19 Burst results for "Mathworks"

"mathworks" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"mathworks" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Before today it is a racing poverty is so gosh darn simple as mathworks Wade Matt welcome to the show this morning thank you very much Bob no match up at this network an organization that I have the support over the years I have had many of your colleagues on my show when the opportunity arises tell us a bit about the atlas network and the reason I'm asking you to do that is you have quite an unusual and effective business model soon share with us the business model of atlas network sure so it's hard enough to explain to one's parents that you work for a think tank and what that is imagine trying to explain that you work for a nonprofit that serves think tanks so this is the challenge I always face at the holiday dinner explaining to relatives what is the outlook network and what does it do well the quick history is that the development of think tanks that is not profit institutions that are independent from government in the case of the ones we serve that are looking at policy solutions that are going to increase economic freedom and individual freedom towards human flourishing so in the fifties our founder established a think tank in London that Margaret Thatcher later credited with being the intellectual foundation of core reforms that were very successful fast forward to today the number of think tanks around the world that fit that mold is around five hundred and in more than ninety countries so the organization I work for atlas network looks at those local lead lead think tanks that are independent of government and independent from us as the answer to achieving the kind of economic and individual freedom reforms that we know lead to human flourishing so our job is to support them and our model is to provide grant making that financial support for their projects also to provide training on think tank excellence and on the best in policy reform ideas that are happening around the world and most importantly to provide the main network it is not the most common job to have to lead a think tank and we learned so much from peers and so so much of what our programming does is simply provide these fantastic inspiring enterprising think tank leaders with peers around the world that they can learn from and so the case studies is an example of how we try to circulate those kinds of great ideas that are being discovered around the world and then shared at the same time mad when I when the when as you explain the business model of atlas network what I thought of it is my goodness its global federalism it's all up all the good work all up the quality of work that's done is better to the extent that it is local to the problem states are better at solving their problems than Washington cities are better than states so the more local one can get the more success you're likely to have that was a founding principle of our country it will often referred to in a Supreme Court justice Brandeis's describing states as laboratories of innovation he respected the fact that states could do better than Washington and your model is simply that same premise that the good work can be done by local think tanks because while it in one sense the there is a commonality to the problems which cause poverty on the other hand thus the cures for that problem will vary from locale to locale now without thought if one didn't have five hundred or so local think tanks which is with knowledge of their community their states or their regions what's the alternative how does foreign aid operate without think tanks what is this the governmental system that we live right now and what about the shortcomings with it because you all local think tanks solving problems of economic freedom and poverty are doing the same have the same goal as the global organizations which our government gives a lot of support to so how does the operation of these global network these global aid organizations work and why is local think tanks better well it's become increasingly important to share this message of there is an alternative way to foreign aid and the reason why it's become important is that most of the aid community has recognized the limitations of our foreign aid as a model and just a quick background or just a quick orientation currently the United States spends about close to fifty billion dollars a year in foreign aid it is by far the largest donor in absolute dollars but the U. N. has established a target that's adjusted target that all countries give all donor countries give point seven percent of of GDP very few countries do that mostly Scandinavians cross that threshold but of course in absolute dollars it's very little money compared to the U. S. less than ten percent so we do about fifty billion and foreign aid most of that goes through USA ID that the United States eighty eight agency for international development and the state department and the defense department what is foreign aid a lot of it is our military support that's included in that not many people realize that it also includes things like trying to deal with health issues in the local area but it's also this idea of long term development how do we help solve poverty in the long term not not just humanitarian aid for right now which is also part of it and the reason why the foreign aid community hubs become very introspective about its efficacy is you started to have some broad criticisms the last twenty years about two things in particular one.

Wade Matt
Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:00 min | 9 months ago

Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

"So the other day Darius we took a little trip to a huge apartment complex in New York it is enormous one of the biggest biggest in the world. It spans like ten city blocks in New York houses around thirty thousand people. Yeah and it's known locally as stuyvesant town or Sta towns down a uh-huh cool village cat. It's like a bunch of giant brick towers sort of all identical in rows and we were there because because of an indicator an indicator given to us by Ben Ho. He's an economist at Vassar College. Yeah and Ben says this indicator is a big deal a milestone down and win this indicator hit this milestone. Ben said he was like Oh my God. I thought there should be parades and like people cheering and instead like there's a the articles and like the trade press and people haven't talked about much. I think it's a contender for the most important indicator of all time the most important indicator for all time at least for me. Ooh Okay make your case. This is fascinating. What is this indicator? Indicator is the cost of solar electricity specifically that the cost of solar electricity has been falling by a lot not falling by so much. It's actually now competitive with fossil fuels. It's gotten that cheap which brought us to the roof of a twenty storey brick building in February roof that has now covered in solar panels. And we were there. Because this roof is owned by one of the biggest baddest most profit focus companies on Wall Street in large large part because of Ben's indicator this is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Smith and we are on the roof of building. We're here twenty or so stories above these filaret colds today on the show the price of solar what changed and I've been thinks this so important. It's a little windy too. Beautiful View his beautiful this message comments from NPR sponsored show. Bonnie Haute made to taste just like milk. Doc It's creamy frothy and great with coffee and cookies but without the dairy because it's not milk it's almost milk new Shabani owed support also also comes from the capital. One saver card earned four percent cashback on dining and entertainment to percents at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases now. Now when you go out you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet? Terms apply back in two thousand six. Ben Ho was the lead energy economist. Missed under president. George W Bush and he was part of a team looking for energy alternatives economically viable energy alternative. Being the operative word there the energy source to beat was coal it was the cheapest source of energy and back then like solar was almost like a joke. At the time I was looking at the numbers and cost five cents ends or four cents per kilowatt hour natural gas also in that range and sold there was like a dollar per kilowatt hour. Oh Wow and you were just like this. This is never going to be cost effective. You heard that correctly recklessly. Solar Power was twenty times more expensive than coal solar was just never gonNA happen. It was a non starter. It was a punchline and then something changed changed actually a bunch of. Something's yeah a lot of small things that took the price down by five or ten percent so for one thing. Government subsidies on the state and federal level brought costs down for businesses and residents got more people to buy into solar which meant more companies started making solar panels and then companies that made solar panels started competing against each other tomake cheaper more efficient panels as a result. The panel's got nearly twice as efficient and the price dropped from about a thousand dollars per panel to around one hundred and fifty dollars per panel today. Hey It's a series of sort of small process improvements over the past ten fifteen years for the cost down like a magical amount of money a magical amount of money. The prices solar job by more than ninety ninety percent from one dollar per kilowatt hour fifteen years ago to four cents per kilowatt hour today and that is today's indicator four four cents per kilowatt hour. which makes the cheapest form of electricity in the US and also in the world cheaper than cheaper natural gas jubilant coal cheaper than coal? Oh my drop. Yes because when that happens is ben everything changed and then thinks this will take solar power from like a fringy source of energy to a major maybe even the main source of energy in the world but at this point solar energy still only accounts for about two percent of the energy in the US I think that's totally changes. At least how icy climate change right so before when like solar and renewables more expensive it was all about sort of getting people to like sacrifice to do the right thing And now it's actually just getting people to save money. I mean if we're looking at pure economics though I mean if solar is only two percent and we have these huge entrenched energy can companies from the biggest companies in the world. That have a lot of money. A lot of jobs tied up in traditional like fossil fuels and those kinds of energies. Like how I mean. That seems like some daunting economics to overcome right. I think I'm a big believer in the markets. Now the soldiers act cheaper. Actually think that the market and capitalist pretty powerful driving force to move people torward the cheapest form of energy and you see that happening right So they just had the biggest year in history in the United States because of just the fallen costs companies like facebook book and Microsoft have started investing millions of dollars in solar energy and so has blackstone blackstone in case. You haven't heard them a giant Wall Street private equity firm Um and Hedge Fund. Basically they deal with money. Enormous amounts so much money. They manage hundreds of billions of dollars yep blackstone definitely really not like a hippy. dippy let's all try to save the Planet Company. No no no. This is not like reusable tote bag Greenpeace canvasser type company. They care about the bottom line and blackstone has started investing millions in Solar Power Blackstone owns the company that manages Stuy town the apartment complex in New York with all the solar panels and Kelly vaas is the CEO of that division of the company. And he oversaw this big solar project and he took us out to the roof to check out the solar panels firsthand. We're standing standing on the rooftop status in town and you're looking at a few of the nine thousand six hundred seventy one solar panels that we put on rooftops to be precise and isn't isn't the that's for size. Nine thousand six hundred and seventy one solar panels on building after building just spanning ten. The city blocks just laid out before us. All these buildings like as far as we can buildings so as you can see like how many square feet of roof twenty two acres does that have to do the math on the square feet on that. We did the math. We did the math and it is almost a million square feet of roof all painted white and all covered in shiny black glass solar solar panels all about the size of a foosball table. Kellyanne is team installed the panels last year and they estimated it will reduce Stuy town carbon footprint by about sixteen percent so the project cost of eleven million. That's a lot. Will you lose money on it as a cost neutral we make a little money we we we will have a return on investment. It's not significant. It's it's not a lot of money but it is definitely not a loss if it had been a loss Kelly. They couldn't have really considered going solar now that they have these panels up and running. Kelly says lots of other building managers and businesses have been taking exactly this tour that we took asking about how they might go solar as well. What's the biggest this question that you get from people who are considering doing it? Did you make money on it. They want to know. Is there a return on it. Is it affordable all of those things and in the answer for I was yes blackstone was so jazzed about the results of its Stuy town project it is investing another eight hundred and fifty million dollars and solar and this says Ben is exactly clear why he thinks the cheapness of solar is the most important indicator of all time on this sort of problem of climate change. I think yeah I've optimism. I think in part because a lot of the stories you hear about climate change all assume that coal-based future I mean listen. Climate change is not over as a problem Ben Points out. There is still significant obstacles to overcome if solar is to become a major energy source for the world. I mean for one thing. It only works when the sun is out. That's a problem battery technology that could store. Solar Energy is in great right now also the panels would need to get more efficient for all of STA towns. Nine thousand Rosen odd solar panels. Solarte will still only supply about six percent of the energy for the apartment complex. Still says now that economics is on its side. Now that the mathworks he thinks solar has a bright view. Now now biggest hurdles past right. I think it's for me. Is the most exciting indicator. It makes me optimistic about the future.

BEN Solar Power Blackstone Ben Ho Stuy New York United States Kelly Vaas Blackstone Vassar College Blackstone Blackstone Darius Stacey Smith NPR
The Most Important Sale

Launch Life with Jeff Walker

03:18 min | 9 months ago

The Most Important Sale

"Okay. So we're talking about money in the little mini series food. and I wonder what the absolute most important things you so you have to get this right. And that's this idea of of making the second sale so people get really a namrd with acquiring acquiring the customer with finding the customer reaching out into into the interwebs and somehow attracting someone having to come in and buy from you getting an initial sale and that's all great and frankly. It's something that I did that quite a bit in years past but ah one. There's one rule that that was not going to change and that it's always going to get more expensive to acquire the customer estimate. Advertising costs. Keep going up. The cost to reach people keeps going up. That's not gonNA turn around anytime soon. It's just going to keep getting more expensive to acquire the customer. So what you need to do. You need to focus on the second and third sale of four sale but the next sale. Aw The back end. What is what are you going to sell to people that have already bought from you? Because I'll tell you this in my experience it's about fifteen times easier to make the second sale than to make the first sale and so the completely changes the way you're mathworks and often the second can sail can be at a higher price and the profitability is so much greater because you're no longer paying the cost to acquire that customer so you have to focus focus on the back end and what that does is it allows you to spend more money to acquire the customer so if if your first sale one hundred dollars but then of the people that buy from you a third of them make an additional purchase for another hundred dollars then that means that initial I shall aquisition. Well that person's worth so much more to have to bring them into your world that allows you to spend more to get that initial sale tale. This will completely change and at the end of the day. You're competing against other people in your market to acquire that initial customer. And as I say the cost will keep coming up. And you're you're competing your spend is competing against their spent and so what you need to do is at a back end and hopefully it higher end back and completely change the math in your business and it will it. You just can't survive in long-term effect when I look at businesses and occasionally come across one where it's like well that we really hard to have a back end for that business. Then it'd be one I wouldn't even be interested in if if you and the corollary or the tangent off that it's almost every business you can build a back end but you absolutely have to focus goose on their back and additional sales or else at some point the cost of acquisition. Way Too high for you so I hope this isn't

"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"Scripts and code and run it on the cloud. You don't have to have a desktop license things like that. So it's a that's a pretty amazing partnership. Mathworks also has a software application called simulink and simulink is how you can target a device you can you can model it in software and then output the code. So you can create the device. So this is using the automotive industry and. Nasa as a customer, and so a lot of those one of those navigation algorithms come from a simulink model, and then the code you get model up in virtual environment. And then output the code to an onboard computer on a on a car or on a system. Yeah. No. That's that's the action. I call that this offer defined product sometimes referred to as the digital twin? But that's that's where the action isn't. That is in the modeling. And everyone knows we've talked about that before. But I it's interesting because I known about math lab, obviously for a long time. I didn't know that they're playing in the data analytics space. So that's kind of new information to me. Okay. Yeah. Great. Yeah. And one other clarification, you said you can use it for free in earlier, you said there's a licensing fee was that for visualize ation versus this simulink or what's the difference though? Although in on all those products are are separates things because for free you get access to Matlab via things for free. But if you want to take that further mathworks toolboxes that are called like the stats machine. Learning toolbox in order to use machine learning on things. Speak. You'd have to have a license for the machine learning toolbox. Through mathworks and the machine learning would be not the simulink then so as part of helping build the model in simulink or was the relationship between machine learning simulink, so simulink is. There's definitely relationship might be very complicated. The really purely define it. But similar I like to think of it is targeting the device and the outta them. That's going to run on the device. Okay. So I'd model it up in simulink. And then execute your output, the code for the device that I'm gonna program there's even simulate blocks and simulink packages that will target an Dino and raspberry pi. So you don't have to have like a proprietary computer or anything like that to to run? You can we've what we've done with. It is we've we modeled up a car counter, the takes an image from a webcam that took a raspberry pi. And we modeled up the the the feature detection from the images that are coming off the webcam to detect car and detective what direction the cars going. And so we have a camera facing a highway, and we're able to count the number of cars that are going. By but all the counting is done on the raspberry pi. But we modeled it up using simulink simulink was our our way of defining on. You know, what this blob is in counting this, but not counting that and so we did all of that modeling on simulate simile exported the code got a label. Now, we're Matlab came in is now Matlab is running on things be. And so that raspberry pi sending the raw count of cars to speak and on things we we write a Matlab code that aggregated into how many cars went in a certain hour. And this is where the data analysis starts to come into Matlab starts the shine. The we say, and then you can use Matlab to say what the peaks were right? So find the peaks in the traffic now that we've added it all up across the day. Okay. Now, we have peaks, you know. Warning, we have peaks of cars in the after work, and now you can create a predictive model and say, what's it going to be tomorrow based on all this historical data, and that's where Matlab comes in gut. Good. So the machine learning than is helping create these models effect, right? Exactly. Excellent. Thanks a lot UN's. I appreciate it. And we'll be talking soon. Thanks for having me. Okay. That's a good talk with Han. Charlotte..

Mathworks Nasa UN Charlotte
"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"The good to maybe develop that intellectual property that's going to be unique. And I agree with that as well. But then at some point you're most likely going to be pivoting away from the open source and looking at a commercial is that accurate characterization? When you say, we what do you mean? Well, so what I mean is a company let's say an enterprise beyond beyond tinker. So most of our listeners are enterprises, and they are they are looking at what's the best way to to build are not product. Now. I advocate all the time. Don't build but rent or buy an IOT platform so woke it. So now, we're on the T platform track. Now, we got this option, which is interesting, which is the open source option. And what I think I hearing you say is open sources good. It's really cheap. Obviously them you can you can test a lot of things with it. But at some point, you're probably gonna need to to move to a commercial platform of some form or another. And I guess I'm just wondering is that a fair characterization of where we are today with the with yours in particular, and in general with IOT will consorts platforms. Okay. Yeah. I get. I get your questions. Really good question, by the way. And I think you're I think you're actually summarizing where not just where we are. But where I t is in general, it's still extremely early in the evolution of how I o t is going. So I think you're right. I think once you get. Beyond the prototyping and tinkering and you're trying to figure out if this is going to be something your company invest in. You're gonna have different needs. Once you get to commercial product. If you're going to put this out into the marketplace, maybe for sale, or if you're to your business is now going to rely on getting this kind of data, then you know, you're going to have a different challenge here. You're gonna have you know, privacy policies, you're gonna have to work out that you may not have to work out before you are you going to have a tech support. You know, a help desk added to your company is something you may not have before taking inbound questions from customers billing billing, and so becomes a much bigger problem. And we haven't. Had enough time. Even though I've been you know, in this space for a long time. I don't think I've had enough time to know what all the commercial requirements are going to be. So that's why I'm not I haven't put out something that says, okay? This is the commercial thing that everyone needs. Right. We just haven't. We haven't got enough data and use cases to really understand that. But with that being said, we do have commercial partners. We're learning a lot together where developing lots of new technologies together, and that's you know, part of my role at mathworks. And so I'm I'm trying to learn those use cases and solve those pain points through keeping pushing and extending what things because capable of doing. So some point maybe we'll have something that answers, a more commercial system broadly. But like I said it's early. So I don't I don't have all the I don't have all the information that said everyone's. Going to. Here's what everyone needs. Yeah. No that's fair enough. And and I don't think anyone does at this point to be honest, but there are commercial platforms out there and the business models for commercial platforms are generally pretty easy to get into you know, because they're gonna be related on some metric with us can be data flowing or or actions taken. And so I guess I'm looking for your vice when you're let's say, you are an enterprise, and you're tinkering you're at the beginning stage. But you you're that person raised their hand..

IOT mathworks
"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"mathworks" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"It was with another company. I I recently joined mathworks as principal engineer. And you know, prior to that I started a company, and so it was for it was for our own company our own consulting company. And so that's what led me around the world. Okay. Now today what I'm gonna wanna talk about with? You is open source not platforms in in them. So it sounds like you may be maybe live double life is that that you're working at mathworks. Plus, you're maintaining think speaker house at all working OB. So we have we have a close partnership with mathworks amounts. Works is definitely pushing the things technology investing and trying to keep the servers going and adding more capacity and nice adding features and things like that. So it things is an open source project, so companies and partners can jump in. And that has happened in many in many cases. Well when we start from the beginning. So what isn't let's hear your definition of IOT platform. And then what makes it what makes it different from an open source IOT platform. Okay. While the that's a good question. What the definition of IOT or being so close to it. I don't know if I can I'm not if I'm the best person answer that question because I hear everyone has an IOT platform. So I'm not I'm not too. Sure. What is his true is true play here?.

mathworks principal engineer
"mathworks" Discussed on Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"mathworks" Discussed on Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Daniel Moran

"Here's why here's how the mathworks if you've got a business that if you just got a product that is selling one hundred thousand dollars a month, and it costs you twenty thousand dollars a month. And you've got to order five months of inventory, that means you've got to go make a one hundred thousand dollar purchase order. So we're going to spend one hundred thousand dollars, and we're gonna get five months of sales out of that. So if we sell five hundred thousand dollars worth and five months and forty percent profit that is two hundred thousand dollars worth a prophet. So we spent one hundred thousand dollars we got. Two hundred thousand dollars. We have a two hundred percent return on our money. Most people would celebrate it this. And this is why most people make this stupid mistake of funding their own inventory. Two hundred percent return in five months, and we're all going to be rich. This is amazing. Except for one thing. Yes. Two hundred percent return on our y looks good on paper. But since that is a predictable expense. We can predict what our expenses are going to be. We're going to predict what our outcome is going to be as a result. We would do much better to let someone else fund that. Now, I've talked about services for funding on inventory on this podcast before I'm gonna use Amazon lending, my example, because I think it's the best place if you've got Amazon lending to pay for that hundred thousand and all you pay is the interest on that debt, which is typically going to be between five and ten thousand dollars. You have now turned your expense. You no longer have a an expense on inventory. You just have an expense on interest. So your investment your own investment out of retained earnings is between five and ten thousand dollars. So you're five to ten thousand dollar investment becomes two hundred thousand dollars. What we have done..

Amazon five months one hundred thousand dollars two hundred thousand dollars ten thousand dollars Two hundred percent five hundred thousand dollars Two hundred thousand dollars one hundred thousand dollar twenty thousand dollars ten thousand dollar two hundred percent forty percent
"mathworks" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"mathworks" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Mathworks today Ramsey shout. Listening to the Dave Ramsey show up tomorrow morning. Rush Limbaugh on talk radio five sixty. A good security system is a sound financial investment a break in can set you back thousands of dollars. But home security also helps you fear less, and you can't put a dollar value on that. That's why I recommend SimpliSafe SimpliSafe keeps working. If the power goes out, if your wifi goes down, or even if a burglar smashes your keypad, plus there's no pricey contracts or hidden fees. Go to SimpliSafe direct dot com to get our ten percent discount. That's SimpliSafe direct dot com. Let's get real for a minute. Paying off debt isn't easy. If you're looking for extra money to pour into your debt snowball. Do yourself a favor and twit your cell phone provider to pure talk USA the same great coverage for half the price. That's right half the price of other brands, try it risk-free today. Visit pure talk USA dot com or call eight four four eight six to three six seven seven to see how much you can save enter promo code radio and received fifty percent off your first month. That's pure. Doc, USA dot com, promo code radio. Hey, creative people listen up. This is Dave Ramsey, and I'm excited to tell you. We're growing rapidly. And we're hiring for all kinds of creative positions. This is your opportunity to do what you love and get paid to make it a for instance, millions of lives. We're looking for creative directors designers, senior designers copy editors and more. So use your talents to help people head over to daveramsey dot com slash careers. And check out our openings many companies define success based on dollars coming in. We define our success by the number of lives changed. We strive to be the employer of choice for talented individuals who want to do work that matters. This means we work really, really hard. But we have a lot of fun too. It's why we've been voted one of the best places to work in Nashville ten times. See the work, you do create real life. Change apply today a day. Ramsey dot com slash careers..

Dave Ramsey USA dot USA Rush Limbaugh Nashville fifty percent ten percent
"mathworks" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Because this is not there's not enough money in the private sector for this to be funded independent of government expenditure. And there's just no way where I've heard NASA administrator say there's no way we're doing a one way mission to Mars. It's just not gonna happen. Yeah. I can see how NASA wouldn't wanna do that. But I could see how private space company like this. Could it could make it happen? But it this isn't a fully private thing. They're using public resources to get their house. The space X's main Reese. Main income stream is very NASA. Yes. And there's no way they're going to launch an independent expenditure to March. They don't have the money for it yet. Yeah. I mean, it's basics is also privately for higher for trip around the moon. Right. If you for you and seven one way artists knows not. No. But I'm saying they have other revenue. Streams that's not gonna get up there. Still. I don't think the mathworks. All right. I'm going to stop being so indignant. You wanna go? No, I don't know way. You don't wanna go. There is there is no calculation that I should be in the top half of candidates on this planet to go to Mark the person that the people that go to Mars should represent the best of us. I still believe in that ideal. Like cert- Soleil. Sure. You don't think he lands one of the best of us? Just in terms of. Dreaming big ideas, and engineering and being he's done so much professionally compared to everyone else. He's also demonstrated human failings. Sure damn him. His boring company has pulled out of making a tunnel in LA's west side. I guess that was one of the places that they were going to actually provide a public service of boring tunnel to help people get from one place to another place faster and two to three miles of underground. Exactly. One of the or some of the people who lived above the tunnel proposed tunnel objected to the tunnel beneath them sounds like standard Nimby ISM, or what do you call it? When it's a tunnel. Tim be ISM. Yeah. To be expected. But it said never mind, we're not gonna do it. It'd be. Tumbler ISM tunnel under my backyard. Yeah. Nice. And that will do it for technology news, one of the other sponsor that makes this episode possible. And that is Caserta by lutron smart lighting control brought to you by lutron pioneers. In smart, home technology with Caserta, you can schedule your lights that come on at dusk..

NASA NASA administrator Caserta lutron Tim LA Mark
"mathworks" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Because this is not there's not enough money in the private sector for this to be funded independent of government expenditure. And there's just no way where I've heard NASA administrator say there's no way we're doing a one way mission to Mars. It's just not gonna happen. Yeah. I can see how NASA wouldn't wanna do that. But I could see how private space company like this. Could it could make it happen? But it this isn't a fully private thing. They're using public resources to get their house. The space X's main Reese. Main income stream is very NASA. Yes. And there's no way they're going to launch an independent expenditure to March. They don't have the money for it yet. Yeah. I mean, it's basics is also privately for higher for trip around the moon. Right. If you for you and seven one way artists knows not. No. But I'm saying they have other revenue. Streams that's not gonna get up there. Still. I don't think the mathworks. All right. I'm going to stop being so indignant. You wanna go? No, I don't know way. You don't wanna go. There is there is no calculation that I should be in the top half of candidates on this planet to go to Mark the person that the people that go to Mars should represent the best of us. I still believe in that ideal. Like cert- Soleil. Sure. You don't think he lands one of the best of us? Just in terms of. Dreaming big ideas, and engineering and being he's done so much professionally compared to everyone else. He's also demonstrated human failings. Sure damn him. His boring company has pulled out of making a tunnel in LA's west side. I guess that was one of the places that they were going to actually provide a public service of boring tunnel to help people get from one place to another place faster and two to three miles of underground. Exactly. One of the or some of the people who lived above the tunnel proposed tunnel objected to the tunnel beneath them sounds like standard Nimby ISM, or what do you call it? When it's a tunnel. Tim be ISM. Yeah. To be expected. But it said never mind, we're not gonna do it. It'd be. Tumbler ISM tunnel under my backyard. Yeah. Nice. And that will do it for technology news, one of the other sponsor that makes this episode possible. And that is Caserta by lutron smart lighting control brought to you by lutron pioneers. In smart, home technology with Caserta, you can schedule your lights that come on at dusk..

NASA NASA administrator Caserta lutron Tim LA Mark
"mathworks" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You're trying to save the right percentage of your income number one and number two you're trying to build tax diversification so you want some money that has to after tax you want some money that is tax free think roth any what some money that is tax deferred that's coming from your employer in a 401k plan hopefully eventually even though you're still saving that five thousand dollar sherry eventually you've accumulated so much that the five thousand doesn't matter as much as protecting and growing what you've already accumulated that's when you enter what we call the preservation stage and this is the only time average return matters so if if you're getting ready to do what i call land the plane if you're getting ready to go into distribution where you're actually pulling money out at where your your two goals by the way here are the amount of volatility between distributions and the tax rate paid on the average dollar that you pull out but if you're getting ready to land the plane and you're talking to somebody in there talking to you about an average return during distribution you need to vacate that situation very quickly they do not understand how mathworks that you're not understand the variances in volatility in it's a it's a very problematic thing i've seen people simply reduce the amount of of average rate of return think that's enough to overcome volatility well tell that to two thousand two thousand eight two thousand and two seven it's not that it's an and that doesn't mean you run for the hills and hide everything in cash in a coffee can in the backyard that means you just have to understand where in what you're what your directive is for that for that money part so as a fiduciary we don't function under suitability i don't have a box of stuff that says here's what i can sell sharee at her young age based on where she is right now and where she's trying to go i look at it and say okay joe based on what i know and that's thirty one years of being in this industry it's a cfp it's an adjunct professor from purdue based on what i know what would i do with my money if i were in sherry situation i have to treat her money the same way that it is mine and and i do two things to start this conversation off the first one is to help her articulate her financial vision where is it you're trying to go not a number based it's not quantifiable it's qualitative right you know one of my one of my missionary says he wants to get more money away at sixty five and he spends on itself right so yeah i know his intent right from one of my docs wife says at ninety two she doesn't want to be a bag lady i got it i so i understand i understand the intent so your ticket late that financial vision in terms of where it is you want to go and then then i have to say okay joe based on if i were cherries age if i was sherry situation in sherry's live how would i treat her money if it were my own and that's really the calling of fiduciary and you brought up a big important word earlier in conflict of interest you know we have to we have to put the cards on the table and say i have a conflict of interest here that doesn't that doesn't mean that it's horrible sometimes there's no way to avoid it right we just need to be aware of one that is at the end of the day i get paid to manage money so i believe that money to be here so that i can manage it so that our business can.

five thousand dollar thirty one years 401k
"mathworks" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And the tax rate paid on the average dollar that you pull out but if you're getting ready to land the plane and you're talking to somebody and they're talking to you about an average return during distribution you need to vacate that situation very quickly they do not understand how mathworks that you not understand the variances in volatility in it's it's very problematic thing i've seen people simply reduce the amount of of average rate of return think that's enough to overcome volatility will tell that to two thousand two thousand eight two thousand and two seven it's not that it's an and that doesn't mean you run for the hills and hide everything in cash in a coffee can in the backyard that means you just have to understand where in what you're what your directive is for that for that money part so as a fiduciary we don't function under suitability i don't have a box of stuff that says here's what i can sell sherry at her young age based on where she is right now and where she's trying to go i look at it and say okay joe based on what i know and that's thirty one years to be an industry it's a cfp it's an adjunct professor from purdue based on what i know what would i do with my money if i were in sherry situation i have to treat her money the same way that it is mine and and i do two things to start this conversation off the first one is to help her articulate her financial vision where is it you're trying to go not a number based it's not quantifiable it's qualitative right one of my one of my missionary says he wants to give more money away sixty five and he spends on itself right so yeah i know his intent right right one of my docs wife says at ninety two she doesn't want to be a bag lady i got it i so i understand i understand the intent so you're late that financial vision in terms of where it is you want to go and then then i have to say okay joe based on if i were sheri's age if i was sherry situation in sherry's life how would i treat her money if it were my own and that's really the calling of fiduciary and you brought up a big important word earlier in conflict of interest know we have to we have to put the cards on the table and say i have a conflict of interest here yet doesn't that doesn't mean that it's horrible sometimes there's no way to avoid it right we just need to be aware of one that is at the end of the day i get paid to manage money so i believe that money ought to be here so that i can manage it so that our business can run i can.

thirty one years
"mathworks" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"On how that mathworks adam how much data center power costs and all that other stuff it could make sense to do that but it's the thing that everybody is trying right now so everyone's seeing how that works out you know is it just makes sense for old games does it make sense for people who can't afford beginning pc's and we can get them to rent games and like i don't think anyone has shown that miles would be particularly lucrative so i think in the next one or two or three generations we are still going to be downloading bits and running things locally but five generations from now it seems conceivable to me the especially for like tv connected pucks tv's themselves and they've done this as well there's like a playstation now tv puck thing and i think they built into some tv's for games with don't require latency that could be insane the phone games that could be you know a the dominant form of cheap gaming for the rest of us but i think for the rest of all of our lives listening to this running games on a local device will still be a thing at the high end anyway thanks to our sponsors this week aftershocks rover and molecule and we'll talk to you next week now the show is over they didn't even mean to begin because it was accidental accidental joan go and casey wouldn't let him because it was accidental accident does did you can fund the show today b m follow them s e l i s that's casey lists and a c o r m anti marco arment are kc qs go to your job your job you had a job you don't well i still do for now soon you won't but soon i won't so that's that's the thing yeah so we couldn't talk about it last week because it was kind of big event but now we can because it's just us here nobody nobody i very much care and listeners due to as much joke about it so you had this big long analog episode about was excellent so obviously anybody who really wants you know a lot more about this you should also analog but i figure it can cover it here too so you decided to quit your job after months of us badgering you about it what made you decide like you know it seemed like in the early part of this year right before mckay was born seemed like you were kind of on the fence and you're kind of into during your leave of absence and then at the end of since you you seem like you decided you know what actually i don't want to go independent i wanna go back to work i think that's a fair characterization right and solely obviously sometime between that which was what late march or something like that sometime between then and june you change your mind what happened yeah i mean i'm perfectly happy to give the abridged version of analog i think the chemical version of this conversation just like you said is on analog upset one thirty four running toward a better future and i put a put a blog post about this which is kinda the supersede version of it but to answer your question more directly a few different things happen all around the same time broke shoelace right pro cashew lace it's deep cut prouty john i broke shoelace and that's all happen what actually happened was started arguing with my insurance and that was kind of sort of my broken shoelace moment because it occurred to me was two things i argued with my insurance i actually looked at how much we pay for our for the insurance at our employer provides so if you're not from the us generally but not always your employer will effectively subsidize your health insurance so they'll pay a large portion of the cost and so at around the time that i started thinking how much am i really paying an insurance was when we were starting to really get the bills from kayla's birth and the insurance is not very good in fact it's pretty bad and it's fairly expensive what occurred to me was i've got garbage insurance that i'm paying a not insignificant amount of money for what am i doing because in so many ways the re the thing that i was hanging my hat on for going back to work was i need insurance i i don't wanna pay for my own insurance i don't know if i can't pay for insurance i need insurance which means i needed you well then when you.

"mathworks" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And you're listening to public radio eighty eight point five fm it's the takeaway coming up at noon funding for here and now comes from the listeners of wb you are boston where the program is produced and your npr station from mathworks creators of matlab and simulink software for technical computing and model based design mathworks accelerating the pace of discovery and engineering and science learn more at mathworks dot com and staples with printers printer ink and toner cartridges for home and business and in store print shops for customized presentations booklets manuals in store and online staples it's pro time it's here and now thanks to twitter it's not hard to figure out what's on president trump's mind he likes the idea of a border wall he likes actress roseanne barr and presidential physician ronnie jackson in the disliked column there's daca hillary clinton and now topping that list the washington post and by extension the posts owner amazon founder jeff bezos here's a presidential tweet from nine fifteen this morning and it's a long one quote the fake news washington post amazon's chief lobbyist as another of many phony headlines trump defiant as china ads trade penalties wrong it goes on should've read trump defiant as us ads trade penalties will end barriers and massive ip theft typically bad reporting and tweet joining us to sort out that long tweet and what's behind his npr's media correspondent david folkenflik welcome david and tell us what is the connection between trump's anger at the washington post and at amazon's jeff bezos.

npr david folkenflik china washington founder ronnie jackson president twitter boston theft us amazon jeff bezos washington post hillary clinton roseanne barr trump
"mathworks" Discussed on IoT inc

IoT inc

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on IoT inc

"And this is one of those two times and you know these podcasts you never try to reproduce them the they just go where the at least for me anyway it's not scripted and so it just goes where the conversation ends up going but i think this one ended up turning out better having done it a second time with jim mostly because he was able to think through certain issues was pressing him on internal mathematical representations that mathworks used and yeah so this is a this is a a very good episode if you want to go a little bit deeper in terms of modeling how the models are built how you do within a platform like mathworks so that's episode eighty seven episode eighty eight was interesting and it's called the emergence of the iot cognitive digital twin and it's with a med el ad l and he at the time and i think he's still is with a censure now this introduces the concept of a cognitive digital twin and so what does that mean well the digital twin again consists of two parts it consists of the data and the models and the data has raw data and meta data and the models have raw models and meta models now within the raw models and you could just eliminate the word raw so within the within the models different there's different types of models generally up to this point in the podcast and jelly up to this point in my thinking as well i've been considering only analytical models the podcast with a med was interesting because i saw actually his post on lincoln and i want and then i reached out to him.

jim lincoln
"mathworks" Discussed on IoT inc

IoT inc

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on IoT inc

"Certain ot platforms and ptc's fingers platform is one of them allows you to develop the digital twin within the platform environment or development environment so just like you can develop an application with pointing click and also using programming libraries in p is the same thing is with the digital twin again for a certain subset of ot platforms again with doing point and click type operations and so a lot of a lot of the functionality in a platform like this is trying to take the place to a certain extent of a data scientists and trying to make it a little bit more easy to use by choosing the different models to apply seeing how well they work choosing a different model apply almost like the metaphor of choosing models off of off of a store shelf and seeing how closely applied to data but in case this is a good episode to listen to if you are considering t platform and in particular looking at one that'll help you develop both your application and very important your digital twin now you may have another strategy for doing this you may have a completely different development environment as we'll see in the next podcast you could be using something like mathworks but any case if you want to look at it from a platform a point of view eighty six is a podcast for you to listen to episode eighty seven is called breaking down and building up by ot's digital twin is with jim tongue and he is from mathworks he's one of the original mathworks employees and actually this is one of the i think only two times this happened although i was having podcast recording problems for a certain period of time there where the quality was not great but it's only really happened two times when we had to actually re do the podcast.

ptc jim tongue mathworks
"mathworks" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

TalkRadio 1370AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

"Your down payment interest rates are four percent if interest rates rise fifty percent it would only be six percent we'll be i mean really when i got in the real estate business in nineteen seventy eight interest rates were ten percent most of our lives we've not had interest rates of three percent and so if moving from four to four and a half causes you to not be able to buy a home you weren't able to buy a home anyway that's what we're saying so you need to finish your emergency fund you need to finish getting out of debt build your downpayment and then by house when you buy a house broken in that you're asking for trouble the house is going to be a curse and not a blessing and denver they don't have a thing in denver they haven't passed a law in denver this has math doesn't work there mathworks in denver mathworks in california mathworks in new york mathworks in miami mathworks everywhere not everybody follows math but math is still math when you buy a house in your broke it makes you broker that's why they call them mortgage brokers adrian is with us in san antonio texas i adrian how're you you better than i deserve what's up i had a question on a an automobile my wife and i have to.

denver denver mathworks california mathworks york mathworks san antonio fifty percent three percent four percent six percent ten percent
"mathworks" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"So most of our lives we've not had interest rates of three percent in so if moving from four to four and a half causes you to not be able to buy a home you weren't able to buy home anyway that's what we're saying so you need to finish your emergency fund you need to finish getting out of debt your down payment and then by house when you buy a house broke and in debt you're asking for trouble the house is going to be a curse and not a blessing in denver they don't have a thing in denver they haven't passed a law in denver this as math doesn't work there mathworks denver mathworks and california mathworks in new york i mean that's works in miami mathworks everywhere not everybody follows math but math is still math when you buy a house in your broke it makes you broker that's why they call them mortgage brokers adrian is whether in san antonio texas hi adrian how're you mr how you about other not deserve what's up i had a question on a an automobile my wife and i have to to loans left to auto loans ones about thirty and minus twenty three five thousand dollars upside down on my loan i was wondering if i should so they'll this truck and buy cheaper truck fuel three thousand dollars on the hickel's yes in what is your household income one ten right and how much other debt other than your home do you have.

denver california mathworks mathworks denver mathworks new york miami mathworks san antonio texas twenty three five thousand dol three thousand dollars three percent
"mathworks" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"mathworks" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More and mathworks dot com from npr and wbz you are boston i'm jeremy hobson i'm robin young it's here now coming up president trump's lead lawyer in the muller investigation john dowd resigns at the beginning of the week he called for the probe to be shut down also reaction from silicon valley to facebook ceo mark zuckerberg's apology flights and a good story it's about isaac shapiro whose family fled russia and as a fourteen year old in japan became the mascot for us marines as they toured hiroshima we walked around these horrible destroyed streets i'd never seen anything like it no one said a word on the way back it was just a riveting experience these stories and they've done it scientists have figured out how to reverse aging in mice coming up here and now the news is i live from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi singh vex with the us has massive trade deficit with china president trump is now imposing fifty billion dollars in tariffs on chinese imports he signed a memorandum today the list of items subject to tariffs have yet to be released but trump says he wants to see a more reciprocal trade relationship between washington ambi jing i've been speaking with the highest chinese representatives including the president and i've asked them to reduce the trade deficit immediately by one hundred billion dollars it's a lot china has previously threatened retaliatory action further escalating tension at a time when the us is seeking china's support in stopping north korea's nuclear program north korea is one of china's historical allies president trump is preparing to hold direct talks with north korean leader kim jong un we'll secretary of state rex tillerson was expected to be part of those talks until he was fired last week today he was given a warm sendoff at the state department in tillerson's parting words he said everyone should undertake one act of kindness every day for someone else a message that seemed to resonate with many of his colleagues at stay this can be a very meanspirited town.

tillerson rex tillerson kim jong lakshmi singh ceo facebook john dowd boston npr north korea china president washington us japan russia