18 Burst results for "Master Distiller"

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"My <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Silence> job <Speech_Male> to slow <SpeakerChange> it down. <Speech_Male> So yup <Speech_Male> perfect <Speech_Male> dan. I want to say thank you <Speech_Male> again for coming on the show. Today <Speech_Male> it was a pleasure <Speech_Male> again. I <Speech_Male> have you on as <Speech_Male> first time here being <Speech_Male> number in pursuit but also <Speech_Male> to get some more mixers <Speech_Male> representation. I know <Speech_Male> it's one of <Speech_Male> those brands that people <Speech_Male> always love to <Speech_Male> to know more about <Speech_Male> and they're like how the name <Speech_Male> come and like. Oh it's michael <Speech_Male> peterbilt like there's <Speech_Male> so many there's such <Speech_Male> good history that <Speech_Male> comes into it and <Speech_Male> you know you'd even mentioned <Speech_Male> some the legacy brands <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> shakes and burgers <Speech_Male> that we didn't even <Speech_Male> get into. I mean that's <Speech_Male> those are really some historic <Speech_Male> brands and <Speech_Male> really even victor's <Speech_Male> itself has <Speech_Male> a a lot <Speech_Male> of good rooted history. <Speech_Male> So if you haven't <Speech_Male> yet please go <Speech_Male> and check <Speech_Male> out our podcast. <Speech_Male> We've had talked about <Speech_Male> history <Speech_Male> and they've also got a lot <Speech_Male> of great history on the website <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> dan for anybody <Speech_Male> that wants to know more <Speech_Male> about you or fall <Speech_Male> longer. See <Speech_Male> what you're doing <Speech_Male> in this. How can <Speech_Male> people <SpeakerChange> get in contact <Speech_Male> with your follow <Speech_Male> you. of course. <Speech_Male> there's are. Mixtures <Speech_Male> website <Speech_Male> discusses all things <Speech_Male> mic. There's <Speech_Male> i also have <Speech_Male> the instagram <Speech_Male> mixmaster distiller <Speech_Male> which forgive <Speech_Male> me. I'm still <Speech_Male> learning that whole <Speech_Male> social media thing <Speech_Male> there so <Speech_Male> i'm kind <Speech_Male> of old lead in front <Speech_Male> of people now. It's a little bit <Speech_Male> different. <Speech_Male> I you'll be <Speech_Male> on oxygen. <Speech_Male> I'll tell you <Speech_Male> what that's one of <Speech_Male> my goals for twenty <Speech_Male> twenty one is to do <Speech_Male> better on <Speech_Male> social media instagram. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> now definitely <Speech_Male> that's one <Speech_Male> way and <Speech_Male> also hopefully <Speech_Telephony_Male> hear <Speech_Male> you know sometime <Speech_Male> this year. <Speech_Male> We really hope that <Speech_Male> we can start kind of <Speech_Male> going out and market <Speech_Male> and everything. And <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> that's the best way <Speech_Male> is i. I enjoy <Speech_Male> that so much that <Speech_Male> interaction. <Speech_Male> You know the team <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Male> creating something <Speech_Male> here. That's being enjoyed <Speech_Male> all over the world and <Speech_Male> that's the most <Silence> satisfaction <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> that that's <Speech_Male> what i love and <Speech_Male> also i just <Speech_Male> want to say thank you thank <Speech_Male> you for. Let me be a part <Speech_Male> of this great <Speech_Male> talking to <Speech_Male> you guys. And <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Yeah it's very exciting. <Speech_Male> I look forward to the <Speech_Male> future and <Speech_Male> whiskey is a <Silence> very special <SpeakerChange> thing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I agree <Speech_Male> in kenya. I'll say <Speech_Male> that you know mixers <Speech_Male> has a <Speech_Male> backlog of <Speech_Male> folks who should be in the bourbon <Silence> hall of fame <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think willie pratt <Speech_Male> should be in. Pamela <Speech_Male> heilmann <Speech_Male> definitely andrew wilson <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> although not <Speech_Male> affiliated <Speech_Male> with with <Speech_Male> dan's <hes> <Speech_Male> makers <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> the last <Speech_Male> Master distiller <Speech_Male> in pennsylvania the <Speech_Male> pennsylvania makers dick <Speech_Male> stole also. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know it doesn't. <Speech_Male> I think you <Speech_Male> can make a case for him. So <Speech_Male> i think there's a <Speech_Male> there's a lot of great <Speech_Male> talent <Speech_Male> that's been in the mix <Speech_Male> portfolio <Speech_Male> and i'd like <Speech_Male> to see them get in the <Speech_Male> bourbon hall of fame in <Speech_Male> the next few <Silence> years especially <Speech_Male> willie <Silence> may he <SpeakerChange> rest in peace <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> of good pedigree. <Speech_Male> That's for sure. <Speech_Male> And i also forgot <Speech_Male> to mention the top of this that <Speech_Male> dan is also listened to the <Speech_Male> podcast. So it's also <Speech_Music_Male> great to have somebody <Speech_Male> that is <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> listens actually <Speech_Music_Male> is on it and able to <Speech_Music_Male> share their stories of <Speech_Music_Male> dan. Thank you once again <Speech_Male> for coming <Speech_Male> on so make sure <Speech_Music_Male> you follow dan. You can also follow <Speech_Music_Male> pursuit wherever <Speech_Male> you get your podcast <Speech_Male> as well as on all <Speech_Male> the socials <Speech_Music_Male> and with that <Speech_Music_Male> we'll <SpeakerChange> see you <Speech_Music_Male> all next week. <Music>

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

06:36 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"What you got cooking. Yeah i mean kentucky is one of the best places in the world stage whiskey and the changing of the seasons and heating up and that whiskey inside that barrel as it warms up the pressure inside increases at drives that whiskey into the capillaries of the wood. And then when it cools down that whiskies coming back out extracting those flavors and over a course of a year. We say there's about four to six natural cycles where it's heating up tooling down over the winner here in kentucky when the temperatures at a low we we go ahead and heat up the warehouse. We see a certain temperature change and then eventually will will stop. The heat will open the louvre's windows and let it naturally cool down and we've caused cycle now again. You know you can't put it on the label but our data our experiences show that we're probably adding six months for each year that we heat cycle and you know again. That's the art of it at the color extraction the flavor. All of that is you know. mouth feel. it's it's impacted by a additional heat. Cycling not many distilleries dude. It's very extensively liz. A lot of angel share I think a traditional non heated warehouses somewhere around two two point five percent angel share and we're upwards around four percent so it's definitely a art of managing the barrels and so forth so another question. I kinda wanna poses as we kinda start rounding this out a little bit is one of the last offerings in. I think ryan hinted at the beginning of this was the toasted barrel. Bourbon came around. I think the very first one was in. Twenty fourteen. And fred said that would kind of followed suit Soon after that what has been going on with the toasted barrel craze in the past year that has seemed to just being blown up everywhere. Because you all have multiple expressions of it now. Yeah i i think is very exciting to be a part of that and yes two thousand fourteen. The it was the toast a barrel a bourbon. Think we did started out in fourteen and fifteen four. We can't do it every year because our whiskies are allocated so we have to be very thoughtful in the process. You've now seen the toasted the barrel finish barrel strength And then we have done the toaster. Barrel finish original sour mash in each one's a little different. You know we use again. Each whiskies fully aged in that new toasted chart american white oak barrel. Once it's fully aged. We remove it and put it into a a new toasted unchartered american wide oak barrel. Finish it for a certain amount of time and again same things. We're looking for those certain house style in those toasted products and again that flavor extraction you get from that toasted barrel. It's amazing and going back to the barrel shrink toasted barrel. It's those burnt sugar's toasted notes marshmallow cream purely asking whatever your experiences but those are some uncommon notes the barrels for that the would stage were air dryden seasoned for a twenty four months. We typically air. Drying season are woodstoves for minimum of eighteen months. All the way to sixty months to something that we're very proud of but there's just a the expression that's created when you finish in a toasted barrel. I you know a lot of people you either like it or don't but i think it's very rich flavorful and They're very popular. So i think other distilleries of seeing that and it's something they're trying to duplicate. Where did that originally come from. That idea of doing a secondary toast show was before my time really at mixtures here But i know again you know you have willie pratt with over fifty years experience in the industry and very familiar with aging maturation process and how toasting and charring and all of that affects the whiskey. But you know when you're toasting that's the art of slow heat and time you know you've raised the barrel you said it over a an oak Of that you know using oath chips that around fire just generating a a lower. He and over time that helps break down those inner layers of the wood to and you have different toast Profiles a lower toast profile can allow more fruity nece whereas like a heavy toast profile can bring out. Some real mocha type notes characteristics. And you know there's a lot to play with our original sour mash. That toasted barrel finished product Way went with a different toast profile than let's say the toaster barrel finished ri- because they're two different whiskies that original sour mash. Whiskey is a very elegant westie so we didn't want to overpower with a higher profile. So we went with a little bit of a softer one lighter and i think it complemented. It's about complimenting it really cool so one last question. I coming to throw at you as we start wrapping this up here. You know looking forward into this next year like what is a professional goal that dan mckee has for for twenty twenty one. Well i mean first and foremost Has been very successful. Thanks to so many people you know in the industry like i said the bar restaurant store owners consumers. It's amazing what people are doing in the support for the brand so number one professional goal is to continue working with the teen andrea wilson. Map bell are distiller cow. Lloyd head of rnd and so forth and just continue the success that we're doing now. I mean it's not necessarily going out. My goal is not to make changes necessarily the mixers. And what can. I just necessarily put my mark on. It's about continuing success. But also as we go. Is there different product lines that we can do. Our shanks and bomb burgers are legacy brand. We call it kinda outside that victor's house style. Those are two fun releases that we kind of play around with. We haven't settled in non arrests appear yet. We've used the new toasted chart. American white oak barrels in some chink append oak barrels. And things like that at something to play around with and create very nice high-quality whiskeys and continuing. The success would be my professional goal for the year. And then working with the team and seeing scroll into the future predic- you don't screw up. That's the guy exact on it's joe. Let's joe would wanna hear. The train is moving forward. I it is not.

kentucky willie pratt liz fred dryden ryan dan mckee andrea wilson Lloyd victor joe
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

06:49 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"The pressure on you. what are the things about. Is that you all have kind of taken like an old school approach with with with your titles In in your in your job roles If you go back to the nineteen fifties the master. Distiller didn't do things with the barrels. They just kind of like they put the whiskey in the barrel they did the fermentation they put the whiskey in the barrel and they left it to the warehouse managers. They might go back and taste and everything but and they might choose what the product was but that was the they didn't really focus on the warehouses. You have a very distinct role in andrew. Wilson has a very distinct role. I'm curious as to what is your involvement in the warehouse in the maturation in. You know it does. Is there some overlap there or you just put it in the barrel in europe. I am definitely Responsible for the front end part of it bringing the grains in the mashing fermentation distillation and passing all the qc checks entering it into the barrel and then andrea is. She's overseeing that maturation process but there is definitely a lot of overlapping. I mean just. Let's say for example a year into distillates into the barrel for a year where already pulling samples were tasting as a team or you know creating data and that goes on through the lifetime of those barrels and then with whether it's Using different types of barrels amid on the process making decisions. There's the voice there that contributes and and then of course when it comes time to released and bringing different barrels together on the part of that and then ultimately making the decision. When what's ready to be released you know. I have a question about that too. Because i remember when we interviewed pam and she had done all of her tasting in the morning. It's now ten. Am has the time. We're actually recording this. Have you already done tastings for the day. Are you more of an afternoon person. I typically in the morning. So i didn't today because of preparing for this of course but now that typically a day would be coming in Walking around the department seeing how everyone is seeing how production is going. And then also it gives the distillery time to get the samples and things like that. But whether it's tasting the new district the distilleries already been running. So i can taste off the stills and then also the production from the day before As it's going through. Qc you know. We do our century panel here. We have Over twenty five employees that are trained to approve new distal. Let you know the g. c. mass spec to do chemical analysis and it has to pass both of them before it can be approved if as i mentioned before of one of those off. Let's say the century picks up on something that the g c. didn't will actually fail it. And then you know send it out of here to be repurposing fuel ethanol but you know that's a an important and then once it passes we give the warehouse the green light to go ahead and cut that desolate too much lower proof as fred mentioned We go in the barrels at one. Hundred three proof. Which is the lowest entry proof of any distillery of scale and that's for all of our products on. That's very important for us to do that. And it's expensive. That causes us to use more barrels but again disalvo sugars more readily at helps create that nice smooth this that's associated with a mixers and it's something that we do but yeah it's going round. I typically taste in the morning but true flay all day long it. It doesn't matter. It's it's when it's available one time allows usually with the distillates in the morning and i did have a question about one of your releases because it's only happened. I think A rare occasions. You all putting out a barrel proof expression and knowing. I don't have any bottles anything like that. But i don't know whether like the final proof an being but you know going in at a lower proof of one hundred and three depending on where you're pulling these barrels. From what sort of variations. Do you see in barrel proof expressions barrel proof sampling and everything like that. That's coming out and tasting so as we go in at one hundred three. We see a lot of our barrels. Come out around one hundred eight to one. Twelve one ten. Being kind of the average i think for twenty twenty we did the toasted barrel finish ri- and the average av on that was fifty four point six. So you know that's right in line with what we typically see. Sometimes you'll see some barrel proofs up around one hundred and fourteen but you know that one ten twelve is what we say and if you think about it it's you know that's another thing that we always speak of and how it really makes our whiskies grade is when we go in at the lower you have that chemical reaction that again that we prefer that as it comes out you know. We're adding more water up front but you take someone that went into the barrel at a much higher higher proof they're gonna come out a lot higher and they're having to add about fifty percent more water to get it to bottling proof so you know. At least the water at the front end has those characteristics of the maturation process and again creates that. Nice real rich flavorful whisky that we that we have. Do you think Lower it reproves They obviously taste greater at a younger age. Do you think they can hold up to age as it matures. 'cause it seems like to me the ones that distilleries that do have those high entry proves it takes them a long time to get where you want them but once they get there. They're very good and they age well But i'm not sure about. The lower injury proved because we really haven't had a ton you know until recently you know there's so many factors just like everything but i yes. The low barrel entry proof will do fine as it ages. But it's like anything you know. How was it made. How is it age barrels. it's age you know. We use new toasted charred american white oak barrels. I mean talk about maximum flavor extraction with that toasting and then charring so but again that's go that's why we go into the warehouse and we're continuously. Collecting data is the barrels mature. We even have a program that we have stainless steel drums. That if we see that a barrel is Kind of whether it it's at its best at may start the plateau and we want to stop that in and we have that opportunity to put that in stainless steel drum Stop the aging process. The yeah very much. So low entry proof will do just fine and of course you got the heat cycled warehouses that plays a little bit of a role in.

andrea Wilson pam andrew europe fred
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

07:05 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Distillery for a step-by-step. Look at how they crafted their award. Winning lineup of american whiskeys haven't held reminds you thank wisely. Drink wisely cheers. What's the process of blending different whiskies at different ages from different places of the warehouse. So there are protocols. I mean this is the great part of working with again andrea wilson our master maturation and and her overseeing that the But you know as far as you know are small bachelor. Us one kentucky straight bourbon are. Small batches are truly small. They're they're the equivalent of twenty full barrels. That's all our equipment can handle so again. You have to have very high quality consistent barrels to do that and we have flavor profiles so you know as those barrels whether they're five to seven we have been monitoring them doing tasting during the scientific lab testing on them. So we understand what they're offering and y- there's protocols the brain from different areas to establish it. There's times though that we can put a you know for testing before we go full-scale you'll bring in those barrels in determine that it's it's not the you know there's house style for our us one bourbon and so then we go back to the drawing board but yeah there's definitely those protocols set in place where they were to pull and you know as you guys well know at different parts of the warehouse. Age a little different. But that's one thing that we've also are doing really well at our warehouses are you know they're. They're not the traditional non heated warehouses. We do heat cycling here. They're only four four floors high. So there's a consistency there It kind of reduces those variances from maybe the very tall Warehouses that you'll see on the countryside. I think a interesting anecdote. There was the fact. You said. Only twenty barrels. Go into a small batches as most of our listeners. Know that the term small batch doesn't actually mean anything there's nothing that's designated forward or anything like that however when you even think of since there is no designation it could be up to three barrels that go into a quote unquote small batch and hearing you only do twenty just to kind of put it in perspective to a lot of people like that's on average maybe somewhere after get cut with water maybe somewhere between forty five hundred fifty five hundred bottles at a twenty twenty barrels at your and get into it so it's it's surprisingly a lot smaller than what i would would have thought that you all would be doing into a batch. Yeah it's Something that was started early on like you said you know. Every distillery is about quality but here mix. We do a lot of things that you know. Support that it's not just me saying it. And you know that was one of our products are either single barrel or truly Small batch and that was something that was established early on and as we continue to grow. We have shown no signs of changing that. It's something we're very proud of your by only going. Twenty full barrels reduces that opportunity to kind of introduce maybe some subpar barrels there are distilleries that do over five hundred even over a thousand barrel batches. So it's Something that we are very proud of. Was that the case that your former job. And is it easier for you to blend those bigger batches than the smaller ones i. I won't speak to whether it's easier not in or what. My previous employer was doing. But i will just say for us. It is challenging. I mean again. You do come across the barrels. That may not have aged to the expectation. And you know that something that is. Let's say our processing operators. they're They're doing sensory. You know all the quality checks on the incoming barrels and there are cases where we have to reject matured barrels and actually send them from our facility. The be repurposing fuel ethanol. And you know. It's the same with our distillate discs. We unfortunately have a batch. That didn't maybe ferment. Well or It doesn't fall within our standards. We actually reject it and you know it's painful the have to call the owner and let them know that we rejected a batch. It's something that We know if the not right at the beginning. It's not going to be right at the end. And we're not gonna force it. It truly ultimately is about bringing the best american whiskey to the consumer and enjoying it and you have to have that consistency and a great whiskey for sure. You know i got a question about your career path. You're to With pam moving on retirement and them looking for new successor. Did you think that you were going to be next in line or was there an interview process like how did that all happen. And what was the transition like for you as well. Yeah so my journey to master distiller. I'd say interesting to say the least you know if you go back to the start of my career in in in the industry as a distillery operator. I don't think that thought ever came into my mind. And in fact i know it didn't and when i had the opportunity come the mixers you know again willie. Pratt was master distiller at the time and things were going very well but he decided to retire. Pam assumed the master distiller role and all intensive purposes. I thought that would have gone longer than than it did. And yeah at some point when you know. You are interviewed in mick. There's always you know we're looking to the future so there was a process there when i was offered the opportunity it was a very rewarding. And it's Who doesn't want to be the master. Distiller so i. I'm very excited very. I do not want to be a mess and you know i'm very humble about it i. It was an opportunity that fifteen years ago i would have never have seen and inherently our and doing things like this and going out into into market and meetings such great people. I mean you know the consumer bartenders bar restaurant store owners things like that. I've i've met so many great people and the the passion that's out there is amazing. That's something from year one that i wouldn't have known until you know most recently in just to see the excitement that the bourbon whiskey industry generates. It's it's it is exciting. I know i use that a lot but it is very rewarding very exciting. Do you think that's the weirdest part about the transition is actually having to go and be a a speaking figure rather than always turning dials and knobs all day. I will say it again. It's a lot of fun but you know like doing something like this. This is very hard for me. I always say. I'm a production guy and that's where my comfort levels at doing stuff like this. You know. there's a lot of owns and trying to think about what to say next. And but yeah. This is one of the more difficult parts of it. We're here to put.

andrea wilson kentucky Us pam Pratt willie Pam mick
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

15:51 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Once in a while. You're like okay like we'll get rid of this one or i mean is it. Is it all just all gravy of every time he takes these barrels. How i wish it was gravy. Now it but it is a lot of fun. Not every barrel comes out You know as expected. But you know that's where you know. I'm very fortunate to work with andrea wilson our master maturation and the team. We have You know a great team here. And and the work. That's involved the data collection and so forth. So you know when we're going. In and pulling those barrels we have great idea of where their hat from continuous monitoring. So but yeah you do come across ones that you try to figure out what may have occurred there but with the stocks that we were very proud of him. You know as you've had the twenty twenty five year they're great whiskeys. And but yeah. It's it's a lot of fun to be a part of these older older whiskies. Yeah i would imagine. Okay go ahead. How many how many you got left of that. You know once they were going to find out today as i love my job and mixers has been great to me. So there's a lot of things. I may not be able to speak about today but Now what you know. It's something that they're allocated of course and they'll be limited releases throughout the future and we don't want to overdo. It wanted to be special. And you wanna bring these great whiskies To the consumer and to be enjoyed so. I think there's something special about that kenny. In in dance defense of answering that question regarding how many barrels are left. I have been trying to pry information out of mixers for fifteen years and there has never been a more There's never been a door more sealed tight than than the mixers team with They've they keep a pretty a pretty a pretty good ship with that Loose lips sink. Ships can philosophy that they don't they don't Share too many details about the whiskey but one thing we have seen year in. You're out is the whiskies. Pretty damn good Especially those older releases. I'll say that there's a lot of and lou bryson just recently wrote an article about this for the daily beast about like. Stop spending your money on older whiskey. And i think for the large part that's true but mixers time and time again puts out older releases that don't taste like a fence posts. You know they. They're not over okay. They're really good and so dan. I want to come to you back to those older releases. What what is y'all's process You know for choosing these because again you get a lot of people a twenty five year old bourbon on their hands and it's going to taste off and y'all's always tastes spot on. Well i think. Just when you're tasting these other whiskies you really have to think outside. The box opened up To the experience that you're in hand you know. Obviously these are going to be way different than those ten twelve year. Old whiskies that a lot of people truly enjoy. You know we do kind of have that house profile. We're looking you know the twenty year. You get a lot of that. You know whether it's black cherry the twenty-five those you know whether it's dark tovey's things like that but neither one of them are over over ocht. Woody would bombs things like that. They're never that. And i think that's something special but there is a consistency. Were looking for for each release. We know it's going to be you know a little different. You're going to have different variances but is it rich complex. Great mouth field things. Were looking for a nice finish and again no like you said. Nobody wants to just feel like they're biting into tree. Bark or medicinal things like that so if a barrel ever did come across like that. We're not afraid of rejecting it just because it's been aging and we've spent all the time and resources into aging that berle we won't release unless it's ready and fits the profile and i think that's something special and that kind of that goes through all of our products whether it's our us one line our ten year marks and so forth. It's just not going to be released if it doesn't fit our standards. The i think one question that kind of precedes this a little bit. Is you know when you are trying to figure out the flavor profiles in it like kind of talk about your palate training. Or what did you do growing up in the industry to be able to prepare you to be able to say like okay. We're gonna take care of twenty twenty five year old releases in and how you got involved in that process to so when i joined mixers Six years ago as a distillery manager and we were in entering into face three with the construction of our chevy distillery and so forth. I had a great opportunity You know i was working with a master distiller willie pratt and our distiller. Pam heilmann again andrea wilson. And so you know that's the experience just with those three individuals. I mean it's it's amazing so kind of coming in and then learning about mixers and someone asked me about. What will you remember about willie. And i remember sitting in his office and and you know have conversations and he loved tasting whiskey. I remember the first time he pulled out a whiskey. That was a little over thirty years and got the try. And i'd never experienced something like that before at that moment i i didn't have words for it because it was. It was amazing but it was completely different than anything that i had Experienced before so having whiskies growing up like in your twenties and you know experiencing it for different reasons and then as getting older you're starting to drink whiskey and really really enjoying the flavors and the experience it offers and then coming to mixers and actually just a y you know we have so many different expressions with different profiles and then just kinda learning that way and and hearing the experiences from people like willie and pam highlands so forth. And i think that's really helped. And again i always talk about. Each expression has a profile that we want to stay true to and just adding. you know. you'll always here. Even if he had four barrels barrel one may go well with four but doesn't blend well with three or things like that so those are interesting things to work with the chemistry makeup are different but it also you know that's the art of it and bringing together science and art and that's whiskey making in it's I'm very fortunate to be in this position as a lot of fun to experience it absolutely and and you got your start Jim beam right with With andrea correct with pam pants art. Yet yeah yes pam. I'm sorry Yes what was it. Like working under her at jim beam in the difference being at what were the processes one's a behemoth one's kinda. Start out you know. What's the difference there well. It was a great experience. When when i first hired on at jim beam. I i started out as a distillery operator at the jim. Beam clermont distillery For a couple years there a and talk about a great job. I mean just making whisky hands on being a part of it you know. There's the good times and bad times when you're cleaning up messes and grain and that was a good experience and And then a couple of years later. I had the opportunity to promote to a distillery supervisor at the booker. No distillery in boston kentucky. And that's where i joined with pam. Heilmann i was always on third shift so i would stay in the morning when pam as the distillery manager would come in and and you learn a lot. I was very fortunate working at jim. Beam 'cause you work with such great people that had ten years all the way forty years of experience so you know that's experienced said you can't buy in a textbook and again i. I always cherish those moments. When i was at jim beam and yeah we the volume itself. I mean we made. The team made a lot of whiskey. And then you come to which you know kind of like a mid sized distillery our volumes much less. But we're doing those same things you know quality's important at all distilleries and has a kospi damn approach towards quality which is truly amazing. I mean i can call our president jomaa oko and you know if we have a idea that even if it costs more less efficient. But it'll improve the experience in the whisky. You know at some more willing to try and i think that's what's amazing coming to mixers and one of the things that kind of set you all. Apart from from the industry's your barrel. Attr- proof going into one hundred and three barrel entry proof and and i think that's pretty common knowledge but What are the things i wanted to talk to you about was was the was the yeast like so you are now you all are now of in that in that phase where you all are making your own whiskey. Went from the from the where. You're sourcing to win your contract distilling now. You're you're making your own whiskey. What what can you tell us about. The are you all propagating or is it dry yeast or give us some background on the easter using. He has sorry that that's one of those topics we don't discuss too much about are using a program and i know it's it's shut it all down. Yeah very austere. I set that up. Dan because i thought that was one of them. You could talk. You know he's a kind of the mash. Bill percentages things like that. But now what i will say is You know we do have a yeast program here and you mentioned in phase one where we went out. And you know. Purchase the matured stocks that we wanted to emulate face to went to another distillery here in kentucky and and they produced to our specifications. And i what i can say is we're using those same yeast to as we go into. You know here in phase three so that our whiskies will have a transition and and be those same high-quality whiskies. How long has faced three been going on for now. So that a chevy distillery. We opened in two thousand twelve as far as bottling and processing. And so forth the larger stills at the distillery came online in august two thousand fifteen so. We're getting close to a release time. That's going to be part of this or is starting to now start blend in so let's say are. Us one line. That's another great thing again. Were privately owned company. We can do a lot of things that may be larger Distilleries may not but we do release on taste profile and not not an age statement. Are you know a typical or average whiskey between five and seven years so those barrels now are getting avai age of over five years and as as we deem them ready. They'll start the transition. I remember that time when you were setting up and then you had you know the the collapses at fort nelson which is now you know set but there was. That was a rough go. I i remember when the chevy distilleries getting set up and in the department would come in and say you need to move your augur or something wherever the grains were coming in eating. Move that over two inches. If i felt like i felt like you know in the early phase is like couldn't catch a break in. They had the issues with like the fort nelson Building in those have been pretty well documented. They've got it fixed now but they started working on two thousand ten or even before that i think and then shyly but once they got once it got haman man i in that shy distilleries beautiful the fort nelson distillery is. I think that's got the you know the best distillery bar there. Is you know especially when it comes to cocktails and just You know things are finally hamad for you all dan. yeah it's a when when i Started here. I was a what we call the working distillery manager and it was. It was exciting. The the distillery itself was under construction with again. Willie pratt and pam howman overseeing it and then i joined the help and some of the vessels were already set so i was there before the mechanical electrical. And all of that and the granary was even built so i saw from all nuts and bolts from start to finish and and just to be a part of that but yeah we did have a lot of little quirks little startup issues. But you know every story goes through that when they're starting up but now we're we're very proud of it are in our distillation system hundred percent copper. We have a forty six foot tall. Thirty two inch diameter continuous column. Still to a pot still. There's over eleven thousand pounds of copper in the system. You know it just makes for a very nice. When i say clean but flavorful distillate. We're very proud of Has some prettiness to it. Nice oily mouth feel and yeah it's You know from those first days that we were testing off the stills. I mean that was one of the proudest moments just to see everybody's face when we actually you know we made the mash. We fermented it and send it to the bear still and and we've been going on it's you know like a year later the As determined we needed to expand and we added some more fermenters and eventually here soon will at a few more fermenters the for continued growth. So it's pretty exciting here in that the problem you just you feel like you can never make enough. I i wouldn't say a problem but it's challenging You know it's it's exciting for our industry for everybody. I mean to see all distilleries expand. It's i. I think that's a great thing i want to pick your brain on blending just for a second so you talked about like us one In playing a blend of five to seven year old whiskey. So going into it do you have. Y'all have like a set formula like knowing okay. Based on years past. We know that x. Amount of five hundred barrels two x amount of seven-year barrels from these places in the warehouse. Erc probably gonna give us you know that profile that we're looking for for us one. What's the process of blending different whiskies at different ages from different places of the warehouse. Spirits of french lick exploded onto the distilling scene early in two thousand sixteen as indiana's largest double pot still distillery employ old world sentiment with new world attitudes delivering the finest handcrafted bottle bond bourbons to audience eager for an alternative to the gas and their distiller. Alan bishop uses historic hoosier yeast strains alternative grains and fifty three gallon number. Two char charles to bring you spirits with unparalleled quality and depth of flavor. You can find all spirits of french looks products and new releases on box dot com. But don't just take fred mimics word. Fort find out for yourself. Checkout spirits of french league dot com and follow them on instagram facebook and twitter and remember always drink responsibly. Total wine and more is ready for summer. They've got all your pores for the great outdoors like their top. Twelve winds under fifteen dollars. Raise a glass to america where they star spangled selections of sips made in the usa and beat the heat with refreshing irvine cocktails. Why not mix it up and a brown derby or peachy keen at your next barbecue. Then taste your way to a new flavor. It like ready to freeze cocktail pops and fun. Fizzy heart shelters lime pineapple impeach. Anyone so no matter if you're grilling chilling or both you're sure to find cool prices on over eight thousand wines. Four thousand spirits and twenty five hundred beers in store.

andrea wilson jim beam lou bryson pam willie pratt Pam heilmann pam highlands pam pants willie Heilmann tovey jomaa oko berle kenny dan Woody Jim beam kentucky
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

08:07 min | 4 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Kenny coleman and before we start today's episode talking to dan mckee from mixers weekly urban news. Update a lawsuit challenging rhode island's ban on national direct to consumer alcohol sales has survived a big procedural challenge u s district judge john mcconnell junior on last friday rejected the state's attempt to get the case thrown out for lack of standing. The suit was filed back in twenty nineteen and argues that the prohibition of out of state companies shipping booze directly to rhode island residents without i topping at a wholesaler or a local. Retailer is an unconstitutional infringement. On interstate commerce. There's a big problem with distillation right now. And that's the village or the byproduct waste you've probably heard about this hillary's giving it to farmers feed their cows but there's a new problem on the horizon and that's there's too much s- tillage and now kentuckians are encouraged to submit proposals for projects that will expand the use of bourbon distilling byproduct for competition at the distiller grains symposium on october twenty fifth. Five winners will be selected and they will present to an audience of distillers industry stakeholders in the applicants must submit their proposals by august thirtieth at bourbon reverse pitch dot com the kentucky distillers association has announced that log. Still distillery from. Wally dant that we discussed on previous round table is the newest and forty four. Th member of the craft trail cousins. J w wally danta third linden and charles dant are building log still distillery as an expansive distilling and tourism experience on the site of the former dant and head distillery. That had been shut down since nineteen sixty one. The thirty six million dollar project will feature eight twenty thousand square foot distillery tasting room with a fifty gallon hybrid still a farm-to-table restaurant. Eight twelve acre lake an outdoor amphitheater. Eight twenty two thousand square foot event center four unique lodging options private train depot wooded walking trails and a whole lot more and moving onto some urban release news. Even though there's really not much but we just wanna let you know that we have another friendly reminder that pursuit united we'll be hitting retail shelves very soon likely this week and next week in colorado georgia illinois kentucky tennessee and texas as well as online at slovaks dot com. This is the bourbon. That ryan. And i have put our hearts into. It's a blend of three different states bottled at one. Hundred eight proof. Non chill filtered has retail price of sixty five dollars. We've had the opportunity to interview lots of great people for mixers such as the master. Maturation injury wilson. The head honcho himself. Joseph magli yoko in their former master distiller pam. Hyman pam retired back in april. Two thousand nine hundred. Someone new stepped in for the role. Dan mckee worked alongside payment beam for many years and his pedigree of industry knowledge shared a show. We talk about selecting barrels for twenty and twenty five year old mixers releases and learn a little bit more about their everyday products to barrel. Bourbon is known for their expertise and crafting unique plans taking lots of different whiskey from different regions. And bottling it at cask strength and you can even buy them online. Just visit barrel bourbon dot com and click the buy button what that enjoyed today's episode. And now here's fred mimic with above the char. I'm fred and this is above the char. This week's idea comes from longtime listener. Don not on twitter. Who writes me in april How to act with your local store owner. Listen if you covet relationships if you value that store pick if you value getting and i align for those limited editions small batches or whatever they might be then. You need to have a relationship with your local store owner that is absolutely paramount to your bourbon journey. I do not think that people who walk into a store and say. Hey you got any blatant. I gotta be pathway taylor that i don't think those guys are the favorites of local store owners. Now that being said local stores are having a much more difficult time getting allocated products because the chains and and the online stores are beginning to command the vast majority of them but the local Independent Store owner still has a lot of power. Especially when it comes to barrel picks. I know here in louisville kentucky Westport whiskey and wine and old town liquors two of the best places in town to go get barrel. Picks and barrel picks from there all the time. I'm not going there to buy regulars maker's mark. I'm getting their barrel. Picks to be honest with you. That is the value of the independent liquor. Store is their unique pallets individual palettes and they have relationships that they do cash in on further barrel picks so that being said have a good relationship with them I do know people who know their kids birthdays. They go as far as sending christmas cards. I mean the the store owner consumer relationship and bourbon. It's serious and you really should trade him. You kinda like My wife traits her hairdresser like she's had the same hairdresser for ten years and she buys her presence. I'm like why are you buying her presence. She's like because nobody does my hair like her. I'm like okay that makes sense and so That's the best way. I could put it for you. Dawn is to take care of the store. That's taking care of you. I means by from there frequently By their barrel picks Buys much as you can from their stores. But like i like i was saying i buy all my wine from westport whiskey and wine i get barrel. Pigs for him Old town like you. You gotta be consuming buying in these stores to get any rewards out of it. But that's going to do it for this week. folks. I appreciate you tuning in. Be safe out there. No looking handrails trash cans. Remember vodka sucks unless it's being used for hand. Sanitizer cheers everybody. Welcome back into episode of burn pursuit. The official podcast of bourbon. The whole gang here today doing things remote through a a great platform. We use plenty of times but today on the show. We've got somebody that you know. Honestly we have talked about mixtures time and time again. We had people from on. But i started looking back at our recording counter and i was like we haven't had anybody from mixtures on in like almost two years now so i said this is This is prime time. We get somebody in a kind of given inside scoop about what's been going on with the company what's going on with products and everything like that. I know that you know fred. You've had a lot of good runs with mixers recently. I mean they. You sent a bottle of celebration too ludicrous. I mean that's a that's a. That's ludicrous. Yeah i mean it was It was really quite White quite fascinating to see like how well received that was from ludicrous. A psych is he was. He's actually like a mix fan and in you know when you go after these big celebrities you have to have some big guns to get him. Sometimes and that was that was definitely well received. I did not anticipate him drinking it straight from the bottle and you know that things going from anywhere between five thousand fifteen thousand dollars you know depending on who selling it and what action it is but i just i was amazed and then he was what he was washing down like. Probably twelve dollars. Chilly with mixture celebration is definitely gold. The great pairing. Yeah yeah. I was like ryan. You have any mixers and chile pairings. That usually go with nope. Nope i non pretty standard look forward to my toasted releases you know ten years. That's about all. I can.

Kenny coleman dan mckee mixers weekly urban news john mcconnell kentucky distillers associatio Wally dant wally danta charles dant Joseph magli yoko Hyman pam Dan mckee Independent Store kentucky rhode island
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

04:55 min | 5 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Distillers say they're more important. I just said yes. The more important is was very baked. Clicky kind of way to do this. I mean there was. There was a a another good comment. The chat that says i could throw a rock and hit ten good sales people. But how many people would i hit of a master distiller that same rockin probably not probably not as and it's it's the same thing is that there's people that are good engineers that can make great products but they can't sell it so if you make something great you've got to have somebody can sell. I think everybody goes back to ryan's point is this is. Everything is revenue driven and the best performance should get paid the most. And if you making that whiskey since you're not that's your cost center at the end of the day. That's what it comes down to your cost center. And if you're not driving revenue than somebody else has gotta pay for your salary in. That's sales people come in. So i totally understand ryan's point of making sure that the best performers get paid the most. Unfortunately it's i mean. But unfortunately but i have respect for all massive distillers and i love what they do and yes you are important. Everyone is important in this world. And i love you so now there were there is. That's the wrap up there. His everyone else world. We'll see you next week. By the way. I think arlen wheatly is is is more important at buffalo trace. Because i think that's probably the most difficult distillery to run given how old it is and the fact that they have to have special wooden belts made for certain things i mean. We underestimate what it's like to run a facility in a in like that man is actually running facility and the genius of harlan jenny potter. It's not making whiskey. it's you know. It's manufacturing and engineering genius. You know you're you're looking at efficiencies inefficiencies and always constantly improve in looking at bottlenecks and always looking. How can we get our cost per unit down. And that's the the art that they do. It's not making whiskey. it's you know..

next week ryan ten good sales people jenny potter harlan
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Innate introduced the master distiller in they kind of play off of them a little bit. So let's not also confused sales reps with marketing. Sales reps are out there and they're trying to push cases jimmy russell aren't they're trying to go to whatever distributor be like. So have you down for nine hundred cases it's true but the sales rep says. Hey if i get you. Jimmy s eddie russell to come in. Can we count you down for nine. Hundred Sometimes i think The celebrity of the master still in the bourbon world kind of throws throws things off in our minds. Yeah and i think the you said it can eat. I think the most important is the marketing person who's creating the story to say. This brand is because of eddie and jimmy and you know damn well. They haven't made any whiskey in for for. I mean how long. I mean twenty years tenure fifteen ego in there. It's all automated. I mean every distillery major distillery. Now's automated you got assistant. Distillers got production teams. Who do all of it now. They're in their quality control. Or you know picking single barrels and all that stuff. I mean yes. The master distiller is important. I think it's less these days. Because of science and automation manufacturing technology in the story you sell in the selling. I think is more important to me. Because you're saying master source important. Well who's telling that story that they're import marketing and sales you know. And it's they're they're like the wizard of oz you know you go and they're like oh the wizard of you know. The masters has got this or about him and like they're considered chicken shit and chicken silent and do all these things with corn. And all this and then you go behind and you're like well they don't do shit here. You know all these people on the back end of doing you know. I would love for today's ryan. See soul to talk to the ryan see so from three years ago..

jimmy russell nine jimmy nine hundred cases twenty years three years ago fifteen eddie Hundred today Innate single barrels ryan eddie russell Jimmy
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"That i know is true. And what what i have seen is an i disagree with it. I think the master distiller is more important. But what i have seen. The industry do is they. They put more emphasis on the sales rep because they're moving cases over the master distiller. Who's creating the whisky. So i think i think it's a it's a really. I think i know where most of us agree On the topic but it's the industry really rewards south. Perhaps so but i think that's all industries honestly. If you look at you know you go into any business. He looked at their commission structure their comm plan it. You'd be amazed at how small businesses how much a salesperson can make a really good and there's a reason for that too right inefficient upsets people than they need to reevaluate. Why they're upset. Because those salespeople are making sure that that company is selling a ton of a ton of products pushing revenue through the organization. And that's paying everybody else's paychecks. Right the jobs they do. I'm not in sales whatsoever being on. I look at my own companies complement or others. That i've worked for in run that there's a reason that you really good. Salespeople are worth the money because they're keeping that company growing they're pushing your product out there now now. Do i feel bad for the masters steelers. They're not the ones that are super bowl. Compensate cousin sure but at the end of the day they should be shaken though sales people's hands because they're getting their product out there to the market. They're making sure that companies doing early. Well they're being sent their own paychecks able to grow cynical. Yeah but i mean. That's that's how it works. Unfortunately it's a really good way to put it. I mean coming from the tech side as well. Yes you have. There's a lot of margin be made on software and sales people can make up a pretty healthy commission when you go in and you sell ten million dollar deal but the engineering teams. Don't get paid near that much. And they don't see the commission off of it but you know there's a bonus structure the end of the year to kinda help balance at all out and it's one thing to create a product. It's another thing that to think that if you if you build it they will come. You've got to be able to have a salesforce out there that that really pushes it. And that's what is going to make you be known at the end of the day. Yeah i think the the master distiller is. I think it it varies by brand and it also is what it kind of goes a little bit too of. What is a master distiller. You know. I mean we. That's a topic but when you are when if you are the face of the brand if you are the creator of it i mean. I think you're more important than the salesperson. I'm sorry but you're the creator and that person may not be out there selling and pitching but they are. They are the face and everything to the brand or the heartbeat and you know will there the soul of it and sells rap. That's great appreciate you..

ten million dollar one thing a ton of a ton of products
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Berne pursuit patriot community. And you know maybe you'll get to come on a barrel pick with a kenyan ryan and you know that's always a good time but so that's a way to get the barrel pick and world you really have to go through a retailer or a restaurant but mostly a retailer to you. Know to get it on the action and Because you cannot you cannot actually by yourself And you know they actual- barrel yourself you have to go through a retail system. So that's the way it works. It's really not that complicated even though there's some layers of complexity to it but it's a pretty easy process but thank you so much mike for that great question of if you're like mike and liked to have your question read on the air. Hit me up on. Redman dot com. That's fred mimic dot com until next week cheers..

next week mike Redman Berne fred
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"A distillery..

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Be in the kind of operations role before they take that. Title master distiller spirits. A french lick exploded onto stealing early in two thousand sixteen as indiana's largest double pot still distillery. They employ old world sentiment with new world attitudes delivering the finest handcrafted bottle in bonn bourbons to audience eager for an alternative to the big guys and there still are. Alan bishop uses historic hoosier easterns grains and fifty three gallon number two charles to bring you spirits with unparalleled quality and depth of flavor. You can find all spirits of french lakes products and new releases. Unseal box dot com. But don't just take fred mimics word for it. Find out for yourself. Checkout spirits of french lick dot com and followed them on instagram facebook and twitter and remember always drink responsibly. It's time to fleeing into spring at total wine and more fresh flavors are in full bloom. And we're talking bubbly and brunch with pino on the porch. So no matter. What's on your table. They have the wine and the savings to match bacon practically begs for chardonnay. And which rosaiah are you feeling. Today they surely have your shade brighten up your glass the fresh bourbon cocktail mint juleps for bill. Jewell anyone with over eight thousand wines. Four thousand spirits and twenty five hundred beers to choose from you can expect the unexpected and always at low prices with the best service in america. So what will it be today. Choose curbside pickup or in store pickup. You can explore more in the store or online at totalwine dot com ever wonder how the secondary market is changing american whiskey over the last ten years the bourbon. Boom has produced a terrific and terrible dichotomy people than ever are enjoying america's native spirit with a rich culture of fans and festivals to celebrate it higher prices black market sales and the reality of enjoying bourbon twenty-first-century heaven held cillari dives into how illegal bourbon sales have thrived for years and their impact on legal market prices on their blog at blog dot heaven hill distillery dot com so for more educational resources and to sign up for their newsletter. Please visit hill. Distillery dot com and heaven. Hell reminds you to think wisely. Drink wisely cheers. How long should someone be in the kind of operation role before they take that title master distiller and that's a tough one. Fred i mean it's i mean you know. I think it's when someone deans. You ready whether that somebody within your own company that started the brand you know that is that is hired you for that You know i know people have talked about. There needs to be some type of certification. And i don. I don't know that. I necessarily agree with that because there are other things involved for me. I think it's Just come in willing to learn engage reach out. I mean we all love to talk about what we do. We all love to share things that we see in operations and whether or not. There's commonality if we're having issues because you know some of us source like when you're talking malt and things like that a lot of times they come from the same operation so if you're having an issue hell shit somebody else might be having the same issue so why not engage with that but right. It's it's a good question. I i just think it's. I don't think it's a title you've ever give to yourself if it's a title you've given to yourself. I don't know how genuine that is but it's title it's kinda bestowed upon you or somebody says you know what this is important. And maybe it's not rooted in operations. Maybe it is about telling the story and You know just being out you know consumer facing public facing and they're ready. I think that's Do i think the titles been watered down. Absolutely i do. I mean. I just think that there are people that had the title. They don't have distilleries a little difficult to me. If you're gonna have the titles master distiller you should at least have a distillery. But and their defense. They are bottling the exact same recipe as their great great grandpa. All that happens to be the same as mvp and greeted me show. Five is bringing in their blood grandparents with their lawn. And listen i mean. And i i would never i mean in all of those brands in the way that they do it in sourcing and all that has been super important. I mean right there. You know makers doesn't grow at the rate that we gerrad if it's not things like that that have drawn more people into you know whether it's bourbon but american whiskey. I mean i think it's super important You know how we've gotten here and it's all related and of course you all have a twelve or fifteen year old bottled in bond coming out later this year right fred. Well i'll i'll. I'll distract from that question asking us right now. It would be good. I mean i seriously if you all would just put out like something twelve years old or older i know it used to be in your overage tasting. It would win every damn award. There is an right. I mean when when i had i had Bill samuels this is where all this comes from. Bill samuels That i've heard this direct from you. I'm interested to hear you're sorry right. So bill samuels comes on The does alleged series with me at the kentucky derby museum and we were actually having problems. Selling tickets is kind of weird like it was. It was the time of year or something and he said all right. I've got something. I i know what to do. He's i will will bottle up some twelve year old that we have and That will help sell some tickets. And then we go one. We go on some tv stations talking about. He's like yeah. We're going to be tasting twelve-year-old makers tickets sold out immediately we get in the crowd. We do this taste up. And he's like talking down the twelve year old. It's not any good as a bill. You're wrong and stuff. Mrs rate and i asked that crowd is like all right. Let's vote who likes the you know the standard maker's mark you know everyone knows d like makers twelve year old more. Every hand went up. He's like in bill. Goes like you guys are fucking crazy. That's up to just wrong. Yeah it's awesome brought it. I realized that yeah so. It's all his fault not mine. So that makes me think of a question about makers and someone in operations you know. Someone's who's fanatic about operations. It seems like a company like makers would be like an operations man's like dream because it's all about consistency. How can we refund it to like perfection. It's the same recipe same. Don't mess it up and maybe you could talk about that. Yeah i mean. It's one of the things that i get asked especially Leaving heaven hill and coming back to makers which is you know obviously Heaven hell has a lot of different expressions we ran five primary mash bills. That led to a lot of great. Whiskey's right. there's the thing with makers for me. There's a lot of that and it's awesome and we do some of it right. You know whether it's our with finishing series whether was the evolution of private select whether it's just a lot of different things but man alive. I mean i i take great. Pride and i get a lot of fulfillment out of making sure. We're still doing things. The same way right since nineteen fifty four for the most part when we did our first barrel. I love that. I love the idea of protecting the heritage in the legacy because i mean let's just say some of that changed right one it you know. Probably not good for the brand but don't want to be proud about fifteen years from now. Somebody says oh well. What if we went back to doing this. All that's awesome. That's great. I mean now. Let's keep doing what we're doing. Maybe we don't get huge credit for that because it's not a big talking point but at the end of the day i think all of that is super important and i love the fact that we are still doing things pretty much the same way since we did that first barrel and even did the first bottle In fifty eight fifty nine. When we did that. I ball hand dipped. If you've seen. I know fred you've seen the very first bottle of maker's i'm sure i mean it looks almost identical to the bottle that we do today so even.

twelve america Fred Today facebook first bottle twitter twenty-first-century instagram twelve year bill samuels Four thousand spirits first barrel later this year today rate five primary mash bills twenty five hundred beers Bill samuels twelve-year-old
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

07:44 min | 7 months ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Or five times a year. I'd say. I mean it's you know you have people that you know that. Have the money to back. But you don't necessarily have the experience or expertise do it and and it is. It's fascinating i mean. I you know i don i would never say it's not i would never say it's not anything. You just brushed aside not think about for me. I don't know. I mean i just really liked being a part of something that's been around since nineteen fifty four and then you know when you see the impact that that the brand has just locally for the community. Because they're very. I mean they're very very good paying jobs you know. We're an area of kentucky where the cost of living isn't that high. You see how people can live and and you know how their family can come on board. And then i don. I mean i see both sides of it. Trust me i do see both sides of it but you know just having what i have it at makers. That's kind of what you aspired to be. So if you've got it. And i know it's not my name on the bottle but i've never been about that like it. I love you. obviously you know. I want everything to do with the liquid the quality of the liquid how people respond to the liquid. But you know as far as having my name on the liquid. That's it's never been something that i've really thought too much about pottery of at some point. Yeah i mean maybe there sliders. It's it's gonna it's gonna happen to cantor look a pot. You know some time. But still i wanted to Talk to you about like. I've in watching rob like come in and take over for his father and you know seeing how he's managed the company i have to say i am so proud of him and how good of a job he is done. What's what's it what's it been like. You know working with rob. Because he's he will first couple years. He was in his father's shadow. Now rob is his own man for sure and everybody and being some tory knows it. Yeah i mean you know that that has been. Yeah that was one of the interesting things coming back. Because you know as i said i had primarily worked for bill and rob was involved in the business but as a little more on the commercial side. Right i mean just cutting his teeth on that side the right way to do it. You know instead of just coming in and you know you're thirty years old and the hand the reins no. It was literally do this. do this. Do this and rob did all those things in there. Two different people But with the same ambition in the same goals. They go about it differently. Rob is you know. Rob is a thinker. He sits back a little bit. Anybody that's ever been around bill or worked for bill. Bill's just somebody. That's bill's going to tell you. Exactly what's on his mom right so he seems like more of a dreamer at a visionary like type and gun is more like analytical. You know let's think about it. I think that's a good way to put it. And i do think that. Yeah i mean it's he. I mean he's all in and i think he's adapted his style and there's no way you can't just like you know me at heaven hill with parker or anything like that. I mean it's impossible you can't you know he can't fill bill shoes but he doesn't need to write like he's cutting his own path and it's a different business as you guys know. I mean just the change in over. The last ten years has been phenomenal. I think rob go from begging people to come visit you to like all right. How do we manage these people visiting just how to joke about you know even when i was assistant master stiller back in makers around two two thousand seven two thousand eight two thousand nine. I mean in our bourbon educations tastings. I'd spent thirty minutes explaining to people the rules of bourbon and they would blow their minds. When i'd say you know it doesn't have to be made in kentucky bullshit. I can't be true. It was like no it. I mean now. I mean if i couldn't tell you the last time. I really talked about rules of bourbon if i were to start out an education or a tasting explaining the rules of bourbon fully. Expect somebody to come up. Punch me in the face and be like man. Donen sold our intelligence right about the dry yeast versus propagated in. Yeah and that's true. That is i mean that is the level of engagement you get now and it's i love it. I mean anymore especially over the last year because we've had to turn to so many things. Virtually i would much rather show up and just be like all right. Let's open it up for questions and just go with that and honestly that is a lot of what i do now. You know you might come with about ten minutes of what you think. You wanna cover. And then just let people go because people are when people have a interest and fascination and what we do and you're trying to be transparent about it makes it easy like i don't know why there's so many i don't know that it exists anymore but there was a time that if you ask somebody what their mash bill was at home i got out there. Pretty sure you're still trying to get out of the beams of anti beam and wild turkeys. And they all have the reasons i just. There are so many variables involved in the making whisky and mash bills. A part of that and fred. And i've talked about this before. Just you take all those variables and you multiply them together. And you're like man. Ok it it plays a part but if somebody wants to take our mash bill and try and go make our style whiskey gopher it shit call me up i'll give you pointers. Throughout the way there are so many things that have to be identical mutare at skate. It's near a hassle that i did speaking of questions out of question about about yourself. So what do you think it is about yourself. Like what qualities are what like tactics. Do you have as a master distiller. That makes you a tractable you to these big names like what. Do you think that you add to the table. At makers markers job are you. Interviewing asked me to sell the story. Well i guess. I guess where i'm coming from. That is like most people think all right they think distiller okay. He must make the whiskey and must taste it. Whereas there's this whole other. Maybe you can talk. Lead into that. Bother question is talk about the people that that make up a master distiller to not just you. But but everything else is not just making tasting the whiskey. Yeah i mean that's a great point and it is something. I try to go out of my way to try to explain what we're talking about the master distiller role itself. You so know the the one thing with the title. Right master distiller. I look at my number one job will. Actually there's two one is educate. That is just something that comes with it. And i'm okay with that. You told me coming out of college that you know sitting in front of three hundred people talking about what i do or how we do things. And i'm like man. That sounds miserable But you kind of understand why it's necessary and people are genuinely interested but the role master distiller for me is from a production. Standpoint is protecting the quality of the whiskey and then making sure you know especially in an operation like ours when you're running twenty four hours a day seven days a that. The people in the distillery have the tools and everything that they need to do. The job that they can do. The reality is in. I believe we've got eighteen. Operators in our distillery. They're all master distillers. I mean they all can run every job. It can run the mill the mash tub. The still they can do all the work required for fermentation. They you know. Maybe they don't want to get out in front and talk about it. But their true master distillers. And that's what. I tell some of these people that come asking about you know Starting a new distillery. I'm like you. I can help you. I certainly can't. I mean we've got eighteen people that probably be good at that. So you know it's just there's so many people involved in you know. Can i sit at the table. Yes i mean. I i think one of the important things is is that the title is based in operations. I think that's important. I think probably a lot of the people you all have talked to and built relationships with our people that whether they had the title or don't have the title are rooted in operations one because the knowledge base is there. but to. Because it's you know there's a real passion. How long should someone.

Rob thirty minutes eighteen people seven days Two eighteen last year both sides three hundred people Donen first couple years kentucky twenty four hours a day heaven hill one thing around two two thousand seven two thirty years old about ten minutes Standpoint
"master distiller" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"master distiller" Discussed on KTRH

"The master distiller at old Dominick distillery to tell us the history of this Memphis family business one of the best things about working for all down again declined company is the history of it that history dates back to eighteen sixty six and it is very tangible history that whole family held on to so many documents and ledger books and letters I don't know what they were thinking when they held onto it all but I know we're we're very happy that it's there now the family history isn't just some story that's been passing down by word of mouth it is a history that is very very real and that we can show to everyone just how authentic that story is and to be able to be a part of such an authentic story and hopefully you know be a part of its its history eventually it's just it's very warning so our founder Dominic can alley that was an Italian immigrant and he came over to the states and eighteen fifty nine landed in New Orleans and decided to take her back to Memphis he had family here is uncle had a business already he decided to work for his uncle that building is literally about a hundred yards from the act current distillery worked for him for a couple years and decided to start his own company in eighteen sixty six at which time he found a deacon Allen company start off as a modest Wilfred cards and you just go up and down what is now friends street selling furs over the years that Korea became a much bigger distribution company started distributing beer Z. had refrigerated trucks and decided in the midst of all of that you found all Dominic whiskey that distillers on products but he did by H. product barrels from other states so we have records of barrels from Ohio Kentucky Indiana and he would bring them down on the railroads and that blend in here under the label of all Dominic it was actually one of the biggest whiskey brands in the southern region during that time and of course prohibition heads and so all Dominic whiskey had tears stopped being produced fortunately the other parts of the company continued on some different distribution the beer distribution all that continued on through prohibition and sadly Dominique I did not see the repeal of prohibition he actually died just a few days before the county company continued on just without the whiskey bring it at zero I guess is the late nineties they actually sold off the food distribution but still maintain that beer distribution that they had and so they were the anti service or service and Memphis and then in two thousand ten I believe it was actually sold that off as well and so they kinda had lost all of their Memphis fed hold they had other businesses other investments just nothing actually in Memphis and so in twenty thirteen when they found a bottle of Dominick toddy basically they found this bottle full still lacks the old and they decided to crack it open I believe one of them actually tasted the liquid it had that liquid analyze this and it's a California to see if we could figure out what actually was in that product because with all of the documents that the family held on to they never held on to the recipe for this product go figure and so with the help of a lab out in California and they learned the different components that were present in that bottle she couldn't figure out the exact ratios or anything like that so no specific recipe but they were able to figure out what was in it and then from there we simply reverse engineered it and so today's president Chris Kelly junior wanted to see the company get back to Memphis wanted more than just their headquarters to be here he decided this seems like a cool idea someone said well why don't you sell the Brant he said now this is how we get back to Memphis and so he and his cousin Alex can allocate decided to open up what is now old Dominick distillery that construction project officially started in twenty fifteen and that was the same year that they decided to bring on a head distiller and I was lucky enough to get a message on linkedin I have nothing better to do I said sure I'll come down for an interview and indeed they're deciding to move to Memphis and that same year and so about a year for construction and we were actually ready to produce the first whiskey not just out of all dominant but the first whiskey produced in Memphis ever there were no distillers here even before prohibition so December at twenty sixteen was kind of a big year for all down again for Memphis and then flash forward a couple months may of twenty seventeen and we were actually finished with all of construction and open to the public server stores beginning in may and since then we have added multiple products we now have to back as we have our Memphis tadi we have a gym that's about to come out and we also have our healing station Bourbon and even the chilling station line we're about to release even more products under it so it's been a very very busy two two and a half years and again you're listening.

master distiller old Dominick Memphis
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Think it'll be pretty healthy Were counting on it. We're down the stock for that. So I hope I hope it continues that way. Nope I'm right so otherwise I gotTa Lot stock. I'm GONNA have to. We're in the Boston market at as we like to drink whiskey to we'll be more than happy to help you go through and sample every barrel. That's out there. Yeah so talk about Virginia and how how they kind of embraced it. You guys you know and hung their hat on us like this is our distillery to you. Kind of have that with the state or Well we do. There's you know it's interesting last. You know up until the fifties were really only distillery in Virginia and now over the past five years Just the distilling industry in Virginia has really taken off. We've gone from you. Know being twenty small distilleries in the state. Now I think there's seventy in the state But I think a lot of people still embrace the fact that you know. Bourbon is one of the products and whiskey is one of the products that is made and has been made in Virginia for a long time. And there's a lot of people that Really really are putting out some great products and you know and I think it's. It's great that a lot of people look as Allman and they go. Oh yeah okay. That's you know. That's that's the model that we should follow For making a great Bourbon or a great whiskey in the state of Virginia and I think a lot of people a lot of people who have lived in this area for a long time they know us and they know our products and You know of course. They go to their football games and they had their bodily Smith Bowman. And that's that's our tradition. We have guys a little. Send me a eighty something years old. I've been drinking Bourbon since I was twenty so which is great to hear you know one of those legacy products that You know you just don't find the history and a lot of the smaller distilleries. I think that's a wonderful thing to be part of that history absolutely and I think You know you kind of you kind of struck something in my head when you started talking about elders went from you know. Twenty now to seventy. Do you see a lot of competition coming through your doors and saying. Oh let's go see what Qassim Bryan's up to over here. Let's see if we can take down a few notes in our in our. Yeah Absolutely I. We had a lot of that do that. We'll have a local distiller will say hey. Can I come up and walk through the distillery in and spend some time with you and I say absolutely can come through the distillery tours every hour on the hour? And we don't hide anything and you can. You can see exactly what we're doing now. We may not tell you exactly what we're doing. We may not tell you. Hey this is the Nashville is our doing this. You can see what we're doing and we're we're very were supportive. We WanNA. We really think that the industry has room to grow and we want to support them. But we also you know. I don't want the industry goal. In such a way that people look out and they see the smaller distillers and go. Oh they don't make anything good. So that's why we really want to support and say gap me. No you gotta put out a good product if you can see you wanna come in and see how we're doing things that's fine may not tell you a whole lot but you're welcome to come in and walk around so how the Bourbon Tourism Been in Virginia. Because like here it's exploded have you. Have you guys seen that as well in Virginia well for US tourism is a little bit harder than it is a lot of people? Go to Kentucky and they they go to Kentucky to go visit Stiller's For us a little bit different. We have you know we're right in the middle of alcohol historic where people are coming to see You know civil war were. The distillery site is actually a site of civil war battle. You know there's a lot of historic sites as far as the civil war revolutionary war. George Washington was actually lived. You know his boyhood home is literally across the river from the distillery so a lot of people come for the history and it's our our challenge is to get them to come and visit the distillery. Now I think the Virginia Wine Industry has done a great job. Getting people realize that there's lying in the state and then of course breweries have been doing pretty well as well So it's been a struggle for us as far as getting the visitors air but we still. This last year was almost thirty. Thousand people through the distillery You know obviously not. Hundreds of thousands of people that will go to larger distilleries. We're hoping that we can grow that and let people know. Now we're we're a distillery that's been here for a long time and we plan to be here for another eighty five ninety years. At least you got to figure out a way to get yourself on the history trail over there at the take a break from the capitals and all the Norton come down and yeah you do the capital. You go across the river to go see George Washington's house you grew up in. Oh there's this old distiller over here at all and we get the drink absolutely a count me absolutely absolutely. That's that's our whole goal is how to get get your like. Hey that's a really nice monument there but I mean that's an easy sell point for me to come in just a adults let's go. Let's go do that. You can see a mime in every single day if you wanted to but so I guess You know we're coming. Come down here to the end of this and I kind of want to get a little bit more information about really where you kind of see is is their expansion as there is their ideas of like how how much bigger can is. GonNa get in regards of like what you all are trying to do in regards to growth or anything like that. Yeah well right now. We're actually in in the midst of an expansion You know we're we're adding tanks we've added just in the past Probably GonNa say about a month. We've added about eleven angst or production We're hoping to add to our bottling line. Here Preuss Pretty soon to be able to pick up production because we really. WanNa you know. We're coming up some of the moves that we made a couple of years ago. When I came in five six years ago was increase some of our small batch production in Greece on John. Jay Things like that. In those those are kind of coming into fruition now and we're hoping to expand and make more that urban available but I don't think we ever really have any ideas. We don't want become this huge multimillion case distillery. We Wanna be focused on making the absolute best products that we can the best bourbon that we can find our best bourbon that we can produce and best best best vodkas best. Rum's we want to absolutely make great products And if we grow to be a large larger regional size great but that's not really are focused focuses to make a great product and Cesare supports that vision and are not like. Yeah that sounds great but we want to crank out as much as possible. Yeah no absolutely absolutely under present sport Making the best product that we can make very cool. Yeah absolutely and You know Shutout to to Matthew who is here on the chat He just said thanks for joining in. Brian was so great to actually learn about a brand. That's flying under the radar for a lot of the Bourbon geeks out there. Because like I said for myself learning more about the mashed bill and really how the operation kind of functions. And you know knowing that you're single girls are nine to fourteen years old like that's that's got some age on it for an coming for even most the Sak portfolio when you're looking at the the weller antiques. You're looking at six years old. Maybe seven something like that. So seeing of of of what's coming out of Virginia can't hands more or less bottles. That's for sure. Yeah we'll be sending on your way you got it Niagra marking those barely go. You're out you're mark that barrel up. I got my credit card already to start swiping. Okay but Bryan. Thank you again for coming on the show today. Giving us more information about ace Matt Bowman the history sort of your history and how you kind of cut your teeth and industry and your family life too. I think it'd be fun to get your get your whole family on here one day and kind of see you all. Kinda like go back and forth. If there's any of that would definitely be interested so Last way to kind of give a shout so if people want to know more about your they want to visit the story. Where did it go and do that? No more about us or visit the distillery go ahead and go to AC DOT COM. That's the best way to find us in any information about us. We're on twitter instagram as well. But you can get all that from the from the website new and ride the coattails on Virginia history trail and stop over there. And then go and get yourself a nice bottle basement. Bowman a takeover. John J Bowman. I think I think the John Jay fit my flavor profile absolutely and you never know you can come in and try them all next time. You're in the area okay. So so so. Make sure everybody that you are you. Check out their website. Make sure you go to Bourbon. Pursuit DOT COM. We've got links on there for all the episodes that we've had if you want to know more about any of the The Cesare portfolio. You can kind of check out some of our past episodes. We've done there too if you WANNA follow us. Twitter facebook instagram. We're all over the place there Yeah and then also thank you to everybody. That is a Patriot supporter. That was joining US watching this show live as it happened on Youtube just again. One of those perks of being able to watch. Us law before it actually goes out on air so good and closing up yet for sure Brian. Thanks man that was Very interesting great. You know like you said the Bourbon has been crazy growth in. We're kind of have blinders on you. Know we have these Kentucky brands you know things that were used to like we focus on those but then you forget that. There's these guys like you all doing. Such great things and like it's flying under the radar in With the flavors you were talking about like I think Kenyon I might run out and go get some bottles after this. I just WANNA find more coconut. Coconut the O'CONNELL. But not appreciate your time and is a cool story and I WANNA come to your Holiday Party. Booze wars yeah. I'll put the invitation next time. Cool cool cool. Cool so Yeah if anyone has any suggestions comments feedback Let us know. We're always here to serve you. Guys Bring Nadia. So we'll see all next on cheers..

Virginia Bourbon Kentucky George Washington Qassim Bryan US twitter John Jay Boston Brian Virginia Wine Industry Smith Bowman Matt Bowman Nashville Allman John J Bowman Bowman Kenyon
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"All tipples you have a whole line of Beers in line wines and then of course I'll bring a lot of different whiskies in We have a good time on on the on holidays. Families have like a Chili. Cook off your mom's way which you're megan so it was kind of interesting but yeah we definitely help each other out and I'll get calls from guys all the time they'll say. I talked to your brother the other day and don't don't believe a word he said or Hey I was at your dad's place I don't believe a word. He said he doesn't know what he's talking to each other hard time. That's okay I mean it's family. You have to give each other a hard time especially in the holidays. That's Kinda how I kind of like the booze off. We should probably we should make bourbon pursuit booze off our Christmas holiday party. It wouldn't laszlo my family that like every time. I bring straight Bourbon Nate. They're like I can't believe during his says awful. So let's you know before we start talking more about your job and everything like that that you've gone with. Let's let's give a a our listeners. Kind of an understanding and background of reliigous. What's the history at a Smith Bowman? Because I just realized before we are coming on here that is it is not Abraham. It is actually Abram Smith where the experts schools those as Muth. Beaumont is actually one of the oldest distilleries on the east coast. It was the oldest distillery in Virginia started by Abram Smith Bowman and a lot of his family actually Kind of has roots to be. You know the pioneers of of basically during the revolutionary war discovering what is now current day Kentucky. So if you're in Louisville and you go out to Beaumont seal That is actually part of the boat. What was discovered and named after one of the Bowman family ours of of of Cedar Creek is as renown? All of our current products are all named after the boom like historical figures But kind of getting to modern history. How abram started he was actually the great grandson of of Abraham Bowman or sorry George Bowman and he was actually in the distilling industry. Prior to prohibition he ran a distillery in in New Orleans prior to British one of the largest Rahman Bourbon distilleries Algiers point. And and then after you know prohibition he he happened to by about seventy four hundred acres and he opened up a granary and cattle and then he. Of course prohibition ends thirty. Three thirty four is when an ended here in Virginia and he decided. Hey you know I already know this business quite well ahead. I have all my own horn. All my own. Ri- let's start making Berber and You know and that's what he started doing. So writing thirty four thirty five he started making Bourbon And his bowl was basically straight grain glass. We did everything from like. I said growing the grain we harvested earn. Trees made her own barrels. I mean we did it. All on the whole point was to make you know high quality spirits and You know we kind of continue on with that that kind of mantra today. We're we're known for making bourbons of course but we do other starts as well. So that's getting a little bit of the history of it. We give a complete history. If you ever make it down to Virginia. We'll give you complete district very yeah. We'll we'll we'll do the thirty minute tutorial one of these days. That sounds good. Does it ever make you all mad? That like Kentucky gets all the glory for Bourbon when Virginia was like the the state before Kentucky we have. There's I will say a lot of people come in and they're very proud of their Kentucky Bourbon Heritage and and we're we're proud of it as well but we always like to remind them that Kentucky used to be part of Virginia. We've been making Bourbon here for a long time too. So it's kind of just curious about like the current operation like kind of like the year that really it started or is it still like been running since eighteen. Whatever well so we started like I said and thirty-three in Fairfax County which is about just outside Washington DC area and we moved it to their current location here in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. So we've been running here in this location since eighty eight and the reason we moved is because basically we sold off the. The family sold the farm and the city of Reston Fairfax County. Which is well over. A million people now Just kind of grew around the distillery. And they're you know having this distillery where literally They were walking the cows in from the farm to feed off slop down the middle of the road. They just didn't they kind of didn't like that so much. So moved to the distillery where we at now which is about forty five miles south. The Washington. Dc were in the small town of Fredericksburg And it's IT'S BEEN. It's been a great location for US. So we're right along rapahannock river and and You know it's a great area for aging bourbons and we've enjoyed it here so far talk a little bit about like the history of the Master Distiller title bears. Well are you the fourth? The first of the the new one it did they have master. Distillers back to talk about that. Yeah actually so there's been six master distillers here in. The history of the company. Says the thirties. The first one was for about five years and then we had a kind of one or two that only lasted about a five to ten years. And previous master distiller was actually earth to master distillers ago was actually here for about thirty years. He kind of took it from basically took over his master's stiller eighties until almost two thousand eleven. And then the previous Masters Stiller to me was Truman Cox who came from Buffalo Trace. Actually and he was here. I think he worked here for. Probably about three years. But he's only master distiller for all year and a half he sadly asked away a very. You know very unexpectedly and I took over from him. He He'd been gone for probably about six months when I took over so I came into Into a building with you know there. There hadn't been a master distiller for six months. So it was one of those things where you you. You hope that The previous master distillers taking notes. And you go in and learn the still and you find out what's going on in taste. It's doc I know that's rough to do got a taste. You're all the stock to find everything out somebody in thank you for taking that sacrifice forest. I'll as okay. I'll do it again. I get it by after but it was. It was just trying to come and find out what the house flavors were How the stills ran and and just taken from there so I've been in this role for six years now so how long. How long do you think it takes to become comfortable with the existing set-up into Kinda get those basic flavor profiles? You're looking for dowd in. It takes a little while it takes A. I think you have a good couple of months. You know just tasting through all the stock you know just going through and seeing where everything is so you're literally going out into the warehouse and you're saying okay you know what's this one where this is a year old wants to taste like okay. This is two years old. What's it taste like all the way up? Fifteen sixteen years. And you're trying to find out a flavor profiles that are out there in the different parts of the warehouse. Is You know you? You don't have anybody to tell you that you know that store and this is where I did. This and this is where I did. This and I want this Labor at all out of this area where you just don't have that so You know that that took a little while but you know once once you get there I think then it's tweaking it to make little little changes right off the bat just to just to kind of make it your own style and And then kind of improve the product. That's one of the things that we always want to do. Is You know. That's that's our logo our motto. Here's nearing spirits that were embracing history and just pushing the future. We're just want to improve our products every day. So we don't WanNa just sit back and go. Yeah that's Okay. It could be better free rein to make your own imprint on it. So it's not just plug and play like this is the way we do at. Don't screw it up. Absolutely I mean there there is obviously you have an established brand and you don't want a new if you have a historic Customers that brand you know wanted to change Willy Nilly If you'RE GONNA make changes you WANNA make sure that they're for the better and You want to keep improving them. But if it's a change that does make it better makes it tastes better Improves it's it's overall AOL. Then yeah absolutely free reign once good because you know one thing that we always talk about is how the Bourbon Industry just loves to hear about change. Not really like it's it's it's always like. Let's let's let's stay the course. Let's not really not shake things up too much or anything like that so I guess the question that I Kinda WanNa pose about. When he started coming in you're figuring out like how do we dial or how do we tweak things? Can you recall like one of those things that you kind of had to tweak to kind of figure out what it is to kind of make PRUITT's own signature? Bourbon radio at all. I mean one of the things that I I'm looking for Has the heads. Were coming off the still. I walk in and I'm like all right. Well what are you doing? We're making the cut like not yet not yet wait wait wait wait just a minute and then we do. Our heads cuts a little bit different than eventually you know. We're we're saying okay. Where's our ideal proofs because and we have some periods of time that I will say that the you know the proof really kind of vary quite a bit off the still and we tried to dial that in and tried to really get consistency off the off the distillation process versus. You know I this is the way that we run it every single time. We wanted to go in. And say hey. Each each tank. Each ferment are each batch is different. So we're GONNA just are still to make sure that our flavor profile is consistent from distillation this relation so that you don't have this huge variation from batch to batch in. We wanted it. You know there was there was this processes that you have to go in and say okay this how we want to run it and just a little tweak year olds wake there and a lot of these guys have been working in the industry for thirty years and they they kinda go. Oh yeah okay that makes sense. You know these are. These are good things to do. So I think we've been successful in that so absolutely and so I guess one of the things that maybe most people know about is that it is all part of the the size rack portfolio so Buffalo trace all that sorta stuff as part of a Smith Bowman as part of Kinda winded when that started happening when it became part of that portfolio. So it actually. It's it's kind of interesting story because In the move for a Smith Bowman from Fairfax to the current location They had to take down of basically the entire distillery. Shut down for it. Took about two years to move the entire distillery So they started partnering with What was at that time before it was all buffalo? Trace was ancient age so they started partnering with them and doing the initial mash even the the yeast and the mashed bill. And things like that so that we can continue on.

master distiller Virginia Bourbon Smith Bowman Kentucky Abraham Bowman Buffalo Trace Abram Smith Bowman Kentucky Bourbon Heritage Bowman Bourbon Industry Abram Smith megan reliigous Fairfax County George Bowman New Orleans US Dc
"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"master distiller" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"As I put the Whiskey to my lips I felt the tingle just throughout my palate. It started on the front and moved. Its way toward the back just dripping down the jaw line tickling the top. And it's going to surprise you where this whiskey came from was not from Kentucky Tennessee or Indiana. This barrel proof. Bourbon was distilled aged and bottled in Texas. That's right Texas. Texas is on the move and they had been for some time and I do believe that Texas Bourbon will soon begin to rival Kentucky and competitions and with consumers from California to New York and from Alaska to Hawaii. Now this Bourbon that. I tasted that kind of wild me was T- ex Texas Straight Bourbon. Whiskey it was one hundred and twenty seven point four proof four years old barrel proof is on the label. Obviously and it's from firestone in Robertson. I tasted this on my youtube channel. If you have a go check that out. It's for my Watson. The box segment where I open a box and tastes whatever's in the box but this this bourbon really was one that kind of Made me think rethink my position on where Texas is now. I've always thought. Texas is a growing state and very powerful. When it comes to whiskey and I think the rise of Texas has been has been happening for some time but in the last couple of years we have seen Texas distillers like iron route win major awards. We've seen balconies kind of like You know get on shelves all over all over the country and win a pal especially those in American single malt category while garrison brothers has kind of dominated like this like this landscape and built a cult following for itself. I think right now. Texas is prime to do things in American whiskey that we've not seen any other state be able to do and there's a good chance as I go off to San Francisco to judge the world spirits awards that we could see Texas whiskey win a lot of gold. I'll say this Texas has the formula. They have the formula to be able to compete. With all the great distillers around the world they have a consumer base that really passionate about anything from Texas. I mean how you could you could slap made in Texas on anything I would sell out in Texas. Those people love their state and they have a lot of talent and they have the education. They're like people from that state Who are in the distilling business have taken the time to go get the education that it requires to be good distillers. They're also humble. You don't see them slapping master distiller on there for the most part. You don't see them call themselves masters. Stiller's without in their opinion. Earning it and I also don't think that you see a lot of like terribly bad products coming out of Texas. The one thing that's going to hold Texas back is it's water water. It has. It's it's not a resource in abundance in Texas and this is something that I think that every whiskey state needs to be able to rely on. You need to rely on a lot of water. Obviously but keep your eye on Texas. Something's going on there and if you if you haven't tasted this yet make sure you go pick up a bottle that T- X. barrel proof Bourbon if you followed me for a while you know how hard it is for me to give a compliment from tech to Texas after all I was born and raised in Oklahoma where we kinda rival Texas when a lot of ways. And that's this week's above the char. Hey if you have an idea for above the char hit me up on twitter. Instagram or facebook. Just search for a name Fred Mimic again. That's Fred Mimic my in an ICY K. We're going to my website. Frederick Dot Com until next week cheers. Welcome back to another episode of Bourbon. Pursuit the official podcast of Bourbon. Kenyan Ryan here today talking to one another Master Distiller. We have never had on the show today. But it is coming from a distillery. I've got one or two bottles downstairs. love what they're doing really good things over there but it is It's not in Kentucky's backyard which is a little bit different for us from time to time. Yeah typically well. I'm surprised this is like one of the master story we haven't had on so I'm excited like we haven't had him on yet on the what's taking so long. It's probably my fault. We just got a knock on the right door sometime but they do have a great product that I don't know a ton about it. I'm really excited to kind of get their story and Infobahn had some great Single barrel picks from them from liquor. Barn around here so I know they're doing some good stuff and Excited to see what the future and past president all above for this Distiller yeah absolutely. It's kind of going to be a combination of all those things because what we've seen at least around here in Kentucky is being able to finally get your hands on some of these bottles and now that it's got a unique bobble shaped to. It's kind of like this. This level looking heart-shaped kind of thing and it's it's really cool. It really stands out on the shelf and I think it's going to be good for our listeners. To kind of learn more about the brand more about the people that are behind the brand is well because that's again what our audience really cares about. They want to know more about the stories of people behind it so yup. So let's stop talking and let's start asking so today on the show. We have Bryan PRUITT. Bryant is the Mathis Distiller at a a Smith Bowman out of Virginia so Brian. Welcome to the show Kenny. Thanks for having me on. I really appreciate it guest so before we kind of dive into the history of Bowman and more about you know you. We always like to kick off the show. Kinda think of like. What is it that got you into Bourbon? Whiskey was there. Was there an earth Lee Lake? I mean it's okay because we talked to a lot of people in there like well. It started back when I was twelve in. Grandpa said you know they could nip this kind of talk about your your first run inexperienced absolutely so for me it was a little bit different. I I started actually in school. I had no intentions of going into the alcohol beverage industry. I actually pre pre MED. And I had no you know I was in a class literally looking for nerves or whatever it was on a cadaver and I thought this sucks. I hate this. I don't WanNa do this anymore. Mars on a cadaver. Yeah it was not fun and I decided. Hey you know what I really like. I really like beer. Why don't I try and make beer? So I actually called up the local brewery which happened to be a large anheuser busch and I was able to talk to the master brewer. Here I am this college kid and he said Yeah. Come on down. I'll talk you. I'll tell you how I got to where I was. And I went in and talked to him and he said Yeah. This is what I did. And this is the path I took and so the next day went in and Changed my major to Food Science and did the whole food science thing car out of state and then eventually went on to do the master. Brewers it's a UC Davis and started in the industry. So I was working lava. Small Craft Breweries across the Colorado in California and after several years in the brewing industry. I decided I wanted to learn what beer became when it grew up. Come see that's that's the fun part though. You always gotta start with beer before you make to get to the spirits anyway. Absolutely a lot of people don't realize you know basically what we do here is is. You know for whiskeys as as you as you make a beer. And then you're going to distill it after from it so I kinda really wanted to to learn about that Aso I I I found that at the time I found a weasel my way into the wine industry which had a very large distillery with it and Was able to learn about You know under master distiller. In a master blender the had probably a combined about eight years worth of knowledge and I worked for them for well over a decade. And you've got to make all sorts of things got to make Brandies and Vodkas and Jin's and spend time in Mexico making seculow and Caribbean rooms. And of course whiskeys and But eventually I really wanted to get back to my roots which was small crafts You Know High Quality Spirits. And that's what brought me as Beaumont. So it's kind of a maybe a different route than some have taken a versus just like my father worked in the industry and I got in the industry and you know it's I will say that all of my family is involved with the alcoholic beverage industry. I brother worked at birds. My Dad owns a winery. And I'm in my sister's the only one that hasn't made it. She's a doctor. So You guys like the nerves on the cadaver trail. Yeah exactly so. It sounds like you've worked with a lot of spirits. I know you're a you WANNA work. Whiskies your favorite thing to work with the. What's been your one of your favorite Spirits to work with. I absolutely love with Ian. I mean it came from the brewing side. And just seeing what you can do with the Grain Greenville Different yeasts and then taking that on and the maturation side I think that's I think that's great now. I don't discriminate against the spirits though. I love them all. I love all sorts of spirits. You know in the in the summer. Sometimes it's nice to have a nice gin and tonic. sometimes You need a a nice brandy or rum drank. When you're out you have to have a boat drink you know out on the boat had that wrong drink But of course you know nothing. Nothing beats a nice nice single barrel Bourbon so absolutely see when I go on the boat. It's like it's the only time I let it slide as like you get the Bud light limes there. Yeah one of those. Like the very fruity kind of forward kind beers. It's the only time it works is when you're on a boat raw. It takes plenty of beer to make make Bourbon. So absolute l-let's lot goal so that's good to see like was there. Kinda WanNa talk about your family life here a little bit so you talked about your family. All kinds of being in the the alcohol beverage industry was there a you know at least from your your parents side of it. Was there an influence that said like hey like this is a this is a good route for you to go? Was that a an opportunity that she said. I already kind of have experienced in this young because my family was a part of it like was that an influential factor into it. Now I think it was more actually my father. He started the that he he runs. He started it in that in retirement. So that's kind of like he was retirement thing so it was all of us. Were kind of getting into the industry at all at the same time we all just kind of I think we loved the science aspect of it loved the art aspect of it You know we just all went different ways and it was just one of those things that yeah we get we get together and we have some pretty crazy Christmases and things like that. Where you can you know you really get to bring out the full spread..

Texas Bourbon master distiller Kentucky youtube Whiskey California Watson firestone Fred Mimic New York twitter Robertson Alaska Indiana Instagram Stiller
Whiskey Quickie: Elijah Craig Rye

Bourbon Pursuit

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Whiskey Quickie: Elijah Craig Rye

"This whiskey. We're looking at a new line extension from Heaven Hill Elijah Craig Ri- Now as most people may or may not know that Heaven Hill has one Nashville for the rice. So you're GONNA see this in multiple different kinds of line extensions so you've seen Rittenhouse Ri- You've seen Passover and now they're coming out with a new line extension for cry now. What's new at this one is that it is a fifty percent. Rye thirty represent corn forty percent multi. Which I'd mentioned as part of their or barley or yeah. You're right. What am I say? Multi multi whatever. Yeah you know what we are doing this. We'll figure it out soon enough and another that actually came with this as a master. Distiller Con o'driscoll podcast before he's a big fan of actually breaking a spare time so he actually sent loaves of Rye bread with this as it came out. So yeah cheers connor for that and Kenny. Our data with his fish sandwich so it was delicious. Go appreciate that now. This is going to be released in limited markets of North Carolina South Carolina Georgia and Oregon starting in January. Twenty twenty and it will slowly trickle out time and again not stated the proof. Standard Elijah Craig. Ninety four and the price is going to be at. Srp only twenty nine ninety nine Wonder Win the Lodges Barn Burnt Down. If he ever thought row whiskey would be in there. Well it must have figured it out figure how to make a cheap enough. Because I'm always surprised about how we can keep prices down this low so absolutely stipend with the nose here. Not Very muted the notes. It's kind of really smells more like a bourbon to me. But it doesn't get some basic I would say so to a little bit of grains and stuff like that to really delicate easy to drink It's you know pretty I. I would call it a Gateway Ryan. Maybe 'cause it's kind of similar to Bourbon me has more like Larry Craig me 'cause. I almost think that if you tried this in you know we've gone we progress a little bit. I think if you try this on the rocks you would lose all the flavor ballpark ugly very light. It's very light. I guess let's just go ahead and rape is because I mean for me. The finish already dissipated. It's gone yeah see about all right so on the knows where yet here sideways thumbs. I agree and the taste sideways thumbs. That's a good everyday drinker. Yup and the

Larry Craig Elijah Craig Ri Elijah Craig Rittenhouse Ri Distiller Con O'driscoll Heaven Hill Twenty Twenty Nashville North Carolina Gateway Ryan Connor Rape Kenny Oregon Georgia