35 Burst results for "Massachusetts General Hospital"

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:06 min | 2 months ago

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

"Dr Stanford is an obesity medicine, physician, scientists, educator and policymaker at Massachusetts General. Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She also lectures at Brown and Teaches Med students at Harvard. Hello, and welcome well. Thanks for having me. It's an absolute delight to be here today with both of you. We're just we're the most accomplished person ever had this podcast like I cannot even begins. Batum were all you have. You guys are the best and this is. This is what I need to me through the rest of the day as I conquer the world. Yeah! We're honored that you made have the time the time to come talk to us just a little, so thank you so much. Did I get all of that right? You did I I. Guess What I can do is explain it to people because people are kind of like is all of that absolutely so? I'm obviously a mathematician, so the MD is the easiest part I think to understand on my completed my masters in public health nineteen years ago, so it shows you that I'm older than I appear. And that was in health policy management. My masters impose ministration was from the Harvard. Kennedy School, government and government. Currently working on my MBA executive MBA, so that hasn't quite made it to the end of my name, but I may lead US next year. Let me tell you guys. We'll have more to talk about. The the all the that you see after not team for fifteen, but it is nice that it goes with that, so those are all fellowships, so my fellow of the ANC, which is the American Academy pediatrics I'm a fellow of American College of Positions. American college positions represents all Physicians for adult so internal medicine, a fellow of the American Heart Association so basically. I'm looking at cardio metabolic health and being the fellow in the American Heart Association what represents that and then a fellow in the obesity society. Society which is the F. Toss? So you know these fellowships come you know after having accomplished in those different on areas domain, so I see children I see adults I work in this kind of Cardio Metabolic, health space obviously as obesity medicine physician I work in that space, so it really is a combination of kind of who I am, and just looking at Vegas, the letters that come after my name really talks to the work that I really care about and working with my patients patients across the wall. That's amazing. Wow -gratulations. What inspired you study obesity. One of the things that I was always very concerned about as a black one in a black woman who was born and raised in Atlanta Julie obviously in Boston is that's where mastermind Harvard are? I'm I was really. Perplexed I think is the word I WANNA. Use about the disproportionate impact obesity on communities of color particularly I'm the black community. That was what really brought me to this work, so if you go back twenty years ago, I think you've as you're in your twenties for twenty years ago. When I was doing my m H, you're not okay. Across. Our loved anyways Oh! That's Cute I. Love it still have you guys by? Decades! but one of the things I was really interested in seeing was like. I felt like there was a lot that we weren't doing to understand why. Obesity obesity disproportionately impacted certain groups and the groups that are more likely to kind of tackle these issues or the people that are representative, so those scripts so as a black woman and the group that is most disproportionately impacted by obesity I felt compelled to really approach and tackle this headline, so the projects that I was doing back at emory school of Public Health, back in ninety nine two thousand etc, We're looking at specifically obesity in the black community one project I was doing was. Was Looking at obesity in the Black Church community was looking at obesity among African, American, adolescent girls and one was looking at obesity within those that are law resources within the wick programs. It'll women's and children's for Ram, and how could we fix their Their plight in terms of recognizing that we can in some ways with the limited resources that they may have available to enhance their role house. So this was something that was kind of lingering. I didn't anticipate that I would choose obese medicine. 'cause that was not a field when I was twenty years ago. It really was not a field. There was no board certification in obesity medicine. The first Brit sort of patients directly. No Be Madison didn't start until two thousand well, which was well after I finished medical school, but I can tell you I was on. Call in the pediatric ICU when I was in residency and I as internal medicine pediatrics and I literally just googled obesity in medicine at about two thirty in the morning after I just intimated three kids in the ICU in a new. I was going to sleep at nights. I figured I'd just need to keep myself busy. And, the fellowship here at Mass General at Harvard popped up and I was like. What is this? You know I I really interested in obesity. I had no idea there was a fellowship, indeed the first ship and so I came and I spent three years. Doing a fellowship dedicated to understanding the disease of obesity.

Obesity Harvard Harvard Medical School American Heart Association Black Community Dr Stanford American College Of Positions Brown Massachusetts General Black Church Kennedy School United States Batum Emory School Of Public Health American Academy ANC MD
U.S. reports over 70,000 new coronavirus cases, another daily record

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:15 min | 2 months ago

U.S. reports over 70,000 new coronavirus cases, another daily record

"The United? States of America hit a new record high in terms of new corona virus infections in one day back at the beginning of this week when we adjust surpassed the mark of fifty thousand new cases in a single day, the top infectious disease doctor at Mass General Massachusetts General Hospital said it appeared that the US Corona virus epidemic was in quote freefall. Talking about last weekend. The July fourth holiday weekend. She said quote. We have the fifty thousand cases this past day a single day of this holiday weekend. If they're young people that could be five hundred people who die from that. If they're older people, it could be seventy five hundred people who die from that just from one single day of infection. Infectious Disease Chief at mass general saying we're in freefall. That was at the beginning of this week. Well now it's the end of that same week and our daily new infections have risen from fifty thousand in a day. To over seventy thousand in a day per NBC News calculations this evening again. This is breaking news. NBC News is reporting as of right now that the United States has crossed seventy thousand new corona virus infections in one day. We had fifty thousand a week ago, seventy thousand as of tonight. In the last twenty four hours. We just got in this footage. I'm about to show you from NBC. Reporter Ellison Barber. He and his crew were allowed into one of South Carolina's largest medical units Lexington Medical Center, she she and her crew excuse me. The CEO of the Medical Center has been pleading with local officials to please require masks in the area. The hospital has actually been running ads begging people in the local community to wear masks. But things just keep getting worse watch. What we've seen over the past couple of weeks is increasing rates of infection among younger persons as well as hospitalizations just a month ago or census was twenty two patients on the hospital saw that were cova positive that needed care. In this morning, we were at sixty four. So we've seen a tripling over the past thirty days. I mean it is not an. Unlimited resource that we can keep tapping into. We have only a certain number of beds, certain number of staff and a certain number of resources

Nbc News United States Mass General Massachusetts Gen Ellison Barber NBC Lexington Medical Center America Medical Center South Carolina CEO Reporter
Father's Day Q&A with Essy

Plant Strong

07:44 min | 3 months ago

Father's Day Q&A with Essy

"WanNa welcome everybody to another episode of the plant strong podcast in honor of father's Day. I'm going to be interviewing my father you know. We last brought him on the podcast three months ago when we just had the kind of the outbreak of Kobe nineteen. Nineteen here in the United States. And, so we'd love to get his thoughts on that also we have a bunch of questions from from our podcast. Listeners really that are that are directed towards you. Daddy, but let me open this up by saying you know in in in honor of father's Day You Know How lucky I am to have you as my father and you have done such a great job blazing such a a wonderful bright path forward not only for me, but for so many other people that have had the had the privilege and the honour of. Embracing your tenants around a whole foods, plant based lifestyle, and beyond that I've had the privilege of of seeing just how you conduct yourself as a as a father, a man and a great human being so. Thank you for that. So let me start by I. Want to share something with the listeners something that happened to me last Sunday. And, it's obviously something that you're well aware of but. I Love Mountain. BIKING I mountain bike behind my house. There's this greenspace of. Probably anywhere between. Twenty to fifty miles of mountain biking trails, and I've been mountain biking back there for well over. Twenty years without any kind of mishap or injury, but last Sunday morning I was riding with two of my friends, and on a an a decline that was going into a creek bed. I hit a slippery rock. took a nice tumble and basically. broke broke my the distal part of my fibula, which is is that? Would you say that's considered kind of part of the ankle? Yes. Yeah. And, so I immediately knew that something was seriously wrong. I try to stand up and got nauseous and wanted to vomit. God lightheaded, these guys had ended up carrying me out through the woods into backyard and long story short went in for X-rays the next day, and in fact it was. It showed that it was. It was fractured now over the next couple of days we were trying to get some reassurance as to whether or not, I should have a a surgery. be to try and. Determine if this was a stable or unstable fracture, and we were able to determine a week later after the inflammation was down that it was an unstable fracture needed to have needed to be set needed, have Eight screws and a plate. And so that surgery happened. Two days ago. I think everything went really really well, but I am now convalescing. In in bed, and it's been really a a bit of a torturous last. Six seven eight days Kinda On my back, trying to trying to take care of this thing. But you've been so helpful. As far as guiding me through this process, so thank you. Well Rip I'm just delighted to have you share your story with your. The audience the key. Were you have a fracture of the digital fibula? That Along with the Tibia makes up the ankle mortis on born on either side of. The rise on the Taylor's and. It was very nice to see that they absolutely brought back precisely as it should be. The anatomy of those those bones, even though eight schools in a metal plate. That, also on the other thing, you may have some excitement. You can join me when you go through the airport line The bills go off. Yeah, yeah, you're well. It's a little more picture of time. Skillful neglect, and this will take care of itself nicely. I shouldn't yeah. Yeah, thanks. So remember what. What routes Waldo Emmerson said. Mike All Times is a great time if one knows but what to do with it. While I'm trying to figure out what to do with this. I want get out and I WANNA I wanNA swim I want. I want to walk. I want to do something. So the last time that we had joined the podcast. Cove in nineteen, just hit It was back in March I. Believe you know we're now. April may June. We're now. It's three months later. Do you have any thoughts on kind of where we are right now with. With the corona virus will what is very apparent if you. Follow the television update every day is that? There are number of states in the east to really buckled down and played hardball. Social distancing staying at home handwashing. Getting Really Interesting, out governor Cuomo. Absolutely counter that message for day after day after day. And the the states there on East? Kept pretty under control on the other hand. Those? It opened opened early and relevant, more lax are never or never closed. It looks like we're paying the price I think next week will really tell the the virus. The virus doesn't listen to. to anybody the virus has its its own pace and what it's going to do. But there has been something that I'm particularly keen on because there's fits right into. The the lifestyle that we want ARC agency. Cardiovascular Disease Fall. And just to give you a little bit of background. This has to do with with nitric oxide and we may have talked about it. Somewhat last time, but I think it bears repeating because yeah, sometimes, the whole concept is not that easy for people to grasp the first time. And it was a number of actually a decade or two ago, maybe more. That was found out that earlier virus. Could be killed by nitric oxide, which is obviously a molecule of gas. And so at the present time there are two academic institutions spoke. The Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. and. Ohio State University in Columbus Ohio. Where they have. A. Setup a study where patients who come in with a coronavirus. Will be first exposed thirty minutes of inhaling nitric oxide. And that's repeated three times a day. They're also doing the same. With. With. The healthcare workers who will get thirty minutes of animation of nitric oxide when they arrived at work. And thirty minutes identification again when they arrived from today.

United States Biking Love Mountain Kobe Massachusetts General Hospital Ohio State University Waldo Emmerson Governor Cuomo Columbus Ohio Mike All Arc Agency Taylor Boston.
How Does Anxiety Work?

BrainStuff

03:43 min | 4 months ago

How Does Anxiety Work?

"It's perfectly natural to be feeling anxious. Everyone does sometimes and there are plenty of things that anyone can do to help combat it a Christian goes through a few ideas end of the episode but in this one we wanted to talk about what's going on in the brain when anxiety becomes a disorder. Here's Christian brain stuff it's Christian Sager here. Listen I get anxious you do too but hey it is totally normal and healthy response. That keeps us from doing things that might actually be dangerous. Like sticking your hand in a fire for instance but when anxiety is so pervasive that it interferes with your daily life it becomes a disorder and most researchers believe that disorder begins in your brain there several types of anxiety disorders phobias. Ptsd and OCD. Or just a few and some forty million American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder according to the National Institute of Mental Health. But let's focus today on general anxiety disorder which affects close to seven million adults in his twice as likely in women. You're constantly anticipating a threat or disaster. That isn't actually present. Maybe you're worried about money. Health family or work in despite reality you'll expect the worst. The symptoms include restlessness fatigue difficulty concentrating irritability muscle tension and sleep disturbances. The symptoms officially become a disorder. When you can't control your worry for at least six months you may still be social or even employed but people with general anxiety disorder can have difficulty carrying out even the simplest of daily activities experts. Believe that general anxiety disorder is caused by both biological factors and life experiences good old combination of nature and nurture but anxiety is also recognized by many as an emotional response with neurobiological routes simply put the neural pathways in our brains sometimes lead to irrational anxiety in stressful situations encourage us to develop associations with those pathways by influencing which neuro chemicals pass through them the same way you learn to tie your shoe you can also learn to be anxious the neurons in your brain fire and overtime. They get wired together. One stressful thing like being stuck in traffic leads you to think of another stressful thing lake a car crash. She wants survived. And this activates. A part of the brain stem called the locus serious. This triggers the symptoms of anxiety by releasing neuro epinephrine into your spinal cord and parts of your brain while hormones like adrenaline and cortisol spread through your body. It's supposed to initiate an analgesic response to suppress pain and initiate defense. When you're under threat like if you were actually in a car crash and injured but when there isn't any actual threat all were left with is the jitters of anxiety a couple other things about the brain contribute to anxiety. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that people with a thicker venturo medial. Prefrontal CORTEX are less likely to get anxiety. Basically some brains have more armor against inducing situations than others. We don't have enough

General Anxiety Disorder Christian Sager Massachusetts General Hospital National Institute Of Mental H Ptsd Sleep Disturbances Muscle Tension OCD Epinephrine Cortisol
Computer Models Simulate the Future Spread of New Coronavirus

Arizona's Morning News

00:19 sec | 5 months ago

Computer Models Simulate the Future Spread of New Coronavirus

"A new coronavirus simulator is giving states a preview of what could happen if stay at home orders are lifted developed at Massachusetts General Hospital it suggests coronavirus deaths in that state is stable owe five thousand if restrictions are followed through August if they're lifted the simulator said deaths could be nearly ten times

Massachusetts General Hospital
No evidence antibodies protect people from second COVID-19 infection, WHO says

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:27 min | 5 months ago

No evidence antibodies protect people from second COVID-19 infection, WHO says

"The the World World Health Health Organization Organization is is warning warning there's there's currently currently no no evidence evidence that that people people who've who've recovered recovered from from corona corona virus virus are are protected protected from from a a second second infection which is raising a number of troubling questions CBS news senior medical correspondent Dr tearing a ruler spoke with the nurse practitioner who tested positive then negative then tested positive again for the virus just felt like at times somebody was like stabbing me with an ice pick Colorado nurse practitioner Lisa mark has been documenting her coronavirus journey since she first tested positive in March there's a certain error I feel as a health care worker markets repeat tests so she knows when she can safely return to work on day twenty one of isolation she got good news just seven days later she got a retest and was shocked at the results this is really scary to me mark was once again positive for culvert nineteen that's really confusing it's very frustrating do you feel like you got infected twice with corona virus or do you feel like that as they came back negative was a false negative I feel like the test that came back with was a false negative I mean there's no way to tell viral PCR tests based on nose and throat swabs are reliable about sixty to ninety percent of the time depending on the test can people get it twice so I don't think we know the answer to that yet doctor Stanley Pearlman a professor at the university of Iowa has been studying corona viruses like sars and mers for nearly forty years fifty percent of people or so who had a sars infection actually still have antibodies now which is seventeen years later and so that would tell you maybe most of them are protected against sars again for murders the amount of antibody seems to decline out fairly rapidly if you have miles east of severe disease last much longer just like with murders Dr parliament believes more severe cold in nineteen symptoms may mean longer lasting immunity so this disease we think that you will be protected at least for some amount of time especially if you had pneumonia if you have only the upper airway infection you may get infected again parliament says the good news is that covert nineteen is not mutating quickly so this means that making a vaccine is more feasible because the virus isn't changing what do you make of the Korean CD seizing the coronavirus bad backbeat reactivating in people who they initially thought works you work yeah the question is whether it really is reactivation or it's a low level infection that was not detected for part time and I was detected Martin Hirsch of Massachusetts General Hospital agrees he says genetics and several other factors affect immune response younger people healthy people without any underlying conditions are the most likely to develop prolonged antibodies with Culver nineteen the World Health Organization says we need more evidence about how we selected the antibodies are and how long immunity will last that is CBS senior medical correspondent Dr tearing a ruler who reminds us that anti bodies are not synonymous with immunity she says the any bodies just tell us that you have been infected before she adds it's also important what number and what types of

World World Health Health Orga
What are the long-term effects of climate change

Environment: NPR

03:03 min | 11 months ago

What are the long-term effects of climate change

"Which is thinking about global health over the last two decades. The world has made so many strides vaccinating kids lifting millions out of poverty childhood. The deaths have been slashed in half adults are living an average of five and a half years longer but now scientists are warning. This progress is under threat from climate. Change the researchers for more than two dozen universities and the World Health Organization have published their findings in a sweeping new study in the journal The Lancet Pearson read Eisenman has more all this time the world has been doing so much to improve health. Climate Change has also been underway slowly pushing up the average temperatures experienced around the planet. Today it's about one point. Eight degrees Fahrenheit hotter than pre industrial times one consequence the conditions for growing all sorts of crops around the world have become less favourable each of the major crops We difficulty trek as we track Ri- within as bringing winter weight. Dr Nick Watts of University College London lead this study study. He says the research team found that the yield potential for these staple crops is now down as much as six percent. which might not sound like much but here there is GonNa be the most vulnerable children particularly in poor countries? Fewer crops drive up prices. People get less food which leads to malnutrition. That's devastating for kids. Because their bodies are still growing they end up with these health impacts with them for the rest of their life gastrointestinal cardiovascular disease cognitive defects lifelong only impact that he irrevocable another effective climate change. It's improving conditions for the spread of bacteria called Vibrio all sorts of problems cholera cholera wound infections and diarrhea in poor countries. And especially big killer for kids as the surface temperature of the ocean rises the salinity patterns in the water shift shift. And then what you start to see is over a period of time. Those ideal conditions develop into Algal Bloom Algal blooms that then produce critical levels of Vibrio bacteria which which make it into the water supply and humans condemned up ingesting. We have seen the number of days suitable around the world that transition to the Abreu double as much as these impacts packs are disproportionately hitting poor countries. Every nation is affected. Dr Rini Saleh's is an emergency room. Doctor and Harvard professor who authored the report section on the United States people living in the United States experiencing the health harms of climate change today last year in the US. They were three point. One million incidents in which elderly people were exposed to heat waves because of climate change solace saw the impact in her own er at Massachusetts General Hospital last July during a massive heat wave in Boston an elderly man was brought in in a terrible state of

Dr Nick Watts Algal Bloom Algal World Health Organization United States Dr Rini Saleh Cholera RI Massachusetts General Hospital University College London Harvard Diarrhea Eisenman Boston Abreu The Lancet Professor Eight Degrees Fahrenheit Six Percent Two Decades
David Ortiz: Red Sox legend moved out of intensive care following shooting in the Dominican Republic

Politics, Policy, Power and Law

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

David Ortiz: Red Sox legend moved out of intensive care following shooting in the Dominican Republic

"Fulmer, Red Sox star. David Ortiz out of intensive care two weeks, after he was shot in the back in the Dominican Republic says correspondent Bill Michaels. Ortiz said in a statement issued by the Red Sox that David Ortiz remains at Massachusetts General Hospital and is in good condition. A gunman shot Ortiz in the lower back on June ninth while he was sitting on a crowded bar patio incentive to Mingo authorities in the Dominican Republic say he was not the intended target

David Ortiz Red Sox Dominican Republic Ortiz Fulmer Bill Michaels Massachusetts General Hospital Two Weeks
David Ortiz was the alleged target of $8,000 hit

Red Eye Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

David Ortiz was the alleged target of $8,000 hit

"As baseball star David Ortiz remains in ICU at a Boston. Hospital. Prosecutors in the Dominican Republic say he was the target of an eight thousand dollar hit when he was shot Sunday night. Don't Michigan officials say ralphie Ferreira. Cruise is the gunman who shot Boston Red Sox legend David Ortiz Sunday night in a brazen attack at a nightclub in Santo Domingo, police described the shooting as sophisticated hit job carried out for about eight thousand dollars involving two vehicles, and multiple suspects, who tracked, the former big leaguer while he was at the club with friends CBS news, correspondent, Mola langey from Santo Domingo after two surgeries. Ortiz continues to recover at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In a statement, his wife, Tiffany said he will remain in the ICU for the coming days, but he is making good progress towards recovery. Authorities say they're still investigating the shooting looking for who ordered that hit and what their motive

David Ortiz Santo Domingo Boston Boston Red Sox Ralphie Ferreira Dominican Republic Massachusetts General Hospital Baseball Tiffany Michigan Mola CBS Eight Thousand Dollars Eight Thousand Dollar
Two arrests made in David Ortiz shooting as former Red Sox star recovers from surgery

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Two arrests made in David Ortiz shooting as former Red Sox star recovers from surgery

"The second person tied to Sunday, shooting, former Red Sox, slugger, David Ortiz, has been arrested, while there's no public indication, the man is the suspected gunman spokeswoman for the national prosecutor's office in the Dominican Republic gave no further details. Ortiz is now recovering from. Exploratory surgery in Boston following surgery to remove his gallbladder part of his intestine by Dominican doctors at last word is wife says he stable awaken resting comfortably in the intensive care unit at Massachusetts General Hospital with a forty three year old is expected to remain for several

David Ortiz Dominican Republic Red Sox Massachusetts General Hospital Prosecutor Boston Forty Three Year
Police arrest second suspect in connection with David Ortiz shooting

Michael Medved

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Police arrest second suspect in connection with David Ortiz shooting

"Reporting a second person is tied to Sunday shooting. Former Red Sox star David Ortiz while there's no public indication. The latest man arrested is suspected shooter a spokeswoman for the national prosecutor's office in the Dominican Republic gave no further details or tease who is now recovering from exploratory surgery in Boston following surgery to remove gall bladder. And part of his intestine by Dominican. Doctors is said to be resting comfortably but remains in intensive care at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dominican Republic Red Sox David Ortiz Massachusetts General Hospital Prosecutor Boston
David Ortiz, Red Sox And Massachusetts General Hospital discussed on Vince Coakley

Vince Coakley

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

David Ortiz, Red Sox And Massachusetts General Hospital discussed on Vince Coakley

"Former Red Sox slugger. David Ortiz is recovering from exploratory surgery in Boston this morning listed in stable condition in the intensive care unit. And Massachusetts General Hospital is expected to remain there for several days. The man police say shot him Sunday night in the Dominican Republic is

David Ortiz Red Sox Massachusetts General Hospital Dominican Republic Boston
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WTVN

"I don't think of hilarious and Jim tressel coming together a lot. But apparently he told a story about recruiting William, and we're working on it. We're going to try to get it ready for you after the eight o'clock news. So if you can hang around for a little bit again. Hilarious, Jim tressel who would have thought, but you'll hear it at about eight oh seven right here on News Radio six ten. W T, V and good stuff. If you've got kids may want to keep in mind when you're walking down the salad dressing. I'll have you ever in trouble, getting them to eat their greens craft is launching a new packaging for ranch dressing. They're calling it salad frosting, salad frosting. The idea is the trick kids and eating salad, which would be a big help. I don't really know if it will work or not. But. That's what they're trying this morning. We'll see retired. Boston Red Sox star. David Ortiz underwent a second surgery returning. The Boston late Monday from his native Dominican Republic. He was shot there in an ambush attack at a bar Sunday night. According to reports or tease said to be in stable condition after exploratory surgery, which followed the initial emergency surgery down in the Dominican Republic that one took gallbladder and part of his intestine. His wife. Tiffany said in a statement late yesterday. David arrived in Massachusetts General Hospital last night. Underwent a successful second surgery. He is stable, he is awake. And he is resting comfortably this morning in the ICU. They're expecting that. He'll stay there for the next several days, she stated, I want to thank everyone for the outpouring of support and love that we receive during this incredibly difficult time doctor say, yeah. We expect him to make a full recovery. Justice appointment yesterday announced that nearly seventeen hundred people have been arrested in the nation. Live child porn crackdown. That involve federal, state, and local law enforcement of those arrested in the two month investigation more than three hundred that were suspected of producing child porn or committing sexual abuse involving kids suspects targeted who produced and possess child porn, tried to contact children for online, sex traveled to other states and countries to abuse kids, or who were involved in sex trafficking. So they're saying big success in that sting operation for sure fifty eight year old pilot who was killed when his helicopter crashed onto the roof.

David Ortiz Jim tressel Dominican Republic Boston Tiffany Red Sox William Massachusetts General Hospital fifty eight year two month
David Ortiz has more surgery in Boston after shooting

John Williams

02:39 min | 1 year ago

David Ortiz has more surgery in Boston after shooting

"David ortiz. Known as big Papi. The baseball star of the Boston Red Sox and really more than just a Red Sox star. He was a baseball star people loved him the world over and he was in his native Dominican Republic at a bar the other night. And somebody just walked up from behind him, and shot him and then ran out of the bar, the crowd chased him and nearly beat that guy to death. Yeah. So his lost some of his intestines. I believe he lost his gall bladder. His wife issued a statement saying that he's actually doing pretty well under these circumstances. Have you heard any other news those lines, he underwent a second surgery? He's in Boston. The Red Sox have been pretty supportive in great with this as well. Considering what he means that town team. They sent their team playing the Dominican to pick them up. They brought him back. He landed in Boston. He was he was transferred to Massachusetts General Hospital. Undergo a second surgery late last night, that went past midnight. So, I guess in early this morning. It wasn't exactly clear what the second surgery was four, but they say. He's in stable condition and yeah, just the weird crazy story and. I watched the video of suppose. Everybody's seen it by now. Anybody? That's interested. It's not that graphic it's grainy black and white video. But he's sometimes when you see somebody in a bar fight or shooting, you think well they, they should have avoided that scene. He wasn't doing anything wrong. No use sitting there sitting there and guy comes up from behind him a plug them. And I keep reading that if they keep describing it as a club, and it may be, but it looked like a casual patio night for a lot of those guys just kinda hanging out. And this guy comes up. There was a two people are in custody with Dominican police, the driver and the actual shooter driver was the one who got caught and beaten badly by the crowd, which probably the best way to handle this situation. But it shows you how much they love big Papi down there. I think the whole crowd that. What are you doing? This is you get shot in the guy, you know, I'll call nine one one but can I get maybe these people went after him? I mean. Yeah. And you know, when I. I heard about this story, and then I just started to replay Ortiz stuff in my mind. I thought of the speech he gave to the crowd after the Boston marathon. Right. Your member that Boston strong. They really rallied around him. This is a belief the clip here is bleeped. And it's a little distorted because he was really hugging the Mike. But before the baseball game you remember what it was, like, after the Boston marathon, attack the world was just on edge. They're going to play a baseball game or TS comes out into dresses the crowd and says this.

Boston Red Sox Boston Baseball David Ortiz Massachusetts General Hospital Mike
David Ortiz in Boston to receive care for gunshot wound

All Of It

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

David Ortiz in Boston to receive care for gunshot wound

"Former Boston Red Sox slugger. David Ortiz is back in Boston to continue. Recuperating from gunshot wounds, he suffered in an attack and the Dominican Republic bar share. Springer from member station. WBRC says Ortiz's injuries, more severe than I thought surgeons in the Dominican Republic operated on our tease for six hours, according to multiple reports and removed his gallbladder as well as part of his intestines. Ortiz also suffered liver damage. The Red Sox arranged for an air ambulance to bring Ortiz. To Massachusetts General Hospital. Red Sox president Sam Kennedy given update on Ortiz's condition. The doctors in the Dominican Republic, I've confirmed the David's condition is still serious. But that he is stable enough to be transported back here to Boston for continued care. Ortiz was ambushed by a man at a Santo Domingo bar. Investigators are trying to determine if he was the intended target for NPR news. I'm sheera Springer in

David Ortiz Red Sox Dominican Republic Sheera Springer Boston Santo Domingo Bar Liver Damage Massachusetts General Hospital NPR Wbrc Sam Kennedy President Trump Six Hours
People in their 20s are injecting face fillers to look like their selfie filters

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:24 min | 1 year ago

People in their 20s are injecting face fillers to look like their selfie filters

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash MBA. People in their twenties and thirties are getting injections to look more like their selfie filters from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Selby's are an art form on social media. But some young people aren't happy with just a Snapchat or Instagram filter. They want the lip cheek and forehead injections. So that their real life faces match the doctor itself fees. The American Academy of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery says there's been a twenty percent increase in botox injections among eighteen to thirty seven year olds in the last five years. Marketplace reporter, Eric embarrassed, it's reporting on this recently. And she told me that the makers of injectable fillers which smooth out the lines on your face like a photo filter. Does are starting to spend a lot more money on social media marketing, our Gan, which is the company that makes boat talks makes Juve Dharam does cool sculpting. That's where they're paying influencers to do a lot of the work. So people are on Instagram anyway, looking at other people's faces all the time. And then they're seeing people that they might follow women that they might look up to. And they're seeing that they also were are actually, you know, talking. About these things, you know, they're like hash tagging Sunday afternoon. Hashtag tocks hashtag filter. Hashtag fillers. You know, the whole thing. Yeah. Tell me more specifically about what people are getting done like what specific procedures than what are people trying to look like. So the most basic thing that most people are getting done is just getting, you know, likable talks injection that kind of freezes your face and kind of makes you look relaxed. But then after that there's a lot of small spas that have opened up that are offering things like institute, which is some stuff that you can get put in your cheeks that give you like sort of a higher cheekbone. You can get your lips done and make them a little bit plumper a lot plumper. There's all kinds of stuff that you can get done. I understand that one woman told you she really has heard of people asking to look more like the filters that they have seen on social media. Right. Yeah. So one woman I spoke with who's Twenty-seven-year-old in Rhode Island. And she says she just gets her lips done. She gets imbo both talks. But it's pretty like normalized amongst her group of friends, and she has a couple. They get a little shot of Duve Derm in the tip of their nose. It makes them look a little bit like that Snapchat filter, and I just thought that was kind of fascinating like the idea that you wanna look like what your online reflection looks like do you have a sense of whether any of the doctors are ethically conflicted about this. Do they resist it at all? Yeah. So I did talk to one doctor who actually is the head of one of the plastic surgery. National plastic surgery associations in Memphis, and he refuses to give anyone any kind of injectable or bow talks unless they medically need it or if they're under a certain age. So he's adamant lead not doing it. But at the same time, he knows that there's like clinics just right up the street that you can just walk into. I think the big part of it is is that because you know, it's it's an elective procedure. It's a lot of money. And so you're budgeting thousand or two thousand a year, you know, it can be hard to say no to that. Erica barris is a reporter with marketplace. Last year. Researchers at the Boston University school of medicine Warren. About what they called Snapchat, Dismore FIA and said, it could lead to body Dismore fic- disorder, a mental illness that causes people to obsess about their imagined defects. And now for some related links head over to our website. Marketplace tech dot org for a link to a longer story that Erica did about this four marketplace and more stories about Snapchat, Dismore, Fiat, and how it has plastic surgeons worry earlier this year doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital published a guide for cosmetic practitioners to help them figure out when they're dealing with someone who is beyond normal discontent with their appearance and onto the obsessive compulsive spectrum that is body this Morphing disorder their research that as many as thirteen percent of people seeking cosmetic surgery have the disorder and in a fun. Fact, I learned that dissatisfaction with your appearance is so common in basically, everyone that researchers call it quote normative discontent. There is a hopeful story from Taylor Laurenz over at the Atlantic though from just a couple of weeks ago about how even though those twenty and thirty somethings or getting the nose injections, look more like their filters. The next generation. Of influencers is actually rejecting the carefully edited super stylized aesthetic, and they're going for a quote, Messier and more unfiltered vibe, the story quotes, a fifteen year old influencers who says that avocado toast and posts on the beach are generic and played out and that it's not cool anymore to be manufactured. So maybe the children really are our future. Unless allergen comes calling with the big check. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM.

ALI Reporter University Of Florida Warringt Erica Barris Snapchat Selby America Duve Derm American Academy Eric Embarrassed Rhode Island Dismore Fia Messier Boston University School Of Me Memphis Taylor Laurenz Massachusetts General Hospital Fiat
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I wanna thank Pedro AMRO's REO Barboza, Phil t bear the zombie drummer David J e Smith Jeffrey Peres Gabrielle Philippa had a meal Gonzales Brian Holden. And Jeffrey Sewell. All right. So this week I chat with a very interesting individual names. Dr berry Sandru, he's actually. Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts General Hospital. Neuroscientist turned entrepreneur, inventor digital imaging expert, visual effects, pioneer, and filmmaker. And we're going to talk all about the really cool work that he did inventing film colorization technique and doing all sorts of really cool visual effects over the course of his career super fascinating stuff a little bit of science meets Hollywood in this episode. So without any further ado here he is Dr berry Sandru, Barry. Thank you so much for joining me today. Great opportunity. Thank you for inviting me, I have to first and foremost, thank you for being so flexible, I have had a banana schedule recently between trying to work on my PHD working on the the new TV show that I'm working on which I can't even tell anybody about yet. And seeing clients and podcasting and goodness. It's been a ton of fun. But. Around where they were going to stay in. What clinical psychology cool. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. That's where the seeing patients comes in. And it's it's been a ton of fun. But it's also like there's just a lot right now, it's been pretty exhausting. But of course, you know, about having kind of your toe in a lot of different pool. So from what I gather and correct me as we go through. So you did your PHD from Harvard in neuro science, right? No. I didn't do it at Harvard. I did it state university of New York at Stony Brook. I got my doctorate there in that. I didn't National Institute of health postdoctoral fellowship. It Columbia college of physicians surgeons and then became staff neuroscientist at at Harvard for seven years. I see. Okay. Okay. Cool. So your staff neuroscientists at Harvard, and okay, and you did this training before. And so what was your position when you're at Harvard? What is a staff nurse? Scientist do are involved with basic neuro science research studying the neuro chemistry physiology of of the brain, and in particular is being emotions memory and pain. The interesting thing is that now you are working. I mean, you have a lot of things you're working on you're working on a couple of startups. One in sports betting one in augmented reality. You're also doing your heavily involved in these really cool visual effects projects for Hollywood film. So before we dive into all of those cool things I have to know how does one transition from neuro science to visual effects? Well, when I was at Harvard, I was also in one of my labs Dilara deliberation. I opened up their founded rather ways when in neuro radiology, and that was this is in the early days of neurology in even at Harvard, and it hadn't really gone digital yet. I mean, it was still analog people still looking at rays. And that's the thing was there were no digital x rays or anything. And when at Harvard, we used to get all of the greatest toys from seamens from g and all the rest, and they gave us pet scans and say t's memorize that today are commonplace. But back then they were really leading edge. And they were a lot of them were very experimental. So I got involved in all of that. And I got I got fixated on trying to improve the diagnostic quality of those images. Using color using three d reconstruction all of those things that today are again are very common but back then nobody every. Even thought about it. So I was using color in particular to to improve the diagnostic value of those those x-rays, and and and the the digital work that pet scans in the CT and everything and out of the blue some entrepreneurs from these coast approached me to to find visibly to colorized black and white movies. They had three failed attempts to produce graphic engine to do that. And they finally got some some advisers from Stanford research who said you should look at medical imaging..

Harvard Dr berry Sandru Harvard Medical School Barry Jeffrey Sewell Hollywood Pedro AMRO Jeffrey Peres Gabrielle Philip Massachusetts General Hospital Stony Brook David J Stanford New York Brian Holden Scientist postdoctoral fellowship National Institute of health Gonzales
Treatment Options for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Invisibilia

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Treatment Options for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

"About someone struggling with mental illness and so parts of it could be difficult to hear. Massachusetts General Hospital may seventh twenty eighteen Megan's obsessive compulsive disorder has been really bad. So she's come to the doctor for some help. She sits in a chair as he fiddles with a hand held, computer. The one that talks to the device that's been implanted in her brain. He's trying to find just the right amount of electricity to make her feel better. While you were talking I slowly ramped it up again anything different now. Little bit. Yup. Wasn't what's happening? Slightly more aware. Really? It's not like in the past where it was like who I feel good. But it's like a different feeling general just sharpening worse like everything got light turned up a little bit. Yeah. That's okay. People say that. Let's try going up. One more step. Anything different. We should dial this one back a little bit. Now, if you notice me it down, then maybe I'll change my mind on that. I just feel it. I don't feel good at all right now. Something just changed. That's why. Because in the process of reconfiguring, it it just temporarily went off. So you really notice that me once? Okay. Hang on a second. Let me get this back to a state. And let's go back to the left side and take a look. Tell me more like, what's. Kapiti? Okay. Okay. Listen. This is visibility. I'm HANA Rosen today, we have a story about a woman who desperately unhappy. So she signed up for the scifi sounding medical trial where she got an electrical device implanted in her brain. We look at her experience. And the man she fell in love with a love affair entwined with batteries and wires and electrodes technology, which might have implications for assault. Stick around. So Elise Spiegel is telling the story today. One note, there are references to suicide in this piece. And this is Megan story, but that's not where we begin we begin with part one Megan's boyfriend until he found Megan Brian almost never had luck with girls. It had been a huge problem, and I had a habit of meeting girls. And then kinda like job interviews, you leave thinking I think I went really well and like you don't hear about. But even when Brian did hear back and things seem to be headed in the right direction. It typically didn't last long his rose always seemed to lose its bloom pretty quick like those wanted to be different at some point. Like, there'd be a point where they'd be like, why don't you? Why don't you more like this? Why don't you do this? I was like they weren't accepting who I was like I felt like even really know why was probably. I didn't really know why. So you wanted someone who accepted you? Yeah. It lease on some level. I got tired of people dating me. But then wanting someone else. The problem as far as Brian Cataldo was his depression. He'd struggled with it since he was seven Brian's, biological father had left a month after he was born and his single mother did her best. But he came to wonder if she sometimes his father's face in his own when she looked at him. He wasn't sure. But in any case he'd resigned himself to a loveless fate until one day while perusing Facebook, he happened across a picture of Megan years before she dated this guy he knew, but apparently she'd recently moved to his hometown in her Facebook picture, she had a friendly smile. So Brian went for it at the risk of being too random. I was just browsing the old f book hip, and so you live in Farmingdale. How'd that happen? Maybe we should hang out at adventure land together. Megan replied, right away. She dropped out of college because of her OCD and pression and moved in with her parents. So sure she'd love to hang out. She was looking for friends in the area to Brian was glad to hear it. But he didn't allow himself to get to excited member thinking if you just wants to be friends, that's cool. So in the night of the date, he played it low key. It was summer. So he suggested that they take a walk down main street, then after they went back to his apartment to hang out. Fortunately, for Brian things went much better than expected back we serve watching movie, and she took my arm and put it around her. And I was like, okay. She doesn't want to just be friends. And that was that was the beginning of their from that moment on Brian. And Megan were thick as the who just make weird jokes and just everything's funny. Like one of the earliest memories was like I have to like voices like this. And and we were watching the two thousand twelve to beat and one of the questions was about deductions, and I was like. And that became a running joke for here's. So just like a lot of just hanging out. I worked for us. So it's beautiful. Yeah.

Megan Brian Massachusetts General Hospital Brian Cataldo Facebook Hana Rosen Elise Spiegel Assault Farmingdale OCD One Day
Vaping two times better for quitting smoking than patches, gum

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Vaping two times better for quitting smoking than patches, gum

"New British research in the New England Journal of Madison says vaping is nearly twice as effective is nicotine gum and patching in helping smokers to quit CBS News Radio. Julia Weaver talked with Dr Nancy regarding of Massachusetts General Hospital about the research what they did is. They did a randomized controlled trial of smokers who are interested in quitting smoking. And the people who signed up for the study or randomly assigned to either use nicotine replacement which could have been a patch Gummer combination of several different types or using electronic cigarettes. And what they found after year is that the quit rate was double in the east cigarettes compared to the group that got the nicotine replacement. So it sounds like contrary to what we've been told in the past e cigarettes might have some type of public health benefit. I'm wondering if you can talk about. That a little bit. And also whether people who are trying to quit smoking might really want to seriously consider using e cigarettes as opposed to some type of nicotine patch or gum. The reason that e cigarettes might have a public health benefit is because they might help people to quit people who haven't been able to quit with other methods or haven't been willing to try with the existing treatments that we have. And this study shows us that in fact e cigarettes help people quit smoking. It suggests that they are at least as good as artistic treatments may be better. I don't know that it says that, but it certainly says that they are an option for people who are trying to quit smoking, especially if they have not been able to quit using nicotine replacement products now in terms of the type of state, we know what what kind of cigarettes. This study used second-generation e cigarettes. Those are the ones that are refillable and reusable. They're not there. Little ones that look just like a cigarette set you tell out when they're done, and they're also not tools, which are the current bestseller in the United States, which are pods. And what they did is they gave people as sample of second generation e cigarettes. And then they said go out try different ones and see which kind of cigarette is best free that you liked the best and used that. So they didn't give him a specific one. They gave him a trial of of one kind of cigarette. But we don't know exactly what people use. So it's not like you can recommend a specific brand in this case. Right. And I think one follow up question that I have that. I'm sure a lot of folks have is how many people in this study, how many people are still actually using these devices right because we've been told that they are incredibly addictive, and do, you know, if someone's using it to maybe curb one addiction are is this something that they're able to wean off of nicotine completely or do we find that people are still using these devices or the gum? You know after the great question. So the goal for smoking cessation is to get people off of what we call combustible tobacco, which means tobacco burns. Because it turns out that most of the harms of tobacco are caused by burning the tobacco products backup product not from the nicotine in it. Something that many people don't know. Is it nicotine is actually not that harmful for people? Surely it is addictive but itself doesn't cause cancer. It doesn't cause heart disease and other things. So the goal is to get people off of

Nicotine Massachusetts General Hospital New England Journal Of Madison CBS Julia Weaver Heart Disease United States Vaping Dr Nancy
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Omaha and eventually about eleven pm. It was cancelled. So I had a short night in a hotel. And now I'm hoping to be on an eight AM flight to Denver I gave up on getting Mike Campbell four CBS news, Detroit. A male nurse has been arrested for the rape of comatose woman who gave birth at an Amazon medical facility last month. Thirty-six-year-old at Nathan Sutherland is charged with sexual assault and abuse of a vulnerable adult based upon a court order. We were able to obtain d. DNA samples DNA evidence from him which was compared to that of the baby. And that's when the crime laboratory, scientists confirmed that in fact that he was the suspect in this case Tommy Thompson is a spokesman for the Phoenix police. He says that Sutherland worked at the hacienda healthcare facility where the twenty nine year old victim lived and was one of her care. Caregivers study looking at physical activity and links to depression has been published by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. Carmel Choi PHD is co author of the report study findings did support the idea that physical activity is causally protected for depression. But interesting we saw this protective effect only when we were looking at physical activity that was objectively measured so using wrist worn activity trackers. A report published online in the journal JAMA psychiatry Alec Baldwin has pleaded guilty to harassing. A man during a dispute over a parking spot. Last fall, the sixty year old actor appeared in New York City courtroom this morning, and then agreed to complete a one day anger management class to resolve the case if he completes set the record will be sealed Baldwin only spoke a few words during the hearing mostly answering short questions from the judge. He did not comment afterward. There may be copycats. But an original candy favorite.

Nathan Sutherland Alec Baldwin Carmel Choi PHD Tommy Thompson Massachusetts General Hospital Omaha CBS rape JAMA Mike Campbell Detroit New York City Phoenix Denver assault twenty nine year Thirty-six-year sixty year one day
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Untangle

"More. What are your thoughts on meditation devices like means, well, as you know, I'm on the advisory board amuse, and I think that's because what you're doing is helpful and technology can be a really powerful bridge for people, especially those people who think the mind doesn't really affect the body. I remember when I was doing my residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital at Harvard in one of the gods of medicine. He wrote the textbook came out and said dean, you really think the mind affects the body what a. Stupid idea. And I looked at him. I said she's have you ever had it. Erection. I mean, the idea that the mind affects the body is like, you know, so obvious to me, and yet it was still considered radical at the time and still a lot of people don't really believe that. And so part of what the muse technology does is it gives people the direct feedback of. Oh, when I think certain ways, or when I meditate I my my markers. Get better, my brain waves change, my blood pressure changes all these things that really make a difference. You can actually see that. And that can help you provided the feedback to go into deeper deeper states of meditation. You don't need that to meditate, but it can be a great tool for people who do awesome. I didn't. If you got a chance to look at muse too. But we now have real time feedback on the heart the breath in the body. So you've breath exercises. And as he breathe you're actually learned to control your inhales, an elongate your ex hails. You see the impact that it has in your heart because as you breathe in your heart rate increases as you breathe out your heart rate. Decreases Sacre teach people that with real time feedback actually hear what your heart. It is doing and learn higher breath modulator physiology, and it makes a difference in in. It's very powerful. When people literally make that connection between their mind and their bought their mind and their heart their mind in their breath, and that can be incredibly powerful tool for getting deeper and deeper states of meditation. That's why on your vise reward on not on very many of them because I really believe in the technology. That's a good example of how technology can really the great adjunct in helping us. He'll inc. You I remember you, and I are having conversation some years ago, but meditation, and I said, why do you think meditation works, and I expected you'd give answer like three Alexei shin response dilation of blood vessels at cetera. And you give an answer that I was never expecting from doctor and that was love. Yes. And hence, the last chapter of your book chapter seven deals deeply about love and connection and ability to sustain our health and improving enhance our health, and you talked a little bit about it. But I'm wondering if you can really unpack. Back why from a molecular level from a biological level? It's so meaningful what it comes down to his that intimacy is Hewitt. Love is healing. Now. You know? Love is a four letter word. You can't talk about in cardiology meetings. Even though the although I do now he was this art as the symbol of love because you know, even the word healing comes from the root to make whole and yoga is from the sanskrit Meany to unite union. These are actually really old ideas that were rediscovering and study after study again is showing that when you have that sense of love and connection community. And the real academic is is loneliness and depression, it you're much more likely first of all to make lifestyle choices that are life enhancing. But also in ways that through mechanism. We don't fully understand your much less. Like, I don't know anything Madison that affects our health to that degree. Now. The other thing that I've learned is that kind of related to love is that is not just romantic love, as you know, having a pet can be thing. But loving yourself is really the first step to begin..

dean Hewitt Massachusetts General Hospital advisory board Alexei shin Madison Sacre depression
FDA Issues a Recall of the Popular High Blood Pressure Drug

Nick Digilio

06:54 min | 2 years ago

FDA Issues a Recall of the Popular High Blood Pressure Drug

"I remember that generic blood pressure medication that had to be recalled. Barely. There was a suspected carcinogen. Now, they found a second carcinogen. So I'll tell you guys what's going on. We actually got some good news and bad news within so we'll deal with the bad news. First. Regulators are flagging a second potential carcinogen in the China made heart drunk as you know. There was a blood pressure medicine. Generic blood pressure medicine, Vel certain manufactured in. Zhang whole high pharmaceuticals in China. And as part of the manufacturing process n d m a was created and praises of it were found within the pills. This happened back in the summer. And so health regulators had to as well as our FDA had to initiate worldwide recalls of the generic medication. Thou certain is a generic for the brand name divan fantastic blood pressure medicine in the AARP, the edgy tested receptor blocker family. But unfortunately, during the generic processing that happened in this Chinese pharmaceutical plants this after product or by product was made and D M A, which is the original one that was found. It basically contains nitrosamines nitrosamines it's in that classroom. Nitrosamines has been linked to cancer, especially in animals. We also see nitrosamines in smoked cured meats. Tobacco. And these nitro sa- means have unfortunately been implicated in amicable cancers such as lung and liver. So the second I guess compound rather than the nitro so Di methyl Amine is the nitro so diethylene N D E A. So rather than Di methyl Amine? It's Di ethyl Amine and DA that has also been detected in the Val certain made by Jay z Zhang cli- pharmaceuticals in its previous manufacturing process before changes were introduced it two thousand twelve so data on levels of NDA. And what it can actually do is still limited. And so the European Medicines Agency is all over this. They're the ones that of came out, you know, making us aware, and they are going to provide further information on whether it's presence impacts of risk assessment. Once more information becomes available. Now, the watchdog also says at further risk assessment had confirmed that the lifetime risk of cancer from exposure to these is still very low. So what is the good news? Well, there has been a recent study sane. There is overall no short-term risk of cancer. According to the latest study on the DM, a not the N D E A because the news just broke. And they've been studying the MD as since the July recall, so the US FDA July recall, the veldt certain medications, and then the FDA European health agencies wanted to look into where we weren't cancer risk. They say Danish patients exposed to eight invalid certain products, do not appear to be more likely to develop cancer. That's according to the study. And the study was just published yesterday. So according to casper Christensen, we found no evidence of an increase in short-term risk of cancer from exposure to contaminated products in the study of all adult Val sergeant users now he's a doctoral student with the university of southern Denmark's public health department. But I'm thinking, wait a second. It's been what forty five days. It's been forty five to sixty days. And how do you know that there's not going to be long term cancer risk again? Nobody's giving us the quantities of this NDA may or this NDA. So I think it's too soon. But he says that says a too soon to tell whether people exposed to end EMA vowel certain will have a long-term higher risk of cancer. So when you hear this you're like, wait a second. So short term risk means getting cancer early. But I wonder if I'm going to get cancer in my life. I mean, if somebody says, look, you may get cancer. You know at some point in your life. I mean, whether you tell me I'm gonna get into months or two years. I I'd like to know I'd like to have all my questions answered now. Please. So they say researchers did find some evidence that might influence short term risk of colon uterine cancer. But results were not statistically significant again one US exports. None of over the city expressed caution. He says, I don't think there's any reason to say this research sounds the all clear, that's according to Dr James Januzzi, it looks like jacuzzi. But it's Januzzi. He's a cardiologists with Massachusetts General Hospital. He says I literally just got off the phone with the patient of called me about this question. And I switch them off the generic certain to another drug now, not all Val certain medicines for the high blood pressure or heart failure having recalled only certain brands, so the recalled products were those distributed by major pharmaceutical socal healthcare and Tiba pharmaceuticals. Also, some of the certain hydrochlorothiazide formulations that were distributed by socal healthcare. So about certain many times will be added to a little diabetic. There'll be a little diarrhea added to it. And that seems. To augment its blood pressure lowering effect. Plus it helps with heart failure. I it's a great class of medication. I love the air because medication to just this is a manufacturing issue. And the question I have is if they caught this in this one drug. What about all the other drugs? I mean, I I'm hoping they are researching like crazy every single drug made out of this pharmaceutical plant, and then look at some other plants because people copy each other's manufacturing process. I doubt this is the only plant that did this. So contaminated medications. This is the first time we've seen it happened. It looks like they've been on top of it. And from what I understand all those products should be out of the loop. But what's gonna end up happening is people are going to avoid certain altogether.

Cancer Nitrosamines FDA Uterine Cancer Val Sergeant United States European Medicines Agency Zhang Cli- Pharmaceuticals China Zhang Aarp Massachusetts General Hospital Casper Christensen Diarrhea MD Dr James Januzzi JAY Hydrochlorothiazide Tiba Pharmaceuticals
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Enters in the first year after the removal of financial incentives reductions were greatest for indicators related to health advice with a reduction of sixty two point, three percentage points in electron ick medical record. EM our documentation of lifestyle counseling for patients with hypertension changes were smaller for indicators involving clinical actions that automatically update the EMR such as laboratory testing with a reduction of ten point, seven percentage points in control of cholesterol in patients with coronary heart disease and twelve point. One percentage points for thyroid function testing in patients with hypothyroidism. There was little change in performance on the six quality measures for which incentives were maintained. Removal of financial incentives was associated with an immediate decline in performance on quality measures in part the decline pro. Probably reflected changes in EM our documentation, but declines on measures involving laboratory. Testing suggests that incentive removal also changed the care delivered. Circulating extra cellular vesicles in human disease of her in tears in medicine article by Ravi Shaw from Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, it is well known that cells release fluid filled, sacs vesicles to the extra cellular environment during cell death or a pop SIS. But it has been increasingly recognized that healthy cells may also release vesicles in the process of normal functions. Vesicles that are released by healthy cells have a wide variety of names such as x, OEMs microparticles micro vesicles Xhosa GMs, and uncle Soames with the term extra cellular vesicles typically used as a generic reference to secreted vesicles extra cellular vesicles are found in circulation and contain cell derived bio-molecules, for example. Aren a protein and metabolites extra cellular vesicles are implicated in trafficking of molecules between cells and as such have an effect on physiologic function and serve as biomarkers for disease. Nevertheless, important limitations, including practical difficulties in assessing low concentrations of extra cellular vesicles in circulation identifying their tissue of origin and specifying which molecular cargo is most relevant. Have restrained enthusiasm for research into the role of extra cellular vesicles. In vivo this article provides a brief introduction to extra cellular vesicles with a specific focus on translational and clinical studies to highlight emerging evidence that suggests a potential role in human disease, circulating extra cellular vesicles can be markers of disease processes and perhaps even tools to. Deliver new therapies. Just beneath the.

hypothyroidism uncle Soames Ravi Shaw Massachusetts General Hospital
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It's even three times as likely as your child dying from choking. Now. I know a lot of people have freaked out when their kids are eating something and choke, but it's so unlike it's three times less likely than that they're trans and attempt suicide. So there will be real risks associated with kind of the traditional gendered way of raising kids. And after doing that huge multifactorial cost benefit analysis, we came to the conclusion that the minor risks from bullying kind of came out in the wash on the whole. It was a positive choice and that's why we're doing it. Let's add another voice to the conversation joining us now from. Austin is Eugene Barisan. Eugene is child adolescent psychiatrist and executive director of the clay center for young healthy minds at Massachusetts General Hospital. Gene, welcome to on point. So give us your take on this whole discussion and the issue of they b.'s. Sure. Well, first of all, I want to applaud. I applaud defensively to planning thoughtfulness of Nate, Julia, and Alex in making this decision. I think that it's an admirable social mission to kind of change a sexual stereotypes and pigeonholing our boys and girls. I think we've come a long way since the nineteen seventies where girls have been able to be more assertive and competitive, and the advent of title nine has been huge and boys have been more in Pathak and able to actually cry and hug each other after after sporting events. And I think this is a step in the right direction that being said, you know, as parents, it's our job to support our children to know who they are to have conversations with them to be open minded and non judgmental, and also to. You know, we make decisions and parenting across the board that that embraces our choices, values and beliefs as parents and as Nate was pointing out, you know, there are risks to this. It may not be for everyone. The risks of a kid being assigned, a non gender pronoun comes with consequences. And as they pointed out it is the risk of bullying, the gay and lesbian. The straight educational network has done extensive research on this and non-conforming gendered youth more about twice the risk of bullying. Bullying some cases can scar kid for life and one third of kids who believed in these kids can be, you know, marginalized bullied confused, scared and stressed. Now, the job of parents, of course, as natives doing is to monitor your kids to watch them to make corrections to help them navigate these waters. And if if you know if it needs self-correct. Thing we as parents, you know, can't self correct, and that's what our job is. So I think they're going about this social experiment in the thoughtful manner aware of the with risks with eyes wide open. And I'm curious because there is no research on how these children will turn out. So we're looking at this now, I'm curious to see how it comes out and you know, I, I wish them the best gene in a twenty eleven ABC news article. You were quoted as saying to raise a child, not as a boy or girl is creating in some sense of freak. It sets them up for not knowing who they are. Let's make the assumption that's a correct quote on that you're not improperly quoted. Has your has your thought on the subject as been any nuance in your thoughts on the subject? Since twenty eleven the I, it actually is an incorrect quote because when it was about the child store who was raised in Toronto in a homogeneous community, and my comment was. This may be fine. You know, just as as Nate has has carefully chosen the school, the community, the the folks that the kids are kids are going to be seeing my comment. The context of the comment was take storm out of that community and put that child in different community in the child could be viewed as a freak and marginalized got though so that that that's the, that's the danger. The danger is that we will, nor kids to know who they are and to be tolerant and open minded and flexible. But also to be Jane. I'm gonna cut in for a second. We gotta go to a break gene, innate least standby or discussing a trend and creative parenting world raising vacancies. I'm but Michigan. This is on point. There's a new way to hear morning edition all things considered and all your favorite programs. Just ask your smart device to play NPR listened to your local station anytime like this, hey, smart device play NPR..

Nate Eugene Barisan NPR Gene Massachusetts General Hospital Pathak Toronto Michigan executive director Austin ABC Jane Eugene Alex Julia
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WEEI

"I. With Darnell Williams from the urban league of. Eastern Massachusetts good, morning everyone this, is? Darnell Williams I'm the. President. And chief, executive. Officer of the urban league. Of eastern. Massachusetts Aka known as Dr d. Is in the house the mission of. The urban league is to deliver programs. And services, that. Aim to. Increase the self reliance of. African Americans and other people call to overcome racial social barriers economic inequalities sexual, and domestic violence to employment and other economic development opportunities we'll be celebrating one hundred years in two thousand. And nineteen and I am the longest. Serving CEO in that first twenty years and. So I'm very very humbled and grateful to be in the job this community focused program that you. About to listen to is where one where we bring in personalities and luminaries in our community this morning is, no different, this. Morning we have Greg. Hannan in the studio good morning Greg good morning thank you for having me Grateful for you to be here for those of you don't know Greg Greg is going to tell us a little bit, about himself but you should, know that he is right now as assistant district attorney for Suffolk County district attorney's office is also a. Candidate for the big job him along with five of the candidates are in the race for Suffolk County for those of you who do not know that Suffolk County is, made up of a Boston Chelsea revere and with those four communities make. Up to some it's probably the largest America Greg is the, largest it's probably largest in terms of popular lead Middlesex County is. Bigger geographic geographically but, we're the big dog in the capital so we. Got the capital so that makes a difference so Greg what we like, to try to do is a folks really get to. Know who Greg is read your your. Your bio and you have a very. Very impressive, background. In terms. Of what you've done on Personal as well as professional, level thank you but let them hear it from you I'll tell you grew up where I grew up downtown. In. Boston right next to Massachusetts General Hospital t. station. Right on the red line okay I grew up there for a couple. Of. Reasons my parents moved there in part because my dad was a, television reporter okay for any of. Your listeners. Who, were, over, the, age. Of forty five may watched them on TV that's right two seven five seven four he worked. For almost, six basically worked for holding the networks Except for FOX I never worked for what was then w LVS Simply started like you and radio he actually. Was in radio when he was in these communications You're you're already got. You're stuck just went up ten points increase in the stock Oh wonderful turns me some points he? Does it with me now you gonna, do it with their lists with the, voters, my dad when. He worked. In television he. Used to be a reporter general And. Also just general news store later in his. Career, he. Did a lot of. Work at the state house. So he was able to walk from work to the state? House and back home pretty easily and, so I grew up right downtown writer Was that the western as they used to call it a before precinct eleven to West End I was baptized and confirmed the old west church was prior to the West End been kind of being transformed what it is. Today because it used to be a whole lot of, people who used to live there used to be people that they still attend the church that. I went to Saint Joseph's right there on Right there behind us yeah it's your emotions Knows it's there but there's the church in. Regina clarity. Which is where the entire preacher that's right that's a culture of traffic up on Cambridge street church where I noticed street where I worked for Mass General for, eight years will almost, everything around it, is oh my Mass General. As, you know mess The whole foods but that whole plaza is owned by Mass General so it's n. g. h. and then, government buildings that's where, the West End, went I think it said if you lived here. You'd be home already right that's not that's on, the other side of the engines Goal. On Storrow drive yeah that'd be right before, you get to the, science? Before you..

Greg Greg urban league Suffolk County Darnell Williams Massachusetts Mass General Boston reporter Middlesex County Massachusetts General Hospital President executive Officer Saint Joseph Hannan CEO
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Where two studies coming from harvard medical school harvard school of public health brigham and women's hospital massachusetts general hospital welsh mount sinai in manhattan albert einstein college of medicine in the bronx a columbia university cornell up in ithaca new york nyu in manhattan all of them are showing improved brain function there was this great study from a whole bunch of academic researches tuitions and florence italy and militia italy and qiaotou pescara university over there barry italy and the university of rome to catholic university of rome when they gave older people cocoa that was very rich in flavonoids just like to invite health cocoa their brainpower improved and the more cocody gave them on a daily basis to better their brain worked so when they gave them milk chocolate no improvement and brain function it didn't do anything it just was giving them calories when they gave them i'll scuba cocoa their brain did much better but when they gave them to scoops cocoa i mean basically their brain was blasting off it just really improved memory and their thinking skills all these skills critical to winning a game of poker betting on the right horse on doma anything like that show columbia university did a study like that in in conjunction with nyu lane goni that brain research department and a found that giving people a high quality cocoa now the researchers came out and said you can't do this with a chocolate you can't do this even with dark chocolate you have to use cocoa we'll talk about this study when we come back from the break coco is the first product on special today we'll.

bronx columbia university cornell manhattan barry italy columbia university harvard school of public hospital massachusetts general albert einstein college of med ithaca florence italy university of rome catholic university of rome milk
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"United states say the liverpool goalkeeper loris carriers sustained a concussion during their champions league final defeat by rail madrid doctors at boston's massachusetts general hospital say carry us may have been dealing with visual spatial dysfunction during the game sport understands that government officials have spoken to the premier league and english football league about a review into all seater stadium safe standing at all seater stadium save standing is popular in many or paying countries and league one side shrewsbury town has installed more than five hundred rail seats so let's speak to the chief executive brian caldwell good morning good morning the reception by fans your club to this happening what does that been like and what's been like in terms of ticket sales there we've probably had to support a late initiative in the first place taking over the ago the possibility of installing the seats for steve asif standing eighty louisa club working to support it to be the first clubbing within we used to do this i'd seen this excess of celtics popular boys defined the choice whether they went to stand safely or set off should we we've bought into the funds are really by you can see the the wheel of opinion through through the uk especially because we've been the first club to do so much stay over in the first club in england and we used to do it sorry i'm just going to presume you've been following what's happening at celtic they've had a trial period because the law requiring all see to say jan which has been in place the nineties is different in scotland doesn't it so they have been up to trial it so far yes definitely schooling from my oxygen with safe that it has been definitely scotland in decides we've been elite to do it because we've gone stadium and lebron lead to and it's something that i think i do believe past as pilots i think people are washing should be towed to see how we hope you cope with it as successful as and that often i believe it will be it'll data clubs with the concerns wishing he came in from justice taylor's recommendations off to the hills disaster has football moved on enough over the last almost thirty years for this to.

liverpool lebron louisa club steve asif brian caldwell chief executive shrewsbury seater stadium football massachusetts general hospital United states taylor scotland england uk celtics all seater stadium boston loris carriers
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hey i'm kelly mcevers host of npr's embedded and we've got a new episode all about how scott pruitt ended up running the epa it's a story about pruitt's life in the southern baptist church how he handled a major pollution case and why he sued the epa fourteen times to search for embedded on the npr one app or wherever you get your podcasts this is on point i'm david folkenflik we're discussing doctor's guide to boosting health by practicing empathy and patience you can join the conversation there jin care center you get your doctor's full attention who does it feel as though they're shuttling in too many patients in a single day for you ever to be heard follow us on twitter and find us on facebook at on point radio on speaking with dr david rickel he's author of the new book the compassionate connection the healing power of empathy and mindful listening he's a family doctor and professor at the university of new mexico david thanks for sticking around i'd also like to bring another guest into the conversation joining me now from boston massachu sits is dr helen reese she's a psychiatrist and medical educator at massachusetts general hospital and the harvard medical school she's also co founder and chief scientist for empathetic company that provides empathy and interpersonal skills training for medical professionals her forthcoming book is called the empathy effect seven neuroscience based keys for transforming the way we live love work and connect across differences helen reset thank you so much for coming on on point with us hi david thanks for having me i wanna read just a little passage from a david's book he's he he's witnessed to a moment where a thirty one year old man he's been treated from cancer married young man is being told by his physician that he's going to die and that there's nothing there's nothing he can do she says we've tried everything in that it's time for him to go home and he turns to her and says what happens when we die and her response is the following she says i don't know what happens when we die some people believe there's heaven some people believe we get to come back to life in a new way.

medical educator scientist massachusetts general hospital dr helen reese boston university of new mexico scott pruitt co founder harvard medical school kelly mcevers professor dr david rickel facebook twitter david folkenflik southern baptist church npr thirty one year
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Tensions added to andhra jin deprivation therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer have recently been noted to increase or vibol decisions about which treatments to use ended what order to maximise the benefit should be made on the basis of high quality clinical trials this article focuses on recent accomplishments and future challenges in the management of metastatic disease which continues to be associated with a high rate of death despite multiple new drug approvals in recent years a sixty three year old man with confusion after stem cell transplantation a case record of the massachusetts general hospital by a reach eljabari and colleagues a sixty three year old man presented with confusion and weakness five months after he had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia post transplantation complications included the in graf men syndrome amal assists caused by abo incompatibility paroxysm atrial fibrillation acute kidney injury delirium and fevers the delirium was thought to be related to medications or the and graf men syndrome and after several days the mental status improved twelve days before the current admission the patient was admitted because of weight loss of thirty four kilograms during the previous four months during added mission the patient had episodes of mild confusion and fever mri did not show evidence of acute brain abnormalities the fevers resolved and the confusion diminished one day before the current admission the patient reportedly fell and hit his head on examination the patient had ca qixia appeared fatigued and was oriented to person but not to place or time he made inappropriate comments reported visual hallucinations and picked at the bedsheets there are multiple viruses that can cause encephalitis in an immuno compromised host human herpes virus six eight h v six is one of the most common causes of encephalitis among patients who have undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation h h v six is a ubiquitous virus that causes a chronic latent infection in most adults which can reactivate.

visual hallucinations massachusetts general hospital graf qixia sixty three year thirty four kilograms five months four months twelve days one day
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The idea of writing about using palliative care aaron it together by fifa kind roadmap to cancer diagnosis well thank you so much for having me um this combination or a collaboration between palliative care and oncology uh with an experiment really that started about fifteen years ago or so at the massachusetts general hospital here in boston vicky jackson and i were young colleagues together uh i was an on colleges than in she was a a palliative care physician and the experiment was to start seeing patients together on the outpatient service um in the cancer center and that grew into uh what is now a nationally recognized program uh that our colleague dr jennifer tamil has done research with and and as shown the benefits of of combined uh palliative care and oncological here for cancer patients now is it fair to say um the pals of care focuses on haitian symptom on management of adverse reactions to medication and treatment as well as you're emotional health during treatment and this is something that the probably a lot of unconscious themselves don't have time to do that's exactly right that's exactly right most people feel that uh mistake that palliative care is just hospice care they they equate the do but palliative care is is about helping patients do as well as they can uh and get the best chance at the best case scenario at any moment in in their care it could be for folks with who are undergoing curative therapy it could be for folks who who don't have a chance of curative therapy but just want to feel as well as they can and it and it encompasses the entire patient so not only the symptoms that they're going through from the cancer the symptoms that they're going through from the treatment but the emotional told that this is taking on them and how to understand their their own prognosis in their in their own way in the world so it's a completely holistic approach to patient care no i think a lot of people queue get mixed up between hospice empowers have care so let's explain you know what the differences because it's important that's right so hospice is um it is a period of time that is to find uh it's a program that exists for people who were in the last six months of life and it helps them through and of life issues palliative care um encompasses that but.

palliative care massachusetts general hospital vicky jackson dr jennifer tamil adverse reactions hospice care boston cancer fifteen years six months
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Stem cells during the initial period of transfer in order to give the cells an edge to in graft recent study using a mouse model demonstrated a strategy to guard against their a pop totic demise the study showed that protection against a pop towse's of a madda poetic stem cells during initial and graf meant resulted in successful repopulation and reconstitution after jimeta poetic stem cell transplantation with no overt increases in tumorigenesis toward a culture of scientific enquiry the role of medical teaching services up perspective article by katrina armstrong from massachusetts general hospital boston a major goal of academic medicine is to link patient care to scientific enquiry the value of this linkage for understanding human biology has been recognised for over a century postmortem examinations of patients with a faiza drove the localisations of higher brain functions and studies of patients with acro medically informed the first notions of the existence of petur terry derived growth hormone investigation driven by the desire to understand pathophysiology in patients with unexplained illness and unusual disease frino types underlies many major advances in basic science and therapy dicks despite this history the bridge between patient care and scientific inquiry is increasingly threatened greater complexity and severity of illness among patients receiving care reduced length of stay and increased administrative tasks have left less time for physicians to think about the fundamental pathophysiology of disease a distancing of basic scientists from inpatient medical services has impeded the development of informed scientific hypotheses about patients presentation unlimited access to technologies for exploring any hypotheses that are developed trainees are increasingly exposed to a culture that values efficiency clinical protocols and specialized expertise over scientific debate and critical thinking now a growing number of programmes are creating linkages between.

Stem cells stem cells stem cell katrina armstrong human biology graf massachusetts general hospital boston growth hormone
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Was a group of scientists the university of manchester university of auckland new zealand agri search new zealand the south australian research and development institute massachusetts general hospital mass john met mass general and harvard university and they're looking at what causes dementia and one of those what what they found was that the precursor to dementia the thing that they can reliably find over a period of months or years before people experienced dementia is high levels of urea in the blood now urea is produced in response it's the stuff that it that that uh produces i believe a urea is the stuff that produces the characteristic appearance in smell of urine and and it is the byproduct the breakdown byproduct of protein particularly animalprotein you eat a lot of animal protein you get high levels earea and your bloodstream and this uh this study the their study revealing that ria is similarly linked alzheimer's shows according to professor cooper that the discovery could be relevant to all types of age related dementia here's the huntingdon study also showed that the higher real levels occurred before dementia sets in which could help doctors one day diagnose and even treat dementia well in uh in advance of its onset urea and ammonia in the brain are metabolic breakdown products of protein urea urea is more commonly known as the compound which is extremely through the body in urine if you're ria and uh uh if they build up then kitties can't eliminate them then you've got a real big problem but this is what professor cooper said he said the study is the final piece of the jigsaw which leads us to conclude that high brain urea plays a pivotal role in dementia he says alzheimer's and huntings or at opposite ends of the dementia spectrum so if this holds true for these types that i believe it's highly likely it'll hold true for all the major agerelated dimensions now they're not making the leap that i'm making are they the the team used human brains donated by families for medical research is wells transgenics his sheep in australia for this research cutting edge gas his crowd graf niem mass spectrometry and all kinds of stuff to britain measure brainy real levels and.

development institute alzheimer cooper australia university of manchester unive massachusetts general hospital john harvard university professor huntingdon one day
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"A 32yearold man with acute chest pain a case record of the massachusetts general hospital by douglas druckman and colleagues a previously healthy 32yearold man presented with the sudden onset of postprandial chest pain nausea and die of for recess several hours before presentation the patient had eaten pizza in his apartment less than one hour later while he was at rest and watching television crushing pain die of her rhesus disc nia and nausea developed he went to the emergency department he rated the pain at seven on a scale of zero to ten when the patient was asked to indicate the location of the pain he pointed to the subs ifor area there was some tenderness in that area on palpitation and electrocardiogram showed concave s t segment elevations laboratory results revealed increasing billy rubin and aminotransferase levels and mild lucas i toast us when a patient such as this one is evaluated in real time abroad differential diagnosis must be considered including cardiac vascular embolic and gastrointestinal causes of pain the first aim was to rule out myocardial infarction and he was treated with appropriate empirical therapy seven hours after admission laboratory results showed aminotransferase an billy rubin levels that had elevated since presentation the presence of such liver function abnormalities in a patient with no signs of cardio genic shock or congestive heart failure pointed the physicians away from a cardiac diagnosis this patient had some features that were typical for kolesas died us targeting the colorectal cancer stem cell a clinical implications of basic research article by jahn palme deem up from the academic medical center amsterdam.

douglas druckman lucas real time infarction kolesas stem cell amsterdam massachusetts general hospital billy rubin jahn palme seven hours one hour
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"A 48yearold man with weight loss confusion skin lesions and pan side a pina a case record of the massachusetts general hospital by shabani mccurdy and colleagues a forty eight year old man was evaluated for confusion one week earlier he had travelled to mexico when his family spoke with him by telephone four days earlier he seemed euphoric and easily distracted they were then unable to reach him for seventy two hours ultimately he was reached by telephone he was agitated and refused to board his scheduled return flight the patient's mother travel to mexico wish he found the patient to be confused and unkempt and to have lost his wallet and passport she escorted him on a flight back to the united states on examination in the emergency department the patient appeared thin and agitated he had begun having unexplained weight loss approximately one year earlier and had a history of multiple nonmelanoma skin cancers that had been treated with cryotherapy the patient had sex with men and used condoms intermittently when he was asked why he was in the emergency department his response revealed said nausea and confabulation examination of the skin revealed purplish skin lesions there was tender inguinal lim fat not the on the left side laboratory results revealed pan side of pena and plea of psychosis and an elevated protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid this patient had systemic symptoms that were suggestive of aids and a steadily progressive neurologic deterioration that was suggestive of hiv one in several law pathy biopsies of the skin lesions revealed cabassi sarcoma.

shabani mccurdy united states pena psychosis massachusetts general hospital mexico nausea seventy two hours forty eight year one week one year
"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"massachusetts general hospital" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"A fifty three year old woman with leg numbness and weakness a case record of the massachusetts general hospital by william david and colleagues a fifty three year old woman with rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to the hospital because of progressive asymmetric high poet st shah and weakness in the legs four months earlier hypo as the'dual developed in the lateral aspect of the left foot on a valuation by her primary care physician the patient reported that her chronic low back pain which radiated to the buttocks had increased in intensity at an outpatient neurology clinic the patient reported gradual progression of hypo as zsa involving the left leg nerve conduction studies were performed a provisional diagnosis of chronic inflammatory de mylan aiding paulina roppa 'they was made an intravenous immune globulin was administered symptoms in the left leg did not improve and hypo is dj and weakness developed in the right leg and progressed since tripoli the patient had several false at home and began to use a cane then a walker and ultimately a wheelchair mri of the lombo sake role spine revealed thickened clumped enhancing nerve routes urinary retention absence of rectal tone and saddle anesthesia developed of the possible diagnoses in this case meningitis related to a cancer was the most likely the rapid extension of disease into the forensic nerve routes and dorsal root ganglia suggested an aggressive infiltrative process timing of metastases in breast cancer a clinical implications of basic research article by robert schwartz from tufts university boston.

william david st shah tripoli cancer robert schwartz tufts university boston massachusetts general hospital urinary retention dorsal root fifty three year four months