35 Burst results for "Math"

Lou Holtz talks Notre Dame and more

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

13:10 min | 2 d ago

Lou Holtz talks Notre Dame and more

"Lua alluded to you as being a builder and again i go back to the interview which you had here in the studio with us and the obvious question from a person when you They asked you about the rumors you going to. Usc and you said usc is one of the three best jobs. And i said wait a minute. I know notre dame is one of the best. What's the third best job. And you said the one that i get and it turned out to be usc but the university of south carolina. And and i'm just wondering when you reflect back about taking over that program. Why did you take over such a struggling program. And what is it is allowed. Lou holtz everywhere. He has gone to be able to build success. What i foresee a we will not arrive. I think we had three offensive linemen on scholarship is all we had. It did have a quarterback and didn't have a running back to his per se. But you know you grin there you you just you try to fundamental you. Try to do the things that we talked about. Just you know. Build build the football team. And i have gone to six different situations in college and never inherited a winner and went to bow game no later in the second year with matter of fact after going on eleven we finished seventeenth a country next year and beat ohio state in a bowl game following here i think we finished loveth in the country. Beat state again on january one. But it's not because guy it's Coach it's all about the people. If team i mean it's about coaches and players. All all really tried to play their road and believe that you can do something. We read great fan support in south carolina. We were below eligible this year. We'd basically accepted a bowl bid and then of course after a little probably had with trump said in my last football game we decided not to go to a bowl game. I would've liked to vendor micro in a bowl game and yet at the same time within hayes and i'll have the same legacy Last was in clemson was involved. Refer also that's not a great legacy to have necessarily but it's a good football team. Many people coming back in. Like steve spurrier command. And you know he. He's a guy that likes to win. And i think he can win earlier. I believe that in the bud by heart. I think he's an excellent coach. I think the players will respond well to them. And i think we took a the longest losing program the country and took it to a bowl game and he'll take it from there to the championship level when you talk about coaching today And i think about francs being fired after he won nine games and i think about the expectations that go along ty willingham of course sopa but notre dame in his first year wins his first eight and then what has happened to him recently as well. What are the expectations of football coach at a major program today. Well i've been figured that basically very very impatient but you know they. They want instant success. One instant gratification and want to go the top. That the trina goes to the university of louisville inherits a very very good football team. From coach smith went onto michigan state. Now goes between things that a tremendous job but You know feel air. And he has those great athletes. They have great success. Urban meyer. who. I hired at university of notre dame you know he goes to Utah has instant success and everybody sitting there saying well. Hey he can do it let. Let's go get that guy that can do it here that we can win immediately will You know having code having smith there your quarterback as a pretty good asset to have it set about where somebody also had success. And i am sure they they look at it and say well gee they came in and they were down and all of a sudden they one. That's what we want to do and everybody all the fans wanted to two things who's going to be the new coach and he will be the next quarterback i. It's unbelievable i. i don't care you. You want to become unpopular to hurry. Go for being the second team quarterback to the i team the anything too is if you think about it and i was thinking about notre dame just the other day what should be their expectation level and i know the obvious as well to win championships but if you look at the landscape of football today lou there's a lot of teams that are able to get outstanding athletes that don't have the same requirements to get maybe to get into school There's a lot of schools have reputations of putting players into the pros and what have you so having said all of that. What should be the expectation at notre dame today as far as their season and their teams year in year out when further. Joyce hired may at the university of notre dame. He said. I wanna talk to you about a couple of things. Basically not negotiable. These are not negotiable university. Notre dame we are need understand. This now isn't even before i was ever offered the job at you. Know we we. We will not redshirt. We will not take transfer from junior. College will not take a transfer from another school against need search chain core curriculum classes for years of english. Three years of math through calculus at center players are going to miss practice because of late classes or or or labs or tutors or things along that line. The players are going to live on campus. We are going to have great facilities. You have nothing to do with the discipline but athlete on campus We don't pay a whole lot You're not allowed to president of the university. Notre dame was the rule when say they gave the president rates once that they could give me a raise anyone on all that and he said with the we're expecting to compete for a national championship at least once every three or four years and I didn't find anything wrong with ed. And we did the head it. I think that should be their expectations. Not necessarily this year even next year. But i do think They expect Charlie wise to compete for the national championship. And i think he will. The same things are saying about notre dame they said about whenever procedure went there years ago. They said it. When i was there i remember my first year recruiting at notre dame. My aunt had us fifty eight to sixty year before. I got there in their last football game on national television and You go into a home to recruit a young man that have all these That have all these articles in there. About how Notre dame can't win anymore and the schedules to tough. There's all this. And there's all that. And i just don't believe that i i think you know. The sec schedule's pretty tough When i was at university dame might think at fifty four percent of games ever coach there were against a top twenty five football teams. But that's part of notre dame you play the best you know. We played washington when they're really good. We played tennessee. We played texas We we we played Miami florida played. Florida state You just that's just the way you did it at notre dame and I don't think it's any different now. I might be a little bit down right now but yeah. I think it's going to be fine but lou. Isn't it a little bit different. In the sense. That i used to think of notre dame and you probably going into a home where you know it was. I want this kid. The kid's gonna sign right there. It was like with john wooden at ucla. I mean john recruiting because everybody wanted to come and play for john wooden at ucla during those particular years but now the competition it. It's almost like well. We've got a pro passing program so if you're an outstanding quarterback you're going to go to this score that school i mean isn't the the mystique oh most of notre dame and not to their own detriment or fall but isn't it a little bit perceived differently today might be but i don't think necessarily it should be. I mean on tv every saturday. One time when i said notre dame we had fifty seven players active in the nfl. The next was penn state with thirty nine and third with southern cal with thirty eight But we we had to work hard. Recruit again we. We found uphill struggle. But here's the different. We could go to california and would we went after navigate. It was us usc or ucla. When would end attack between us. Texas tech today and you went into florida as a youth. Florida state miami and florida. You went into nebraska to be between you and the university of nebraska. You could go anywhere in the country and you would have legitimate chance to recruit the best athlete in that state but you would have to use the beat. The home state and you didn't always do that but when they start talking about well. Nfl i want this type of program. Notre dame's not a four year decision. Support here decision. What do you do in your football's over guarantee you're gonna play in the nfl with china education. You'll get what are you gonna learn. And are you going to be better prepared to go in there. You know i was watching Tonight on tv On some sports show where they had the ten major mistake officials made and one of them was grown bettas called tails and the guy said hatch. And i had to laugh because a whole time as notre dame the first thing i said the locker room before the game was we will call tales. We always called. This was a game. But i just think that You're still a forty year decision. Not a four year decision. You talk about the only thing that's going to change it from where you are today to where you'll be five years from now the books you read the people you meet in a dream a dream and the baby. You're gonna meet university in our day and they're going to be the ones that are going to be illness companies and being. Ceo's and they're going to be the leaders that those are the people you're gonna come in contact with and then you get him on campus. Let them talk to your athletes now. The guy that doesn't feel comfortable in that environment isn't gonna get isn't gonna fit well notre dame anyway and now there were always people that didn't want the discipline did want the the challenge. Academically didn't want to have to work that hard on their academics guy that they won't be interested in the university of notre dame necessarily but one thing i used to laugh about was you would read. You would read these top twenty two football players in america. What schools air considered and other day. It'd be listed on about eighteen oven. Maybe seven of them. We were recruiting because we couldn't get in school academically. But they would always put notre dame was one of their schools Florida not because it made them look good so to speak and I think notre dame will get back. I really do because it's a national school a special school. One of the thing that i think is the lou holtz legacy when it comes to football in. It's almost like parenting. In a sense. You mentioned about urban meyer. I think a barry alvarez a host of other coaches you must feel awfully proud of the the legacy of lou holtz from the coaches that went on from underneath year wing onto other programs either as assistance or successful head coaches as well. I've always felt that. I learned this from woody. Hayes have an obligation to prepare your coaches to become head coaches. I'd always explain why we did things and how we did it. the philosophy at center. I think we've made it look simple that everybody would come in and they go. I can do that. I wanna be head coach. But i went down. Visit very alvorada in preparation for the bogue. Gabi speed come down and one time we had about. I don't know maybe a sixty some former graduate assistants were either in major college or professional that had been graduate assistant said many people gone on u. p. care coach for me at the university of arkansas. We we started him out You know monte kiffin coach for him in the defense coordinator tampa bay et cetera. Just you know it's just so many coaches you enjoy it and that's one of the reasons why you wanna talk to me. Now's not because. I prepare them but because of the contribution they made our success but not mind. There's there's their contribution to my success is far greater mike. Entre bution to there's

Football USC Ohio State University Of Notre Dame Ty Willingham Lou Holtz Notre Dame LUA University Of South Carolina Steve Spurrier Charlie Wise Urban Meyer Ucla John Wooden Smith University Of Louisville
Deals for Black Friday 2020

Anna Davlantes

05:07 min | 2 d ago

Deals for Black Friday 2020

"We need to put the bat signal up for one of the top tech gurus in the world from U. S a today and so many other great publications that literally Jennifer Jolly Jennifer. Welcome to WGN. Thank you so much for having me. Well, it's great to have you. I mean, obviously, this is a busy busy time of year. I think people are always kind of leaning on you to help guide them in as many ways as possible. But this is a time of year where everybody starts flipping the switch. From the turkey. Certainly we're gonna have that food all weekend long. But start thinking. Okay. What's out there? What am I going to need? What are people gonna want And where do I get it right? Yeah. And how do we know that we're actually getting the best deals? You know, all of a sudden this frenzy has started. The good thing about this year is what we're all pretty much suck at home. So instead of having to go out and camp out, you know long lines outside these big box stores. We just have to wait with our finger poised over the check out now, But me on our laptops. That's good and bad press. It means people started shopping much much earlier this year. Some 60% of people across America say they're done. The holidays. But then for the rest of us who really haven't even started? That means we better get going because a lot of things that you're selling out and with shipping Billy's things like that. You know, this might be a good chance. We if we wait too long, we won't be able to get it. I wanted to ask you to Justus, though we all complain. You know, the holiday decorations are starting to become available. You know, in September, you know where the thinks they're the Halloween stuff is coming up in the summer is when people are looking towards you know black Friday what it used to mean where you did have to physically congregate in the parking lot off the walmart and trample your neighbors and friends in order to get that deal now because There is just so much access, and so much of the world in a million different ways has become on demand is that it's sort of blurring the line where maybe cos they're trying toe, get a jump on things, or is this the kickoff and then there's it just turn into like, okay, it's just open season on opportunities. You just got to keep your eyes open. Well this year because of the pandemic, and really, because Amazon did their big sale days in October, and you know, instead of in July, they had him in October. So that's really when everybody jumped in with the deals and almost all the big box retailers. The targets the best buys the WalMart. Their deals have been going on. Kind of the whole time, like targets started November. 1st Best buy started rolling out their black Friday deals last Sunday, So we've been seeing a lot of these deals already. And really, the message has been shop early shop online. Uh, if you don't get the big markdowns today, it's okay. Don't panic because you'll still have a chance. Tomorrow you'll still have a chance The next day and Cyber Monday is supposed T blow by all. Shopping ever in a single day online, So there's still a few chance of left something you need to shop. But then also I read it in some of the notes and some of the things that you've shared that is also The thing that is one of the hot products is is laptops and new laptops. What should we expect? As sort of the life expectancy off the laptop? I remember traveling the country, maybe even the world with a laptop that must have lasted eight years or something. Where every day I would wake up and say, Are we gonna make it today? And now two people and prices have you know if you if you shop around, prices have come down a little bit, and certainly the technology Has stepped up. What should we expect out of a laptop and is now the time to get one? Even if it wasn't that long ago, you got one. You know if you are a heavy, heavy laptop user like I am for my work, and I write scripts every day and write articles every day. I'm I use my laptop all the time travels with me. I am really lucky if my math book pro My Apple left laptop last more than three years, That's dramatic, But I added on, you know, it's got a lot going on all the time. So heavy laptop user you are really lucky if you can keep that thing running in it. Shit for five years. If you're more of the normal average laptop user seven years is kind of it these days, and I say if you have a laptop right now, that's seven years older, older and you go try one of these newer versions out today, whether it's a Lenovo gel, the New Macs are are the best. Computers we've ever seen out of Apple and you know of the Mac line and the same across the board I My second favorite brand is Lenovo and the New York and nine I two in one notebook. It's the most versatile too, and one really. It's more like a five in one. That's a laptop that folds to prop up like a 10 to life flat like a tablet. It's one of these models that is ushered in this new generation of portable powerful laptops. What do we expect out of those? All day. Battery life, more modern, connective, itty lightning fast speed and a lot more room to store all of your documents

Jennifer Jolly Jennifer WGN Walmart Justus U. Billy Best Buy America Amazon Lenovo Apple New York
Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

The Boxer Show

00:30 sec | 3 d ago

Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

"Center for Education statistics, postponing its national math and reading tests until 2022 due to the coronavirus. Originally, thousands of 4th and 8th graders across the U. S were supposed to take the national Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the Nation's report card early next year, and Si ES commissioner James Woodworth says hosting the tests in 2021 would cost tens of millions of dollars. To insure coronavirus precautions were met. The delay will allow for conditions to stabilize. I'm at Madison for the

Center For Education Statistic James Woodworth U. Madison
Investing in Bitcoin

Animal Spirits Podcast

05:08 min | 3 d ago

Investing in Bitcoin

"All right we are joined today by zach. Prince and ceo of block fight zach. Thank you so much for coming on today. Guys them so pumped to be here. I listened to your show every week for the first time. I've been nervous to go on a podcast public speaking in a while. Because i'm just so happy to be herbs so excited to be the first guest talking about cryptocurrency on the animal spirits. Podcast i think is a longtime Well thank you for saying that. We are excited as well. We actually started this pocket. And i were just talking about this in november twenty seventeen so right into the teeth of bitcoin mania and we'll get into two point out. I don't think it's quite the say manic fever that we saw in december twenty seventeen. But why don't we just start off briefly for those who don't know anything about you. Give us a quick introduction. Who are you zach. The founder and ceo blocked by. I grew up in texas. I was always kind of an entrepreneurial slash math in finance minded kid. I guess i actually put myself through college as a semi professional online poker player so unlike a lot of folks are generation unfortunate to not be carrying a big amount of college debt. I always wanted to work in the financial services industry. But i finished school in may of two thousand nine so i ended up working in an advertising technology startup that was ultimately a really successful venture. We got acquired by google. I spend a little bit of time at google but learned that. I really enjoyed building things and being at smaller companies left google to start another ad tech business that got acquired and then more recently and most relevant for blocked by i was working in the fintech sector specifically the online lending side of fintech. So there was a big boom in that industry appear to peer lending online lending and alternative investing and i worked at one of the companies. That was the biggest aggregation of data provider of technology solutions to institutional investment firms that were participating in that asset class. When i was doing nat i became kind of like the fintech guy within my friend group and i started writing a blog which i don't think rather i just i didn't stay with it as well as the Clogs and built up a readership but writing. This blog is what led me to discover bitcoin for the first time back in twenty fourteen and one of the things that struck me about it initially was a lot of what happens in fintech is just a new front end on top of the traditional financial system. So you're doing something that banks already do but you're doing it with a mobile app with a much better user experience and it's faster and easier. You don't have to go onto a branch when i learned about big like. Wow this is something truly different. You've got a brand new asset built on top of payment network where i can move something around the world. Twenty four seven and it's not using any part of the traditional financial ecosystem. So i was screaming to no one on this blog and twenty fourteen. I think you should be taking a flyer on bitcoin. Maybe it goes to zero. But with a little bit of capital you should be investing in it and then from there kind of slowly and steadily went down. What people in the crypto currency industry referred to as the rabbit hole and ended up starting block five around the same time. You'll start started this podcasts. In the fall of two thousand seventeen to before we get into what blocked by does specifically. How do you explain bitcoin. Someone who thinks they know what it means or has no idea in is never really entered. This base of workers obviously digital ledger been well. I mean i think one of the actual biggest positives about bitcoin. The fact that the narrative seems to change so many times over the years. But how do you explain it to someone who doesn't really know what it is one of the things. I like to start with when i'm explaining bitcoin. People is the best analogy and kind of story. That i've ever heard demystified a little bit and the story is actually about the platypus. So back in the sixteen hundreds explorers from europe. We're going all around the world. They got australia. They found the platypus and they sent some specimens back to europe on the ship and the scientists back in europe rigidly thought. They were playing twisted joke on them. And they're like this animal can't be real. You stapled together a duck in beaver and you're telling us this thing lays eggs like there's no way this is a real animal. It took the scientific community about fifty years to actually accept. The planet was a real animal. Create a little part of the animal classification kingdom that incorporated the platypus. Another funky animals like it but the platypus was very real and the problem that bitcoin is had is kind of this platypus problem in the traditional financial services industry. Where is it. A currency is it. An asset is it. A commodity is security is at a payment network. Well it's not really any one of those things in a silo. It's a little bit of all those things and it's something completely new but it definitely exists and the reaction from votes whether it's jamie diamond or others who are now coming around to it but back in twenty seventeen. They were saying bitcoin fraud. It's a scam. It's only used by folks who are doing illegal activities. Those types of things come from a position of not actually understanding.

Zach Manic Fever Google Bitcoin Mania Prince Texas Europe Australia Jamie Diamond
Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

Phil's Gang

00:41 sec | 3 d ago

Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

"The coronavirus, forcing the delay of national reading and math tests. The National Center for Education Statistics says the tests are being postponed from next year until 2022 This is due to concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results during the pandemic. The tests are taken by thousands of 4th and 8th grade students and are used for the nation's report card. But remote learning and health protocols have added complications and costs. Leaders of the National Assessment Governing Board say scheduling the test for 2022 will provide valuable and valid data about student achievement in the wake of covert

National Center For Education National Assessment Governing
What Will the World Look Like When Crytpo Is Fully Adopted?

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

07:14 min | 3 d ago

What Will the World Look Like When Crytpo Is Fully Adopted?

"What do you think the world will look like. Once crypto has been adopted. There's there's two sort of visions. I think i don't maybe we can just be honest ourselves. Sometimes i worry about the vision. We have for currency so aware. I started and i have a lot of respect for jeremy in the team at circle. Because back when i was in grad slow boston actually used circle to violate quinlan. So kudos huge you. Jeremy you saved me from my days for buying the clan on craigslist in using fan. So i could do how well yeah. So you obsolete neat stack my my sats. The early days of the coin The i think they're sort of two visions and they're two very different visions the vision. I've always had for bitcoin that i think. Really compelling one is the separation for the first time of money and state. Money has been object of the state since julius caesar stamped his face on a gold coin and i think really the experiment. We're attempting here like the world is no longer defined by physical orders. We live in a very digital world. Anyone could be anyone on. The internet has many different identities many different communities where part of sometimes as our default reality south. Sometimes where donnas you know there are a lot of eggs anonymous individuals citing. We live in this really interesting world that is truly becoming borderless antony. Bitcoin really represents the evolution of money transfer value in that world. But in the same time. I think governments are looking at bitcoin Right now we're living in a world where governments are trying to ban math. They're literally encryption. We done this time and time again. For the last twenty five years since incriptions existed but the advent of central bank digital currencies. In certainly what. We've seen in the asia pacific region in particular the advent of dc p. and Sort of national quote unquote digital currencies. You do have a lot of concerns around the ability for people to have financial privacy. Privacy transactions privacy communications so we have these two very different paths down which we're heading. I don't know if they're gonna coexist. Don't know if it's going to be an ethic collision and i know jeremy also you know than working a lot on uscc which which arguably has replay here. But i think the future of joe currencies in our society is sort of at this. Very interesting impasse. I want bitcoin to exist. Ideally people have the right to privacy that people have the right to sue committee in their transactions. But i think governments certainly do not like that and are advocating now for the antithesis of that which is central bank digital currencies and monetary systems that. Give them complete control the ability to exert financial censorship at every level of society. Driving up tacit. Tiv know early. There's so much there. I i guess i it just as a technologist The to the question of you know. When will this be mainstream or however you wanna call that my view is that you know. Things are mainstream in terms of technology when they disappear when they're invisible people and and when when essentially like people just take take them for granted right and said depending on your age and depending on where you are like. You might take for granted social media. But obviously that wasn't something that existed Wherever x. number of years ago you might take for granted that you have this amazing you know Supercomputer that just like that is reality. That is what the world was but obviously that had changed so at. What point is the use of crypto so ubiquitous and so embedded in so many things that we just take it for granted so were were. We have credited ago on that. But i think we're making really really strong progress. I think when. I also think about that question. I really think about Crypto and blockchain Is is. It's a pretty broad surface area right. You can be narrowly focused and sort of say there's non-sovereign stores value that use of blockchain infrastructure. You know bitcoin cash you know cetera et cetera which i completely agree with melting right. There's this this is this new form of borderless internet money and it will continue to grow and scale. And i'm i'm quite quite optimistic about that. But then there's the the fundamentals of the broader technology right so you know public chain infrastructure as effectively a new operating system layer on the internet. A new set of systems for storing data conducting transactions and executing code. That's what operates systems can help. Do these new operating system layers are very very general purpose in many respects there well suited to what i call fiduciary trust applications but can also be you know i. I was in a hackathon panel with melting the other day and we are looking at someone who built a decentralized messaging application on top of salona. The point being anti-centralized fantasy football fans in so digital games. You know messaging applications all these things on decentralized infrastructure web three cetera. Like that part of this is also a very very important part of this and so and you know something like stable coins like regulated stable coins like a us dc or potentially libra like these. These are also like apps that run on this new operating systems and could be quite popular. And so i think in terms of the question of when does that become mainstream. I think we're really close there. I think in the next twelve to twenty four months many of the most popular digital wallet products in the world that are used that we think of unused like as peer payments. And things like that. They're gonna turn on these protocols they're gonna turn these on and you're going to have you know all of a sudden hundreds of millions of people that can make interoperable payments at each other and that will kind of be in the background. That will be invisible. You'll you'll just you won't be trapped in making payments to people who then mo you'll be able to make payments between van mo and square cash and pay pal and swish in sweden and vips in norway. And you know go around the world to all these different apps. They're all going to speak. These common protocols in i think that's a a mainstream phase in digital currency. That's that's coming. I think ultimately that same number of people who might feel okay like i'm using euros or dollars or whatnot feeling comfortable using bitcoin that will grow to and eventually i would expect billions of people will will wanna use bitcoin to

Jeremy Quinlan Bitcoin Julius Caesar Blockchain Antony Asia Pacific Boston JOE Football Van Mo United States Sweden Norway
Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

KNX In Depth with Charles Feldman and Mike Simpson

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

"Of national reading and math tests. The National Center for Education Statistics says the tests are being postponed from next year until 2022 This is due to concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results during the pandemic. The tests are taken by thousands of 4th and 8th grade students and are used for the nation's report card. But remote learning and health protocols have added complications and costs. Leaders of the National Assessment Governing Board say scheduling the test for 2022 will provide valuable and valid data about student achievement in the wake of covert 19. I'm Mike Camp in

National Center For Education National Assessment Governing Mike Camp
Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

"Delay of national reading and math tests. The National Center for Education Statistics says the tests are being postponed from next year until 2022 This is due to concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results during the pandemic. The tests are taken by thousands of 4th and 8th grade students and are used for the nation's report card. But remote learning and health protocols have added complications and costs. Leaders of the National Assessment Governing Board say scheduling the test for 2022 will provide valuable and valid data about student achievement in the wake of covert 19. My company. We're teaming up with the

National Center For Education National Assessment Governing
Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

"Forcing the delay of national reading and math tests. The National Center for Education Statistics says the tests are being postponed from next year until 2022 This is due to concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results during the pandemic. The tests are taken by thousands of 4th and 8th grade students and are used for the nation's report card. But remote learning and health protocols have added complications and costs. Leaders of the National Assessment Governing Board say scheduling the test for 2022 will provide valuable and valid data about student achievement in the wake of covert 19. My company.

National Center For Education National Assessment Governing
Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:41 sec | 3 d ago

Coronavirus delays national math, reading tests until 2022

"But a virus forcing the delay of national reading and math tests. The National Center for Education Statistics says the tests are being postponed from next year until 2022 This is due to concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results during the pandemic. The tests are taken by thousands of 4th and 8th grade students and are used for the nation's report card. But remote learning and health protocols have added complications and costs. Leaders of the National Assessment Governing Board say scheduling the test for 2022 will provide valuable and valid data about student achievement in the wake of covert 19.

National Center For Education National Assessment Governing
Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

Wayne Cabot

00:11 sec | 3 d ago

Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

"To federal officials say national reading and math tests are being postponed from next year to 2022 over concerns about whether the testing would produce valid results amid the pandemic.

Young protesters in Thailand risk much to demand change from military, monarchy

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:12 min | 4 d ago

Young protesters in Thailand risk much to demand change from military, monarchy

"Escalated in thailand. This week we're called to reform the monarchy are getting louder this morning. Police blocked rush hour traffic to stop demonstrators. They said from breaking the law out. This isn't the first time this year there have been protests against king maha vajiralongkorn who took the throne for years ago. He's one of the richest royals in the world and a playboy. He's churned through four wives and spends the majority of his time living in a german hotel amid lots of women in the past few years he's taken steps to consolidate power leading mostly younger student campaigners to demand the monarchy become more accountable and transparent yet eating suggesting these reforms comes with a hefty price. Thailand has one of the strictest lese majeste laws in the world criticizing. The royal family is punishable by up to fifteen years in jail yet. It's a law that people are increasingly willing to break yesterday evening. After left the protest side there was a pipe. Bomb in the protests in front of parliament happens that we could go also that were six protesters being treated for gunshot wounds. A man was arrested. So it's a very unstable situation. Tom felix young writes about thailand for the economist and is based in bangkok. At the same time. One has to see that the students are in a different position because many of them are the kids off the bangkok establishment. So the hope here some say is that you don't go around killing your own children what do you mean how is the makeup of these protests. Now different the biggest difference. Is that the kids on the streets. Some of the math fifteen there are university students as well but they are incredibly young. And if you were looking for a sentence to describe what's going on out there they are fearless. Fear is gone. And i say that because the legs majeste laurels the roy. Defamation in this country. I'd incredibly harsh. And they have been applied in the past so every time kids go out there and demonstrates some of them seeking out of the house of their parents they are committing a criminal offence and they are risking ending up in jail and yet no one really seems to care so what you see now when you go and went to observe protests yesterday is all sorts of tones and abused director directly at the head of state which is something that has happened in the past but not in the way that it is now. And why is this upsurge of animosity against the head of state king. So his father passed away in two thousand sixteen and since he seems to the throne taken a lot of steps to concentrate power in his hands. So there's been a shift from watts once looked as a relatively normal constitutional monarchy to more absolutes attack monarchy. The has changed the crown property bureau law which essentially said previously that these assets are being held in trust for the people for the nation and now with this law changed. The king has direct control over these acids and they actually if you look at shares in companies. It's no longer. The crown property bureau owning is the name of the king the students and many people who sympathize with them on our asking. Well what is his old about these assets odds and we want to see a reversal. What is it that the protesters are demanding here so the three months initially many months ago that they wanted to change the constitution basically a more democratic thailand. The second one they wanted to give it to speak to freely and not face arrests and the third one which is by far the most controversial is a reform of the monarchy now in recent months more and more the last demand has become the most prominent to the extent that even neutral observers here referred to these protests no longer as pro-democracy protests but anti monarchy protests and what likelihood that what the protesters are demanding will actually be met. I mean what chances for actual a change to the monarchy. Well if you look at the original three demands the one of the demands was that they wanted essentially to express themselves freely without landing in jail. Now we use the opposite. Now you see a hardening of stance on the part of the establishment on that from the students are not getting anywhere. The second part is that that was a whole unto last week that the constitution might be mended and made more progressive. That door now seems closed because the crew military royalist government coalition government. They have a majority in parliament. One proposed in particular which mirrored of the demands of the students was voted down so there is no way now through the parliamentary process to bring about change and on the third demand. It is pretty clear now that this heading for a confrontation and everybody knew that because the way that paolo is acquired exercised and hells in. Thailand is dri up for debate. You say this is heading for a confrontation but it sounds as if the confrontation kind of already here. The students don't have any recourse left either in the protesting over real constitutional reform. So where do you see this going. One thing that is really worrying is that it's all it is perceived to be now this one dimensional quest for essentially getting rid of the monarchy in its current state or modernizing whatever it is but all the other things the original demands and are now in the background and what that means for the students i think is that they will find it very difficult to build a broader alliances entice society that will allow them to carry on with this hand. I do not see any fundamental change happening in the near future

King Maha Vajiralongkorn Thailand Tom Felix Young Bangkok Crown Property Bureau Watts Paolo
Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 4 d ago

Pandemic postpones national math, reading tests until 2022

"Officials say national reading and math tests used to track what US students know are being postponed from next year to 2022 over concerns about whether testing would be feasible or produce valid results results because because of of the the pandemic, pandemic, the the biennial biennial national national Assessment Assessment of of educational educational Progress Progress tests tests used used for for the the nation's nation's report report card. card. Were Were slated slated early early next next year year for for hundreds of thousands of the country's 4th and 8th graders, officials say pushing that testing to 2022 is morgue light likely to produce statistically valid and valuable data. The D. C council. Wants feedback on legislation aimed at the public school system there. The Pandemic Learning Emergency Act focuses on a handful of key goals, including collaboration between school system leaders and stakeholders and establishment of metrics to measure health and learning. There's a discussion draft posted online now that's intended to solicit feedback and generate discussion with families and teachers. Council members plan to vote on that legislation next month. So what?

National National Assessment A United States
Elon Musk Shares New Details on Tesla’s Battery Costs

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

04:03 min | 5 d ago

Elon Musk Shares New Details on Tesla’s Battery Costs

"Moving onto the european battery conference interview with elon. Musk then that's was overnight about two. Am pacific time about a twenty minute interview and you did share quite a few things one of the things that caught the most attention at least on twitter today was elon. Musk's comments on long-term battery cost goals for tesla. So of course we heard at battery day. They aim to reduce those costs by about fifty six percent per kilowatt hour. So you on here. Finally gave us a dollar target. We had not heard that before he says quote the long term goal would be to try to get to a cost per kilowatt hour of perhaps around fifty cents or fifty five cents at the cell level for a long range battery and quote so you may have noticed the reason part of the reason this got so much attention today on twitter was because he on said fifty cents or fifty five cents per kilowatt hour at the sea level considering most estimates today put tesla above one hundred dollars per kilowatt hour down fifty cents per kilowatt hour obviously would be pretty insane so he llanos pretty clearly misspeaking there. Just run through a little bit of math year in case anyone has just a wild theory that maybe someday that would be possible. Nealon stock really long term. No that's not the case so to demonstrate that we can look nickel content in the battery pack for the model three that contains around thirty kilograms of nickel a kilogram nickel. Today costs about fifty dollars per kilogram. A little bit more. But let's just round down the scale discounts. You know whatever the case may be so. That's four hundred and fifty dollars of nickel in a battery. Pack for the model three assuming that seventy five kilowatt hours that works out to six dollars per kilowatt hour just for the nickel content in tesla battery so yeah that's just raw materials. There's no way they're ever getting down to fifty cents or fifty five cents per kilowatt hour. He also says at the cell level so even if you misinterpreted that and said that's a purse l. price of fifty cents or fifty five cents. Which will never make sense to quantify it that way. But let's say the new forty six eighties. There's going to be you know. Eight hundred nine hundred of those per mile three pack if each cell were fifty cents. You're then looking at a total battery cost of four hundred and fifty dollars but again just the nickel content alone costs around that much so pretty clearly ilan just misspeaking here any means fifty dollars or fifty five dollars per kilowatt hour so that shouldn't be too surprising with the math that we had worked through from battery day that fifty six percent cost reduction most estimates today. Put tesla at the pack level. You know somewhere around one hundred and five to one hundred and fifteen dollars per kilowatt hour so we can use these long-term targets and combine those with the battery percent reductions that we heard on battery day to get a gauge for those current cost estimates. But it's important to remember. That on here is talking about the cell cost and during battery day that fifty six percent per kilowatt hour reduction seven percent of that was actually four. Sell to vehicle integration. So i don't think we should be. Applying that percentage on this base cost here. So let's say than just at the cell cost level. They're targeting a forty nine percent reduction there if that's an accurate assumption that means yawns numbers here would imply that. Today's prices are somewhere between ninety eight dollars and one hundred and eight dollars per kilowatt hour at the cell level. So i don't know how much the additional cost to go from. Cell to pack would be per kilowatt hour but these do seem to line up pretty well with what estimates have been and can give us a lot more confidence in where tesla is currently and then of course. We're they intend to get to longer term with you on confirming that in this interview. So that means longer term you could be looking at a seventy five kilowatt hour. Pack costing just three thousand seven hundred fifty dollars versus today may be somewhere around seven thousand seven hundred so that's obviously very exciting for them locations for the car but one thing that i do also think is really interesting. Is the marginal impact of that as you. Add battery capacity because at that price. It just doesn't cost that much to add additional range adding twenty five kilowatt hours. There would only cost additional roughly twelve hundred dollars so in the case of a model three for example you could add an additional say hundred miles of range for only a final cost to the customer if you apply twenty percent margin on that of about fifteen hundred dollars. Obviously the batteries have to fit in the car. So there's going to be a limit. But i think as better costs come down. That limit is going to be more physical constraint versus pricing constraint.

Tesla Elon Musk Nealon Tesla Battery Twitter
Interview With Gabrielle Ferrara

Masters in Psychology Podcast

06:06 min | 5 d ago

Interview With Gabrielle Ferrara

"To the masters in psychology. Podcast we're psychology. Students can learn from psychologists educators and practitioners to better understand what they do how they got there and to hear the advice they have for those interested in getting a master's degree in psychology or related. Field i'm your host brad schumacher. And today we have the privilege of talking with gabrielle ferrara. After graduating from morristown high school gabrielle attended university of miami where she received her. Ba in psychology and criminology. She then attended rutgers university where she received her masters degree in clinical social work with an emphasis in mental and behavioral health gabrielle served as a mental health counselor and she did her internship at the immediate care psychiatric center in parsippany new jersey. Gabrielle is a licensed social worker and currently works at the counseling center in middlesex. New jersey as a substance use and mental health therapist. Gabriel welcome to our podcast ink spread. I'm happy to be here My name's gabriel ferrara. I'm really honored to be on your podcast. Thank you for having me. Well you're welcome. Thank you for being on the podcast. I know that a lot of our listeners are going to get a lot from you today. A lot of things going on especially in the last six months i mean. You've you've graduated with your masters degree. You started a new job. You got engaged. Congratulations thank you. Thank you and you actually have your first blog post on psychology today so a lot of exciting things in the last six months It's been an exciting time. So let's go ahead and get right into it. I kinda wanted to open up the floor for you and ask you. Tell me a little bit more about yourself. Other than what that introduction. You know what i did with the introduction for all of our audience members yes so i mean you covered it pretty well introduction. But i'm from new jersey born and raised. I'm currently still living. Where i grew up in marseilles town Just getting into the field of social work and starting my career in my free time. I have a adorable little rescue dog that keeps me busy and keeps me on my toes. So yeah i mean. I just happy to be here talking about my experience and my rite aid and My my career at this point. We'll good good i. How did you actually decide to get your bachelor of arts and psychology and criminology. What made you decide to go that route so it's actually a funny story. I started college as a pre med neuroscience major and then i realized that there was a lot of science and math involved in that that i was not interested in so i but i still really had a passion for mental health in the brain and all that stuff so the next logical step seemed to go into seem to be to go into psychology so i switched my major psychology and began taking some courses and saw that there was an overlap between mental health and the criminal justice system and some of those common themes among the two fields and so i added a criminology degree as well and of combine the two and got to see some of the overlap and it was an incredible combination of studies and field work and just a really good overall experience. Based on our research on the website we are seeing more of the that overlap with criminology and psychology or and more of those Psychologists are needed in the criminal justice system as well. So it's interesting that you chose that route You know the next follow up. Question is what is you know. At what point did you come up with the idea of becoming a therapist. Yeah so that is something that didn't stand out to me at first. I wasn't really sure what i want to do. With my psychology and criminology degree. I considered going into the fbi. Some sort of police criminal justice work and then ultimately subtle settled. It's not the right word. But i made the decision to be therapist and go into clinical work based on my own experience in therapy. And i think we're gonna get into that a little bit later but my own experience in therapy and my good dot experiences with different therapists really motivated me to want to get back. Beat up person for someone else. Because i've had very good therapist and are not so great therapists over the years. Not just kind of comes with the territory but it really motivated me to want to continue studying psychology understanding it understanding people and being a person for others to connect with the actually interesting that you brought that up. If you don't mind i'm gonna go ahead and share my screen. And i'm going to share one thing with you and the audience and i liked your tagline here and you should see the psychology today website here in. Here's your most recent blog post. Why showing emotion as a therapist is okay sometimes and if you notice on the left side. Your tag is gabrielle. Ferrera therapist who sees therapist. Tell us a little bit more about that and how you came up with that idea. Yeah so. I actually got that idea from a book. I read earlier this year. I think i've been late last year. Actually and it was a book by lori gottlieb. she's a psychotherapist and author and also as speaker and she has a memoir called. Maybe you should talk to someone. And in that memoir she about her own experience as a therapist and also her time that she spent going to therapy and that book really resonated with me and it was the first time that i had connected so deeply with a therapist who also goes to therapy themselves. And i knew that a lot of therapists go to therapy. And it's something that were encouraged to do in grad school but reading. That book really made me feel like it was something normal and it was something nachos normal but an asset it was a strength to be in therapy myself and also be on the other side being in that helping possession.

Brad Schumacher Gabrielle Ferrara Morristown High School Gabrielle Attended University Immediate Care Psychiatric Cen Gabriel Ferrara New Jersey Parsippany Rutgers University Gabrielle Middlesex Marseilles Gabriel FBI Lori Gottlieb Ferrera
Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

Short Wave

04:18 min | Last week

Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

"Or at quang. I am ready to go back to school with you. Which honestly dreer great. We would be good lab competitive. Yeah we will be competitive but we be great together. I think and so the science concepts. We're going to unpack. Today is states of matter. You know some of those other states of matter. You didn't learn about in science class rights so the physicist i called up to explain this is martin's veer line at mit. and what. i find hilarious. How martin is he said when it comes to his own kid. He actually prefers to keep this particular science lesson. Pretty simple to assam like. Oh yeah you the gas liquid solid bam. Leave it at that you know. He's seven and states of matter is really just a way to describe how a group of particles think atoms or molecules etc move which is sort of beautiful and collective and different from what you would gifts by looking just at a single particle and changes in temperature and pressure can cause those particles to move differently and change their behavior right. We see the super easily with water. That's right in the liquid phase water molecules slip and slide past each other but we humans quickly learned that if you lower the temperature the particles slowdown bam. We see is appear and we fridges. And we're very excited about. That actually was a huge deal hundred years ago to make ice and if we go in the opposite direction heat water. The particles move faster and farther apart and eventually the h. two o. Molecules breakaway and dissipate into the air as water vapor humidity. That's right it is already a miracle in itself. Water exists in these three different states that we can see those states at temperatures that we can reach as a humans in the kitchen. But here's the thing we can only do so much in our kitchen. Speak right speakers though there. But there's a limited range of temperature and pressure that even you can achieve in your kitchen mattie and there are states of matter beyond this okay like do you remember plasma who ya. Sometimes it's called the fourth state of matter and it can happen when matter gets heated to a super high temperature like electrons rips from atoms which actually allows plasma to conduct. Electricity super cool. Lightning is plasma. Plasma is wild. It is wild. Yeah and if we were to go in the other direction to an extreme if martin son were to ask dad what can happen at a temperature much cooler than ice. Is there something else. I might start telling him about these superfluid states of matter which is exactly what martin's studies at mit these superfluids states of matter that we're long predicted but not easily observed in nature. So how many states of matter are out there. Well we don't actually know martin want to even commit to a number. When i asked him this question he actually said ouch. The is apparently no end to the series of interesting new. Twist that nature gives us to to find your states of matter. We just are digging as we speak. We're digging into this all the time and that's because in theoretical physics. You can use math to predict things that experimental physicists haven't observed yet and i say yet because in the last few decades scientists have successfully coaxed atoms under extreme laboratory conditions to enter other states of matter states that could have useful applications for future technologies awesome. Okay let's get this. Emily like how do they do. This kind of lab can had to exist for these other states of matter to emerge. I'm so glad you asked. They had to get cold. Ultra cold we work in the neno. Kelvin regime for breakfast ano- kelvin. So you might ask what so. That's actually very called. It's a billion times cold interstellar

Martin Quang MIT Emily Kelvin
Goldman Sachs on S&P 500, Model Y Range, Tesla Police Vehicle

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:59 min | Last week

Goldman Sachs on S&P 500, Model Y Range, Tesla Police Vehicle

"Everybody rob our here today. We were talking about tessa. Stock and the s. and p. five hundred inclusion process. We have an updated note from goldman. Sachs talking a little bit about funds that may need to purchase tesla. We also have some news on the model y and then a recently published study by the fremont police department on using tesla as a police vehicle. All right so i up on the stock tussles. Green streak has come to an end finishing down one point nine three percent today to four hundred eighty nine dollars. Sixty one cents that compared to the nasdaq down zero point four percent and two again quickly. Check on the volume. As we've been doing for the last few days it was quite a bit lower today. Only about thirty two million shares traded hands. That was the two hundred and first highest volume rank day for the last year. So very low. That's out of about two hundred and fifty trading days was actually even below the one month average of thirty three million shares and well below the three month and twelve month averages around sixty million shares debt. If you're curious why. I keep talking about volume. It's because i anticipate a lot of shares needing to be purchased. So i do want to keep an eye on volume as we head into the snp inclusion. I do expect most of the related buying four. That will happen around inclusion. But who knows how much for there's going to be so i think if we see a lot of really heavy volume heading into that that might indicate a little bit more front running. So it's not normally something i watched super closely and i'm definitely not a technical analysis based investor. But just something. I'm kind of finding interesting for less period time. Quick related note next week. Is the week of thanksgiving. So the nasdaq will be closed on thursday november twenty. Sixth all day and then on friday the twenty seventh. We closed early so reopened until one pm eastern time. As for my schedule. I'll probably take thursday off and potentially friday. We'll see on that. But hopefully the seven episodes that. I put out this week as well as two interviews that i did the most recent of which is on the talking tesla podcast. By the way we'll make up for that next week. Okay so we've got a bit of an update here on the s. and p. five hundred situation a new note from goldman sachs. Has shed a little bit of light. On that. portion of funds that is benchmarked to the s. and p. five hundred remember. This is the portion of funds that their compensation is impacted based on the relative performance to the performance of the s. and p. five hundred versus the tracking funds. They're literally trying to replicate the performance of the s. and p. five hundred identically. So if we look at our little spreadsheet here that we've looked at many times based on today's closing price for the s&p five hundred and four tesla. It looks like the waiting would be about one point two five percent for tesla and the s&p index so the p last update. They gave us said that there was about four point. Six trillion in assets tracking the index. Saw one point two six percent of that should be allocated to tesla shares. That's about fifty eight billion dollars. Almost one hundred nineteen million shares and then additionally there is six point six trillion in benchmarked assets. So that's what we're talking about here with this goldman sachs update and one point. Two six percent of that six point six trillion would be eighty three billion or a hundred and seven million shares so focusing on that slice for now goldman sachs in an updated note. Overnight said quote of the one hundred and eighty nine large-cap core funds in our universe one hundred and fifty seven funds that manage around five hundred billion in assets under management did not hold tesla on september thirtieth and quote. Okay presumably here then. The one hundred eighty nine funds that goldman is referring to here are benchmarked against the s. And p five hundred. I don't have the full note. So i'm not sure if they stated that clearly but i do think it's the best assumption we can make so they're saying five hundred billion in assets under management for those one hundred and eighty nine funds. That's five hundred billion of the six point six trillion that we're talking about here so that's about seven and a half percent of the slice so then golden is saying that of those one hundred and eighty nine funds. One hundred and fifty seven of them didn't hold any tesla that's only seventeen percent of those funds so we don't necessarily know how the dollar distribution looks if one of those funds makes up the majority of that five hundred billion assets under management and they hold tesla the dollar percentage will look very different. But for now it's just assume it's the same at seventeen percent and then let's extrapolate that percentage to the six point six trillion and benchmarked funds. Broadly obviously quite a few steps. There were the math. Can break down. This is just a theoretical exercise but if we apply that then we could assume that of the six point six trillion and benchmarked funds about one point one trillion of that may already have a position and tesla leaving about five point five trillion. That does not so drop that. Six point six trillion down to five point five trillion. Assuming others already have tessa positions. If all those funds want to be equal weight on tesla they would need to buy sixty nine billion dollars. Tesla nice which one hundred and forty two million scherzer's. Obviously they could buy more. That could buy less. Could by not at all but doing anything other than being equal weight on tesla is an active choice to deviate their performance versus their benchmark based on how tesla's said another way if they don't know about tesla the safest thing for them to do is just to be equal weight so that it's not influencing their relative performance if we hop back to that goldman note per the bloomberg article on the topic. They say quote assuming those funds chose to hold the carmaker at benchmark. Wait they would need to buy eight billion dollars of the stock or about two per cent of tussles market value the analysts set and quote so many of you may have seen the headline articles about that today. That's just goldman saying that of these funds. These five hundred billion in assets under management those funds. We need to buy a billion to be equal weight. So there's walk in clients through the exact math and we've been walking through here for awhile. But on their universe as they say which is just a subset that seven and a half percent subset of the six point six trillion that the snp says is benchmarked against the s. and p. five hundred. We've now seen a couple of separate confirmations that overall the we've been walking through here is correct. I we had the snp announcement which indicated that okay. Yes it's going to be about a one percent weight that equates to about fifty billion in terms of shares that need to be bought so check that box and then here we have goldman sachs now the benchmark funds and how they would need to buy eight billion and that lines up well with the math that we've been talking about on the bench marked funds so i think good to see that i still don't really know how all this is gonna be able to work again if all that is equal weight. That's you know. Thirty eight percent of tesla's float you can't just take thirty eight percent of afloat off the market over the course of two weeks

Tesla Fremont Police Department Goldman Tessa SNP Sachs Green
Where the Trump campaign and Republicans' election-related lawsuits stand

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

03:14 min | Last week

Where the Trump campaign and Republicans' election-related lawsuits stand

"State legislators from Michigan were invited to the White House today. What was the goal here? That's right. You had Michigan's Republican House speaker and Senate majority leader who were at the White House today to meet with the president and the White House Press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany held her first briefing in 15 days. She was asked about this meeting, and she said she kind of dismissed. It is nothing more. Or than routines, and the president meets with people from our with lawmakers, rather from all around the country all the time. But of course, this meeting is not routine. It's all the most alarming and that we know that Rudy Giuliani will be there. And Rudy Giuliani has been leading the president's efforts to try and contest some of these results in certain states. Some of these election results he's been the one kind of Meeting the Trump campaign legal effort here. We should point out he hasn't really been successful. A lot of these lawsuits have been thrown out. But he's been the one kind of behind this this strategy, so the fact that he is at the White House in that meeting. It is certainly raising concerns that maybe the president here is trying to exert political pressure on these members of the Michigan State legislatures so that they don't certify the election or that they are rather than they certified in in a way that would be favorable to him and Essentially be the president, asking them to overturn the will of the people and overturn the outcome of the election. So you had Michigan Democratic congresswoman Debbie Dingell making that point earlier today, she said, This goes beyond partisan politics. It's an attempt to subvert our democracy and undermine the will of Michigan voters legality aside even if the president Did manage to somehow change the result of what happens in Michigan. That still wouldn't be enough to change the outcome of the election. It wouldn't get him 2 to 70 electoral votes. Is he planning to do this in other states? Do we know that's the concern here to your right? The math Peter even if they are able to certified Michigan for president Trump, which would be, you know, just in and of itself, just so alarming and that you know, Joe Biden believes believes in Michigan right now, by over 100,000 votes, if not 150,000. So that ah big margin for for for them to overturn That election would be quite something, But you're right. The mask doesn't work in the president's favor. Even if he were to win Michigan, he's still wouldn't have enough votes to become president. The fear is that they were speculating now, but there's a concern is is whether there would be a kind of domino effect and whether maybe more states would follows to feed into Georgia is on the cusp of certifying its vote. The losing party. Okay. If it's within a 0.5% kid can ask for for a recount. We're expecting the trump campaign to ask for another recount s. Oh, So is that going to the lake, You know certification. Would Georgia follow suit with other states where the Legislature's or maybe a little bit more friendly to President Trump? You know, Pennsylvania's a state with a Republican Legislature with Pennsylvania follow suit. That's the kind of concern here but this is all at this point Speculation and I should point out. This is uncharted territory. We've never been in this situation. Before a bee season as delicate Terry with us on coma news and as thank you very much,

Michigan White House Kayleigh Mcenany Rudy Giuliani Michigan State Legislatures Debbie Dingell Senate Joe Biden Peter Georgia Republican Legislature Pennsylvania Legislature Terry Coma
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Is actually helped us find sponsors they do the legwork of finding sponsors serves and we get a notification and that's been really exciting. It's it. It's helped us a lot especially with how busy we are so I would suggest if you're interested in starting a podcast on your own download the anchor APP or go to Anchor F._M.. To get started all right right back to the show children are being taught mathematics often balk at the idea of negative numbers thing to be fictional entities and only learn later that they're useful for expressing opposite directions of things such as considering a debt an amount of money with a negative some similarly students in mathematics oftener puzzled by the idea of complex numbers saying that it makes no sense to be able to take the square root of something negative and only realizing later that these can have the meaning of two dimensional direction magnitude or they are essential to our modern understanding of electrical engineering our discussion today will be much more abstract than that much like inner discussion in episode five limited the universe we'll be talking about them. Physics drawn inspiration from there. We're going to talk about what different fields such as the real complex attorney and fields seem to predict about the universe so how real numbers <unk> classical mechanics. What does this mean complex numbers quarter earnings are lady do and we'll pause pull physics exist Alderson more on this episode of breaking math episode forty-one reality is more complex complex and I'm Gabriel and this is breaking math with his again we had on Alex Lanese? WHO's on the episode Syntax Matters Syntax matters and Alexander for being on the show? Welcome and Alex is one of my co workers by the way hi everyone. It's great to be back. I know I've been gone for quite a long time. I've been very very busy at home so so it feels great to be back. I've been working behind the scenes but now I'm back in front of a Mike and boy feels good so yeah and as you also know Alex is one of my co workers properly Dr Alex or Doctor Alon Easy if you will you tell us a little bit about your pedigree <hes> in in in stem specifically I will have a bachelor's degree in physics and master's degree in mathematics. That's all classes. No no no thesis I did. I was heading towards a doctoral degree in math decided to go back to physics to to stick to the real world so I'm a particle physicist exist by training awesome awesome and you've worked at few national labs. Is that right I I did eight years at Los Alamos National Laboratory working as a nuclear weapons what they call a designer okay very good and then for the sake of this episode so which is <hes> on mathematics physics. We tell us a little bit about how your background influenced <hes> your contributions to this episode roughly for ten. Maybe fifteen years after I finished my doctoral degree I wanted to dot every I and cross every t you and just caught by physics in a simple way as possible which is what is inspiring this episode and also part of what inspires this episode are a lot of. I guess you'd call them. Water Cooler conversations that Alex and I have at work where we just chat in between cubicles during our downtime and there's been a very very strong desire to make <hes> something for people studying physicists that help them to see the big picture. Would you say that's probably a pretty good representation. It is in tobacco up. I've written probably thousand pages. Most of them are available online through Google drive that are step by step that go into derive quantum mechanics every inch of the way every every I dotted every t crossed so far listeners want to actually read the derivation and some of the stuff that we talk about please send us an email and you can get a hold of.

Dr Alex Alex Lanese Los Alamos National Laboratory Gabriel Google Alderson Alexander attorney physicist Mike Doctor Alon fifteen years eight years
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"And now back to the episode. Surrogate talk real quick about Ramana, John and the Texaco up numbers. I think there's a good story does because it's just about peer recreational mathematics and very famous by the petition. So this one is a very simple story rebutted, John in some expedition. We're in a taxicab and reminded John is really well known for a lot of really incredible mathematics a lot of things like nested radicals like square it of one plus square of to square of three plus four plus, but like not the squared of each number like scored of anyway, you keep really weird like things like that. He's good at that kind of thing or he was in the nineteen tens, but they were in a taxi cab and the number of the texts cab was one seven to nine in the method issue with Ramona John's that it was a really boring number, and is like, no it isn't. It's a small number expressive in more than one way as of two cubes, and he's like he is twelve q plus one cubed or. Nine q. Ten cubed interesting. Yeah. That's crazy. Like came up with the like instantly. That's incredible. Yeah. And it just goes he just goes to show these methods isn't there in a taxi cab? They weren't doing other things. But like, I don't know they they had no goal in mind. And but math mathematics still was something that this is due in to the point where they call these numbers taxicab numbers from then on numbers that are expressed for more than one way as the son of tutoring. Cubes? Wow. The situation. Imagine if you're the kind of person who just like went around and every single number of it showed up, whether you know, it was a piece on your plate. Whatever you you figured out the significance of that number, man. I mean, you could do something kind of like this like just I assure you reminded job would it have been lucky on every single number. But like if you if you're driving down the road of try to find patterns in the numbers and letters in the different things it when somebody rings you up at the checkout counter trying to think of the fastest way to remember that number forever. She really got another that there's a lot of memory pneumonic. That's one way of pneumonic devices. Anytime you have to have a list of numbers just just think of patterns or stories to sort of Anchorage two. Now that actually it would be a good idea numeric scavenger hunts. I don't know if you wanna kill kid busy for a while. Just like give him a list of fourteen numbers that are like four digits and save find something that these describe. Yeah. I mean, they're just it's just a really simple way. I mean, it has everything that a recreational math problem has has a problem, which is data has a solution. That's non trivial has the feel the feeling of accomplishment. It's pretty much. Yeah. It has everything you need. I feel like the way I described that was so lazy almost mean. I care kid. Just go figure out something about these numbers. Knock yourself out. Then, you know, lo and behold, you've got a math genius. Who then tells you something amazing? So right. You know, there's other ways to keep yourself occupied. But yeah, the goal here is to do it with math Ramana, John is really interesting to me because apparently he believed that he was receiving his proofs from the goddess Lakshmi, which was ancestoral goddess the goddess of prosperity, and beauty, and they do religion attributed a lot of his Beth, medical discoveries. Her. And that's another aspect of this. Kind of math. Is that math is has an emotional component as well. As a useful component. If you're just pure boringness. Then we wouldn't have like, I don't know. We don't have the festive notation fest notation, this dorky thing I've ever said. But we wouldn't we wouldn't have different stuff like that to go along with mathematics. It would just be impure Lee boring things like accounting, you know, there's there's nothing pure than seeing somebody just just raptured by the joy of mathematics and of counting things. I mean, think of the count from Sesame Street one. Two. Just saying I'm not being sarcastic. Not not at all. Lilly. Count is a very important figure both politically and economically. The count as a special correspondent on some news news program on economic. There's nothing is count of empire. I think that's implied. We're not going to get sued by by HBO..

Ramona John Ramana HBO Anchorage Lilly Beth Lee Lakshmi four digits
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Listen. Yes. You can't listen to breaking math unless you do the math, homework and ginger episodes. We're going to have to submit it by Email. We're gonna have to grade. It's if you get an a you get to listen to the whole episode sorry guys if you get to be listening to forty five minutes if you got to see you get half an hour. Oh, gosh. We're gonna lose. Listen, so fast. You know, because I think a business practice. The worst thing. The worst thing to do. What they have to do. So your customers. Oh boy. That's not a great business practice here. So how you gonna keep that in at that out? No. Oh, man. Okay. Yeah. Now now, the whole idea that I said earlier is I try to imagine this whole modulus dose. He doth thing is brings me back to our episode on math factory. We're we're talking about our favorite algorithms and general essentially, that's what it is. Like you've got a problem to solve. And you've got all these different algorithms. It's basically are kind of a song and a dance where you end up with something, you know, and that's the brilliance of mathematics, and that's the brilliance of algorithm. So and sometimes I feel like it does have the same feeling as dancing, at least certain types of dancing, like definitely the does he know type dense because it's about steps. Yeah. You have corn ties steps in discrete math versus like calculate like impetus calculus is a different story. Yeah. You've got like, you know, you talk about like things that are understandable with respect to information theory. Well, there's a pattern in what you just described that does he do with. Mathematical systems. That's you know, it's very easy to describe how it works. And it always produces an end results. You know? So it's exactly like a dance of it's. Well, that's that's cool. That's cool. Yeah. And the cool thing about like module. Oh is the way that I visualize it in my head is a ring of of beads, so one hundred module. Oh, seven is. Just you just you have a ring with seven beads on it..

forty five minutes
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"You know, we could actually have people send us emails or letters intense or even call us have a phone number. Now, we don't. We are too poor to have a phone number. Right. Oh, yeah. No. Let's getting we folks contact us. Anyway, that they can, you know, breaking math podcasts at gmaiLcom, and send us your mental math ideas things that you may have heard about through the grapevine or you know, other great mental math techniques. I think that is one way to really garner and appreciation for mathematics and something. I wish we all had more of. Oh, yeah. You could find to on Twitter at breaking math pod. Yeah. Yeah. Send us your mental math will do a whole episode on it, and you will get credit. You'll get a shoutout. But yeah. So that's that's Euclid contributions to discrete math. Well, those are all of them. I don't think they were. But the the let's continue. So our next section is on dia phan-tien equations. Oh, yeah. And those are like we talked about him in the introduction a little bit things like finding a expert. Plus y squared equals z squared, you know, like three or four or five triangles. I think one of the characteristics of them is that they are harder to find their hard equation to solve involving integer quantities. Description of them. Yeah. Like, and one of the famous ones is Fermat's last theorem ferments last theorem, he came up with it in sixteen thirty seven, and he basically said that if you have X to the end so expert by bite self end times plus whiter the in equals Z to the N. It's impossible to solve for N greater than your equal to three. That's right. And is less Thurnham. Apparently, he proved it in according to him he proved it in the margins or rather he said he did the proof, but it couldn't fit in the margins of a book because that right? Yeah. We have the quote here in Len and an English Kubo mouth. Tim and duos Kubilius out Quadra Quadra out to them. Do a Squadra Quadra tos it's Gennady liter Newland in infinite to withdraw Quadra to put the stop to induce them though. Meet niece pus as DVD quiz today. They will start deal in them. Sinai. The text. Hunk megani? Lease exit guidos known cut Pettit. It is impossible to separate a cube into two cubes or a fourth power into two fourth powers or in general any power higher than the second into two like powers. I've discovered a truly marvelous proof of this which this margin is too narrow to contain. That is is that what we call nowadays as trolling. I don't think he's trolling. I think he was just kind of full of himself a lot of math petitions are now now. Okay. So are you saying it's it's possible that he didn't actually write the proofs because I mean approve that beautiful. You would think you would have kept track of it. Definitely. He was probably like he thought he did it. And then he won when you went to I've done this before when I think I saw the homework problem. And then I'm like go to write it down was like this not a solution at all. This is just have you ever thought about starting your own podcast? You know, when we were trying to get this podcast off the ground. We had so many questions. How do we even record? An episode where do we go to find background music? How do we post the audio? How do we get our show onto apple podcasts Spotify and all the other places for people to listen, the answer to every one of these questions is really simple anchor anchor is a one stop shop for recording hosting in districting your podcast and best of all it's one hundred percent free and one hundred percent ridiculously easy to use..

Pettit Quadra Thurnham Twitter gmaiLcom Hunk megani English Kubo Len Tim Spotify apple one hundred percent
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"J w weatherman is a guest who has interested in mathematical education and has made use of that interest in the form of creating the website. Math bought dot com, which teaches mathematical concepts in the form of games which explained play the most primordial form of learning breaking math of thirty four. An interview with math lot dot dotcoms j. w weatherman. This is Jonathan and this is Gabriel. And of course we have on j w j w thank you for being on. Yeah, thanks for having me guys. I've been looking forward to this. So the first question I think I'm going to ask you is what inspired you degrade the website? Yeah, actually, I, I'm a software startup guy, so I had sold the software company and I I was out to dinner with my wife and she was she's always been math nut. I've always really enjoyed math from an early age, and so she was tutoring some kids in the neighborhood, and she was really, she was just really frustrated with with the kind of the methodology of teaching that a lot of kids were experiencing. And so we spent our whole anniversary dinner just kind of geeking out talking about all the ways that that we would do differently and how we can use software for that. And I think that was about three. Maybe four years ago, and it's kind of been an obsession ever since it's nice. I quite a few questions that I wanted to ask you, especially for our listeners about math bought dot com. And I think the question will start with is for somebody who's never heard of math bought dot com in might be inspired when they get home from a drive or whatever to go, check it out, what? What? What can they expect? Yeah, it's it's a website. You don't have to install anything, but you go out to math dot com and you just click play. Now you have to create a username and password just because that will allow us to keep track of what level you're on and and then you're immediately on a screen where you can give a robot commands to have him perform tasks. So the very first level is just walked forward once. So you have a little box down at the bottom that shows a guy walking forward. One time you drag that up into the command bar and hit play, and you see that the robot works Ford. So it's very simple, very easy to get started. But within a few levels, your programming rehearsal functions with conditionals end doing some more advanced programming and and really learning some pretty challenging concepts and just to expand a little bit on what you said just to paint a picture for listeners. It's the grid that's maybe what is it like five by ten grand and and you have a character that you need to get to a destination and you have certain commands. He could give that character. For example, go forward in, there's a rocket that you could put something like three go forward commands into, and the rocket has command, and it restricts the number of commands which makes it more difficult..

Math Gabriel Jonathan Ford four years
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"How the big bang theory when the singularity explodes, it's strange because it should be uniform distribution of things that you still had an. Like chairs? Yeah, yeah, he's mentioned he, Jonathan. Has these amazing leaps of logic, he's a brilliant person, but his leaves of logics are four or five steps ahead of ours. So he was talking about why it's a mystery with the big bang how we have things like chairs, and we just thought, I'm sorry, I'm not following so. So. Yeah. Yeah, it was great commerce. The leaves of Lago is bringing back to chairs to. Yeah, yeah. Okay. So few questions here. These are some that were submitted by cat. Actually. She says she has her degree in a field in biology. I believe it's biophysics and she says biology has a central dogma does math? Yeah. Question I insured. No math doesn't have a central dogma. I think if I had to name one, I mean one that's comparable to the central dogma biology. You know, the idea that central, essentially the process of gene expression, inheritance write us central Valgy. So the closest analogy I can think of math is kinda fun. It's a fun parlor game to play, like, what would you call the central dogma to me? I think the Kircheisen plane and the idea of more generally that geometric objects can be expressed algebraic Lii and that algebraic relationships can be visualized. Geometrically. You know, the fact that you talk about. The line. Why was ex- ex- not align saying to their Abel's x. y. or the same thing. They could be both five, ten in the new draw coordinate plan in some of the comes straight line passing through the origin with slope of one into the idea that there's a correspondence between the world of algebra in the world geometry..

Jonathan Lago Valgy
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"I mean, I wrote, you know, when right sort of five hundred words probably like hedges caveats. Delete later. Explain why wasn't this was really failure. Either were good circumstances as to why struggled in this class. But then when I finally was able to force myself to writers piece about how I took this policy class, didn't get it. I really didn't. I wasn't able to grasp what the class was about, and I had to give this presentation that I was really prepared for and sort of had to go grovelling to the professor the day before to just ask for help them mercy in it was even, you know, few years later writing about that. It was really surprisingly hard to bring myself to just looking at the. Son just look right at that experience in what had I felt in. Why had done what I did? Why react to the way I reacted 'cause it really, really stings when you're not getting something in mathematics. That's a really painful experience are. Absolutely. And so I think I think that's something that you know being able to write that down thrust jokes in there. I think that that resonate with people because almost anyone who's if you spent long off in a math classrooms, Matthew, you're gonna have that experience at some point or another. We could do an entire podcast or series of podcasts on math frustrations, I think, and it would relate very well. You know. I, I don't know if I should say that's a future episode. I feel like making upset about mouth frustration itself may be frustrating, maybe. So I think I might just as little pallet cleanser, we'll go down here to the to one of the what are your favorites? What are your favorite fi stories? And that can be novels or comics, or movies or shows. And why. It's a tough question. So I think probably when it comes to TV shows as still don't think there's a better science fiction show for me in in in my heart than Star Trek next generation. I enjoy these face nine admired he space nine. It's got a lot of Scott. Thanks to it on bell south Alaska's Gloria show. I think one of the people who will defend the finale but Star Trek, the next generation, particularly once it gets going once you get these these episodes with Patrick Stewart, just getting the heart of what it is to be human moments as there's the episode, probably one of the best of television that there's been is they upset were probe comes in and zaps the captain, and suddenly he's in the life of this man on Elian planet and over the course of the episode, he lives like thirty years on the salient planet. They have called the inner light and experiences. This experiences, this whole life as this man with a different name on a different planet in that. At the end of the episode, he zaps back into. His own body and has to live the rest of the series with the memories of this life of the that he lived atmos- Lhasa validation. That is a kind of story that you really can't tell any other in any other John rather than than science fiction fantasy the ends, and there's something that's able to say about what life is and what experiences that yet more more conventional fiction just can't can't go into that kind of territory. I'll say I, it's pretty, it's pretty clear to me where Rick and Morty draws a lot of their plots in their subplots from there's an episode all about that. But I think in this case, it's a video game. Oh, yeah. Good forgotten about that. Yeah. Where where he plays a guy who. His name though the guy in the name of the video game. Oh yeah. It's gosh, Google it real quick. Yeah, there's, yeah, there's this moment. Rigor, mortis enemy takes. I would imagine virtually infinite number of influences Denso's Trump's mopping. Oh, absolutely. So God actually look the name of that one out. But yeah, I think in that mode, he is, of course, born is a baby in lives out as a man who ends up working at a carpet store and. I think he battles cancer and survives, and then he goes back to the carpet store or something, and then you ends up dying as an ROY. It's called ROY, ROY. That's right. In the only foles a minute and a half the street time in the morning. Yeah. Do you think that there is?.

ROY Matthew Rick atmos- Lhasa Alaska John Patrick Stewart professor Denso Google Scott Elian Morty thirty years
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"So of course, math makes sense to you. Yeah, one one assumption that's contained in there which I think is very common among people who feel sort of slightly math verse. Is that not MAC solvent numbers? I think knowing some people who are professional mathematicians in being a math teacher, knowing of math teachers, many mathematicians like to disavow that idea that masters are good numbers, boast about how bad they are with Nick. I think it's a way of reorienting. People's focus on mathematics is not arithmetic. It's not fairly computation. It's about logic, and it's about argument, and it's about conceptualizing things and creating models of of reality in. So yeah, that that tends to be my answer where people assume that mathematics is all about arithmetic. You know, that's that's one interesting, exciting part mathematics, but there's a lot more to it. What do you think that the process of learning math does to a brain just in general, how does it infect the other ways of thinking? Yeah. That's a really good question. It depends what kind of mathematics, but I think the to me, one of the coolest possibilities of mathematician can do is that it can be a really crisp and transformative education logic says, for example, ABRAHAM LINCOLN seed in the movie Lincoln where he suddenly one or two point. He kind of rattles off some Euclid quotes, which is totally true history. 'cause Lincoln love Euclid. In fact, like in the middle of his legal studies, he kept coming cross references to Euclid as just the model of how logic works that somehow the the arguments that Euclid laid out in his geometry book were the purest and the the most certain sort of arguments that one could give. He actually kind of abandoned his legal studies in back and for like six weeks, just read math radio, good learned about geometric proof and obviously Lincoln someone. I mean, he became a lawyer, became the best president. We've had. You know, he was someone for whom argument was really central to what he did when he contributed to the country. So to me, that's a pr-. Pretty good if you're gonna if you're gonna argue from anecdote that's Antic dot RB from. 'cause I think Lincoln understood that mathematics education could teach logic in a really profound way. There's a subject that a lot of people think is really hard that obviously we call geometry and we, we have the best textbook that almost anybody's ever written for John retrieve. We've had it for three thousand years. You know, the elements. Why is that not used in your opinion. The jump checks, we have tended draw from Euclid. They sort of rearranged the assumptions little bed fuss with little bit end. I think a question of why wise jump through still hard to teach. I guess what it comes down to maybe is that having a great textbook doesn't constitute a great education. They're there on a night acts out there. People can learn from book, but for most people, it takes a more.

Euclid ABRAHAM LINCOLN Nick reorienting president John three thousand years six weeks
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"I'm Jonathan and I'm Gabriel today's special down the breaking podcast because we are collaborating with another educational creator. We'll be interviewing and author about a brand new book. Those just released on September eighteenth called mathematics with mad drawings. This book is by author named Ben Orlan who also writes a blog by the same name Bennett had his writings and several journals, including the Atlantic slate vox Los Angeles Times the Chicago Tribune, and now he's on the lectures, breaking math Ben, are you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks for having me. We are very glad to have you very, very exciting. I just got this book mathematics with bad drawings and I'm thrilled to safe to audience not only there are a lot of math, of course, but there are tons and tons of drawings, and we don't mean just math, you know, like like diagrams and such. There's there's stick figures and cartoons and comics. It is an absolute delight to read. Now Ben, would you consider what you draw. Diagrams or cartoon. What are they closer to cartoons diagrams? Yeah, it's a little bit of both. I mean, I think when I started the blog, I says about five years ago now I knew that to do math. It really helps to have visuals. You guys do some inventive stuff with with audio. But you know, when I'm teaching, I know that when I have a good visual for something that's when I can. I can sort of get through to students. And so I knew I wanted to drawings else knew that I can't draw those just not a skill that is in my in my skill set. And so I figured I should disavowed up from by con blog, massive, bad drawing. So they're gonna be drawings than please don't set expectations too high for them. So think we denser was there a little bit of both? I mean, they definitely have. I mean, the ones in the Booker, definitely there to help explain the ideas and to make it a little more lucid and easy to follow. And there's also a lot of jokes in them, and then they're meant to be silly and playful, of course to ask you with this book. Now, of course, it's pretty obvious to me or least I, or at least I think it has what age group and what target audience is this book for specifically. So I've been really happy with the feedback it's gone from from. Matt folks, folks, math teachers than people who are already bought into math. But really, I mean, the most for is for adults who feel a little bit alienated for math or feel like they may have, you know, a bad break up with math at the end of their educational trajectory and would like a chance to, you know, not to do a full range elation necessarily. That's hard to do in one book, but least have nice experience with the subject, get chance to to play around with mighty as I sought that. You did a very what I call good job of approaching statistics where you start off by talking about the psychology of statistics, how a one percent chance in reality is what most people call six percent chance yet? Nothing that's about right. Yeah, that I think the research from Dana comments book, I think fast in slows where I learned about it. There's this whole them, right? The whole realm of behavioral economics day real psychology kind of psychology. But so yes. So basically what happens is when people here ninety nine percents, they tend to think of that as they kinda round down. Down to like ninety five percent. Ninety percent. Maybe when people here at one percent, they kind of round up to five percent, six percent, which I think helps explain why why people react to sort of strangely as they do to tiny probabilities lottery tickets into into almost one probabilities. When you taught, what was the age range that you taught?.

Ben Orlan Bennett Booker Los Angeles Times Jonathan Chicago Tribune Gabriel Matt Dana one percent six percent ninety five percent Ninety percent five percent five years
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Method where you test for positives and negatives, and you You know, know, he. he, he talks about the mathematics of Richard fine men and the book go del Escher Bach. In fact, the chapter I just read was a chapter where he has the sorting hat on and he he is thinking about the consciousness and the awareness of the hat. And the hat reads his mind, thinking about the hats, own consciousness and becomes a strange loop, and the hat becomes conscious. All of a sudden references go del extra balk. It's which I didn't episode on it. So if you guys are looking for something really great to read, I would Google search Harry Potter and the methods of rationality. It's so enjoyable wheels have the poster, the plug the prince have been ordered and the shipping soon. So if you want to get a poster, thirty, five dollars on our patriots of the price will go down at some point. But right now that's basically a breaking even for us. We just want the poster to be, you know, we want you don't let you have this poster. We worked hard on it. Yes, it's been. Very, very long process to get the prince correct. Earlier this past year, we had prince from so many shops and they were never of a quality that we were happy with. They always had strange lines on them where the paper was too thin. We finally found the shop that has the equipment to get us what we need. So those posters are being printed and they're being shipped very, very soon. So yeah, make sure you check out the patriot, which what's the patriots website? Patriot com lies breaking math podcast. We're also on Facebook at Facebook dot com. Slash podcast, Twitter at breaking mouth pod. We have a website breaking podcast dot com, which will be updated soon into really needs to be updated. And one thing I also wanna plug is PBS space time. It helped a lot with this episode at least getting some of the stuff primed, and it goes into a lot of detail. It's if if you like a another, plug three, blue Brown, it's very much like that. Was there a specific. Episode of space time or did you just kind of flip around on it? Oh, I lost count of how many absorbs I've watched. And of course, as you guys know, we've mentioned so many times. I think that the book the black hole war by Leonard Susskind is absolutely required reading. I did say that parts of it are, how do I explain this? There's so much brilliance in it that it's a must read. But I'll also say that there's other segments is not talking about black holes in instead he's talking about sandwiches Zan, Yay sandwiches or shop or something, but it is charming. You get to love him. He wrote the book club him. Yeah, so it I would say it's a must read for sure that as well as the the the BBC documentary on the information paradoxes. Well, August stuff, and I think lastly, there's a podcast that we really, really admire. Very good friend of the show. Yes, a very good friend of the show. There's a podcast we want to talk about called the mad scientist podcast. Now this is neat. It's a slightly. Different style, the breaking math, they talk about science, skepticism and culture, which means that a lot of the episodes or about the colts they've got episodes that are are about medical marijuana, science behind it. They've got a recent series of four part series all about UFO's. Now let me tell you about the one of the founders Chris cogs. Well, he actually has his PHD in chemical engineering. We actually had an episode. It was a joint episode for all the podcasts called. If you look it up is b one and b of NBA to the first one is food for thought, and the second is thought for food and the. That acronym stands for blink for non blankets, part of it, which is now called CNC podcast, which is a podcast collective that were associated with. Yeah. Yeah. Those a lot of plugs there. I realized that that's quite a right. You know, there's a lot of plugs in this episode. The world were black holes run rampant. A hero is needed at one comes just in time. Ventured space and time Ohno I've divided by zero. What it's become sentient I know your virtual, but I have a gun black hole coming to some. Some problem.

patriots blue Brown Escher Bach Google Richard Twitter Harry Potter Leonard Susskind Facebook Ohno NBA Chris cogs scientist BBC colts marijuana five dollars
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Hey everyone is john from breaking math before the subs of begins let me just correct an error i made about ten minutes in so that you're ready for it when it comes and it doesn't throw you for a loop i said that to internal photons photons have the special property that they act like when another even at a distance go through two polarizing filters i meant to say that of one entangled photon goes to polarize her than a photon entangled with it will go through a similar filter and if neither end of the first one doesn't go through than the second one won't go through either got it good now onto the road the history of physics has a natural science is filled with examples of when an experiment will demonstrate something or another but what is often for gun is the fact that the experiment had to be thought up in the first place by someone who is aware of more than one plausible value for a property of the universe and realize that there was a way to where to question in such a way that the universe could understand such a property was debated during the quantum revolution and involved einstein podolsky rosen and schrodinger the question was do particles entangled no the state of one another from far away or do they have a sort of dna which infuses them with their properties the question was thought for a while to be purely philosophical until john stewart bell on the right way to wear to question and proved it in a laboratory of thought it was demonstrated to be valid laboratory of the universe later so had a party will speak to one another far away what do we mean when we say we observe something and how has a pair of gloves unlike a pair of walkie talkies all the more on his episode breaking math episode twenty eight bells infamous theorem.

rosen john stewart bell ten minutes
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"In there that pulls it back i only saw the attraction moving in one direction because of an elementary understanding of the north and south poles and how that would affect the circular magnets and this to say didn't work but the lesson learned there i think is the just your interface a human with the paradoxes of mother nature and science are kind of mind boggling and how unintuitive they are with the rest of our experience so it's a great introduction into the field study of stem and ten staffel there you know such thing as a free lunch you can find us on facebook at breaking meth podcast you could buy us a drink at patriotair dot com slash bringing podcast and these drinks that'll help us get you more content through magical exotic you can find us on twitter brighi math pod you could check out our applets bring him podcast dot com and that's our info for contacting us oh please send in questions yes any any questions and these are not just about a about paradoxes but anything that you'd like to answer about math including math education we'd love to talk about math education as well yes so if you've ever wanted to know why there's like why certain number show up in nature more than others if you wanna know why a certain proof in book works the way that it does anything really we'll try to answer it and or get you answers.

facebook
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"If you're join this episode and love studying not only paradoxes put the mechanisms behind them you're going to want to be comfortable with logic and if you're not one hundred percent competence but i like to point towards brilliant dot org the course on logic makes it fun an easy for you to start in theme logically manipulating complex propositions it's part of every form of math why not work through the course in just a few days in particular the chaptered syllogism and sets has lots of do the concepts only go into in this episode so if you're a computer good a brilliant dot org slash bringing math click on the course's select logic and select last chapter soldiers them and sets that's really dot org slash breaking math not only are you directly supporting the show but the first two hundred breaking math listeners who had 20 percent off the annual subscription that we've been using and now back to the show so now we're going to go visit our old friend euclid again who as you may recall from an earlier episode was one of the founders of rigorous mathematics and developed one of the first or vi s a mom not totally sure about that systems of axioms a n even though it's criticized today for not being very regress um assuming did that the person on knows what a point is and not be informal it's still an axiomatic system and it's a good example of one and so we're gonna give you the five postulates now we we i think we've titian listener previous episode out on koa which went on was if it was one of our earlier i can recall at this point i it made been on the episode about a proofs acuity prove its perhaps yeah and uh the point of this being that the fifth postulates is uglier than the other four and we'll show and will run through them real quick just to show you uh y yeah i'm aside vw it's always offer.

euclid one hundred percent 20 percent
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"What it contracts by for more than that going to math just check out the electoral dynamics of moving bodies by albert einstein and that makes sense because were saying okay we're holding velocity constant which is distance over a certain amount of time so if you hold that one thing constant those two things need to change in direction change knowledgeable one on the other bad both of them are changing what i do want to to joe here is that you know with this equation we have the perceived link of the fraud is you know square root of one minus v squared overseas squared times a okay so if you have v square to oversee squared let's save v is very small your velocity of iran is way slower selling a mile an hour than the like one mile an hour it's way slower than the speed of light than that v square to oversee squared term vets pretty much zero and so we have b equals one times a yeah so that's why i mean he he does that cool game released by mit you can find it with some googling were special relativity is taken into account and it's really bizarre moving around this world where special relativity is actually you get a feel for it though which is weird yeah so this is why we don't perceive you know normal everyday life that car looks like it's still the same length because it's mall it's going of aussie so small compared to the speed of light but when things go near the speed of light that v square to oversee squared terms that starts to get bigger and bigger and actually that has been used to describe a lot of things including things like cosmic rays so there's a particle called a mawand in fact that decays pretty quickly pretty quickly related barely exists that odd i don't have the actual time decays but it travels very very far and out when a travels from the atmosphere i believe that because of the speed the lanes constricts quite a bit so it's only traveling what appears to the milan to be i think what six miles something like that were in reality at some how many miles out as our atmosphere honored one hundred kilometers within 100 calmer.

albert einstein fraud iran milan joe one hundred kilometers
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Some see the world of thought divided into two types of ideas evolutionary and revolutionary ideas however the truth can be more nuanced in that revolutionary ideas can spur revolutions and revolutionary ideas may be necessary to create incremental advancements general relativity is an idea that was evolutionary mathematically revolutionary physically and necessary for our modern understanding of the cosmos divides full form first by einstein and later proven correct by experiment general relativity gives us a framework for understanding not only the relationship between mass in energy and space and time puts apology and destiny so why's relatives such an important concept had a special in general relativity differ in what is meant by the equation g equals eight pie tea all of this more on this episode of breaking math abso 21 einstein's biggest idea as many of you know we have a patriot accounts at patreoncom regan give us a monthly donation or even a one time donation to support us we incentivize at in various waves and just for this episode air translating brand new an educational breaking math poster on the mathematics behind einstein general theory of relativity created by yours truly johnson bacha in order to understand general relativity it helps immensely to understand appealed mathematics known as tensor calculus this poster helps the reader understand both what tensor's are as we'll tell their used on the ice i feel to graze a combination of beautiful visuals as will step by step instructions walk the reader through the concepts and details of this branch mathematics you can see the poster if you visit or patriotic just go to petri oncombreaking math and look for the post entitled tensor poster the great for anyone team general relativity were even linear algebra they are on sale for thirty five dollars printed on.

einstein patreoncom regan thirty five dollars
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"You'll learn math science in more on her website this time where showcasing there so yes classes if you've never done computer science if you're just starting out you can take care of your science fundamental course or if you're more experienced you could challenge yourself with of course computer memory or neural networks these can help you in school or even professionally and in life so to support a show on end to maybe sport themselves in life within can go to www dot brilliant dot or slash in now and yet it'll help us out on a now under the rest of your episode yeah i say i'm actually really really excited about this episode i mean frequencies are just about everything there's a quote from tesla from it nikolai tesla i did my dentist pacific quote but he says something to the effect of his his goal is to try to understand everything in the universe in terms of frequencies so it's just a really cool avenue of mathematics and also issued eluded to we we can talk about frequencies where it's you know uh sound and in music and ratios and anything that happens over time as well as your current job electrical engineering so i i think that this is just this episode is really rich for things like analogies and we've got a lot of applications i think the golfer this episode by the way too when word planning that this episode we went to start off with just talking about conceptually what frequencies are and then also at a very basic level the kinds of engineering that people can do with frequencies things like am radio and fm radio and how that works or even a civil engineering design with buildings and bridges and we'll get into that way direct oh yeah.

computer science tesla fm radio civil engineering
"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"math" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"So here it breaking math of course a very often we like to talk about all things math and and society but we also have another interest in our show we'll we'll have a guest on who have who has a specific experience with with math education or or stem education and we liked bring unguessed who may have a unique perspective on at things like education in stam which is science technology engineering in mathematics and that's what we're doing on today's episode today i am interviewing a student name frank tsao us who is currently a phd student in electrical engineering at the university of mack of michigan and he's also a recent graduate of the university of new mexico also with a bachelor's in electrical engineering and frank has a quite a story about what got him interested in electrical engineering frank solace is a statistical exception but far from an irreparable result busted on the streets of albuquerque of selling crack cocaine at seventeen an age where many of us are busy hunting the skills that we've chosen to master and promptly incarcerated what are the myriad concrete bucks that comprise the united states penal system there he struggled as most would his position to better himself spiritually are ethically once even participating in a prison riot after two stinson solitary confinement he did the unthinkable he mentioned a better world for himself one whereas not all him versus the world with newfound vigour he discovery was there a long a passion for mathematics and the sciences after nine years of hard time he graduated to a halfway house from there he attended classes at community college honing his skills using his second lease on life that took him on a trajectory which developed into him working on the phd in electrical engineering from the university of michigan we're talking of course about frank solace a man who is living proof that condition in destiny are not forced to correlate and who uses this proof as inspiration for many in the halfway house that he once roamed.

albuquerque crack cocaine united states community college frank tsao university of mack michigan university of new mexico stinson phd in electrical engineering university of michigan nine years