things. I'd recommend other companies. Try that we've come to l. Let's say there's there's a A post which is presenting an idea. A very common pattern is a t. l. d. are at the top ever not familiar that acronym it's t. l. semicolon dr and it stands for too long. Didn't read and so essentially. Oftentimes people put like a little tweet late..

thirty six hours fifteen twenty thousand words
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Like pool in the number two and so if we're trying to make a decision for the now says widget inside the product we don't call a bunch of meetings about it. We create a threat and so this internal blogging threat. Someone will say hey we decide on this widget mouth as discuss it for thirty six hours. And then we're going to make a decision and then everyone essentially has almost like an internal common thread. that's kind of like mixed between not just like a blogging common thread or forum. Where they can discuss. They can embed videos in gifts and mock-ups in discussions linked to research and everyone's kind of participating in their own time and they're right and essentially little mini essays so steps on the cuff responses and reactions to things. We're able to really think about it. Take around walk around the block. Shower may players dog. Think about the problem and really ruminate on it and bring their best answer to and then everyone's doing that back and forth and then at the end of the time period because that's synthesize the best wisdom knowledge information from this make decision and so it took a little bit longer. Maybe from start to finish. I feel like the decision could be ten or a hundred times better and when the quality of your decisions determines your outcome disorder. Process can be amazing now also. Let's fast forward. Each thread that gets created is adding to the institutional knowledge of the organization in a permanent way. So it's ten years later. Like why on earth does a widget work and what usually happens particularly software. Engineers come into this. I'll let let's rewrite this sort of reinvent if scratch and then they. Reinvented the same problems again. All bugs because they didn't really understand why it worked the way it did before but now there's this perfect threat which shows the entirety of the thought process of the decision and how the decision came from. And so now we have now at automatic. I feel like it's a. It's our biggest asset more than the money in our bank. More than us offer anything. Is this sort of now. Fifteen year record of every decision. Every design process. Everything is in these internal blogs. And it's kind of amazing what you can find there. Of course we built a good search engine for and everything and you can really mind. And i think it allows us to now not recreate the same mistakes particularly when in tech company fast growing twenty thirty percent of your people might be there less than a year they might be ready do and so is allows fast scaling companies to escape the ground hodousek. That often happens when you're growing quickly and what was level five level five is nirvana it's somewhat unattainable but you always want to aspire to. So i think that we have glimpses of level..

thirty six hours twenty thirty percent Fifteen year ten ten years later Each thread less than a year level a hundred times five two
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"If you haven't essentially what are are how companies evolve through working in a distributed fashion because an engineer we start counting at zero. So there's a secret. Six level level is job which absolutely cannot be done distributed. What's funny is we think. A lot of jobs were zero. It turns out they warmth in the pandemic. So i like to refer to a telemedicine us. Thank you needed to go into the doctor to have them. Look at that rash on your kid. And i can do that online. So level will zero like construction. Maybe being one level. One is one. If you weren't in the office or with your other colleagues for a little bit of time you could get by but it's the environments not really suited for so typical and level. One is like a family emergency. Go pick up your kids from school. Maybe you could hop on a phone call. But maybe you won't have access to like the vpn or internal company resources. It wasn't really designed for that. So you get by for day but you're pretty unhappy. Level two is where most companies went to a pandemic sellable. Two is where you basically try to take everything you didn't office and retreated online and this is like the cargo cult of the sugar at work right like you. You say oh you know. We used to be in six hours of meetings a day now. Let's be six hours resumes a day and let's have these ways of reporting and let's In a maybe you have access to more tools online A typical if you're in level two you might feel totally exhausted at the end of every day in a way. You never did an office. Lots of little to organizations too many meetings you know. They worry about mont an selling monitoring software on their employees. Computers are like in. They don't have a good way for people to to have a home office for things. Like that level. Three's where he started to embrace the benefits of being online..

six hours One zero one level Three Two one Level two level two Six level a day
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"It's why it matters in the beginning to write. Because i've tried to change talked about physical distancing ideas in conversation but at some point there's so much momentum around the term. You're kind of stuck with it. So naming things particularly in the beginning is so important because whatever your code name is whatever the the the the thing is the internal name you know. You're gonna end up with that almost certainly for a long time and changing names later is is especially if you're successful is almost impossible. Yeah i can definitely see that terminology. Once it gets a hold of you is like so hard to to get rid of. What are the differences between going distributed at this point in time in these circumstances and being distributed by default from the star in a global pandemic. I think that there's just aspects of life which are very difficult and challenging that you wouldn't in a non pandemic scenario so Part of what's great about distributed at one question we also get Lonely because they don't have their friendships at work things and they could be certainly like if if you're only social networks at work. You might be lonely if you weren't working with people physically but then what does that. Open up a helping the opportunity for you to choose people around you. Geographically does spend time with who you can talk about things out of the work you talked about with work talk about someone else. You can play ultimate frisbee. You can do Among us or sellers guitar and you can go to music you can. And part of our model of distributor also provides a fair amount of autonomy in how people get the work done so in if your customer support you need to be on a few house weekly. You have a lot of tomei choosing those hours. Your engineer or designer. You did accomplish things. But gosh if you could do that in one hour a week for you. It's really about getting from a to be. We're not tracking down. You know how you do it so that allows people a lot of flexibility design their day around what works best for them. Now there's folks who wake up every morning star work at four thirty am. I would never ask someone to do that. But that's what they feel more productive to get a couple of hours before the kids wake up a non pandemic times. A lot of magicians love dropping their kids off from school and picking them up. That's easy to do because you don't have to like leaving office. Walk into a parking lot. See all your colleagues going somewhere. Wonder if you're goofing off. I guess just barbara day and i liked that. It creates a lot more objectivity and focus around what the actual work is. Because i believe in offices were so distracted just as a human social animals by all the things around the work. How someone dresses. Whether they're president or not with times of presents they appear to be working really hard and these things are not territory right. Yeah definitely. I had a friend once who were furnished investment bank and he. He figured out very quickly. This was like a facetime culture thing not necessarily a. You're working all the time thing so he did. This sort of i would call it clever. He hired the janitor who used to come in at like three or four. Am to switch his coat and turn on his computer every so it looked like he was the first person in the office and he would stroll in at ten and you know like he had just come from a meeting or something in. Everybody had thought he'd been there because his computer monitor was on. And it's like yeah it's hilarious. How he thought of the. I love that. So i'm gonna use that in the future but it's so much easier..

four thirty am four three first person one question one hour a hours barbara ten
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"I think it probably would have been a little bit easier just to completely recreates by the six thousand servers that they had before and by the exact number with his configuration in our data centers we ended up producing that about eight hundred. Seventy six thousand eight hundred part of that. Was you know doing a lot of engineering work to bring things onto what we've learned with best practices and being super duper frugal with everything we built and so took a little bit of work but it just saves so much that it made sense to make that kind of like no. We're gonna do this decision. I wanna keep going a little bit more on this. Is it run by the same person. It was run by before. Or is it run by somebody new so the ceo jeff is still in place a he was the ceo before he's the ceo now. So that's really interesting right because that sort of leads me to speculate. That environment matters a lot to help people perform. Is that something you think about it. I think it's the most important thing by far. So a company running a community with wordpress r- obsessing over the environment where creating and i think there's a microcosm of that like think about the environment around you in your office or you're working. The smells temperature. The lights the inputs. The music everything contributes to how you're operating and companies have to that and act communities. Have equivalence of that you know in wordpress. We have five ten thousand people contributing to wordpress on a regular basis Now what sort of environment is happening there. We have something happening right now. Which i think is fairly unique and exciting for open source which is worth as five point. Six coming out fairly soon is an all women release. Lead squad. Wow that's awesome. It's a result of the past decade of trying to make like wordpress really open inclusive friendly place to be and it wasn't that there was ever a specific gender target or anything like that which is why most open source projects only attract a certain type of person. Not even michael engine to a certain type of person who like loves the fight and beyond mailing list and night and then what sort of products that. Great over time. If we're trying to create products for the world our mission is to democratize publishing congress. So if we want truly democratize it which means everyone has access to it. Regardless of language technical building anything we need to get as the world involved in building this. And so i think about that for every aspect even language. I want people who don't even have the ability to speak or read english to be able to contribute to wordpress and have their code included. What good deeper on some of the other differences or not differences but things that you see is environmentally impacting people's ability to nana lincoln tribute but perform at work in work. What helps people. What unleashes them inside the organization environmentally that we might not see as constraints as somebody. Who's thought about this a lot. The best framework found. I believe i got from dan. Pink in his book drive which is mastery autonomy. Purpose mastery is essentially Being challenged and getting good at what you do you think of it when you're on the issue that curve for learning new skill autonomy is essentially the freedom to be able to do it. So you're not being micromanaged. You're not being so many people and organisations know what the right thing to do they can't do it and finally purpose is working for something bigger than yourself. I think that it's very difficult to drive. World changing performance. If it's.

congress six thousand servers dan. Pink Six about eight hundred five point Seventy six thousand eight hun nana lincoln five ten thousand people english past decade michael engine wordpress jeff
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"Now yeah so. I was in college. I ended up dropping out to take a job at sea nets which was a digital media company which early adopter work best and after year there. I really wanna work in this full-time i sort of pitched him. Wordpress dot com all the automatic related to. Is that what we don't we don't want to do that. But we'll we'll support. You will invest at you and so That was candidate. The genesis qismat funnily enough used to be called automatic spam stopper until we realized that was unfortunate acronym naming usually not my my forte and actually my sister came up with that name and that was very first product and it was a plugin for wordpress also plug in for many other systems so some large social networks who's it accounting systems discuss other platforms like little type. Drubel can use kismet and that was also one of the ideas. Tell me a little bit more automatic. Click what are you guys do and so automatic started actually fifteen years ago. I just celebrated my fiftieth anniversary of the company and the idea was to essentially credit company. Watch trying to build and flourish from the open web and open source so we wanted. I wanted to create a place where i could work on open source fulltime and all the other developers worked Could benefit from it. We also wanted to create a company a for profit that was paired with a nonprofit where each one would be stronger than either way beyond is up so nonprofits do thousand things four hundred thousand things but when wordpress we have as injury wordpress dot org which is open source software which is now owned by odd. We have automatic which creates services wordpress dot. And then there's a huge ecosystem outside of that you know. Wordpress as mentioned earlier has some the most incredible market share and that's been very rewarding but automatic. The company actually has smaller revenue than than other companies. That you've probably heard of because we only make a few percentage of the dollars in the workforce ecosystem so we've always targeted and i got. This seemed to be sort of a law of platforms The way back to like dos and windows if you look at like the launch of windows ninety five one of the things markelle safra offer talk about you. Remember that launch. There was. He would line up at best. Buy a new iphone or something. I feel like there was like a rolling stones song and you know people get billions. Okay so one of the things markets off a talk about the time is for every dollar we make from windows nineteen or twenty dollars made by the windows ecosystem. And so. that's kind of like you know. Call it. They were about five percent. I kept finding this ratio twenty to one everywhere successful platforms not invade platforms like facebook. Facebook made like ninety percent of the dollars in that ecosystem but in others and so automatic. I wanted credit company which didn't take the oxygen out the room so we would try to make about five percent of the revenue in the workplace ecosystem and then grow the pie as much as possible. That's a that's a really good concept. Because i guess the theory behind that is if you're you're capturing more value than you create you'll inevitably die and if you're not capturing enough value you'll inevitably die. You have to capture a little bit but not too much always less than the value you create for others. That's the idea. And so the products we've evolved into doing our our workers dot com is kinda like are easy.

ninety percent Facebook iphone twenty fifteen years ago billions fiftieth anniversary facebook Drubel sea nets first product Wordpress about five percent windows ninety five markelle safra each one dollar twenty dollars Wordpress dot com windows
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"The ability Those changes means that the software takes on like almost like an evolutionary dynamic where there's sort of survival functions and wordpress itself is actually a fork so kind of like evolutionary branch of assistant software copy to when be to died there were like five or six of these different branches and we're ended up being the one that was the most fit and survived. That's amazing Love the concept of being able to sort of look under the head and see what's going on. How do you commercialize that though. Like what causes people to work on open source projects. Yeah part of the freedom is the freedom the chart for the freedom to commercialize it the freedom to sell it anyone listening to this could take wordpress and sell it to others. In fact many many do you can get wordpress from blue host or go daddy your amazon or million different places. In addition for more vista college rerun. So that's part of what's built in there and there's different business models around open source There's some much try to say. Like here's is open source thing that will give you the same thing under a different license are will put the best features in so papers. I personally don't like that because it seems to take what makes open source successful and essentially have incentives against right because if you played it out ten twenty years now your very best features are going to go into the paint version and the open source thing will probably wither on the vine a bit. And we've seen some of this happen so the approach we take is essentially making all the best stuff in what we call core which is a software. You can download from wordpress and wordpress our can use for any purpose and either we create services around it. So the first one we launched was actually anti-spam service called which just celebrated its five hundred billion spam blocked. I remember. I remember that from back in the back in the day. How amazing was that. That's an arms race. The like blocking spam while italic talked me through the through the comments and trying to figure out if it's a legitimate person or it's actually what things the most products of today we call it like a machine learning system that at the time we didn't and it's now ten years later still has over five nines of accuracy for blocking spam and keeping an allowing good stuff through so it's essentially like basically again it's all about markets markets always trump anything individual company do and there were all these solutions to blocking spam on sites. They would only work for that one site. And of course what happened is as families between their code and and it would start working so we created a system that essentially allowed all the kids being bullied on the playground to work together. And the gang up. and i. that's what makes you mandate is our ability to collaborate so we started collaborating against spammers and so they would very quickly but the network would adopt in real time that they're changing tactics and in particular with web. Spam typically web spam is trying to direct either a search engine or person to a place so that provided a really great avenue of But you know about security available target these because ultimately they didn't just want to you know they didn't want to rank first in google for v. One g are for right. They want rate. I for viagra Or whatever the random term that china rank is and so that ultimately ended up being one of the weaknesses and still is a weakness. Today they still are trying to spam me to strictly website. It was a kissing start of automatic or was it was different origins. Because you're running automatic..

five today ten twenty years Today six five hundred billion spam one site amazon ten years later google first one over five nines china first million italic wordpress host v. One g one
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"I'm so excited to be here. One of my favorite at favorite wordpress sites in the world. Yeah definitely what percentage of the internet are you now like fifty sixty. No not yet not yet. I think we're thirty eight percent at the top ten million websites which is more than ten times. The number two. yeah yeah. Furnish streets like point zero zero zero two percent of that. But yeah but it's like twelve percent of the awesomeness a- and you a very rare to letter got blocked on redo one of the oldest in the world. Thanks to you. That was possible to really appreciate. How did work press get started. What's the origin story behind. Wordpress gash wordpress came out of of a passion. I was blogging and found the software called me to to essentially founded as the most customizable blogging software out there but very small the dominant one was called movil type just kind of a static site publisher probably ninety five percent the market by likely to and i started like volunteering the forms and writing little code patches for like helping other people and so got involved in that community which i've always found the most exciting part of building things are being online. It's being persecuted and when the software kinda got abandoned I blog about that. And said i'd love to see something that combined. The best thing is the simplicity of blogger. Customize ability or the power of movable type the elegance of tax pattern and ability to those reporting a blogging platforms so kind of try to combine those things. This fellow i'd never met in the uk a little if you're serious about this. Let's work on this together. He was another volunteer on the forms and things and also a real developer was like a nineteen year old kid used professional and so we just started packing together together and that turned into war us. And how did that like overtake the world. Was it just like it was such a better mouse trap or was it a timing thing or like what was the. What would you describe. The reasons of that sort of one set at a time and still to this day i believe in sort of incentives and environments and markets always trump anything one individual or company can do and i think we're presses a great example of that the competitors others in the market were far better transfer funded had hundreds of employees are launching onstage..

twelve percent ninety five percent nineteen year thirty eight percent two percent fifty sixty more than ten times One ten million websites uk hundreds of employees Wordpress wordpress one individual number two one zero
"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

"I believe all proprietary software to be an evolutionary dense. Maybe it'll take fifty or one hundred years but what happens just like what happened fairly quickly with like encyclopedia. Britannica and other cyclopes. Wikipedia is at the thing which is open to all and gets everyone working together if it truly gets that sort of like humanity working together on the same shared resource you get the opposite of the tragedy of the comments versus like the field being overrun each person operating in their own self interests so kills the environment or kills. Share thing you each person operating their own self interest mixture share thing better and better and digital world. We can do that. Because we have economists economics of abundance versus economic scarcity. that's why open source of wolves eventually win every market..

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"matt mullenweg" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Optimal minimal this altitude. I can flat out and start shaking question now. It Time cybernetic organism video endoscope books. I've loved on the Tim. Ferriss show is exclusively brought to you by audible. There couldn't be a better sponsor for the series my dear listeners and readers. I've used audible for so many years as long as I can remember. I love it. Audible has the largest selection of audiobooks on the planet. I listen when I'm taking walks. I listen while I'm cooking. I listened whenever I can. And if you're looking for a place to start I can recommend three of my favorites. I is the Tau of Seneca by Seneca. If you want to hear my favorite letters of all time touches on stoic philosophy calmness under duress etc. The next is the graveyard book by Neil. Gaiman G. A. I. M. A. N. One of my favorites even if you're a nonfiction purist this is the fiction book that you need to listen to. Neil also has perhaps the most calming Voice of all time in third. Greg McEwen's essential ISM subtitle the disciplined pursuit of less. This is one of my favorite books of the past. Few years combines very well with the eighty twenty principle but more inaudible every month on will members get one credit for any audio book on the site plus a choice of multiple audible originals from a rotating selection. They also get access to daily. News digests from the Likes The New York Times Journal and the Washington Post as well as guided meditation programs and here are some other amazing audible features and I use a bunch of these. You can download titles and listen offline anytime anywhere. I use this feature even when I could get access. I'll put my phone on say airplane mode because I don't WanNa get bothered with notifications and I'm taking a walk to to clear my head and you can listen to you. Titles offline in a case like that or on a plane or whatever. Obviously I'm not flying much these days. The APP is free and can be installed on all smartphones and tablets. You can listen across devices without losing. Your spot and Whisper. Sink is another feature. I use quite a lot. I love reading my kindle in bed for instance then picking up at the same exact spot where I left off when I go walking and listening to the next day kindle and audio versions can be sync up automatically is just amazing. And if you can't listen don't sweat it. You don't have to rush. You can keep your credits for up.

Jason Fried on Treating Workers Like Adults

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

08:24 min | 2 years ago

Jason Fried on Treating Workers Like Adults

"Jason. I am so glad expected. Likewise basecamp formerly known as thirty seven signals has been so many ways and inspiration for automatic over the years and I'm sure countless ever distributed companies. So thank you for that I of course and I would say likewise I mean you guys are even more distributed than us so oh I feel like we're year the ideal situation where we're getting there because we're we still have about fifteen people in Chicago and we have an office there were maybe are you getting rid of so. We're GONNA be following your footsteps so we we had zero office but then with the acquisition of Tumbler. We've now got a space in New York again. So we've got the direction Right it's funny how we keep trading. Yeah we're not sure we're GONNA do but our lease ends in August so we're thinking about moving on as as in moving on to nothing and then trying to do that for a while and see what happens in if that works out. We'll do that if not will We can always go back to getting off again but we'll see just for our listeners. Who might not be as familiar with base camp? What you kinda publicly share about the scale of the company customers number of employees that sort of thing? Well we've about fifty-six people who work at base camp and we have close to one hundred thousand paying customers all in across all of our different products Although basecamp is the primary product but we have basecamp way of high-rise. We have a few others but basically it's base camp in all three generations. We have classic base camp tune based Cam three. This is a specific as we'll be but we generate tens of millions and annual revenues annual prophets. And we've been around for twenty years to Sir Twenty th year in business and we've been profitable since the start kind of a big thing for us is to always be profitable so that's that's Kinda only KPI. We don't really use those terms but that's the only one we have. Which is let's make sure we make more money than we spend every year in in other than that whatever happens happens? How do you think about investing more or not? We don't have a investment shortfall. Kind of thing. It's not like if we only had an extra. I'm just making up rough numbers here. Next million bucks we would do I do x or y like we. We have everything that we need to do. And we don't want more people because we want to keep the company's small we possibly can so we we have a bit of A. It's on a dilemma really. But it kind of is in a sense because I feel like we're doing everything we could do and having more wouldn't help us In fact I think in in some ways it would probably hurt us. We'd be a little bit slower. We be probably doing too much work at the same time which I think can often dilute what you're really trying ado. We might take on more stuff than we really want to. We might just find work invent worked. Keep people busy. There's always of course more work to do but we kind of believe in doing it at a certain pace and I think having more people or fewer people would at this point would can mess up that pace when you say a smallest possible. Do you mean by customers or by colleagues and employees. I mean employees. I mean The number of people who work here. We've always wanted to stay at fifty or less but we're about fifty six right now and that feels like a really good place to be so. We're very comfortable with that. The thing is is that we could have considerably more people but again we're just not really. Maybe maybe we're just not good at it. I mean I'll just take the blame for that like I. I'm not probably good at running a much larger company than this and I don't think David is either. I don't think we want to. I think it also keeps Edward honest in terms of the experiments ruling to do which I didn't some places more and more and more experiments is a good thing. I think a few or thing but I think too many people people get stuck doing things that never ship over and over and over and over and over and I think that can be a bit demoralizing. So we think we've got kind of good enough feeling here right now at least but then again we're the largest we've ever been and I'm sure when we were thirty people. We said You know thirties enough. So you know we're here fifty six at feels like enough right now. We'll see how it shakes. A louder probably has to do with with the success of this other product. WE'RE GONNA launch next year because the one part of a company that that does have to continue to grow is customer service so product development doesn't have to grow. We have enough people there but as we have more and more and more customers of course we have to make sure we support them at the highest level. So that's that's one place where growth does continue. You need to happen even if we don't want it to offer automatic that's been pretty larch it's been appointed half of our company was a customer service just because we wanted to maintain a certain level there and as the customers went up. You just got kind of goes literally one of those things yes. Of course you want to invest in making the product easier documentations self help and everything like that. But at some unlevel he wanted a person talking to a person. You need some more of them. You know you WANNA do documentation and make things easier to everything. But I've also I've been sort of changed my mind and a little bit on on it. I think earlier on when we just had fewer people we are really focused on. You know like on the self help side of things and you know making ensure documentation was really good and answer great online and people could find their own answers and we WANNA make sure that's true too but actually see customer service interactions as a competitive advantage manage. Most companies are pretty terrible at it and the larger the company is it seems like the worst they get try to email. You know Google get help and say forget it or Amazon sometimes times but not always that great although quite good sometimes also it's one of these things are the larger you get the more customers you have just the hardest to maintain that level standard. Have you tried to live chat for customer support yet. Yeah we do that sometimes and it sort of depends on availability and then we also use twitter as well for that those those things all work out really well as well it just depends we wanna meet people essentially where they are with the exception of we don't have a published phone number but if you want us to call you we will live. Chat was a big step function for us. Just both young terms of agent and customer happiness. Because you cannot resolve things on the spot actually know we do support rotation where everyone the company goes into us. Customer service at least one week here is actually coming up and I think a couple of weeks. You're journeyman. Yeah so if you contact us and I think it's the third week of December you might get me. We do the same thing we call it. Everyone on support One day every like roughly six weeks or eight weeks or however like the the company you know the the number of people are you know as we rotate through. So we'll each do support for a few days a year throughout the year. It's great. I'm glad you guys do that too. I think it's one of the most valuable things you can do for reasons come rotary hearing from customers and understand the language. They're using syncing their frustrations or their happiness or their whatever it might be the and then also just having a lot of respect for customer service as a as a job in as a career in a lot of places. Customer Service is sort of treated as a almost as a part time. Job as a stepping-stone somewhere else but I think it can be a wonderful career and it's just really nice to see the people who've dedicated their time here in this my only experience of course to work in customer service for five six seven eight plus years and really see the work that they do and support it is and and it's our it's our doors are frontline. It's really important experienced. What is your company breakdown right now in terms of roles in the fiftyish? I'll give you some rough numbers because some people are sort of multiple things so he can't. It's like if I give you the counselors might not add up to fifty six so we have about Currently a belief sixteen people on customers support and that also includes. I believe. You've this might make it seventeen or still sixteen. The team lead so all of our managers or team leads are are working managers and that they do the work too so sixteen ish On customer service we have seven ish on technical operations all the server work that kind of stuff all the level infrastructure work then we have four people people on what we call the SIP team which is security infrastructure and performance. We have about seven fulltime designers. We have around fifteen. Gene developers actually fewer than that because some of them are now on SIP on the team around that number. We have two people who do our podcast work. We have One data analyst. We have an office manager slash keeper. We have a head of people ops than we have David who's CTO Oh and museum CEO. We have a head of strategy and ahead of marketing.

David Chicago New York Jason. Twitter Google Office Manager Product Development Analyst Edward Amazon CTO CEO