3 Burst results for "Math Marine Expeditionary"

"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it Bellawood. In the first World War Guadalcanal Andy Wajima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city in Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know. There's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And I want you to explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know why you're going in? What was the mission? The mission was to flu. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand and four in which You know you may or may not remember. It began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed and their bodies hung from the bridge influenza. An led to a sort of aborted battle With Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faluji itself became a no-go area for coalition forces. And what really wanted to happening was between that March November It became a real safe haven for members of kite on Iraq and people like Zarqa. We were operating out of flu. And so it became this sort of seeping wound In whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Iraq at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Falluja the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrived in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February. Two thousand five and so We also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going and clearing out flu which is what came to pass So you know. Our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote tactical mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there you know. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy it's doing right by the Marines who become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires people to go the extra distance in those situations. But you knew going. In at the casualty count could be enormous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in? I think that the number you gave him the book was that you are expected. Potentially to lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in. When my same company commander my platoon had been tasked within our company which is three platoons about forty marines. Each our platoon was tasked as with all the main effort. So we were going to be the lead platoon going in. And you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty breaks for the lead platoon usually very very high. And I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine. Decide who is the commander of the platoons in saying? Hey you two need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled. Because I don't expect you guys to be combat effective by the end of the first day combat effective basically means. Don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore see us so that's pretty sobering But on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer. You know I was seventeen years old when I decided I wanted to go into the marines. I worked very hard my senior year of high school to get in on an ROTC scholarship. I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry so you know about seven years of my life. I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives. They look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled. You know you you've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready for it and have to accept. It's one thing to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you where your comrades and you tell a story about how. What rainy nights remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ryan? Shane and Sergeant Lonny Wells. What happened? Well lonny wells Was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company and you know most marines. Who fought him food? You can tell you where they were. When they crossed highway. Ten highway ten was a six lane highway. The bisected the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so lonny wells went across highway. Ten in as they were crossing He was machine gun in the street shot through his moral artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the road. Ryan Shane at the time. Was that you know real strapping. I mean you know six foot two two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery Sergeant who enlisted the age of seventeen whole life. He wanted to be marine Solani get shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie. grabbed him. Pull them in once. Pull them twice. And then the same machine gunshot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road In there was a very iconic set of photographs taken on sequence of Ryan running out into the road to lawn and About two years later I was in camp. Lejeune and Ryan. Shane was awarded a Bronze Star for valor. So metal for trying to get Lonnie that day and that day it was raining. Those the first day it had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bet about when it would finally rain racks at Hunter Rain. Once the whole summer we'd been there And so in Ryan is getting his award. He said two things you know that really stuck with me. The first was he some finding it really hard An old by tobacco by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps He wasn't able to serve anymore. Which was pretty heartbreaking for him mandate time. He's getting this award. You know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct. I mean been shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his awarding. Said you know I'm finding it really hard To accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what?.

Marine Corps Marines Sergeant Ryan influenza Iraq Ryan Shane commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc Commander Marine Gunnery Sergeant lonny wells assault Marine infantry Korea Dc Vietnam Chosin Reservoir Amtrak Andy Wajima
"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on First Person

First Person

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on First Person

"It's been sixteen years since the United States went into Iraq nearly nine years since president. Barack Obama formerly ended. Us combat missions there and yet the impact of the decision to fight is still being felt today in the early years of the Iraq War. One battle particularly stands out for ferocity from early November through mid December two thousand four US Iraqi and British forces moved into the city of volusia fighting operation. Phantom fury a joined effort to fight the insurgency afford trained well led and ready the operation deliberate the people who've lose it and begin the reconstruction of the city and the restoration mobilized more than eighty. American soldiers died in that operation. The heavier weapons fire a barrel of the insurgents. They caught it. Suppressive Fire and marine has been injured and his colleagues need to administer first aid and get him out earlier that year. Four American contractors were killed in Florida. Their bodies were burned and dragged through the streets. Everyone who comes to Faluji he warned will meet this fate. Phantom Schori was an effort to retake the city from a safer rooftop. We filmed tank moving along the street. Ready to fire a round into each house where they might still be resistance. Elliot Ackerman is a marine veteran. Deserve five towards up Ghanistan the Rock and was awarded the Silver Star the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart. He led a battalion of soldiers for that month of two thousand four in his new book. Pleases Names on war. Revolution and returning Ackerman describes what it was like to be involved in that critical battle and how it felt to return years later not as a soldier but as a journalist. He's our guest this week. Elliot so they actually want to start at what feels to me the heart of the book. Which is Florida two thousand four and I wonder if you can take us back to November tenth and begin their well. On November tenth. I was serving as a marine rifle platoon. Commander in Volusia on the assault of the city hadn't yet begun begun for us on that day. And I think that is kind of in some respects the center of the book because that was one of the earliest and most intense combat experiences that I had had a lot of what else occurs in. The book is kind of orbiting around that central. Experience lead you join the military? To begin with. I joined for a variety of reasons. I grew up overseas grew up in the UK. And I think kind of always being a little bit of an outsider to America. Made me want to give something back and kind of perhaps give me a different perspective on what it means to be an American. I was someone who when I graduated from college. I wanted the job that I had whether I was good at my job or bad at that job to really matter onto feel like I was going to have an impact and have real responsibility in the corps offered me that on finally like I was the kid who never stopped playing with his Gi. Joes I guess. I always had an innate fascination in the military and I think the confluence of probably all three of those things. What led me into the Marine Corps and I joined a before nine eleven did ROTC and college to become an officer in the nine eleven. While I was at school and so the Marine Corps than you know went from being kind of a you know more abstract thing in terms of what I would be doing when I served to something. That was much more tangible as there was a war. Going on there's a an Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual Afri- Doug back he says. Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go to college. They joined the Marines to be a part of a legacy. That was true for you absolutely. I mean the Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it. Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and he will Jima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and Waste City and Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanting bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And wait explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know.

Marine Corps Marines Iraq Elliot Ackerman Volusia Florida United States Commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc assault Barack Obama Phantom Schori Los Angeles Times UK president Purple Heart Faluji ROTC America
"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"math marine expeditionary" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"There's a in Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual reference Doug's I back. He says Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go go to college. They joined the Marines to be part of a legacy. Being that was true for you. Absolutely I mean you. The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture and I listen. I think thank everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons but one thing you do opt into when you join is this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and Faludji I remember three days before the battle. The <hes> Math Marine expeditionary for sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted Marine Alva rat came and talked to all of the assault battalions and you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go. Do is just like what the Marines did Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and Iwojima and the Second World War Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city and Vietnam this battle is going to become part of the marine cores legacy. That's only one component opponent what that battle net and with that experience mad but from an organizational perspective certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps curate that your company commander told you two two weeks into the battle that you are both the luckiest and unluckiest to be going into that battle so soon into your service why was that I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan so I think what my company commander who when he said those words to me was you know all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five <hes> what he meant was is that you know right out at the gate would when I came into the Marine Corps my experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would <hes> live up to that and that was why I was unlucky in that Vike coppee perceived in somebody who truth the rest of my time in the Organization would be a letdown compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words prove true in the duality behind those words also proved true in that experience is one that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret I lost a lot of friends influenza. I wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines and explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle <hes> well yes so talking about the culture November. Tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday so as they say November tenth seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these things and <hes> one of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon or at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington D._C.. Wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there in deployed halfway around the world going to a battle is you <hes> you read lead the cosmonauts message but the current cosmonauts message and the General Jonny Lee Jun who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday and you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth two thousand four all loaded up both <hes> in about a dozen with a call Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning really come almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into flu Asia and <hes> you know where we were handing out these little bits of birthday..

Marine Corps Math Marine expeditionary Marine Alva Doug Los Angeles Times Bellawood commander Chosin Reservoir Jonny Lee Pentagon Washington assault Korea flu Asia Vietnam Iwojima Vike Iraq