35 Burst results for "Mation"

"mation" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Science Friday

"Years ago on september eleven. The world changed the ball. Did i'm jim. Oh great with the story of a new american who risked everything to try to take down a terrorist cell. You'll have to talk like you have to think like commodities blinds by the road to nine eleven a podcast series from the history channel and wnyc studios. Listen wherever you get podcasts. This is science friday. i might replace. The brain of a person with alzheimer's disease has a few hallmark traits i. There's a buildup of plaques of proteins called amyloid beta second or tangles of another protein. Called tau with an individual neurons and the third is inflammation and while researchers have long thought the inflammation was a byproduct of the disease itself. There's a growing hypothesis that it may be something else. A driver of the disease progression. That would help explain why researchers have found people whose brains are full of tout tangles and amyloid plaques but with no outward symptoms of disease research on animals has supported this theory but finding the same evidence in human brains. Well that's a lot harder but now a team of scientists thinks they have it time lapse images of patient brains showing tau tangles and inflammation spreading through the brain in the exact same pattern. Here to explain is the first author of that research. Dr tarik past quayle. He's an assistant professor of psychiatry and neurology at the university of pittsburgh. Welcome tarik thank you very much fighting and is very exciting. We we are able to research and we're very excited to be here today. Nice to have you well. Let's let's begin by reminding us what. Alzheimer's does to the brain at least as far as what most researchers agree right now. What does the process look like both inside and out. Yeah lepe you know about those Or say what is the most essential what you know about. Those amer is that those disease is corrected is it most referred the position of two pathological proteins in the brain. And the names of this proteins. I'm alight and tau. We know already is very established disposition starts more or less twenty years before the cognitive symptoms of the patient and we know as well protein is somehow associated with the narrow degeneration of the brain degeneration of the ring in these really to the cognitive symptoms. This is something that's established but what we still don't know is exactly how destroy proteins amyloid and tau interact with each other to the remind the progression of the disease because we know this is barrow savage as well. We know that there are many patients or out. Save more or less thirty percent of the elderlies older than sixty five years old. Have some of these proteins in the brain but they never developed it the rhodesian nation in the never developed the cognitive decline assays before ambulances certainly. There is a missing link between the position of this proteins in the development of the disease. And so what. Your research is showing that this missing link turns out to be inflammation and so how does inflammation fit into this picture of alzheimer's now if fact we know that notification is somehow associated with alzheimer's disease many many years that on many evidence any mwandosya innovating numerous lincoln. The notification falls birds but wasn't very it. How deflation plays out between this brought into this position of amyloid tau protein in the development of the cognition. The most acepted understanding of the disease suggests that the position of amyloid intel protein and each may upstream events lead the progression of disease. What you're proposing is that notification is in fact involved in the development of this involving the first step of this. What you are proposing. Is that those that have the position of amyloid protein in the brain but also have depressants fief summation debris and the ones that gonna have the development of the of staubach tallish. That's the protein that we know that mark rosie related to the symptoms in this interview this weakening their action between the amyloidosis in the brain into notice mission to bring. They developed up at all as pathology. we're going to cause the cognitive symptoms. So what you're saying is that we used to think inflammation was a side effect but now we think it is the actual catalyst for this to go to to progress is accolade this week to figure known as a as a byproduct of everything that was happening such as many orders as the atrophy of the brain but what you are saying he had an issue issues in fact involving the beginning of this is in three out there the rest of the process that come in front of nerve mation thought does so you look at the let. Let's talk about how what you actually did in the study of people. Because it's fascinating so you looked at the living brains of people in different stages of alzheimer's disease. What did you see. What does that progress of inflammation and tau actually look we assess hundred interviews and imagine bragging amyloid how notifications and what we saw was that the interview the baseline they have the depresses of amyloid. Pathology in the brain inflammation in the brain. Were the ones that developed up in the follow up in or the ones that develops cognitive decline developed the symptoms of dimension. We also found that individuals that having the bring only amyloid pathology that is believed to be honest because of the disease did not develop the the symptoms of disease and there was only some summation also did not develop this of the disease then. Our study suggests that the amulet is important of bikers diseases everyone though but amyloid alone without the presence of notification cannot lead to progression of the dow n sequences the cognitive symptoms. How i know that the the inflammation is not the result of the disease. And you're suggesting it's the cause of the disease how do you. What kind of data information makes you so certain about that. This is a very vaguely question as a measurement my less but i think for a bit more certain about that..

alzheimer's disease wnyc studios Dr tarik mwandosya tarik quayle university of pittsburgh amer mark rosie jim amyloidosis lincoln intel
"mation" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"And i think some of them that there's there's going to be some level of of blowback there. It's just it's fascinating to watch the dynamics stray right now but it is progressive policies. That are causing the dystopia. Now there is one place in america. Though where there's this weird dystopia landscape that is deeply read and it is becoming some sort of weird alga mation because of the united states supreme court much to be said about what's happening in oklahoma. This hour was not themed to be dopey. And but i mean my gosh. We're here in neal. Gorsuch has a lot to do with it. there's a five four decision Mcgirt versus oklahoma neal gorsuch sided with the liberals on the court and said that essentially half of oklahoma and most of tulsa oklahoma. Heidi you guys at k. r. m. g. might might might still be indian country under the treaties from the eighteen hundreds so there have been a bunch of overturned conviction of a bunch of criminals. Set free There have been all sorts of tax protests. Zony rules fishing rules even legalization marijuana there. They're all up in the air and oklahoma because of this ruling This is The governor who is cherokee he says in our opinion. This is the biggest issue. That's ever hit any state since the civil war. He says that essentially before the ruling that everyone in era in oklahoma kind of understood that their reservation territories and there were states territory because of the situation with the mcgirt decision. We don't know which part of oklahoma supposed to be indian territory which part is supposed to be Which is supposed to be state territory. How can i just and it's by. I th i think he was the governor of their shirt. I think he actually is is no no note jerky So let me read you part of this situation here. This is from the wall street journal editorial indians living on their own nations reservation whose income is derived holy from on reservation sources may be exempt from state tax law according to the cherokee nation the state tax commission has a number of protests pending A about whether or not they are a company that owns a power plant outside. Tulsa has sought a ruling on whether the county can legally tax personal property within the territorial boundaries of the creek reservation. The town of winchester said it would suit a stop. The creeks rebuilding a meat processing plant and wastewater lagoon which local leaders are. You ignores not only the environmental laws but also the areas residential zoning last year the seminal nations that a letter to oil and gas producers in the area asking for an eight percent extraction tact oklahoma officials. Push back at the time. Chief greg. Jill coat clarified in january. The civilization had not exerted taxation authority over non-member oil and gas producers operating on free feasible land..

oklahoma Gorsuch Mcgirt neal gorsuch united states neal tulsa Heidi supreme court tax commission the wall street journal Tulsa winchester Chief greg Jill coat
"mation" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"System stinking for hey guess bulldog a french bulldog and a pug a frog. That is correct. Who would work all right. Let's go with this. One subsidize a labrador retriever. In a poodle. What do you think me correct job. I would ever get ramona to and all right. How about a pug and a beagle. Mesa locate mace thing. You first so peaceful incorrect. Hogging beagle ramona or hey among john. Arlene has one momentum. What do you think coming pedal. Nope jonah puggle to all right next one. Let's go with the fox. Terrier and a yorkie toys fox terrier yorkie mason turkey. That's correct word. System is and i'm saying to all right we'll do like i don't know my brain's not working to write it out or something i can see it a pug and a shitzu. Whoa either what do you think. Mesa a shug. Moma guess. Vermont hug and shitzu. Mary puggle pugs you. I'll give it to you all right. This one is it's mark mason. Horry won the next two. Sorry to all right so he gets one. We'll do the tiebreaker. And if not then whoever gets it wins. Okay all right a miniature pinscher and a poodle miniature pinscher poodle Okay it's a tough one. Or what do you think poodle. No that is a good gus. But that his match direct. What do you think race kindle. Nope how mamo pinch you. You guys are all incorrect. It's a penny poo a salad. Okay all right all right a donation at a poodle mason. A paul nation own correct mono- hotel mation and a poodle dalmatian poodle thank similar to or doodle poodle okay momo dalmatia doodle incorrect doodle. Dalla doodle dalma. Doodo is correct. Three three three all right next founded this all right a bulldog and a chihuahua. Bulldog and a chihuahua pigmentation that is correct for our..

jonah puggle Mesa Mary puggle ramona Arlene mark mason Horry fox Vermont john Dalla chihuahua
"mation" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"With this vision abraham was able to take a more collaborative approach to win the war using his top advisors abraham even described his approach as mostly reactionary as he had no set plan of attack and how to manage his forces as such he was making decisions and giving commands based solely and his advisors in personal experiences. Up to that point it was also during the war that abraham would make one of his most iconic and memorable political decisions. The creation of the emancipation proclamation. Going back to abraham's earlier sentiments about slavery he had initially opposed it for its deep economic issues for the country. This opinion then evolved into his more well known beliefs and personal freedoms and the morality of slavery being inherently wrong abraham wanted to balance the eradication of slavery with the preservation of the union ultimately. This was his main goal in something that he was willing to compromise over if it meant the end of the war in eighteen sixty two abraham was quoted when asked by a reporter as to why he wasn't fully supporting emerging anti-slavery laws abraham said my paramount. Object in this struggle is to save the union in his not neither to save or to destroy slavery. If i could save the union without freeing any slave i would do it and if i could save it by freeing all the slaves i would do it and if i could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone i would also do that. During the civil war there existed border states in the union that were practising slavery. Abraham was concerned that if he would enforce or support anti-slavery legislature he would lose the much needed military support of these border. Union states on january first eighteen. Sixty three the emancipation. Proclamation was issued with several caveats in exclusions for those union slaveholding states while few slaves were actually freed under the emancipation proclamation. It was the beginning of a wave of federally mandated freedoms that would be finally granted to enslave people throughout the country. Abraham i saw the impending change towards a nationwide distancing from slavery for the united states outside of the areas that relied heavily for commerce which were mostly based in the south. It was on this platform of anti-slavery which was unlike any stance he'd taken before that abraham would be reelected during the war funny enough. Even abraham question the validity of the laws he was an acting during the war. Following the emancipation falker. Mation abraham advocated for the thirteenth amendment which further granted additional freedoms to enslave people throughout the country. Instead of just in the confederacy the thirteenth amendment reads as follows neither slavery nor involuntary servitude. Except as a punishment for crime where the parties are have been duly. Convicted shall exist within the united states or any place subject to their jurisdiction. This amendment officially made slavery illegal in the united states. It was almost tied of radical change. That abraham would be touted as revolutionary for the country. The civil war was still going on strong. But abraham was garnering much needed support from his followers author out the war abraham was not exempt from the regular responsibilities of politics. He had to maintain party relations within his own party. While managing his oppositions parties activities while there are many points to be rectified with the war abraham made it clear that he would consider any peace arrangement that included the reunion of the country and the eradication of slavery in the south abraham's advisors encouraged him to consider any offer for peace but after fighting for four long years the confederacy for saw their defeat and met with abraham to discuss terms of ending the war. Abraham made it clear that he would be open to any plans as long as the seceded states rejoined the union to groups had emerged during the war that called themselves the radicals and the conservatives. Each group had their own plan envision for rebuilding the country some based in partisan views in others in military strategy bringing the country together would not be easy especially after such a polarizing in devastating war. There were talks of seizing properties from slave owners and giving it to the formerly enslaved as well as military occupation of the south abraham had plans of his own as well that centered around the huge task of integrating the newly freed population within the country. Abraham even introduced the idea of granting voting rights to newly freed african americans especially those that had served in the union military. It was a daunting task. Bringing essentially two opposing groups with completely different wants to a commonly agreed plan. There was much opposition in turmoil between the northern and southern states on just what plan would be the best for coming together. The ending of the war didn't bring about a magical solution either just a few days after the official end of the civil war abraham decided to attend production at ford's theatre in washington. Dc if you recall. Abraham was always a fan of the arts and the theater. As abraham watched the play he was assassinated by southern. Extremists named john wilkes booth who was a strong supporter of slavery in the confederacy on april fifteenth. Eighteen sixty five. What is the most unfortunate about. This story is that abraham didn't live to see his true dream of bringing the country together successfully though without a doubt it would not have happened. Without his incredible bravery envision for the country's future as a person abraham was described as good natured down to earth and a spokesman for the common man as a leader abraham was described at steadfast dedicated to his country into the task at hand. Whatever that may be the farm boy with no education would grow up to become one of the most respected in revered men in the history of his country without personally knowing abraham it is obvious that above all else his ideology was one of honesty. In virtue abraham was even willing to compromise on certain aspects of his views in order to maintain the integrity of the country as a whole that requires a strength and a belief in what you know in your heart to be right that is unmatched during his time period abraham was compared to another who was also adored in a mired president george washington abraham lincoln is legendary for uploading his beliefs in the face of overwhelming pressure and opposition simply unyielding to anything that threatened his country. Even its own people. When abraham was assassinated newspapers around the world reported on the loss of an individual of supreme moral principle honest abe was just that and he didn't need to be anything more because it was just simple. Honest abe who changed the course of the country forever. You can check us out at made of metal podcast dot com. You can also follow us on instagram. Facebook made of metal podcast altogether. And that's made of metal m. e. t. t. l. e. If you love the show and you'd like to support my passion for sharing these stories with you you can support me on by me. A coffee dot com. That's made of metal. We also have a membership program with monthly parts. You can also follow subscribed in review the show. Wherever you listen to your podcasts. As always my love. Thank you so much for listening. I so appreciate it. I love the feedback. I hope you guys are having amazing summer in bloom where you are.

abraham Abraham south abraham Mation abraham united states ford's theatre legislature john wilkes booth george washington abraham linc washington Facebook
"mation" Discussed on GSMC Television Podcast

GSMC Television Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on GSMC Television Podcast

"Hello and welcome back to. Gsm see tell was in. Podcast brought to you by jesse podcast network. I'm your host jennifer before the break we were talking about. Two great superhero shows star girl. And what if now. We're gonna talk about a series called invincible. Which is on amazon. Prime invincible is american. Adult animated superhero streaming television series based on the imagine comics series of the same name by robert kirkman cory walker and ryan auto lee which premiered on amazon prime video on march twenty fifth. Two thousand twenty one to critical acclaim for. It's eh mation action sequences and performances the series stars. Stephen i-in sandra oh and j. k. Simmons the series initially revolves around seventeen year old mark grayson and his transformation into a superhero under the guidance of his father. Omni man the most powerful being on the planet in april twenty twenty one amazon renewed the series for a second and third season which is good because so far really like it and i only watched four episodes and there's only like eight episodes in the first season. The premise is this mark grayson is a normal teenager except for the fact that his father nolan is the most powerful superhero on the planet. Shortly after his seventeenth birthday mark begins to develop powers of his own and enters into his father's tutelage so that's basically the main plot and the stock ground. Now talk about the characters since this is a animated series. These are just voice actors but they are still important. Mark grayson or invincible is voiced. By steven i on the infamous main character gaining his powers. Seventeen years old mark discovers the harsh realities of being a superhero. While struggling to define himself. He is shown to have a earth shirker side when fighting the flag. Sins and machine heads villains revealed to be a belcher might trait debbie grayson voice by sandra. Oh mark's mother nolan's wife. Debbie is an experienced. Realtor wants long adjusted to being a superhero spouse before entering into a drunken spiral of depression during the end of the first season. Interesting nolan grayson. Omni man voiced by j. k. Simmons marks vote from might bother and debbie's husband born on both from to a super powered alien race. His parents died in his youth before he joined the bolt from empires intergalactic expansion over several thousand years after arriving on earth. Twenty years before the series nolan is considered the most powerful superhero on the planet with a civilian identity of a rich traveler writer. He is loosely. Inspired by superman kind of figured that some of the reoccurring characters are samantha. Eve wiggles or adam. Eve voiced by jilin jacobs a matter energy manipulating super heroine formerly a member of the teen team and new guardians roster she quits after her ex boyfriend..

mark grayson amazon cory walker ryan auto lee robert kirkman nolan sandra Mark grayson Simmons jesse mark jennifer Omni debbie grayson Stephen nolan grayson steven Debbie Realtor
"mation" Discussed on GSMC Television Podcast

GSMC Television Podcast

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on GSMC Television Podcast

"But then the sunsets and aerial turns back into a mermaid. So now it's ariel and eric and try versus ursula but Since aerial slowly turning into this little bug creature like thing trying gives ursula him instead of aerial like a trade and he turns into the thing and then erste gets hold of the trident and the crown and well area will have that she kind of attacks ursula. But eric is there to throw a harpoon at ursula and it hits her on the arm and now it's ursula versus eric and ariel and it's so cool because they are fighting and they're just doing everything they can save each other and it's beautiful and also one of the things i really love about. Low mermaid is. This is one of the first times when a disney princess has saved prince not once but like twice. It is kinda funny anyway. So they ended up defeating ursula by basically She gets this kebab. Guy ship that eric was piloting and then try and sees. How much area loves eric. So he turns aerial into a human and they have the beautiful wedding between ariel and eric. And that's how the movie ends now. This series is a prequel to that movie of all the original voice actors in it. It shows what area was like when she was younger before she even met eric. And it's really cute. i love the episodes. They're so adorable. Now according to the background information the low mermaid is an american animated television series produced by walt disney television mation based on the nineteen eighty nine disney film of the same name it features the adventures of aerial as a mermaid prior to the events of the film. See its prequel series. This series is the third disney television series spun off from a major animated film. Some of the voice actors of the film reprise their roles in the series among them jodi benson as aerial samuel e wright as the bass kenneth mars as king triton and pat carroll as ursula other voice actors include eden grows and bradley pierce as flounder and jeff bennett as prince era lewis. Murray premiered in the fall of nineteen ninety two on september eleventh with the animated prime time special called awale. A tale thin moved to the saturday mornings. This series originally appeared on cbs with an original run from nineteen ninety two to november twenty six thousand nine hundred ninety four..

ursula eric ariel ursula versus eric disney jodi benson samuel e wright kenneth mars king triton pat carroll walt disney eden grows bradley pierce prince era lewis jeff bennett flounder Murray cbs
"mation" Discussed on DeaconLive

DeaconLive

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on DeaconLive

"Decline. Brian profit radio. I'll be right back to see is a hope to see brig hanging do artur lays on the waves more mation good appropriate radio and now it's time for lessons. Shake up this program to bring you a news bulletin..

"mation" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"You ready. Well i'm ready throat. nancy. Oh am i going why Young wait why do i have such hard time now. Please braids up. Never any sorry. I'm doing why why Shoot our how our yoshi. I oh shit in the heat of the night in the he he didn't okay Titanic doing terminator ecstasy alabama bama bad country boy. Why and i did give two minutes since we're doing Back Why can't i think of it either. Their ease things Why that year i stuff. Is there anything that starts with the letter. E what is wrong with my brain evenings of. I don't know why did you get to goodwill eat movies and shows i truly don't can't think of one is is that a thing i'm sticking with it is i'd say no and i'm going to say no because i'm thinking like three right now. Why register enchanted. I either of those now. That's what i should say is what they might be able to see what happens on tuesday night. We went to if receiving ristic with the letter e l. matija today. May you well so this loan right here. Let me just say i'm not a quiet person at all and like my friends are in my living room right now with my wife and i guarantee you they have heard every single word i said to the point that varying our last commercial break when i was talking about my wiped here instead when i was talking about klay mation she thought i was talking about gumby. Eddie murphy hey. I don't know what you boss of lincoln me there so joshua you got that round. Definitely that's a solid. I'm filing entrapment for e away. Evil dead. what is wrong with me. What is wrong with my brain. Mike you should call me on that one. So we'll we were talking about for about to get outta here. We were talking about it in a week and a half. will we can have faced the finance guys carey. I'm gonna like. Because i'm picking him up at the airport in louisiana so i'm gonna like have side and record it because he's recorded. I've must see it. Are you gonna run to arms. So did is wanted us to do. I don't know how you will. But josh is pretty darned halls. He's seven six seven six for will. I didn't know you. Why as you must so tall you realize it's but when we started pimple like i didn't even realize it but there was a stipulation to be a tall big like it was because it was me brandon gene in tommy and none of us are none of i've never asked anybody. Okay if it might offense. I am a half a foot taller than the national average for women. It's not the fact. Is i may have enough still. If i were young miller's also bagel fowler's aren't they tyler who they make it bigger down here they make them bigger down here. That's why i go to jean. Get off the plan. They're gonna look at me like i'm a song. Get him shoot him down. Yeah there is so we could. We could be stuck on some west. Virginia stereotypes for awhile but at home on that one please. I gotta jump back on on that note. Let's we got a lot coming out for pitfall lot of new shows. Come in loudon new stuff coming be on the lookout arch. Twitch is going to be launching very soon. i'm working on a patriot. We're going to have exclusive content coming into both of those. Were going to be doing a watch party very soon Got a lotta shit to give away. Didn't get away the last time. I still have my member giveaway to do for two fifty always at three hundred so by more stuff. Just have a huge give. It's going to be against this this right here. I'm going to be giving this away. This was meant for someone but fuck him. And i'm beginning this way. He's nice geek. Don't let also get got has something in the works. It's impressed is in progress. So i can't say anything but if he goes through let's just say we might have an adventure on the show. Oh golly that's you're like. I can't say anything. But here's a huge of it on that note guys. Take over joining us tonight. We'll see y'all two weeks. Make sure you are here next week. Same time same. Place for me. And puns debut of drop the mic. Podcast this this. Podcast is literally better to work for over year. It was like the second. Podcast i wanted to launch. And i'm very excited to finally be happening so make sure you take it out. It's gonna be fun like this one. It's gonna be a lot like this just as talking about music can things we loved so these two people might pop on at some point or another. I i see you. I see my brother dan. Thank you guys very guys..

ristic matija klay mation brandon gene Eddie murphy nancy alabama joshua carey lincoln louisiana josh fowler Mike tommy loudon tyler jean miller Virginia
"mation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was sitting in the kitchen one day and I was itching to feel out my belly with the piping hot jelly at the best damn trade in the world. He's talking pop time and I saw a stick of butter. Read it almost made me shudder and scream like a baby girl. Don't want a giant Penis or a rocket trip to Venus. I don't want to win the lottery. I just wanna squat and gobble challenges E n a wobble in about a brutal job. Here we go. I've put butter on a hot, tired. It was so freaking good. Every every four splatter on a buck died. If you haven't then I think you should hear. Hear the butter on a pop tart song. Matt Bear. He's in the WBC traffic centre. Stop coming into downtown right around 21st string. You get a break. Once you're west and then slow into the north Split, looking at the South side Stop and go. Traffic credit eastbound 4 65 Harding Street over to Emerson Avenue Beach Probe and the work Zone Hitchcock to Hendrick County. Stop and go Traffic after State Road nine. Going to Shelbyville Eastbound 74 stop and go after London Road traffic sponsored by America's best contacts and eyeglasses. Don't over. Pay for glasses Get to bears and a free example just 69 95. That's not just a better deal. It's America's best book Your exam online. Today I met Bear Follow us on Twitter for instant traffic updates and w IBC TRAFFIC. Cloudy skies 85 at the American Standard Cooling Weather Center at 93. W I. B. C. Things are heating up at Hugh Blur during the BIS of summer sales event. They're out to buy more cars than ever before. They'll buy your car on the spot for more than You think it's worth? Hurry into Hubler visit Dr Kubler dot com Q. Mation Inc D B, a wonder where North seeks.

Hendrick County Venus Matt Bear Today Twitter 69 95 BIS IBC 4 65 Harding Street 85 London Road Q. Mation Inc Shelbyville Eastbound 21st Hubler Split America Kubler dot com WBC Hitchcock
"mation" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Code Story

"About ai. In the world today right when the layman. Here's the acronym. Ai they think intelligent robots that are going to lead us through our day to day. Lives when i put myself in that place. I think of i robot with will smith right robots are gonna come help us do all of our stuff but how does real-life. Ai differ from the movies. You know spoke the same completely different at the same time. There's a big difference between the machine learning products that are out there on the field today. I'm which are using neural networks. Deep learning all sorts of other technologies as well and what the movies portray which is something that academics have turned. Artificial general is intelligence which is sort of a more aspirational goal. Where the sheen's or computers can really be more like humans and reason and and hypothesize and that's pretty far from where we are today in practical terms for most of the michigan based on that are out there in the market you know. There's an really big technical gap there. However that said the technology we do have eased incredibly powerful and doing stuff today that we absolutely could not do five ten years ago. That feels like it is incredibly smart. And it is that it's making synthesizing vast amounts of information fast and making decisions quickly and scalable in ways that we couldn't do before but there's a really big difference between narrow which is what most of his today and generalize augmented intelligence artificial intelligence this super interesting supreme funding public. I think all those ai. This boys are stories. It looks very fast. And you mentioned the italian mobile another big way through the world you can see is like you already. So does eliza mation. agi essential january intelligence. I think he's the whole far away from but is invest direction will get there by now. The is really the region has been taught all learn how to carry out care especially the talks to the real world. the i learned from the Can do the spicy. Royal sometimes. Much better than humid There's a lot for real worries. I'm follows when you set your sights. Recommend the you part of you won't you talk to. Your is fully recognized the awards and the kind of questions and even self driving cards right. You can see even is the real world at the is the only asian who can do one tasks but he's already very powerful verb powerful but only espec- sauce instead of will behave like a human and there. There's a quote actually that we open chapter one within our bulk from andrew more. Who's the former dean of computer science at carnegie mellon university and defines artificial intelligence as the science and engineering of making computers. Behave in ways that until recently we thought required human intelligence and i really love that definition. I think it's one that speaks to both the reality. And the aspirants of of the field. You mentioned or wilson mentioned learning data right into optimize a businesses return on the. They've gotta have the right data. What does that mean. You can't just throw any data set at at a machine learning algorithm or intelligence. A what is the right data as a super important subjects fought any well. Who's worked on. The i allow people have misunderstanding. Working on a is spending on the effort to tune the model to really optimize all the different parameters in the model right by unity all the aurora by the spending majority of their effort on how to get right. So this super important topic on the superintendent for people to spend efforts there but what is right. Data there's a few common factors to consider way decided if you have the arrived there. The first one i read did have quantity. We all know. Garbagey come out of my. How high quality of the self driving car is example the needs to detect by this car carson many other objects from the images so the you made to train them on to be from this real work and the angle. This image would be the same as the camera on the south korean carbon if the bony boxes and in the image also need to be really precise cannot be too big or too small. All those vail cost-savings apartment for the car. So that's the quantity part second affecting The representativeness the right they need to represent two different cases from the real word back to the self driving cars. And paul you need images from different places in this ticket with different. Weather's on the images from extreme situation that traffic incident. Then we all. I'm walker and all those different challenges it on the third factor. There's sort of the the accessibility onto this affects. Her up by people are more or less needs to be refreshed regularly otherwise homeless will degrade to refers this model unique took the nutrient data to retrain. So if you don't have access to the i in the future you will be in big trouble last but not least re the data is this is hard one serie important introduce lies. We have a shared a few examples. Book try lesion south vera. Come back by dr mail while nurses to a job. Interview don't compromise females nine. Those models have many intention to introduce wise but the article. That is the most of the times from other buyers can be caused by vice in this trinity so make sure enough effort to tackle. The trinity tobias also reported so any time represented in these accessibility buys so those are the major factors. Consider cedar one. You decide if you have the right data. One of the stories that i share in the book sort of my introduction. My first major mistake. In a i when i took over a team For computer vision we. We were working really hard trying to improve model improve. The accuracy of is a generalized sort of computer vision tagging system at ibm and right before we got a launch on. Someone on the team came to me. We can't watch this and i was like. Oh my graphic. What are you talking about all this energy and money. In time people couldn't image into the model and what i got out Was the word on the image that he had put in as a test on someone who was sitting in a wheelchair and the tag was loser right at. I was horrified and we were all like. Oh my god. We can't possibly do this. It's unintended bias. That we did not know about and the problem stemmed from the training data right there was labels and images in our training data. Set that one. We were not aware of a two didn't reflect our values. And i think there's an unbelievable amount of time focus spent on this model training and deployment sort of the end state. And there's not enough time to spend on the importance of the data. The data is what matters. It really is at the end of the day. As as wilson was saying the data that you need for your project is almost always with few exceptions really specific and tailored to the business. Problem that you're trying to solve any need to have the right. Data that is diverse enough and complete enough on hynix quality matching the intended problem in order at mitigate unintended but really harmful in many.

eliza mation Garbagey carnegie mellon university smith michigan south vera wilson andrew aurora carson walker tobias paul ibm
"mation" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Now we know how he's competitive despite the fact that people would come and he wasn't the only guy doing this he just didn't better he. What high would say in cleveland. We're doing it to mark shapiro. Wha what's his name shapiro shapiro jairo and then paul deep edessa all those. He wasn't the only guy doing and he was just doing it really well. And and what's great about the michael lewis books to even the blind side is the same thing. Oh blind so they come up with a concept so the the moneyball is a concept and the blind side is all about the left tackle and how important left tackle is but it's a human story too. I mean the reason those are adopted as movies because he does an incredible job of capturing these sports characters. Yeah there's no question about it. There's no question. there's a lot of heart and empathy. And by the way. Michael lewis if you want to understand why we had a financial crisis. Meltdown of two thousand eight. The big short is so good book. I mean he really does make things digestible and understandable. So yeah moneyball came out on this day. Three great science. That guys like this is a malcolm glad well really really smart guy He He came up with the tipping point. Tipping point. I read that i was in college i read. I just blew my mind. Him thousand hours. You know everybody you gotta put in ten thousand hours before you really good something. That does not all of these. You know what he's great i. He he goes and talks to these social scientists and he has all this all the scientific data research. It's kind of a mostly boring people but tells a great narrative around it and then he puts a name on it and it's a concept that people can wrap their minds around. Like i told you about confirmation bias and you guys know you just you just steal from me it's okay you don't to cite stanford psych one on one. I mean you could just. It's just confirmation bias now word that you use and you know okay. I want to get to one last thing right before we get to. We've been following the progress of madonna. And i cannot figure. Look i've bet you choosing lucky stars. One of madonna's what i have here i better songs. Lucky star i do not begrudge. Okay buddy who wants to work on their face in have plastic surgery and all that stuff but there is a point. I think personally where it goes too far. And i think she's officially gone too. Far what do you think nope. No no i wanted i i just. I've thought about this a lot because we've been talking about it for a couple of days now ways what have you. What are you basing this off of like. What made you think of madonna and pictures on her instagram page. She photoshop's her face of other photoshop's like crazy. She's got her face pulled. So damn tight. I just why not. Just be your age okay. Why can't you just be your age. Like so this listen. Madonna louis cicconi okay. That's a real. Jeez louise okay from detroit from detroit she i. I'm never gonna say anything bad about her kicks up. She made me stay up really late on a work night one night. I wonder concert what she is. Incredible about and the reason why she has been a superstar for entire life and career is that she sees what's coming next. She constantly reinvents herself. She tries different. Things she's edgy. she pushes the boundaries. And i think in this situation she's going to course correct real fast young. She's going to do exactly what you're saying. Every once in a while we can allow her misstep case. She's been going. She's holding onto sixteen as long as she can. And just come around real soon. Make us old women and that is what's happened here. And i understand i mean. She's posing topless in selfie mirrors. You're having a hard time with. What is she sixty sixty one. Yeah she's having a hard time being sixty one to sixty two. She looks great. Right looks great. She doesn't look great where into her body. Looks great. She also works incredibly weird way. Did you see the picture like the paparazzi took her recent visit to she. She was enrolled win. Go show yeah she. She doesn't look like that now again. I'm not. I'm not hating on madonna. i love madonna. I think she's amazing. But i feel like she's portraying ally here with all of this photo shopping and editing to the point where no nobody believes it. It's not realistic. And i think she needs to. Like ramona said this embrace who she really looks like. Really i promise you. Louise is going to do this like she is. She's been trying to go the other way. she's probably trying something different to look younger. And she and i think in her mind she's trying to but she will she will she just lost a little of her mo jo here but this is what she's amazing at whenever she changes before you want her to change and in this case she's a little too late on this. This is the first time this has happened to her case. Let's just give her a minute into reinvent herself again. So i got sued by madonna. What i got sued by madonna. You actually got sued by her or this year radio stunts that nothing actually happened was radio stuff but it was legal. It was a legal thing so we got a hold of madonna's like a prayer the friday before it was going to be released it was going to be released on tuesday and i got a copy of it from a guy i knew in detroit. I'll just say he was a music guy and nobody had heard this. Nobody knew what the record was. We knew there was a record coming. We didn't know what it was so friday afternoon. At five o'clock turned off our fax machine. This was a day. Days is machines. And i put that record on and i played it once an hour every hour for the entire weekend which it again. It was like a prayer. I'm sorry yeah. I was like a pretzel really gets on a great song and then on monday morning i turn my fax machine back on the station fax machine and we we got a cease and desist from madonna's people because we're playing record so of course for me. Why aren't you like that's like getting sued headed reported on. Mtv news was all all really really cool had not been released yet or said. Why are they released. I got an advance copy and nobody else had it. Nobody had heard it. The only place that was being heard was toledo ohio. A ninety three two. Wr qn positive for both of you. Good publicity wait. Did they did they. Did they say steve mation mason like so you were on bass steve. Mason program director. So you are on the news correct. I was on the news. It was actually renew. Kurt loader talked about me..

Michael lewis michael lewis Louise ramona mark shapiro tuesday sixty friday afternoon Kurt loader friday Madonna louis cicconi paul deep edessa sixteen cleveland monday morning shapiro shapiro jairo Mason steve mation mason steve thousand hours
Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

The Ten News

02:51 min | 1 year ago

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

"Many people think slavery ended on the day. Abraham lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation in january eighteen. Sixty three but it actually took more than two and a half years for it to become official throughout all of the confederate states. Our correspondent pamela. Kirkland calls up. He's a museum specialists in oral history at the national museum of african american history and culture in washington. Dc to explain a bit more about the history of the holiday. We'll just start with what is juneteenth. June taint juneteenth this great day that is celebrated because on june nineteen eighteen. Sixty five general. Gordon granger arrived in galveston texas with order numbers sri announcing that the enslaved were now free this is important because although the emancipation proclamation had been signed in eighteen sixty three it had a little to no impact almost of the enslaved throughout the south. Because if there weren't union soldiers there to enforce it it literally. Nothing in did not change of your life if you were enslaved human being in texas. Which was the westernmost state. There was very little union presence throughout the war so it was as if nothing had happened in fact there were slave owners. He moved west to continue. The practice of slavery moved to texas for that purpose so this day this was a big day. He arrived with almost two thousand troops. Some of whom were united states colored troops and they enforced this order. What what kind of the history. Of june teeth in the legacy. It's only recently really bad. It's become more widely known. Yes i well. It started in texas so immediately a year. After this announcement they have the first juneteenth In texas in houston. The african americans their a saved up. Money and bought land is specifically for this purpose that became emancipation park and it was practiced throughout texas In also places like oklahoma is started to slowly spread with the great migration in which you see different ways so it was celebrated through the turn of the century than it waned a little. Then you see it's coming back after the after world war two then. There was another big boost after the civil rights era after the sixties. What are some of the exhibits that highlight juneteenth And demands pation. We have an entire gallery devoted to slavery and freedom so there you will find of of many artifacts relating to we have the actual copy of Mation for example we have of many artifacts related to the underground railroad movement. Things that belong to harriet tubman such as show in our

Texas National Museum Of African Ame Gordon Granger Abraham Lincoln Kirkland Pamela Galveston SRI Emancipation Park Washington United States Houston Oklahoma Harriet Tubman
"mation" Discussed on What’s Wrong With Wolfie?

What’s Wrong With Wolfie?

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"mation" Discussed on What’s Wrong With Wolfie?

"Empathic whereas he's the perfect moga mation of kirk because and in some respects roy was very passionate very confident in what he believes in and not afraid to say. What's wrong but you can't do this. And then you obviously got komeini. Who leaves the enterprise to go to the station as chief of not chief of ops chief of something Chief engineer basically pretty much stronger station opera. Running and his reason for doing that is to have a life. We've his wife and daughter and the only way to do is to be in one location on a station that you can call home and a great thing because they got kkomeini to be regular robin a random guest star now getting next. He didn't clay on the to believe at the beginning the he was caught hesitant about being a regular on the tv show. Yeah because at the time komeini was a very accomplished our chateau and he'd moved to the states and he was in kuala movies. He was very very prolific host. Very very happy when it's chafe. It's the swearing what's going on. Yeah e. crashed the plane in diehard da to the us pilot crashed the plane on aroma in hanover and he leaves to british enterprise and then moves to station. It was very clever as well. Because familiarity i guess exactly you don't alienate your audience roy or strike off. Yeah you got this new show. You got to hand over the traditional handover between old. Show our new show and deposit here a semi regular character from now until the perfect for star trek fan or or annexed gem fan i to see him there but beat to see more of him because the kissing a lot of him in exchange And yours kind of intrigued by his character wounded cmo because he was likable as a cool again character development. They did so much more with character. Vitamin d space nine than any other show much well. Voyager had such a great opportunity and it just was repackaged next-gen. They could have done so much more of that and yeah aggressor show in it was it could have been so much more. It could have been as dark as deep space nine but don newbie cleverly but they decided to repackage next gen just basic different cost and i think students i think where negatively about space nine being dog and different and yet default and they came out two years of the deep space. Nine david because i remember in the caretaking Thing where they they start they space nine before they went off. Yeah i remember seeing kuchen. It is very subtle passing the torch. That's it we need. You don't need to overcomplicate it. But as for like returning stalls when they brought michael dornan they really fleshed out of character..

kkomeini komeini roy kirk kuala robin hanover don newbie us david michael dornan
Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

Mac OS Ken

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

"Institutional ownership of apple. Shares is near an all time high according to morgan stanley analyst. Katie huber d but it is nowhere near enough and harassed mation could be helpful at this point to find out what institutional ownership is according to the site investo pedia institutional ownership is the amount of the company's available stock owned by mutual or pension funds insurance companies investment firms private foundations endowments or other large entities that manage funds on behalf of others. The site goes onto. Explain that once those institutions get into a company. They tend to stay there for a while. Not only this pulling shares out of circulation raise the value of shares outstanding. Their decision to get in can lead other investors to do the same despite being near all time highs institutional ship of apple is still under weight according to a note from hubert to clients posted on apple three not. Oh the way she and hers. Apple is likely to see revenue growth of twenty two percent in fiscal year. Twenty twenty one and earnings per share growth of thirty six percent. That's based on a few numbers. That i wish i understood but i sadly do not

Katie Huber Apple Morgan Stanley Hubert
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | 2 years ago

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
"mation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"mation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I get a lot of info. Mation al Bitch. Thank you very much. Thank you and a fellow insomniac to listen in the middle of the night to KQED. Thank you so much for your contribution. Today. She called 1 809 378850 made a contribution and also left a comment with you two are very much welcome to do, but it's Michelle said. This is a very important hour. For us. It's a We have a triple challenge at play right now. Tell me all about it. Michelle Dollar for dollar for dollar Donations are worth three times the amount Regis and Diane McKenna and another generous friend are each giving $2000 toward listener donation during this hour. Now, remember the challenge Grant rules. If we don't make the challenge before this break is over. We have to offer to return the money. So help us keep the extra money right here at KQED during this important winter fundraiser. Calling and making a donation. The number is 1 809 378850 Donations Awful are also being tripled on our website. The Web addresses kqed dot org's slash donate. All right, So this is the last hour of today's winter fun drive here at KQED may be going out with a bang with a triple challenge that we really hope that you could call 1 809 378850. Turn your $50 contribution into $150 Turn your $100 contribution into $300. Whatever he works for you works for us. Sign up as a sustaining member And your first contribution of $20. A month will be $60 a month. So we'd love to hear from you today, right now. Is this very important? Very rare. We don't get these triple challenges a lot. Eyes at play, and we can make use of it before the top of the hour again..

KQED Michelle Dollar Diane McKenna Regis
"mation" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"mation" Discussed on KOMO

"Off. I honestly it was like something out of a moving. Cory Lee was driving by when he saw all of this happen. It looked like something out of a zombie movie honestly, like You see a zombie movie and you imagine you're trying to get away from a bunch of zombies. You've run him over. A massive police response soon followed in a release. Tacoma Police say that officer was fearing for his safety. And while trying to extricate himself from an unsafe position, he drove forward and then called for medical aid, the interim chief saying, quote, I am deeply concerned that our department is experiencing another use of deadly force incident. I send my thoughts to anyone injured come on his time out seven or eight later, State coronavirus report from the Department of Health nearly 2000 cases on Saturday that pushed our state's total confirmed cases to date over 300,000. There's possibility of 650 duplicates by the way. Double checking on that 92 more people hospitalized, bringing a total now toe over 17,100 rising number of cases in our state and a new variant. Still, the more reason to get vaccinated as soon as possible. Governor injury wants to vaccinate 45,000 people in our state per day latest data from the state Department of Health showing that were well under that right now, the states averaging just over 17,600 vaccinations per day and Amazon along with Virginia mation having a pop up vaccination clinic across the Amazons fears today the downtown they plan to give out 2000 shots They're in the Amazon meeting center on Seventh Avenue will start at 8 30. Now people had to sign up in advance. 24 hours. All 2000 vaccines were taken and spoken for We're here. There's a waiting list. Details at come on news dot com. If you wanna have a look there and build the Education Association and build the school district is still trying to hammer out this deal. I'm returning to in person learning. Second rate students were back in school Thursday. Many teachers, though we're not they want to wait until they get a covert 19 vaccine court ruled in favor of the teachers, so they continue to teach remotely if a deal is not reached a second court hearing in the matter set for this coming Thursday. 7 10 Formal news. Now, as a promise you'll stern he helps out here become others Sunday with the latest women's basketball Husky game today and how the Cougars do yesterday, and we need a couple of teams here to do some more work, so.

Cory Lee Department of Health Amazon Tacoma Police Cougars officer Virginia Amazons Education Association
"mation" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"mation" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"Down and then saying known deep down house known worlds. Call them the spray call. The doctor know what's going down. Call the gentlemen black iran year your host. I can run on on sensor day. Tuesday soon are sick season. You ought gentleness program only nation. It should not be treated subs aid for mation paperless per resorts review major. And i do love you with an attitude of gratitude.

"mation" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"mation" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Alright, Okay. Welcome back. Tost RC dirt radio FM 96 Party game 11 70 The answer. That's Audrey Mation Ed stove it in the house as well. Sitting over there whimpering because he missed the perfect day at the at the desert. Yeah, sdrc dirt radio cruise all around the dunes Yesterday we had a great time at a glam is gonna make you a flag that you can weekend swing in the back here, Jeep. Yes, I Well, I have the str see flag and then I do another I have. Max is another thing for shade that we use my max flag. But, you know, I definitely need a big sdrc dirt radio flags, everything together. Ah, that's a good question. I think I might have a house like helping designer by stats. They Do they do flags? You know those? Yeah, I'm just saying you gotta you gotta get but you can definitely we can work on that. Yeah, we went out Tonto. The swing set yesterday and We pulled into the swing set and as we pulled in there, I mean, it was really busy is busy every weekend. There now, it seems, is really popular Destination spot to go to, and there's a bunch of rangers out there and, um So look like they were surrounded around somebody. We just figured it wasn't in incident that it happened. You know, maybe they had spotted somebody You know, you never know. And then we we decided where we're gonna go. We post up maybe 10 minutes. It took us to get up in around the dunes and over to where we needed to be the post up and get a nice spot of the jump and people jumping over the Double jump right there at the swing set, and as we're sitting there, here comes reach air, medical, air medical reach and They had to circle around about 10 or 15 times and find a good spot and they came in and and definitely life flighted somebody out of there yesterday so Prayers go out to him and his family and hopefully he's okay and I just want to do a shout out to reach their medical. I'm definitely a member because I'm out in the desert every weekend. It's ah, it's a true lifeline. It costs to $200.219 dollars for one year membership for an entire household. That's AH, entry level. Um One, and that's for emergent and non emergent coverage. So even if it's a non reach helicopter that comes out to you, your air medical fees they're still covered because No, A lot of people. That's a part of your insurance. You just don't think of an and most people don't have that little added coverage. I know when my my uncle crashed it Corral Canyon about 10 years ago. Not a brain injury. He had to be life flighted out. Hey, had aspirated his own throw up. And we Hey, was nice to you for a couple years and his helicopter ride from that was Uh, Um Oh, my gosh. What's the backside? What's the one that we talked about all the time? They're doing the new campground. Wow. Why am I blanking out on it right now? But I know that's a calm but not to come back. But the backside of came McCain Valley came is where it is. He crashed it, McCain. It'll be life I did from McCain valley out too. Grossmont is where they took him or no. Yeah, Sharp. Actually, in pretty Mesa. I was $85,000 helicopter ride from from McCain Valley. A Kamba. Too, so they have different levels of insurance. They have different levels of insurance that you can choose and what you can do, because if you just go with the emergent one and its air each one, it's only $85 for household. It's $65 for a single person on that's it, but but that you have to be picked up by her. I reach helicopter or a member of reach. And the other one is 219. Any helicopter could pick you up anyone. It doesn't matter where you are. In that sense, you don't know what's gonna pick. You don't know who's gonna take you out? Yeah, And then I have an app on my phone. So if I get in trouble you can. You can swipe up on my phone and it tells you you can click on my air reach. That tells you who I am gives you my emergency contact information seeking contact my husband of my sister by blood type who My insurance is in my medical insurance number. So if I'm knocked out and you come up and you find me in the middle of the desert completely knocked out, you know you all my contact information is right here who I am, is right here and you can do it, and that's a part of Of my my reach is part of a link that they did. I should I have Ah, connection that I made friends offered expected. Yeah, I made a good connection. She sells it for all of Imperial County. Her name's Lisa. Um and she's she's whole I purchased it from. I don't know the next time we do it clean up anything. We would you. Yeah. Yeah, that would be so I figured at the base. They just drag you across the sand. And then if you go with the upgrade, they actually put you in the helicopter. That's what I would have the first thing. I don't think it works like that. I would see the law slow down. No, you're got you by the ankles. They're just dragon. I don't think it works like that. I was just making sure nice job. Hey, you know, $85 like, come up. They're not gonna put you in a helicopter for $80. Yeah. Medical care network, fly you home safe and sound. That's awfully tell you and then seeing it firsthand yesterday having that guy knocked out completely. Um you know the helicopter. It's gotta be at least once a weekend. Is it? Yeah, unfortunately, I've seen lately. They're regulars out there. Yeah, well, wait for Special lady Lab how many motorcycles sold in the last six months. Yeah, The speaker people are out there this weekend with it was a big weekend, but it was not a big weekend. There was not that many ran into a guy that's never been out there before. Got stuck, and it would and said, Okay, I'm gonna be stupid. Let me see if I could do some work. Stupid stuff. He had the canned ham that we helped in the middle of nowhere you'd rented They'd rented this can a man and he was stuck in the middle of new He had high center Didn't some dunes tried to unburied himself, then kept gas and it re buried himself even deeper. I mean, it was it was up to the doors. He had completely gone like he didn't bury it. It's gone. They don't understand it when when you stop Because you're stuck. You need to let off the gas and figure it out. We'll just step on the gas and they just go down and farther and farther. Think you're gonna go forward? No. You just go down just harder. Well, yeah, because it's just that the wheel spin Any general. Yeah, it was very yourself. Get stuck. Get out. Look at it. Pull the dirt away. Start working on it. Get your friends to push and then gently give it gas. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, Jeff me. Yes, Those are my two big my two big things this weekend. What do you got there, son? Well, son. I'm gonna turn 60 next month. Shit just calls me son. You still could be my son. So there's a couple things going on. I follow action by the Bureau of Land Management of Federal Land Agency. Hey, man, it's 10 million acres of desert in California. And they're doing what's called a Plan Amendment. Desert Plan Amendment. Trying to They want to do a couple of things, and what they really want to do is Uh, there's millions of acres that are designated as.

McCain valley McCain Valley Audrey Mation McCain Max Bureau of Land Management of F Imperial County Corral Canyon Grossmont Mesa Special lady Lab Jeff California
"mation" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"mation" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Attack on the U. S. Capitol. FBI Special agent in charge Matthew Dis, Arno says tips from the public, especially from sharp eyed social media followers helped a lot of hipsters have turned in their friends, neighbors and relatives. All increasingly radicalized. Inflammatory rhetoric. Thank you for bravely coming forward and are providing information. No bail for one of the alleged rioters who was photographed on the Senate floor. Federal judge in Phoenix orders Jacob Chan's Lee. This self described Que non leader seen wearing horns face painted and holding a spear in the Capitol Hill riot be detained. Judge Debra Fine saying have convicted on only the two felony counts chanceless facing he could get up to 25 years in prison. The judge agreeing with the federal prosecutor that chance Lee could be a flight risk and a danger based on his statements on Social Media and actions of the capital, including leaving a message for vice president Pence reading. It's only a matter of time Justice is coming. Chuck's Iverson ABC News There are more than a few angry governors, Colorado's Jared Paulus and Oregon's Kate Brown or among the state executives who learned today that the federal stockpile of covert 19 vaccines is empty President elect bind and outlining his plan today to get more Americans vaccinated more quickly. Vaccines out is one problem. Convincing people to take them is a tougher challenge. Mation campaigns are already underway to further undermine trust in the vaccines. President elect Biden saying he wants to restore trust in government, the vaccines and the ability to vaccinate million's faster and he failed. ABC News Washington about 6000 workers at Amazon's warehouse and best summer Alabama will begin voting by mail next month on whether to form the first union at one of the company's U. S facilities. Stocks closed lower today. The Dow down 177 points. You're listening to ABC News to be being a Bob Williams.

Iverson ABC News vice president Biden FBI ABC Debra Fine Special agent in charge Matthew Dis Senate Lee Jacob Chan Bob Williams Phoenix President Jared Paulus Kate Brown
Looking After My Son

Mentally Yours

05:31 min | 2 years ago

Looking After My Son

"Looking back on it now with such mation on the judges didn't have a back fan was during my exams or the buildup towards them was when my first depressive episode happened but geez lawrence and just sort of the steak today with depression mental health in general. I just wasn't stay with it. I didn't know what was happening to me. Sort of it really much. Take hold that. Perhaps it wouldn't. If i had more knowledgeable than subjects. So what happened when you go to that kind of dog point. If he weren't getting help. What was the kind of okay. This is going really badly. How did you eventually get will be time sick from. It was definitely depressed upset but it wasn't as low as it would eventually. I didn't get help really Was sleeping sixteen hours a day minimum. Not doing any revision. Just doing the minimum betty during existent Doing anything by gency helping period. I just sort of slept to off until university came around. And then what happening. Investing i fell in fell quickly. Just through the cracks self medicating with alcohol wasn't leaving my bed for any reasons stopped attending lectures and just one of normality of life really. Was there any supposed interest at you'll university to fill people who is struggling with mental house and if so what was that i tend to two universities and the second one was that was a lot more fucked in the first one. The first one was helmets number. Interestingly the first university didn't have look so sides the second one i attended as highest suicide rate in the country and not when did have more provisions in place but at the same time that was long waiting lists in muscle Overstretched and yeah and you go to like Place with things What she sort of. What was this sort of the the lowest points i guess. Lowest point was living in a studio apartment by myself just completely gave up. I can see an officer named Tomorrow and a described as adults missing one. I just didn't i just gave up. I wasn't eating drinking. I didn't even feel fast. I so my body would just give me at that stage without further action required. I would just die. And that'd be that i've been the in the sort of weeks up to that moment. Looking out the window was almost a treat but what stay time picked as a young is about policy but at this stage day night muddled into one. Obviously sleeping farmer was than i was awake. I had left my bed in in a long time. And everything just sort of Quite time even before. I was depressed for him. The quiz ups. Nobody expects anything of you is just in perfect. Stillness mayo phones. Looking to ring you can just be that. Creates an environment was for him at all times without so thinking long term consequences. That would be so. You're living away from your parents. This point amanda. Did you have any kind of sense of what was kind of going on with your son in. How did you find out. I didn't have any sense of trudy. What was going on. I thought josh was one of two things either. Having such a great time at university Living adrenal doing things we hoped for centralizing and having this marvelous time that he was too busy to respond to attacks so too busy having a great time all i thought that might be something going on and he didn't want our hell or interference. He'd rather do what you should don which was closed down speaker stuff out And i felt intrusive every time i said. How are you. are you coming to. Can we visit to get such a or not responsible. Felt my slight guy was some bothering him. And i didn't really know. I didn't know one hundred percent didn't know the level to which he saw coming when we found out he's living conditions will ferry patriot. He he was just like a shadow of himself. It wasn't like josh. It was like whatever made him gave me spark his character. Who had gone for babies is which is completely black. He was very very bad way. I do social king to say because we didn't we didn't know how far he sunken. How quick so how did you actually find out. Was the particular instance. I'm just to jewish out. What actually happened against is announcing. I didn't reach out the lowest moment Details had a methods to end my life on my stepfather just failing. Just something wasn't quite right. I hadn't hadn't really retaining. Kohl's hadn't been applying techs and he just came to my flop which was about two hour drive but luckily you said a hundred just came and he came up to my front door. I did on his face just sort of said it orally i i had washed weeks. The bedsheets had been washed in months like kabaddi chimera. I saw demonized version of myself.

Geez Lawrence Depression Josh Trudy Amanda DON Kohl
ICYMI: Popl beams contacts to phones

Talking Tech

03:10 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI: Popl beams contacts to phones

"Of the big problems many of us has is nobody wants to hand out business cards anymore but everybody wants our contact information. What to do I, think we all have a bunch of different solutions but nick. And Jason Alvarez Cohen have happy device called paypal which can pass on your information and the guys are here and they're going to tell you all about it. He Nick and Jason Jeff send thank you for having us on. Sure. Tell us about poppel. So. Papa. Is Your new digital business card. It's a small thing you put on the back of your phone. And then all you have to do is just tap it to someone else's phone like this. It sends a push notification to that phone and win that notification is clicked at sends you right to send them right to my profile, which has my website, my instagram, my phone number, all of my contact information right on their screen. Okay. So what you just showed me was a little round ball basically and in you you I, guess he velcro or something or or a magnet or as probably a magnet right to. And it sticks to the back and then it then up your APP in that swirl, your contact information is in Europe. They have a pop up, it opens up in that but if they don't have the APP, it opens up in the browser and the key to the product is that the other person does not need poppel or an APP for you to share your mation. Believe that the Pablo's are very inexpensive how much they sell for Fourteen ninety nine for basic potholes and nineteen ninety nine for premium populous. What is a premium poppel? A premium poppel has nicer textures this one. For example, we poppel prism. It's kind of. Holographic. The basic ones are black white pink, blue jays color. Yeah and the premium ones are. Little, fancy same functionality, just different looking field Lyndon Okay and obviously once you once you download your APP, you then spend time in putting your basic. referrals. Correct, it's very easy setup you get your pop in the mail you you you put in what you want. Then you activate it with your phone and then you're all set. So you can put on your phone upon your laptop on your car, your Papa anywhere. It'll share where you want to share. So if you put it on your laptop and I had somebody in the office. Where I met somebody at starbucks right in a post Kobe world and I wanted his or her information. They would just put their phone in front of the Little Poppel that was on my laptop Yep. It's that easy. What motivated you guys to come up with this idea? Greg Russia. Well, we're both recent college grads and we learn about the psychology at how cool is and how native it is in modern phone. So we saw this use case as two guys who never used. A really cool phone, the phone method of Sheriff Mason which we did often. So we saw the cell division just credit. All right. Well, congratulations people can get it and is it Papa Dot Com. Pablo. Dot Co.. Dot, co-. Or Whatnot. or on. Amazon

Jason Alvarez Cohen Paypal DOT Pablo Jason Jeff Europe Starbucks Nick Amazon Greg Russia Sheriff Mason Kobe
interview with Kate Breakey

The Candid Frame

07:55 min | 2 years ago

interview with Kate Breakey

"Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. It's a great honor in infect and I went to a legit from now on I went back and watched a whole lot of fees and. What I've seen missing. Thank you. That's very kind of you. Yeah. I very much enjoyed doing it especially when you have a chance with people to talk with people like you. But you're just saying that you raised in Australia and looking at your work. One of the things that I it brings to mind for me as a person who believes sorta appreciate your work is sort of a dearth of relationships that is a city boy have had with with wildlife and nature. Other than cats and dogs, occasional mice, you know. Growing up there really was no relationship with nature at all. I have a little more now because I live near the edge of the Angeles forest. So we get the occasional Bob Cat and bear and you know coyote. But still that connection with wildlife pretty rare and I think that is the case for most Westerners and a lot of your work revolves about their relationship with with animals but I'd love for you to sort of take us back to when you were growing up. In Australia and how that relationship, how that understanding of of of wildlife in relationship to the lives of human beings including us of sort of took shape. I mean I was very lucky. Kid had probably an idyllic childhood because in a a rural country town with. Like NATO Food in scrublands and wilderness, Invest Open spaces and. The Southern Ocean. One big sort of giant playground and there was wild animals, kangaroos everywhere and it was. It was just a lot of allowed animals. Lot of indigenous people obviously living in the towns still have been counted with a match Rura primal idea about the relationships that was just part of the way you incorporated in a way because you knew these people. Trees to climb as said, the Ocean to swim in galloped horses along the beach is kid Babak had like a fabulous life really and again strategies like of untouched food nece and beaches that go on fed miles in is not one single person on the except the odd. Not, to get eaten by shock, which happens routinely. saw. Also, I had parents who were. Interested godless got mystere interested in biology botany end I just grew up sort of fat knowledge is part of my experience of the world and I guess just evolved into love my desire to sort of make images about all of that stuff and so finally enough I've never taken photography 'cause I've never really lived in will victim cities not the kind of cities that kept intense thing going on that becomes. Hugely. Interesting to people who are strafed office. So I've never really taking pictures of people buildings and every now, and then when I get asked to jury show I often get someone else to come and sort of see my selection and I say but you haven't picked one person who. People. including genre he begins it gets a bit by. Anyway. I'm much appreciate I grew up. I went to at school lead freelance all those people who are doing that very conceptual sort of. City staff at copied them. But when it comes right down to what I WANNA do and what I love doing its photographing in the natural world and. Ordering it in this way. So I would say that my childhood absolutely was like the biggest influence in all of that in my life. I love because at the edge of the national forests, we have wildlife particularly the. Coyote packs up. Here. On the social media, I think it's called next door. There are a lot of people who you know who who are probably more city-fied than even I am I know Deauville complain about the coyotes in what they can do about it in my and I think wait a second. Clear in their yard right and it seems like people look at wildlife here as is the the inconvenience even though they live at, you know at the edge of the forest and I think when when I consider your work and your approach to it, you're the dynamic of how people exist with animals is very different from what many of us are used used to and so when you're when you're young you kind of mentioned that you had all that sort of wildlife around you. Talk to me about the relationship might sort of felt like was it like like a we're just we're just temporarily this we're living in their. In their. Not really because you know back then I guess in the sixties, people still went out and show Kangaroos to feed. Wildlife was just part of something that you still kind of used. It wasn't there wasn't a great deal respect for it. You know the Kangaroos are called every year because they basically, there's more kangaroos than they should be. It's like united. So every time there's a drought named died, but people go out and shoot them pharmacy eight them because it was cheap made now they used in. In restaurants because it's considered gourmet neat because it star Lean and good for you. Is All this fusion going on with kangaroo mation. Asian spices in the whole nine yards been to Australia. No not. You know you gotta gotTa sit nate is the best place on earth anyway. And so we had friends who had. Farms or because stations but sheep stations and envy would muster the sheep and then the shears would come in and share them in the be sheepdogs who are just working animals. It wasn't really very romantic. They just happened to be just tons and tons and tons of animals and ahead Ananta Nakal who sort of animal rescuers before it was really official, I would collect up injured bids the anything and bring them in and. Resurrect. Going out to their house, they was just everything was a wombat. There was mad pies. It was Joey kangaroos still a great spirit in Australia because we just had a, you probably know last Christmas we had this dreadful dreadful wildfires where green three billion animals died, and there was a great cold out to people to take animals that were bent to to see if they could be rescued and so sort of regular people do that they go out. In their cars and collect up these things that you know stagnant injured to take them back to the triage animal rescue centers to be either destroyed or treated as I. said that call out to people to to look after them and a surprising amount of people do this because Australia kind of especially, the comic stuff united the the Co Alison the kangaroo is so there is this kindness towards animals and I think because so few people. In this giant continent at so many more. So many wild animals there is a slightly different attitude I. Mean I was GonNa say about city people saying, what are we gonNA do about the coyotes deer eating my vegetable garden you know if you get rid of the coyotes, you'll have more rabbits and end up eating a vegetable garden. You can't control because system you you start ruining at the whole thing goes to hell as we saw Anna, we're getting the pollinate is going the birds in the beast is three billion less birds were in the seventies and they the pollinators and we needed a pollinators. So we actually have trees and on and on and on guys as you know is just becomes this huge horrendous mess. So it's more

Australia Joey Kangaroos Angeles Forest KID Nato Bob Cat Babak Scrublands Anna Ananta Nakal I. Nate Official
Popl beams contacts to phones

Talking Tech

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Popl beams contacts to phones

"One. Of the big problems many of us has is nobody wants to hand out business cards anymore but everybody wants our contact information what to do I. Think we all have a bunch of different solutions but nick actions and Jason Alvarez Co heavy device called Paypal, which can pass on your information and the guys are here and they're going to tell you all about it. Hey, nick and Jason. Jefferson, thank you for having us on. Sure. Tell us about poppel. So poppel is your new digital business card. It's a small thing you put on the back of your phone. And then all you have to do is just tap into someone else's phone like this. It sends a push notification to that phone and win that notification is clicked at sends you right to air sends them right to my profile which has my website, my instagram, my phone number, all of my contact information right their screen. Okay. So what would just showed me was a little round ball basically And in you I guess he used Velcro or something or or a magnet, or as probably a magnet right to. And, it sticks to the back and then then opens up your APP in that Swirl your contact information is in Europe. They have opposite opens up in that. But if they don't have, it opens up the browser and the key to the product is that the other person does not need a pop or an APP for you to share your mation. Believe that the Pablo's are very inexpensive. How much of this L. for? Fourteen ninety nine for basic populism one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, four premium. Pablo's what is a premium poppel? Premium Pablo has nicer textures this one for example, we call Papa presume it's kind of Holographic basic ones are black white pink blue collar workers. Yeah, and the premiums are. Little fancy same punctuality just different looking field limited edition. Okay and obviously once you want to download your APP, you then spend time inputting your basic. referrals. It's very easy setup you get your pop, the mail, you you you put in what social media you want you activate it with your phone and then you're all set. So you can put on your phone you can find your laptop on your car, your Papa anywhere I'll share you WANNA share. So if you put it on your laptop and I had somebody in the office? Where I met somebody starbucks right in a post Kobe world and I wanted his or her information. They would just put their phone in front of the little pop that was on my laptop. Yep, correct. It's that easy. What what motivated you guys to come up with this idea? Greg Rush. Well, we're both recent college grads and we heard about the psychology at how cool it is and how native it is in modern phone. So we saw this use case as two guys who never use business cards a really cool phone to phone method of Sh- information which we did often. So we saw the subdivision just credit. All right. Well, congratulations people can get it and is Papa Dot Com. Pablo dot co not saw.

Pablo Papa Dot Com Jason Alvarez Nick Paypal Papa Jefferson Europe Starbucks Greg Rush Kobe
AstraZeneca Must Explain Spinal Ailment to Resume Vaccine Trial

Von Haessler Doctrine

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

AstraZeneca Must Explain Spinal Ailment to Resume Vaccine Trial

"What the issue was that suspended that AstraZeneca Corona virus vaccine trial. It's a spinal cord issue involving Mation of the spine. But we don't know whether the vaccine is to blame for the spinal cord issues, so they paused the trial. It was in Phase three. That's the last stage in the development process, and experts say the pause is a sign that the trial is working, and they are prioritizing safety. To make sure this vaccine will be safe. And CBS's David beg no reporting that the company CEO says that is still on track to know whether the vaccine will be effective by the end of the year. And

David Beg CEO CBS
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 2 years ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

The Plant Path

06:00 min | 2 years ago

Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

"Hey everybody say John Popham. Here founded the school of Evolutionary herbalism, and it's QNA day today and. This week's question that I wanted to share with you all is. Is a very interesting question that comes up from time to time in regards to weather and herb can actually work like an antibiotic and possible benefits and possible risks. and terms of using herbs to treat pathogenic infections, and I think this is pretty relevant topic these days as we are in the midst of the whole Covid, nineteen situation and I'm seeing more and more people reaching out. To plants as ways of strengthening your immune system and wanting to look at antiviral antibacterial herbs, and how to protect themselves and their family. But as most of US know. Standard, antibiotics can have pretty detrimental effects on the body specifically in regards to the Gut Flora so in this week's Cuna. We're GONNA be talking about antiseptic antimicrobial plants, and they're kind of weighing their benefits and risks, and also kind of a what I think is a really excellent discussion in terms of the difference between how an herbal medicine works in the human organism in contrast to how a lot of pharmaceutical medications, specifically antibiotics work in the human organism. So I hope you enjoy the question answer for this week I question number one here is. Coming to us from Sharing Lemay and Materia Medica monthly. And Sharon his asking since Lemay kills off micro-organisms, is there a danger? It will destroy our gut flora the same way an antibiotic would especially if we drink it as a tea. Does using the tincture, keep it in the respiratory system, so it never gets down into the gut in any meaningful strength, so when used for a cold slash flu situation, the Gut Flora are not impacted, although since also affects the urinary tract. It seems its powers. Go throughout the body, so I'm just wondering if we are nuking. Gut Flora with Lemay mation great question Sharon. This is actually. This question brings up some really interesting dynamics. I think in the way that we think about how an herbal medicine works in contrast to how drugs work right. So this is a question that I actually quite a bit not just around lamasion, but around other herbs to especially see this one a lot with a lot of the. In containing plants. High drastic candidate insists golden seal. Mahoney Aquaphor Liam. Grape a cop, this or gold thread. Really any plant that you look it up in your book and you see. Anti Microbial. Antibacterial Oh. Is this going to adversely affect the Gut Flora? Generally speaking, I think the best answer to that question is for the most no. Obviously I don't really know if there's been a whole lot of scientific research where they measured someone's Gut, Flora. And then they took you know some of these whole plants. Or tinctures teas of these plants, and then measured it again and found that they were adversely affected. I'm not sure if that exists but from a clinical perspective. Through utilizing these remedies, we don't really see any of the. After effects that are pretty common. From as Sharon said, nuking the Gut Flora with an antibiotic right, which be off. Fatigue or post antibiotic use. Digestive imbalances. It's really common these days for. People to have digestive symptoms, digestive issues, and when we really do some digging in to the case and figure out we'll. When did it start a lot of times? You can trace it back to a time when that person was put on around of antibiotics, so it's really common. I've used a lot of verbs that are typically considered anti microbial antibacterial herbs and haven't seen anything that would indicate that it's adversely affecting the gut flora, and especially in the case with limitation. This is not something that I've seen. One study that was done. On a burberry isolate right so this would be isolated. An isolated alkaloid right Bergreen the. Famous alkaloid that we find in Goldenseal and Oregon grape grapefruit that has been demonstrated to have very strong antibacterial property. burberry isolate was administered to people in doses. I would say higher than you're going to probably be able to get from taking capsules or drinking, tea, or taking a tincture and. There was no. Signs of any type of Gut Flora imbalance, and that was actually a study that was done where they measured the Gut Flora, and after a period of time of administering pure burberry alkaloids, they did not see adversely affecting the gut flora

Gut Flora Sharon His Lemay School Of Evolutionary Herbali John Popham Mahoney Aquaphor Liam Materia Medica Lamasion Oregon
Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 2 years ago

Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

"Imagine it jetting to a chimp in chimpanzee whether portray by REX. Harrison Eddie Murphy or Robert Downey Junior Dr. doolittle learn to talk to animals, but in reality signs has remains some distance from solving the long standing question of how we humans learn to talk during our evaluation, his one new clue, a team for searches in Great Britain have demonstrated how the rapid succession of opening and closing mouth rhythms by chimpanzees. Lip smacking mimics the natural pace, acumen mouths talking. The. Findings are in the journal Biology Letters. This phenomenon has been observed before in other ape species who performed lip smacking movements at around five hurts, which falls within a range of mouth, opens, and closes characteristic of all spoken languages namely between two and seven huts, but this lip smacking timing connection had not been made in our closest. Relatives until now mouth and vocal signals with speech like rhythm, Hetero been observed in some monkeys in gibbons and Orangutans, one of our closest great relatives, so the last years had seen accumulating evidence that these rhythm other than something that only talking humans do. This was the rhythm from deeper within our prime ancestry recycled so to speak as a cornerstone for speech pollution. The Mirror of University of Warwick. Who led the study, but the sense of evolutionary continue towards speech steelhead, a big gap to cross the African Apes. There was no evidence for speech like rhythm, neither in Gorillas Bonobos nor chimpanzees, the study followed two captive populations of chimpanzees one in the UK. I'm wanting Germany as well is to wild populations in Uganda. Researchers observed lip smacking at an average of four point one five hurts the made all the observations whenever a chimpanzee was grooming another think of a hairdresser engaging an idle chatter with a customer at the Beauty Salon, the coffee mation of speech like rhythm of the mouth into Pansies, not revealed per se how language came about in our own lineage, but he offers the final confirmation to scientists that we are looking at the right place that. That, we are on the right track to solve this mystery. In that great apes in captivity in the wild steel have to reveal all their secrets about human nature in human origins, Numero also notes the variation in Lips. Mac Times both between and within the chimp groups do not appear to be hardwired rather the lip smacking variability likely reflected how individual differences and environmental factors and even social conventions affect how chimpanzees communicate with each other. Even Dr Doolittle will be amazed.

Lips Harrison Eddie Murphy Dr Doolittle Biology Letters Dr. Doolittle University Of Warwick Robert Downey Numero Britain Uganda UK MAC Beauty Salon Germany
Re-Thinking Church Missions

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Re-Thinking Church Missions

"All through the history of the Church of Christ. There has been a ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth that is a quote from Alan McRae Twentieth Century Presbyterian Churchmen and Biblical scholar. He learned that quote firsthand. He was with J Gresham Machen as a student at Princeton Seminary in the late nineteen twenty s and when Mason left Princeton in one across the Delaware River over to Philadelphia to found Westminster Theological Seminary. Mcrae went along with them and a few years later in one thousand nine thirty six when Mason. Who was ousted from the Presbyterian church U S and he formed a new church the Orthodox Presbyterian church well McRae went along with him again. So what was the issue in the Nineteen Thirties and specifically in nineteen thirty six mccray is about this ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth. Will broadly speaking. The issue was liberalism and cultural progressivism This had been at work in the Presbyterian Church USA and many other denominations as well at the time from the eighteen nineties on through the roaring twenties. Mason battled it at Princeton and he was battling it. Within the denomination narrowly. Speaking the issue was missions in nineteen thirty to the fall of nineteen thirty two. A report was issued entitled Rethinking Missions. This report was then published fully in nineteen thirty three no fewer than seven volumes published by Harper again under the title rethinking missions. This project was all funded by John. D Rockefeller it had representatives from seven key positions on mission boards. In seven denominations participated. This document had two major parts. One was based on a fact finding mission and just spoke of the state of missions and the conditions of places three places in particular China and India. Japan were studied the second part raised new ways. That mission should be done and challenge the old ways that missions was being done in a nutshell. What this document wanted to promote was to advance spiritual idealism social brotherhood Economic Welfare and Cultural Unity. The rethinking part means that to think of missions as simply the Great Commission the Proclamation of the Gospel to every tribe to every nation that is too narrow and in fact has been wrong headed we need a different mission. Different approach that represents the realities of the twentieth century so missions needs to be rethought well. This deeply troubled J. Gresham mation. He saw in this and denial of the Gospel and he couldn't believe that not only did his own mission board of the Presbyterian Church U s not only did it not refute this document but it had key representatives. Who are part of it and were promoting it. This was also the time of the missionary. Pearl Buck in nineteen thirty two. She had just won the Pulitzer Prize. She was a very significant figure in American culture and she was a Presbyterian missionary. Who denied the Atonement of Christ the Deity of Christ the authority of Scripture and all of this just perplexed Mason and so he challenged his denomination. He wrote a one hundred and ten page pamphlet to go along with an overture that he introduced in his presbytery and he wanted the Presbyterian Church to refute this document. They didn't and so. In one thousand nine hundred thirty three he formed the independent board of Presbyterian foreign missions that eventually led to his ouster from his denomination and so in Nineteen ninety-six once he was defrocked he just formed a new denomination the Orthodox Presbyterian church six months later January one nineteen thirty seven. Mason died but his commitment to the church and his commitment to the Gospel was evident there in that action of standing against the tide of his denomination and standing for the Gospel. He did not want to rethink missions but rather in the twentieth century he wanted to reaffirm the mission of the Church and the Great Commission. Well that was mentioned in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. And I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for joining us. For Five minutes purchased

Alan Mcrae Twentieth Century P Mason Nineteen Thirties Presbyterian Church U Orthodox Presbyterian Church Presbyterian Church Usa Presbyterian Church Gospel Church Of Christ J Gresham Machen Princeton Princeton Seminary Westminster Theological Semina Brotherhood Economic Welfare A Mcrae Pearl Buck Delaware River Great Commission J. Gresham Mation Steve Nichols
Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

Outcomes Rocket

12:11 min | 3 years ago

Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

"Ashim. Welcome thank you. Thank you for the great introduction. I really appreciate absolutely as she now. Did I leave anything out of your introduction that you wanNA share with listeners? Oh sure actually what happened? Is that a sense. Mike Graduation Undergrad studies in India. I had left the country. I did my PhD in Australia. And then I stayed overseas. I've mostly had to Canada. Us and I came back to India about thirty years later. It was a different country. Fortunately I had the opportunity of that time to travel to some of the relates from where I live. I live in Bangalore India at the moment and within hundred kilometers. You see a larger rural territory. And what I realize a to my journeys in these areas is that affordable healthcare education financials visits Viennese significant barrier Afar many of the people living in those communities and I wanted to do something about that and I just wanted to grab back in and as part of my section now that's a really important factor. Ashim and so kind of gets us to the first question that I wanted to ask is. What got you into the medical sector to begin with right. You've highlighted why you're focused on what you're focused on today. The around the globe journey. That's brought you back home. But what got you into healthcare to begin looking at some of the challenges that are faced people living in rural communities in India and I'm sure similar conditions exist in many of the developing economies. What I saw was something interesting. I come from telecom background as you told your listeners and I have seen the effect of Moore's law being obliged into telecom industry and the computer industry where the you know the cost comes down every two years and the performance goes up every two years. I don't see that I didn't see that in the healthcare sector and I felt intrigued by the fact that healthcare solutions would be provided in silos. There there was no opportunity to bring innovation into healthcare industry particularly in a country like India and that was a challenge and I felt that if the light some of the principles of information technology and communication et CETERA. You would be able to bring down. The cost of the air be able to deliver better care to communities in the rural areas because people in Abia the journey taken care of that of infrastructure available expertise available etc. If you take a look at a simple problem not so simple for people living in the religious cardiovascular divisive which is very common in India and yet a cardiologist Available only in the top twenty five cities so. I felt that something had to be done and that brought me into the medical sector. That's awesome Ashim and you know what it's great that you identified. This need like you pointed out even developing countries. We do have that care gap and it's important that we start looking to different ideas and technology to bridge that gap and so I'd love to hear your thoughts Ashim on an example of something that you and your team have done to create results to address this really what it is. It's access right access to healthcare so love to hear your thoughts in any stories you have to share in that room. Some of the things that I T- I feel that healthcare the fundamental right of every citizen every every country healthcare leaders need to shift their attention from primarily from two more into primary. Care if you look at many countries today particularly where loved healthcare solution designed larger importance to primary care. I'll give two examples either the energies in UK our health services in Singapore. They probably among the best and dumps of health care being provided to the citizens of the country and there is a adequate not only liquid is really established network of from regulations etc and services available. And I don't see that in You know countries like India developing countries like India where there's a huge amount of infrastructure available in the urban centers in all from the place that I bear in Bangalore kilometer radius two mile radius. Then six major so I'm really lucky. In case something happens to me. I really love that. I will get good services wherever I go out. Not even fifty miles. Maybe thirty miles outside of the city and that situation changes drastically. Finding a cardiologist is a rare finding a specialist of any kind finding simple diagnostic capabilities which are taken for granted in developing countries like USA of will not be available and we address that yes so about very good question so let me kind of come to the main point that I'm trying to bring here. Is that to provide quality healthcare beneath you technology's innovation in healthcare designed or developing economies like India. V cannot use the technology that are available in. Us are many of the developing countries because they would be too expensive for deployment in a country like India. Just affordability what it would not be possible however deaths lots of things that can be done little things that can be done. A take a simple case of vascular disease. It's a chronic illness. It gets worse and worse over Peter. Time if a simple. Ekg capability exists at the primary care level in these rural communities. What happens is that all of a sudden diagnosed people early enough and early diagnosis always saves life. And it's always less expensive by no means struck at science is very simple solution and yet we don't have those kinds of solutions today and that's exactly what we are trying to bring to the non urban areas communities that are underserved. We want to provide those kinds of solutions. I think that's Great Ashim and and you know we recently had guest His name is Ronny Schiff. Ron He's over in Israel and his his organization. Global health is very much focused on the impact. That you're working to effect and one of the examples that he provided Much like your example is the technologies that exist in developed countries. Really have a ton of bells and whistles that aren't necessary for basic like an Ekg for example and. So what can we do? If we want to address the needs of the broader global population. This is a conversation really kind of at the government level hiring an address it right and so two ashamed point we gotta take a look at small shifts small things that could be done in order to make that type of impact and Ekg for example is one of those things that could be done. Have you guys? Ashim started any programs. Anything that's yielded results spar. Okay so I can. Thanks for pointing out that audience. That looked better. They looked in the western countries and to fit the budget of the blubbing communities and just to illustrate that in another way winning them. All I would like to give is everyone. Most of your listeners will be Miller Microsoft Excel. Did the street. I'm apologies of Microsoft and high tech. I use only maybe two percent of the capabilities. The Bells and whistles. That are there that I don't really use. Yep so that's either actually thing that can be done in health care and what we have done the EKG. There are expensive solution that are available which are suitable for. I see us. That's not the market that we want to go because for us. The diagnosis must happen at the primary level. Yes soup or hormone actually will reach the ICU. So we can provide bitty simple solution handheld solution robust solution that would work in the Are the other environmental condition that exists at the primary care level with. There's no air conditioning. In the impetus can go up to maybe Hainan. Vendetta night. The device has to work the condition but began take advantage off certain things that are actually coming on rice so fast that is amazing. Take for example. The smartphone be don't really need a printed paper to give the outward because it's basically going to do with it instead if that is available through an APP on android fallen which cost less than one hundred dollars. All of a sudden beheaded capability of displaying mation. That information is available. Honestly that can be sent to a cardiologist sitting hundred miles away or maybe the word and all of a sudden we have created the solution based on existing technologies around us and yet the solution as many low cost. Yep So taking. This example is a great way of doing things and so tell us a little bit about time when you tried one of these things and maybe you ran into some obstacles. Ashim. What did you learn from those obstacles the into lots of obstacles and I'm glad that we did because become from myself and my other CO founder. Both our technologies become from non medical background and as a result of that may fence that for not necessarily league correct. So I'll give you three or four examples of those are maybe towards suspending on Hammerstein. But simple one was that during the early testing of the Barak behead given the product to driver and he was driving around the whole day with the device and India's lady heart most of the year and His mom would get ready getting device at all and it could slip out of his hands on down so by the time he finished his trial two weeks later he was video blood ridiculous like sad phase and I spoke with him through a translator because I didn't understand his language and figured out that excelled on multiple times and has maybe ladies Saudi awarded and yet it's a simple feedback that actually change the way the product is now the actually have silicone rubber grip around. It is easy to hold very very comfortable. It doesn't slip out of the hand and more or less moreover if it falls down nothing happens to realize another one. I will tell you is. We made it incorrectly at all. Maybe we were due naive. At those days that taught that if the allow our device and the information from our device to travel from the primary care physician to cardiologists. Our job is pretty much done. The largest come on line provide guidance to the primary care physician. They will talk to each other. Everything's date and Beijing sticking. What he didn't realise is the whole imbalanced. The situation is in country like India. There are about sixty million people with cardiovascular illnesses less than ten thousand cardiologists so guess what every time the Tradition wanted to get in touch with the cardiology. They will be busy somewhere else. And so they won't get any response on the grady. The primary air from the relatives for maybe maybe never in some cases because the cardiologists is really the busiest person under the Senate. So what we had to we had to rethink our solution and desks spend meteorologist that interpretation if they want to deliver a solution that would work under all the circumstances than the solution has to be on the basis of a Machine Lynn. Either machine learning or AI. This interpretation that we can deliver to the primary care physician on time every time the dog area. And that's exactly what we ended up many so these are the market feedbacks that regard as Donald mistakes but in the end is actually overall with a solution.

India Ashim Bangalore India Australia Canada Mike Beijing USA UK Microsoft Bangalore Machine Lynn Ronny Schiff Singapore Moore Israel Senate
Identity is Complex with Eugenio Pace CEO and Co-founder of Auth0

Mission Daily

08:33 min | 3 years ago

Identity is Complex with Eugenio Pace CEO and Co-founder of Auth0

"Welcome to the show Eugenia. How're you bring your thank you for having me awesome so so I love to kind of just get right in Tell me a little bit about yourself. I know you move to America from Argentina started a couple of companies. Tell me a little bit about your backstory in how you kind of wound up where you are right now. I'm almost fifty so long time for me to describe everything that happened in my life. Auto notes version short version. So I I was born nineteen many years ago I moved to the. US In two thousand three late two thousand and three with my family was working for Microsoft to at the time Microsoft Argentina. Were there for a couple years and then in wash it took me here and they offer me to stay forward originally was going to be only three years and then three years became four and five and then mortgage and kids and houses schools. I'm I'm I feel more like a native Pacific northwest. You know than anything else but I mean he is his Hossam Awesome. Tell me a little bit about striking the balance of kind of moving to a different country having a family having you know job and making that balance where what was that it like for you in the initial years you know some people ask me this question and maybe reflect because I'm also our or family are all immigrants to my. My own family is originally from Italy and from Spain and so like Somebody made a comment to me. Go to America actually my grandfather came to the US first and then he went to Argentina so my immigration. I was very different from others. You know my family left Europe in a time of trouble. You know very poor very difficult times and my circumstances were very different very different and I feel very fortunate so these white choice was an experienced that I wanted to have the we want to have I was married in. I had two boys to beverly young boys and so we here was a was an opportunity to learn in two different to experience a different culture. We tried to adopt or yourselves to the environment that was around us and so by that. I like to think that we have experienced a much richer. You know overall environment because we haven't closed ourselves to just where we knew we open up ourselves to everything else and he's been great. I WANNA go back in time just a little bit so before you left. Argentina and before joining Microsoft. You had started your own company in Argentina right. So what was that like. Why why did you want to start your own company? Be like a founder. Get into business at all. Okay so to answer that question I I need to go a little bit back in time and so when when I was you know I still have it. I have like these notebook with old drawings and names of companies and I was pleased with like changing the letters of my name and putting other things anyway. I was like brainstorming of names were companies and A. I still have like the sketches of my campus. 'cause I what what did you have like a like a corporate campus talking about putting the horse behind the carpenter fantasy Edwin. I wanted to build a company I always wanted always wanted that. I wanted to create something from nothing I guess and so my very first adventure was you know we with a friend. We invented device. There was a device for measuring servings things and automated mation measurements and that was a fantasizing like these Massey workshop the involved manufacturing right so we thought of all this industrial age but a factory factory but it never go beyond beyond my bedroom earlier but then to your mind stone when just go a went to engineering in school and technical stuff was always you know what I was attracted to and And so when I finished college h a friend of mine and I he had idea but we were really good friends. We decided to. Hey maybe we should make these faint and so we created this solution for a company. There was like the first the first instance off the pro that we built and it was terrible when he was great and it was terrible we worked countless hours. You know he was great the really good partners but both of us were like really naive young and we were like solely will be speaking serious. We have these ideas of what building a company was about all of them wrong. Ideas play the way. The worst of all mistakes was to think that you know we could build the Bronx and then people come and it will just by because it probably was awesome. It was great it was great and he was awesome But he was to hit of. Its time and we'd have no clue of things like pricing or marketing or saves over your support like all the different components that make company and so we just we also unlucky in a way that the first customer that we got was really awesome. They paid us they treated as well they like you know they were. It was not really easy so now way it reinforced all the wrong assumptions. The second customer game and it wasn't easy toward wave and he was like really a pain and they didn't pay us and like all the wrong things will be complete and pieces of the first swamp and so that was really hard and then you know we were exhausted after a year and something you know we decided to was it and then you went and you worked for Microsoft but eventually you wanted to jump back in you wanted found another company your CEO. Now tell me about what you're doing now and why you wanted wanted to take another shot at building your own thing and and building something from nothing I did it because he was stealing me right so moncus was awesome was great the best experience I could have asked for. I was reading lucky and very grateful but he wasn't my company. I wasn't unhappy is not. I was like every day like complaining Muslim. My my style. But it wasn't. I didn't feel fulfilled. And so my wife in their infinite wisdom sadly hey maybe you should change do something else and we. We started brainstorming about what to do and she said something. That's stuck with me. which is like you know you? You never regrets your mistakes. You always always regret what you don't know what will happen. You don't know the outcome is like the is the uncertainty of what breath. I should have a nubby. I shouldn't have. And so. She said like she encouraged me to take one year. Time time boxy she put some help me put some constraints in the adventure and And so that's always thought so. Toya resigned like with Microsoft in December to two thousand twelve zero with another friend.

Argentina Microsoft United States America Eugenia Bronx Europe Toya Founder Spain Italy CEO
The Demoscovery

Daily Sales Tips

05:36 min | 3 years ago

The Demoscovery

"In yesterday's tip from pornography Hindu Burnell called me out for not having featured any tips related to demos on the podcast. He was right and he did something about it by sharing his own tip which was fantastic. I thought I'd continue on the theme and turn this into a bit of a demo weekend and share one of my personal philosophies around on demos and a strategy that used to work really well for me now to be fair. I haven't really done demos the last few years as I've been working in the professional services space but before that when working with Alachua and then in the event technology space as much as possible I did my own Demos Mos- I always wanted to show my prospects that the solution was easy and intuitive enough for the sales guy to us because I always worried that bringing in some technical expert to run the demo just implied that it was difficult or complicated. It also put me in a position to control everything everything. I didn't have to stress so much about having a perfect mind meld with my sales engineer. Who May or may not take people down a path that I thought would be the most relevant what I really WanNa talk about. Though is a process. I developed called the demos discovery. This was driven by the idea that so often Vinh. Your potential new client just wants to see a demo. They WanNa get a sense of the solution. See what it's actually about and make a determination for themselves around around whether or not it might help them solve a particular problem or business issue instead of doing that demo for them. We of course want to do a bunch of discovery. We want to try to understand their needs. Their pain points how much that gap in their business might be costing them all of that so instead of doing what the customer Marwan's we try to force them into a discovery process. That for them is a time commitment that they often can't even tell is going to be worth it or not because we haven't showed them anything it creates friction and really goes against what the customer wants. So I put the two together I.. I built a demo. That was all about give and take and allowed me to run a really good discovery process while also demonstrating the solution and now. I totally get that. This might not even be possible for some solutions but where I did it. Most effectively was in that event technology. Space he's one of the primary things that my future clients wanted to see was a walk through a of the event registration process both the front end and the back end. Fortunately for me the software was easy to use and super customizable so I built a demo event whereas we walked through that registration example example I had embedded all the things I wanted to know some elements. I would have pre filled based on the research in prep had done for the call so at its most most basic have their name email address. Company and title prevailed this. Let me show off some of the marketing capabilities and demonstrate how we could set things up to show things that we already knew about their ten dis. Once they clicked or registration link in an email from there I could talk to. Ah them about the events they ran. How many what type. How complex were they. How many people attended all those kinds of things while they're telling me this. I'm actually chilly capturing the details inside the demo then I could start asking about different functionality. They might need. Would they need to manage hotel. Registrations distractions where they want a mobile APP all those types of details. This is what drove the rest of the demo. I wouldn't show them anything that wasn't relevant if they don't need to worry about hotel registrations why on Earth would I show that to them if they told me. A particular capability was really important. I could go into more depth and also learned from them why that specific capability was so important was done and after using the option to register multiple. Attendees Simultaneously Ashley. If there were multiple people on the call I would show them the confirmation email capabilities here. I was able to send them that email confirmation with with all the details that I had just captured throughout the process. It was the ultimate leave behind. Follow up and it just happened in real time and of course that confirmation email came from my email address and included my contact details. Then as we transitioned into the back end I was able to show them their own data. How it was used. And what else we could do with it. Based on additional discussion around how they were hoping to make use of all this information mation to drive sales deliver better experiences or whatever else was important now. I wanted to give the specifics of this example to make it more real. Oh and show that. This isn't just some theory. Sure had about the perfect product. Her run this demo discovery process inside of. But I've been able to do versions Asians of this with other solutions. The point is this. Try to find ways that you can do your demo earlier turn it into a conversation instead of having a one way discovery conversation where you're trying to get everything you need and then doing a demo where you're providing a one way pitch. Try to combine the two and have a conversation.

Hindu Burnell Sales Engineer Alachua Vinh Professional Services Marwan
Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: 'They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds'

Mac OS Ken

01:40 min | 3 years ago

Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: 'They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds'

"You might think impeachment would be the only thing on president. Trump's mind this week if if so you would apparently be wrong police was on CNBC Wednesday morning spending at least part of the time talking about Apple How oh proud he is of its innovation. You ask of the jobs that creates in the work it does greening at supply chain. Actually he seems to have been talking about about the need for a back door in the Iowa s though watching the one minute and sixteen seconds devoted to the topic well let me just share with you what CNBC NBC wrote President. Donald Trump on Wednesday stepped up his pressure over Apple's refusal to unlock iphones. Authorities in criminal cases apple has to help us and I'm very strong on it trump told. CNBC's squawk box co host. Joe Turner from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. They had have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds and we can do things and and the state monopoly said it provided gigabytes of information mation to law enforcement related to the Pensacola case. But that it would not build a back door or specialized software to give law enforcement elevated access trump told. CNBC on Wednesday. They could have given us that information. That would have been very helpful. The president said he's not concerned about his relationship with Cook Oracle because the stakes are so high you're dealing with drug lords and you're dealing with terrorists and if you're dealing with murderers I don't care. Trump said so. I'm guessing breakfast. Didn't go. Great

Donald Trump Cnbc Apple President Trump Joe Turner Davos Switzerland Pensacola Cook Oracle Iowa NBC
Intelligence officials ask Congress not to hold threats hearings after angering Trump last year

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:11 min | 3 years ago

Intelligence officials ask Congress not to hold threats hearings after angering Trump last year

"A year ago today. The president was so mad as he was watching. Those highlights. That sources told us. He was literally early screaming while watching people like Dan Coats. The former director of national intelligence talk about things like Iran North Korea. And the like because they were contradicting a lot of what you hear from the president publicly so now these intelligence officials have made this request thing. They don't WanNa have to testify about this publicly as you noted you can imagine why given what you were just talking about the Soleimani strike all these issues. Where you've seen this intelligence contradicting itself in recent these officials contradicting themselves in recent weeks? So while it's not the expectation take. This request is going to be granted. It hasn't been any kind of a formal request and we do still believe this report. This report that tells us the biggest threat essentially worldwide is still going to be public. Like you've seen these officials make clear is nothing they wanNA talk about publicly because essentially they are worried about angering president trump. All right CAITLIN. Thank you very much out front now. Ashu adopt a former. FBI special agent. Who knows a lot about these briefings obviously? FBI is involved in them and Republican congressman. Mike Turner Member of the House Intelligence Committee which would be holding one of those hearings hearings on the worldwide threat. Assessment Congressman is. We were talking about as you came out obviously committee has these hearings you get classified briefings behind closed doors but this is the one that the world sees the American public see it comes along with the document and you hear the reporting the top intelligence officials. Don't WanNa do this after last year when they did. You know president trump. Go back to school. It's wrong with you guys. It turned turned into a big A BIG FIASCO. Are you okay with them. Not Giving a public assessment will visit. There's a document that is the public assessment that is available for for the public and hate responding to things that are like one source or unnamed sources about what people are saying at the president might think or feel but I can tell you having served through three administration. There's a number of reasons reasons why the public portion is different than the classified portion that we receive and send sometimes many times administrations are reticent to do the public. I've actually sat through one word. Obama official in the public portion of a Russia threat assessment contradicted themselves than in the classified version because the threats are listening to and that's really the environment that they're in. It's not really. The president. United States is the audience the world is the audience our allies are listening to threats are listening and they also take from what this presentation is what they should do next and what. US policy's going to be so AIYSHA. The thing is though and I understand the point right. They've got different audiences and yet last year. And and this is our reporting. I know congressman. You always say what you just said there but this is reporting from multiple sources. It's bad at town. News organizations operate. They're saying that they don't want to do it because they're afraid of what trump will say they don't. I WANNA be belittled demeaned and humiliated after they say whatever it is. They're going to say. Is that a problem. Aisha that is a problem. Because it tells you off the bat that what they I would say would not align with what the president has been saying. Or what the president's thinking this is exactly why it makes them angry. And I think what you see. Here is basically easily an undermining of two fundamental pillars of democracy which is transparency and accountability transparency into. What do these intelligence heads think are threats threats directly from their mouths and accountability in terms of is the president responding to them effectively and for this president in particular particular? Is He telling the truth about them. So on this point okay. You got a closed door briefing on Iran. You were told that you were told. And you were reticent about it because it was classified presidents allowed to declassify hi which which he does? Sometimes there's no rhyme or reason he appeared to declassify or I don't know make I don't know all I know is he said there were four embassies. He's being targeted by Iran and his own National Security Advisor and secretary defense are unable to back that up. This this is what we're talking about. What are they going to say? Let me just play the president. And Ah play secretaries. ESPERER MR O'Brien I can reveal that I believe it would have been four embassies. I didn't see one with regard to four embassies I look. It's always difficult. Even with the exquisite intelligence that we have to know exactly what the targets are. Do you want to hear them publicly. Explain why he he said one thing and they have been unable publicly to even say he's right a couple of reasons and and I think it's not really an inconsistency one you have at the president is able to say things that they're not even if I had not correct once he says it is not in the version I have CanNot then be revealed but the second thing is is there's a number of sources of information there's even foreign intelligence sources that we receive those classified briefings at the president has at the Secretary of defense doesn't have That depending upon what the need is what the action is So the information that the president is receiving is much broader than all. The rest of us are going to be saying. They didn't contradict. They said we don't have that information. I didn't see that information which again is Does not say that. They're they're they're convict him. But I want to say one thing with what you said the chance to just to get in on that so when trump says I can reveal. I believe it would've been four embassies. And his own secretary of defense who was responsible for ordering troops to launch a drone attack back. I didn't see one with regard to pharmacies. You don't see that as a contradiction I see it as a contradiction and I think that if the secretary of defense is not seeing the same information mation that the president of the United States is that is a problem in and of itself. I also think that from people who've been in these highly sensitive meetings that that would be almost impossible that the secretary of defense sees the presidential daily briefing. They are the ones advising him on the options that are available in this this particular case where the military strike so I feel like it. Would I mean I would hope that is congressman. You would be incredibly disturbed. Well as you know. You haven't had a classified briefing and fifteen years and even the time period did you did not have access to the type of information that goes into the policy decision making or even the world threats brief that we have to hear in the Intel. Or are you saying you want an answer to this question. You're fine with it being behind closed doors or you just. You're just fine without no. I think there are certainly as utility to having the public hearing but what I was going to say to ashes. Prior statement is that the public hearing the public representation of this information is not about the president night states. This is not about challenging the president's AIDS and what he said this is about people who choose unwanted to harm and so all of our questions with respect to national security and this probably threats briefing the world threats briefing. The classified portions should be. How do we make America say okay? That's true but I should also be aren't our elected leaders responsible for telling us the truth about what threats we face before we decide where we're go to war over them with the bottom line is if they're afraid to tell the truth. Then we have a fundamental issue on these pillars of democracy. That I mentioned before if they they any themselves are afraid to come forward because what they think will you know the president will retaliate against them or any other blowback. That is that is a big problem. We're going to see what happens with The Chairman Chef and his own the world report the world threats report of course is public itself so the transparency is you have the opportunity to read it and from that you can make your own conclusion about what the administration saying and the report so that no questions from our electric present but I see your point. Yes we will. We will get the pay all

President Trump Congressman Iran United States Secretary Dan Coats FBI House Intelligence Committee Director Barack Obama North Korea Donald Trump Intel Mike Turner America Declassify Hi Chairman Chef Aisha
Great interface design is often invisible. But maybe it shouldn't be.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:14 min | 3 years ago

Great interface design is often invisible. But maybe it shouldn't be.

"When it comes to design whether it's an apps or online or even with phones or TV's computers we throw around the term user friendly Ettelaat user friendly design makes using a product easy and painless which means we don't really notice it we just enjoy using it and sometimes is when design is really good and easy to use. We also don't notice that we're kind of addicted to an APP or a game or phone or that. We're becoming increasingly dependent. rendent on those things cliff. Kwong is a longtime user experience designer journalist. He's co written a book called user friendly. How the hidden rules of design or changing changing the way we live work and play? He told me the best design comes from empathy. We have this myth of the designer or inventor somebody who creates for themselves in some sense right but if you think about that that's a very limiting thing right in fact I think the greater thing is that that you know evolution gave us this powerful tool of empathy that allows us to put ourselves in other people's shoes and that in turn allows us to create many many more things and we would create naturally and I would argue that sort of displacement of the self is really the thing that makes the corporate world. Go Round Right. You're not always making things for yourself. You're making something for somebody else. There's a process for empathizing with other people. It's not just pure intuition. It's something that I call industrialized empathy and that is the process. which very natural human thing that we do become turned into a tool for developing the products around us? Let's talk about design fine as a weapon because some of this understanding of human behavior has arguably been used to create eight designs. That aren't necessarily good for people so I think it's interesting because this concept of for ease friction looseness by the second actually leads you to a kind of breaking point. It's the idea that all these different gadgets around us. These APPs there essentially optimized for these micro moments events of Inter engagement as opposed to a higher order values of what we actually want. The odd thing about technology is the today. We can't put our higher order. Values in that technology technology they've all been micro optimized for this sort of short term gain as opposed to macro optimize for the things that we ultimately want such as. Let's say being closer to the people we care about or achieving a becoming the people that we WANNA be right. We're also at this moment where people are thinking a lot about artificial intelligence dilligence. You say there's benefit for lots of reasons to us just doing the tasks ourselves. Yes I mean I think that one of the interesting things that people have discovered. Is this idea. Eddie of an automation paradox. Right this is an idea that originated in research into how airplanes work basically what happens. Is that when you introduce automation mation in the cockpit. You do so because you wanna make things a little bit easier a little bit safer for the pilots but what happens over time as that. The pilots now that they have no longer the chance chance to exercise those skills become less and less capable and so you have to introduce more and more automation is so many more decisions around us. Become automated is so many things anticipate what we want without giving us the chance to inspect whether or not we do. In fact want those things we may become less capable about making certain decisions in trade offs. That would not come to US naturally. Right and so there is a certain virtue in friction itself. Friction in some sense the path to introspection friction listener. Nisus is in some way the pass to I guess being subservient or passive in dialogue that we have with the world around us. Well Yeah I mean and Boeing. You could argue is basically a case in point to that principle right which is like we'll just we'll just we'll just take care of this for you. Was it an inevitable end and to design thinking rate. I don't think death is an inevitable outcome result of user friendly design that said. I do think it's hard to see any other way. That things becoming so abstracted and so easy for us doesn't in some sense. Make US less capable as people you eventually reach the point where you're not. I just delivering ease. But you're delivering sort of mindlessness. Right and in fact you know user experience designers think about this all the time but I would argue that the stakes on which this challenge is being met. The hasn't really percolated throughout the discipline. Away that we're really tackling the the fundamental challenge orange. Yeah and I wonder. Is that why it matters. That consumers understand how design works because if it was all positive sort of wouldn't matter if it was hitting on some level yes my sense is that if we understand how the interactions around us or made how user experience around us is designed that it gives us at least this ability to articulate exactly what we would rather have the shortcomings that exist around us and without the beginnings of that understanding ending then again you just become a passive consumer of these things without the sort of necessary ability to push back. We don't even have this idea idea of of this idea of being critical consumers. I mean it's almost something you learn in adulthood. It's not something you learn as a kit right but I would argue that needs to change change for example. It's crazy to me that the times has a full staff of art critics but no design critics that appear on a regular basis. Right the idea that like so much of our lives is not up to critique and inspection and open to channels where we can demand more is very strange change. And what I'm trying to do in this in the in the things that I write is try to make that culture happen That's a pretty lofty goal. It's not a goal that I could achieve myself but I think it's a goal that we as a society need to need to need to look at cliff. Kwong is co author of user friendly. How the hidden rules of design are changing the way way we we live live work work and and